Views
1 week ago

programming-for-dummies

174 Using Boolean

174 Using Boolean Operators The computer examines the first character of each string. If they’re equal, it continues with the second character, a third, and so on. In the preceding example, the computer sees that the numbers 97 (which represent the character a) are equal, so it checks the second character. The number 65 (A) isn’t greater than the number 97 (a), so this comparison returns a False value. What happens if you compare unequal strings, such as “aA” > “a” The computer compares each character as numbers as follows: 97 65 > 97 The first numbers of each string (97) are equal, so the computer checks the second number. Because the second string (a) doesn’t have a second character, its value is 0. Because 65 > 0, the preceding comparison returns a True value. Now look at this comparison: “Aa” > “a” The computer translates these characters into their equivalent numbers, as follows: 65 97 > 97 Comparing the first numbers (characters), the computer sees that 65 > 97, so this comparison returns a False value. Notice that as soon as the computer can decide whether one character is greater than another, it doesn’t bother checking the second character in the first string. Using Boolean Operators Comparison operators always return a True or False value, which are Boolean values. Just as you can manipulate numbers (addition, subtraction, and so on) and strings (trimming or searching for characters), so can you also manipulate Boolean values. When you manipulate a Boolean value, you get another Boolean value. Because there are only two Boolean values (True or False), every Boolean operator returns a value of either True or False.

Using Boolean Operators 175 Most programming languages offer four Boolean operators: ✦ Not ✦ And ✦ Or ✦ Xor Like comparison operators, Boolean operators are most useful for making a program evaluate external data and react to that data. For example, every time you play a video game and get a score, the video game uses a comparison operator to compare your current score with the highest score. If your current score is greater than the highest score, your score now becomes the highest score. If your score isn’t higher than the highest score, your score isn’t displayed as the highest score. Using the Not operator The Not operator takes a Boolean value and converts it to its opposite. So if you have a True value, the Not operator converts it to False and vice versa. At the simplest example, you can use the Not operator like this: Book II Chapter 3 Manipulating Data Not(True) = False Like using fixed values in comparison operators (5 > 2), using fixed values with Boolean operators is rather pointless. Instead, you can use variables and comparison operators with Boolean operators, such as Not(Age > 2) If the value of the Age variable is 3, this Boolean operation evaluates to Not(Age > 2) Not(3 > 2) Not(True) False Using the And operator The And operator takes two Boolean values and converts them into a single Boolean value. If both Boolean values are True, the And operator returns a True value. Otherwise, the And operator always returns a False value, as shown in Table 3-8, or the Truth table.

  • Page 1 and 2:

    Beginning Programming ALL-IN-ONE DE

  • Page 3 and 4:

    Beginning Programming ALL-IN-ONE DE

  • Page 5 and 6:

    About the Author I started off as a

  • Page 7 and 8:

    Acknowledgments This is the part of

  • Page 9 and 10:

    Contents at a Glance Introduction .

  • Page 11 and 12:

    Table of Contents Introduction.....

  • Page 13 and 14:

    Table of Contents xi Finding an Int

  • Page 15 and 16:

    Table of Contents xiii Playing with

  • Page 17 and 18:

    Table of Contents xv Using Structur

  • Page 19 and 20:

    Table of Contents xvii Searching wi

  • Page 21 and 22:

    Table of Contents xix Book VI: Prog

  • Page 23 and 24:

    Table of Contents xxi Declaring Con

  • Page 25 and 26:

    Introduction If you enjoy using a c

  • Page 27 and 28:

    How to Use This Book 3 means they

  • Page 29 and 30:

    Book I Getting Started

  • Page 31 and 32:

    Chapter 1: Getting Started Programm

  • Page 33 and 34:

    How Computer Programming Works 9 De

  • Page 35 and 36:

    The History of Computer Programming

  • Page 37 and 38:

    The History of Computer Programming

  • Page 39 and 40:

    The History of Computer Programming

  • Page 41 and 42:

    Figuring Out Programming 17 As a ge

  • Page 43 and 44:

    Figuring Out Programming 19 ✦ Lin

  • Page 45 and 46:

    Figuring Out Programming 21 Convert

  • Page 47 and 48:

    Figuring Out Programming 23 certain

  • Page 49 and 50:

    Getting Started with Programming 25

  • Page 51 and 52:

    Knowing Programming versus Knowing

  • Page 53 and 54:

    Chapter 2: Different Methods for Wr

  • Page 55 and 56:

    Spaghetti Programming without a Pla

  • Page 57 and 58:

    Planning Ahead with Structured Prog

  • Page 59 and 60:

    Planning Ahead with Structured Prog

  • Page 61 and 62:

    Planning Ahead with Structured Prog

  • Page 63 and 64:

    Making User Interfaces with Event-D

  • Page 65 and 66:

    Making User Interfaces with Event-D

  • Page 67 and 68:

    Organizing a Program with Object-Or

  • Page 69 and 70:

    Organizing a Program with Object-Or

  • Page 71 and 72:

    Organizing a Program with Object-Or

  • Page 73 and 74:

    Chapter 3: Types of Programming Lan

  • Page 75 and 76:

    Choosing Your First Language 51 ext

  • Page 77 and 78:

    Teaching Languages 53 Principles Be

  • Page 79 and 80:

    Teaching Languages 55 The Interacti

  • Page 81 and 82:

    Teaching Languages 57 near future.

  • Page 83 and 84:

    Teaching Languages 59 The main disa

  • Page 85 and 86:

    Teaching Languages 61 Book I Chapte

  • Page 87 and 88:

    “Curly Bracket” Languages 63

  • Page 89 and 90:

    “Curly Bracket” Languages 65 Th

  • Page 91 and 92:

    “Curly Bracket” Languages 67 C#

  • Page 93 and 94:

    “Curly Bracket” Languages 69 Vi

  • Page 95 and 96:

    Artificial Intelligence Languages 7

  • Page 97 and 98:

    Scripting Languages 73 2. From the

  • Page 99 and 100:

    Scripting Languages 75 In compariso

  • Page 101 and 102:

    Scripting Languages 77 Transferring

  • Page 103 and 104:

    Database Programming Languages 79 @

  • Page 105 and 106:

    Comparing Programming Languages 81

  • Page 107 and 108:

    Chapter 4: Programming Tools In Thi

  • Page 109 and 110:

    Choosing a Compiler 85 3. Choose a

  • Page 111 and 112:

    Choosing a Compiler 87 than other c

  • Page 113 and 114:

    Choosing a Compiler 89 With a cross

  • Page 115 and 116:

    Finding an Interpreter 91 In the ol

  • Page 117 and 118:

    Compiling to a Virtual Machine 93 C

  • Page 119 and 120:

    Writing a Program with an Editor 95

  • Page 121 and 122:

    Fixing a Program with a Debugger 97

  • Page 123 and 124:

    Fixing a Program with a Debugger 99

  • Page 125 and 126:

    Fixing a Program with a Debugger 10

  • Page 127 and 128:

    Creating a Help File 103 Obviously,

  • Page 129 and 130:

    Dissecting Programs with a Disassem

  • Page 131 and 132:

    Chapter 5: Managing Large Projects

  • Page 133 and 134:

    Software Engineering Methods 109 Fi

  • Page 135 and 136:

    Software Engineering Methods 111 de

  • Page 137 and 138:

    Software Engineering Methods 113 Ad

  • Page 139 and 140:

    Automating Software Engineering wit

  • Page 141 and 142:

    Automating Software Engineering wit

  • Page 143 and 144:

    Automating Software Engineering wit

  • Page 145 and 146:

    Automating Software Engineering wit

  • Page 147 and 148: The Pros and Cons of Software Engin
  • Page 149 and 150: Book II Programming Basics
  • Page 151 and 152: Chapter 1: How Programs Work In Thi
  • Page 153 and 154: Using Keywords as Building Blocks 1
  • Page 155 and 156: Organizing a Program 131 So if your
  • Page 157 and 158: Dividing a Program into Subprograms
  • Page 159 and 160: Dividing a Program into Objects 135
  • Page 161 and 162: Dividing a Program into Objects 137
  • Page 163 and 164: Creating a User Interface 139 The u
  • Page 165 and 166: Chapter 2: Variables, Data Types, a
  • Page 167 and 168: Declaring Variables 143 This BASIC
  • Page 169 and 170: Declaring Variables 145 You can alw
  • Page 171 and 172: Declaring Variables 147 Every progr
  • Page 173 and 174: Using Different Data Types 149 type
  • Page 175 and 176: Retrieving Data from a Variable 151
  • Page 177 and 178: Using Constant Values 153 Using Con
  • Page 179 and 180: Defining the Scope of a Variable 15
  • Page 181 and 182: Defining the Scope of a Variable 15
  • Page 183 and 184: Defining the Scope of a Variable 15
  • Page 185 and 186: Chapter 3: Manipulating Data In Thi
  • Page 187 and 188: Using Math to Manipulate Numbers 16
  • Page 189 and 190: Using Math to Manipulate Numbers 16
  • Page 191 and 192: Manipulating Strings 167 Most progr
  • Page 193 and 194: Finding Strings with Regular Expres
  • Page 195 and 196: Finding Strings with Regular Expres
  • Page 197: Using Comparison Operators 173 Comp
  • Page 201 and 202: Using Boolean Operators 177 So if t
  • Page 203 and 204: Converting Data Types 179 Both type
  • Page 205 and 206: Chapter 4: Making Decisions by Bran
  • Page 207 and 208: Picking One Choice with the IF-THEN
  • Page 209 and 210: Picking Three or More Choices with
  • Page 211 and 212: Picking Three or More Choices with
  • Page 213 and 214: Playing with Multiple Boolean Opera
  • Page 215 and 216: Making Multiple Choices with the SE
  • Page 217 and 218: Making Multiple Choices with the SE
  • Page 219 and 220: Making Multiple Choices with the SE
  • Page 221 and 222: Making Multiple Choices with the SE
  • Page 223 and 224: Chapter 5: Repeating Commands by Lo
  • Page 225 and 226: Looping a Fixed Number of Times wit
  • Page 227 and 228: Looping a Fixed Number of Times wit
  • Page 229 and 230: Looping a Fixed Number of Times wit
  • Page 231 and 232: Looping Zero or More Times with the
  • Page 233 and 234: Playing with Nested Loops 209 This
  • Page 235 and 236: Checking Your Loops 211 Outer loop
  • Page 237 and 238: Chapter 6: Breaking a Large Program
  • Page 239 and 240: Creating and Using Subprograms 215
  • Page 241 and 242: Creating and Using Subprograms 217
  • Page 243 and 244: Passing Parameters 219 The #include
  • Page 245 and 246: Passing Parameters 221 Figure 6-5:
  • Page 247 and 248: Passing Parameters 223 When you pas
  • Page 249 and 250:

    Passing Parameters 225 DIM Temp AS

  • Page 251 and 252:

    Repeating a Subprogram with Recursi

  • Page 253 and 254:

    Repeating a Subprogram with Recursi

  • Page 255 and 256:

    Chapter 7: Breaking a Large Program

  • Page 257 and 258:

    How Object-Oriented Programming Wor

  • Page 259 and 260:

    Encapsulation Isolates Data and Sub

  • Page 261 and 262:

    Encapsulation Isolates Data and Sub

  • Page 263 and 264:

    Sharing Code with Inheritance 239 S

  • Page 265 and 266:

    Sharing Code with Inheritance 241 F

  • Page 267 and 268:

    Design Patterns 243 However, when y

  • Page 269 and 270:

    Design Patterns 245 The flyweight p

  • Page 271 and 272:

    Object-Oriented Languages 247 Becau

  • Page 273 and 274:

    Real-Life Programming Examples 249

  • Page 275 and 276:

    Real-Life Programming Examples 251

  • Page 277 and 278:

    Real-Life Programming Examples 253

  • Page 279 and 280:

    Real-Life Programming Examples 255

  • Page 281 and 282:

    Real-Life Programming Examples 257

  • Page 283 and 284:

    Chapter 8: Reading and Saving Files

  • Page 285 and 286:

    Storing Data in Text Files 261 A co

  • Page 287 and 288:

    Storing Data in Text Files 263 Read

  • Page 289 and 290:

    Storing Fixed Size Data in Random-A

  • Page 291 and 292:

    Storing Fixed Size Data in Random-A

  • Page 293 and 294:

    Storing Varying Size Data in Untype

  • Page 295 and 296:

    Using Database Files 271 Figure 8-5

  • Page 297 and 298:

    Using Database Files 273 Think of a

  • Page 299 and 300:

    Using Database Files 275 When using

  • Page 301 and 302:

    Chapter 9: Documenting Your Program

  • Page 303 and 304:

    Adding Comments to Source Code 279

  • Page 305 and 306:

    Adding Comments to Source Code 281

  • Page 307 and 308:

    Adding Comments to Source Code 283

  • Page 309 and 310:

    Writing Software Documentation 285

  • Page 311 and 312:

    Writing Software Documentation 287

  • Page 313 and 314:

    Chapter 10: Principles of User Inte

  • Page 315 and 316:

    The Evolution of User Interfaces 29

  • Page 317 and 318:

    Elements of a User Interface 293 GU

  • Page 319 and 320:

    Elements of a User Interface 295 Fi

  • Page 321 and 322:

    Elements of a User Interface 297 If

  • Page 323 and 324:

    Elements of a User Interface 299 Fi

  • Page 325 and 326:

    Elements of a User Interface 301 Fi

  • Page 327 and 328:

    Designing a User Interface 303 diff

  • Page 329 and 330:

    Designing a User Interface 305 A we

  • Page 331 and 332:

    Designing a User Interface 307 Figu

  • Page 333 and 334:

    Book III Data Structures

  • Page 335 and 336:

    Chapter 1: Structures and Arrays In

  • Page 337 and 338:

    Using Structures 313 If you wanted

  • Page 339 and 340:

    Using an Array 315 the array, which

  • Page 341 and 342:

    Using an Array 317 Perkins has empl

  • Page 343 and 344:

    Working with Resizable Arrays 319 D

  • Page 345 and 346:

    Working with Multi-Dimensional Arra

  • Page 347 and 348:

    Using Structures with Arrays 323 Th

  • Page 349 and 350:

    Drawbacks of Arrays 325 To store da

  • Page 351 and 352:

    Drawbacks of Arrays 327 Suppose you

  • Page 353 and 354:

    Chapter 2: Sets and Linked Lists In

  • Page 355 and 356:

    Using Sets 331 Adding (and deleting

  • Page 357 and 358:

    Using Sets 333 This command asks th

  • Page 359 and 360:

    Using Sets 335 Bill Evans John Doe

  • Page 361 and 362:

    Using Linked Lists 337 This tells t

  • Page 363 and 364:

    Using Linked Lists 339 Each time yo

  • Page 365 and 366:

    Drawbacks of Sets and Linked Lists

  • Page 367 and 368:

    Drawbacks of Sets and Linked Lists

  • Page 369 and 370:

    Chapter 3: Collections and Dictiona

  • Page 371 and 372:

    Using a Collection 347 Every elemen

  • Page 373 and 374:

    Using a Collection 349 When you del

  • Page 375 and 376:

    Using a Collection 351 Figure 3-6:

  • Page 377 and 378:

    Understanding Hash Tables 353 Every

  • Page 379 and 380:

    Understanding Hash Tables 355 VP Ke

  • Page 381 and 382:

    Understanding Hash Tables 357 ✦ D

  • Page 383 and 384:

    Understanding Hash Tables 359 In ge

  • Page 385 and 386:

    Chapter 4: Stacks, Queues, and Dequ

  • Page 387 and 388:

    Using a Stack 363 Like a collection

  • Page 389 and 390:

    Using Queues 365 Counting and searc

  • Page 391 and 392:

    Using Queues 367 Adding data to a q

  • Page 393 and 394:

    Using Queues 369 Figure 4-6: The Pe

  • Page 395 and 396:

    Using Deques 371 Initially, a deque

  • Page 397 and 398:

    Using Deques 373 Figure 4-11: The U

  • Page 399 and 400:

    Chapter 5: Graphs and Trees In This

  • Page 401 and 402:

    Understanding Graphs 377 457 miles

  • Page 403 and 404:

    Understanding Graphs 379 Figure 5-4

  • Page 405 and 406:

    Creating Trees 381 Figure 5-5: A tr

  • Page 407 and 408:

    Creating Trees 383 For example, an

  • Page 409 and 410:

    Taking Action on Trees 385 Traversi

  • Page 411 and 412:

    Taking Action on Trees 387 10 8 12

  • Page 413 and 414:

    Taking Action on Trees 389 10 8 12

  • Page 415 and 416:

    Book IV Algorithms

  • Page 417 and 418:

    Chapter 1: Sorting Algorithms In Th

  • Page 419 and 420:

    Using Bubble Sort 395 32 9 74 21 Or

  • Page 421 and 422:

    Using Insertion Sort 397 32 9 74 21

  • Page 423 and 424:

    Using Shell Sort 399 32 9 74 21 50

  • Page 425 and 426:

    Using Heap Sort 401 Heap sort dumps

  • Page 427 and 428:

    Using Merge Sort 403 94 46 74 21 32

  • Page 429 and 430:

    Using Quick Sort 405 Using Quick So

  • Page 431 and 432:

    Comparing Sorting Algorithms 407 If

  • Page 433 and 434:

    Chapter 2: Searching Algorithms In

  • Page 435 and 436:

    Sequential Search 411 Backward or f

  • Page 437 and 438:

    Sequential Search 413 Binary search

  • Page 439 and 440:

    Sequential Search 415 Fibonacci num

  • Page 441 and 442:

    Using Indexes 417 102 John Smith 55

  • Page 443 and 444:

    Adversarial Search 419 The more lev

  • Page 445 and 446:

    Adversarial Search 421 So if the co

  • Page 447 and 448:

    Chapter 3: String Searching In This

  • Page 449 and 450:

    Sequential Text Search 425 In this

  • Page 451 and 452:

    Sequential Text Search 427 The Shif

  • Page 453 and 454:

    Searching with Regular Expressions

  • Page 455 and 456:

    Searching Phonetically 431 Both sym

  • Page 457 and 458:

    Searching Phonetically 433 If you h

  • Page 459 and 460:

    Chapter 4: Data Compression Algorit

  • Page 461 and 462:

    Lossless Data Compression Algorithm

  • Page 463 and 464:

    Lossless Data Compression Algorithm

  • Page 465 and 466:

    Lossless Data Compression Algorithm

  • Page 467 and 468:

    Lossy Data Compression 443 Basicall

  • Page 469 and 470:

    Chapter 5: Encryption Algorithms In

  • Page 471 and 472:

    The Basics of Encryption 447 in a m

  • Page 473 and 474:

    The Basics of Encryption 449 Stream

  • Page 475 and 476:

    The Basics of Encryption 451 Electr

  • Page 477 and 478:

    Symmetric/Asymmetric Encryption Alg

  • Page 479 and 480:

    Cracking Encryption 455 Sender’s

  • Page 481 and 482:

    Cracking Encryption 457 Instead of

  • Page 483 and 484:

    Cracking Encryption 459 Code cracki

  • Page 485 and 486:

    Book V Web Programming

  • Page 487 and 488:

    Chapter 1: HyperText Markup Languag

  • Page 489 and 490:

    The Structure of an HTML Document 4

  • Page 491 and 492:

    The Structure of an HTML Document 4

  • Page 493 and 494:

    Defining the Background 469 Adding

  • Page 495 and 496:

    Making Tables 471 The anchor point

  • Page 497 and 498:

    Making Tables 473 Book V Chapter 1

  • Page 499 and 500:

    Making Tables 475 Column 1 Column

  • Page 501 and 502:

    Chapter 2: CSS In This Chapter Und

  • Page 503 and 504:

    Creating Style Classes 479 color :

  • Page 505 and 506:

    Separating Styles in Files 481 Sepa

  • Page 507 and 508:

    Cascading Stylesheets 483 If you ha

  • Page 509 and 510:

    Chapter 3: JavaScript In This Chapt

  • Page 511 and 512:

    Declaring Variables 487 need to def

  • Page 513 and 514:

    Using Operators 489 The relational

  • Page 515 and 516:

    Branching Statements 491 To make th

  • Page 517 and 518:

    Using Arrays 493 A variation of the

  • Page 519 and 520:

    Designing User Interfaces 495 A con

  • Page 521 and 522:

    Chapter 4: PHP In This Chapter Und

  • Page 523 and 524:

    Declaring Variables 499 Declaring V

  • Page 525 and 526:

    Using Operators 501 Table 4-3 Logic

  • Page 527 and 528:

    Branching Statements 503 Command; }

  • Page 529 and 530:

    Creating Functions 505 If you don

  • Page 531 and 532:

    Creating Objects 507 Creating Objec

  • Page 533 and 534:

    Chapter 5: Ruby In This Chapter Un

  • Page 535 and 536:

    Using Operators 511 # long time to

  • Page 537 and 538:

    Using Operators 513 Table 5-3 Logic

  • Page 539 and 540:

    Looping Statements 515 Command else

  • Page 541 and 542:

    Using Data Structures 517 Using Dat

  • Page 543 and 544:

    Creating Objects 519 To tell an obj

  • Page 545 and 546:

    Book VI Programming Language Syntax

  • Page 547 and 548:

    Chapter 1: C and C++ In This Chapte

  • Page 549 and 550:

    Declaring Variables 525 Despite min

  • Page 551 and 552:

    Declaring Variables 527 All integer

  • Page 553 and 554:

    Using Operators 529 Relational oper

  • Page 555 and 556:

    Branching Statements 531 Table 1-6

  • Page 557 and 558:

    Looping Statements 533 switch (expr

  • Page 559 and 560:

    Data Structures 535 If a function d

  • Page 561 and 562:

    Using Objects 537 Now you can decla

  • Page 563 and 564:

    Using Objects 539 To inherit from m

  • Page 565 and 566:

    Chapter 2: Java and C# In This Chap

  • Page 567 and 568:

    Declaring Variables 543 The double

  • Page 569 and 570:

    Using Operators 545 Declaring float

  • Page 571 and 572:

    Using Operators 547 The increment o

  • Page 573 and 574:

    Branching Statements 549 if (condit

  • Page 575 and 576:

    Looping Statements 551 Because no b

  • Page 577 and 578:

    Data Structures 553 If the function

  • Page 579 and 580:

    Data Structures 555 You can create

  • Page 581 and 582:

    Using Objects 557 So if you created

  • Page 583 and 584:

    Chapter 3: Perl and Python In This

  • Page 585 and 586:

    Using Operators 561 You can write b

  • Page 587 and 588:

    Using Operators 563 The relational

  • Page 589 and 590:

    Branching Statements 565 Table 3-5

  • Page 591 and 592:

    Looping Statements 567 In Python, t

  • Page 593 and 594:

    Perl Data Structures 569 A typical

  • Page 595 and 596:

    Python Data Structures 571 Creating

  • Page 597 and 598:

    Using Objects 573 After you define

  • Page 599 and 600:

    Chapter 4: Pascal and Delphi In Thi

  • Page 601 and 602:

    Declaring Variables 577 Creating Co

  • Page 603 and 604:

    Declaring Constants 579 Declaring d

  • Page 605 and 606:

    Branching Statements 581 Table 4-5

  • Page 607 and 608:

    Looping Statements 583 Looping Stat

  • Page 609 and 610:

    Data Structures 585 FUNCTION Functi

  • Page 611 and 612:

    Creating Objects 587 clear a dynami

  • Page 613 and 614:

    Chapter 5: Visual Basic and REALbas

  • Page 615 and 616:

    The Structure of a BASIC Program 59

  • Page 617 and 618:

    Declaring Variables 593 Declaring i

  • Page 619 and 620:

    Declaring Constants 595 Declaring B

  • Page 621 and 622:

    Branching Statements 597 Table 5-7

  • Page 623 and 624:

    Branching Statements 599 The preced

  • Page 625 and 626:

    Creating Subprograms and Functions

  • Page 627 and 628:

    Data Structures 603 Data Structures

  • Page 629 and 630:

    Creating Objects 605 Creating Objec

  • Page 631 and 632:

    Book VII Applications

  • Page 633 and 634:

    Chapter 1: Database Management In T

  • Page 635 and 636:

    The Basics of Databases 611 To retr

  • Page 637 and 638:

    The Basics of Databases 613 Althoug

  • Page 639 and 640:

    The Basics of Databases 615 Employe

  • Page 641 and 642:

    Manipulating Data 617 Tables divide

  • Page 643 and 644:

    Manipulating Data 619 The Join comm

  • Page 645 and 646:

    Manipulating Data 621 SET PhoneNumb

  • Page 647 and 648:

    Database Programming 623 Figure 1-1

  • Page 649 and 650:

    Chapter 2: Bioinformatics In This C

  • Page 651 and 652:

    The Basics of Bioinformatics 627 Un

  • Page 653 and 654:

    Searching Databases 629 ✦ Swiss-P

  • Page 655 and 656:

    Bioinformatics Programming 631 Alth

  • Page 657 and 658:

    Chapter 3: Computer Security In Thi

  • Page 659 and 660:

    Stopping Malware 635 Worms Similar

  • Page 661 and 662:

    Stopping Hackers 637 Stopping Hacke

  • Page 663 and 664:

    Secure Computing 639 Forensics If y

  • Page 665 and 666:

    Secure Computing 641 start. The ide

  • Page 667 and 668:

    Chapter 4: Artificial Intelligence

  • Page 669 and 670:

    Problem Solving 645 Game-playing Be

  • Page 671 and 672:

    Problem Solving 647 Expert System K

  • Page 673 and 674:

    Problem Solving 649 Humans can unde

  • Page 675 and 676:

    Problem Solving 651 Such speech rec

  • Page 677 and 678:

    Machine Learning 653 With LISP, eve

  • Page 679 and 680:

    Machine Learning 655 Robotics and a

  • Page 681 and 682:

    `Chapter 5: The Future of Computer

  • Page 683 and 684:

    Picking an Operating System 659 opt

  • Page 685 and 686:

    Cross-Platform Programming 661 Unfo

  • Page 687 and 688:

    Cross-Platform Programming 663 The

  • Page 689 and 690:

    Cross-Platform Programming 665 Anot

  • Page 691 and 692:

    The Programming Language of the Fut

  • Page 693 and 694:

    The Programming Language of the Fut

  • Page 695 and 696:

    Index Numerics 0 (zero) initializin

  • Page 697 and 698:

    Index 673 blocks of commands in cur

  • Page 699 and 700:

    Index 675 dictionaries versus, 352

  • Page 701 and 702:

    Index 677 database management conne

  • Page 703 and 704:

    Index 679 enumerated variables (C/C

  • Page 705 and 706:

    Index 681 hybrid OOP languages, 246

  • Page 707 and 708:

    Index 683 knowledge base, 646, 647

  • Page 709 and 710:

    Index 685 modeling, 44-45 Modula-2

  • Page 711 and 712:

    Index 687 advantages and disadvanta

  • Page 713 and 714:

    Index 689 looping statements, 600-6

  • Page 715 and 716:

    Index 691 extreme programming metho

  • Page 717 and 718:

    Index 693 source code as, 264 tab-d

  • Page 719 and 720:

    Index 695 as event-driven programmi

  • Page 721 and 722:

    BUSINESS, CAREERS & PERSONAL FINANC

DUMmIES‰
Read Delphi Programming For Dummies E-book full by ( NEIL)
Download Excel VBA Programming For Dummies, 4th E Free by ( John Walkenbach)
DevOps-for-dummies
cybersecurity-for-dummies
Syndicating Web Sites With RSS Feeds for Dummies--For Dummies
PHP and MySQL Everyday Apps for Dummies--For Dummies
Los Angeles Disneyland For Dummies (Dummies Travel)
SQL for Dummies 7th Edition
THE NORDIC MODEL FOR DUMMIES
Networking For Dummies, 9th Edition