DT May 2018

foleyg

Ride More Stress Less

www.dirtandtrailmag.com

MAY 2018

MOTORCYCLE PERSONALITIES

DOUGIE LAMPKIN

THE JEDI MASTER OF TRIALS RIDERS

MAY 2018 RSA R29.50

9 771815 337001

18005

WORLD LAUNCH: TESTING METZELER’S NEW KAROO STREET TYRE IN ITALY

FEATURE: CLASSIC WHEELS

1982 MAICO 490

TECH TEST: TPI VS CARB

2-STROKES V-STROM 250

FIRST RIDE: 2018 SUZUKI


Driven by a

Passion

for Safety

XTRACE

FULLFACE

R3650.00

R4495.00

FEATURES

Shell: polycarbonate

Double shell size

Double visor (clear + smoke)

Mircometric buckle

Internal air-circulation

Removable and washable liner

Rain protector rims

Removable wind stop

Removable Peak

Removable nose / sheild

TOURMAX

FLIP-UP/MODULAR

FEATURES

Shell: polycarbonate

Double visor (clear + smoke)

Quick release visor system

Double anti-turbulence neck roll

Antiscratch visor with Pinlock

Internal air-circulation

Removable and washable liner

Removable wind-stop

Rain Protection Rims

To find your nearest Caberg dealer - Tel: 011 792 7691 Web: www.dmd.co.za

Prices mentioned are at recommended reatail including VAT. E&OE


15%

340

WORLD

CHAMPIONSHIPS

discount on any Regina chain on

presentation of this coupon to a PBA

dealer. Valid till 30 June 2018

PBA DEALER LISTING

GAUTENG

ZEEMANS MOTORCYCLES 011 435 7177

BIKING ACCESSORIES 012 342 7474

FACTORY RACING 011 867 0092

GAME MOTOR SERVICES 011 849 7000

MOTO-MATE RIVONIA 011 234 5275

MOTO-MATE STONERIDGE 011 609 0944

JUST BIKING 016 421 1153

KCR MOTORCYCLE FANATIX 011 975 5405

OFF-ROAD CYCLES 012 333 6443

PRIMROSE MOTORCYCLES 011 828 9091

RANDBURG MOTORCYCLES 011 792 6829

WAYNE HEASMAN RACING 011 955 5960

MPUMALANGA

BIKE CITY 013 244 2143

NELSPRUIT ATV 013 752 2023

NORTHWEST

BIKERS PARADISE 018 297 4700

INSANE BIKERS 014 594 2111

MOTORS @ KLERKSDORP 018 468 1800

WATER RITE MOTORCYCLES 018 771 5050

LIMPOPO

K.R.MOTORCYCLES 015 297 3291

FREESTATE

SALLEYS YAMAHA 051 430 3326

KZN

ROCKET RACING PINETOWN 031 702 2606

ROCKET RACING MARITZBURG 033 264 3240

RBS YAMAHA 031 701 1311

RIDE HIGH WITH YAMAHA 035 789 1851

PERRY’S M/CYCLES UMHLANGA 031 566 7411

PERRY’S M/CYCLES HILLCREST 031 765 2560

CAPE PROVINCE

CRAIGS M/CYCLE FITMENT 021 939 8944

TRAC-MAC BELVILLE 021 945 3724

TRAC-MAC PAARDEN-EILAND 021 510 2258

TRAC-MAC WYNBURG 021 761 4220

MIKE HOPKINS MOTORCYCLES 021 461 5167

NEVES MOTORCYCLE WORLD CC 021 930 5917

EASTERN CAPE

IMOLA MOTORSPORT 043 748 1017


EDITOR: ROLEY FOLEY

“Where’s your scooter Vicar” I said, (because

it was the fi rst time I had seen him walking in

10 years!). “Don’t know, I think it might have

been stolen, but I will get it back on Sunday”

he replied.

“At my next sermon I will go through the ten

commandments.

When I get to ‘thou shalt not steal’ God will

sort it out, I’ve got faith”

The following week, sure enough he was

riding the bike again. So I asked him if the

ten commandments thing had worked as

planned: “I got as far as thou shall not commit

adultery…….then I suddenly remembered

where I left the bike..”

Ride safely out there guys!

See you on the trails.

CONTENTS: MAY 2018

THE TEAM:

EDITOR:

Glenn Foley

foleyg@mweb.co.za

DESIGN:

Rob Portman

rob@ridefast.co.za

ADVERTISING:

Sinead Foley

foleyg@mweb.co.za

Kyle Lawrenson

lawrensonk@mweb.co.za

ACCOUNTS &

SUBSCRIPTIONS:

Anette

anette.acc@mweb.co.za

Office no (011) 979-5035

(011) 979-0053

CONTRIBUTORS:

Kurt Beine

Richard Sutherland

Zygmund Brodalka

Byron Rudman

Sean Hendley

Tristan Foley

Mike Wessels

Dries vd Walt

12: COVER STORY: METZELER KAROO STREET 30: FEATURE: MOTUL OUT OF AFRICA TEAM

38: FEATURE: DOUGIE LAMPKIN 42: CLASSIC BIKE: 1982 MAICO 490

TO SUBSCRIBE

CALL 011 979 5035 OR EMAIL

anette.acc@mweb.co.za

Digital or hard copy.

50: TECH TEST: TPI VS CARB 56: FIRST RIDE: SUZUKI V-STROM 250

2 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


Piston and Gasket Sets

Cranks, Conrods and Camshafts

Cylinder Kits, Rebores, Main Bearings and Clutch Plates

VALVES,STEM SEALS AND SPRINGS

Email:G124@mweb.co.za

no 4 Fifth avenue

Northmead

Benoni

011 425 1081/4


Acerbis new range of

delectable Off-road gear

X-Move Boots

The new Xmove boots have landed, very stylish

and at RRP at around R4200 they seem pretty

well priced. All the features we like: X-Move is

manufactured with highly durable leather with a

layer of padding at the shin that eliminates chafing

and discomfort.

The inner liner is treated with an anti-bacterial

material which is also breathable and drives out

moisture. The Vibram sole is very durable and hard

wearing. Buckles are provided with Memory Quick

Release which means you do not need to readjust

your straps every time you release the buckle. Nice!

Cool Shades From Pirelli:

Pirelli promotion:

With the purchase of the following Pirelli COMBO

Tyres: Angel GT, Diablo Rosso 3, Night Dragon,

Scorpion Trail 2, Scorpion Rally STR, Scorpion

MT90, Scorpion XC Midsoft/Midhard.

While Stocks Last. Valid with purchase of both front

and rear tyre. Something for nothing. Cool Huh!

Contact Bikewise on 011 566 0333 for a Pirelli Dealer

near you.

X-Strong

Knee Brace

Great for those

riders that do not

need an orthopedic

Knee - guard but at

the same time want a

better protection than

a classic knee guard.

The kneecap, tibia,

and the low part

of the femur are

constructed in a

sandwich of

thermoplastic

material and a

padding that allows

high energy absorption from shock. The

system is double articulated and is well adapted to

the knee anatomy. Ensures maximum movement

with a great torsional stffness. Homologated for knee

and tibia.

Carbon G 3.0 Gloves

Acerbis Carbon G Glove 3.0 Black/Flo.

Some of the trickes looking gloves around, the

Carbon G features a Clarino palm with anti-slip

inserts, reinforced material on palm and thumb,

breathable mesh back, ABS protection on knuckles,

pre-curved cut.

Features:

• Rubber patch wrist with Velcro closure

• Soft rubber patches on fingers

• ABS knuckle covers to ensure optimal protection

from impact

• TPR logo details in wrist area

• Pre-curved shaped fingers

• Refractive piping on the back of the hand and

silicone on the finger tip for a better grip.

Specifications:

• Backhand Stretch fabric.

• Palm One piece Clarino (palm with anti-slip

inserts)

Available at dealers.

4 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


Shock Tactics to distribute

WP Suspension

The 1st of April 2018 will heralded a change in the

way WP Suspension products are distributed in

South Africa. The Austrian parent company, WP

Suspension GmbH, is entrusting KTM South Africa

in the establishment of a new network of Authorized

Centers, thus transferring the responsibility of the

brand’s products to the Midrand-based company.

Franziska Brandl, Managing Director of KTM South

Africa, has been entrusted to lead the WP brand to

‘Get In Front’ - in line with the brand’s slogan - and

will manage the establishment of the network of

Authorized Centers to sell and service both WP OEM

equipment and Pro Components parts. Backed by

the experienced Greg Smyth as WP Suspension’s

PG&A Manager and Stephan Marais as WP

Suspension’s Customer Service Manager, the newly

created division is set to deliver product and service

of only the highest quality.

ABOUT WP

WP is at the forefront of suspension technology,

delivering race winning performance in a wide range

of competitive environments. From Motocross and

Supercross to Enduro and Rally through to Superbike

and every class of MotoGP, racers have scored an

impressive array of victories with WP suspension at

the heart of these wins. The expertise garnered in

competition have filtered down into state-of-the-art

products for the Aftermarket & OEM products.

WP AUTHORIZED CENTERS

Discussions regarding the appointment of these

new Authorized Centers are at an advanced stage,

and WP will announce the full list in due course. Five

Authorized Centers are expected to be operating in

South Africa by mid 2018.

The changes being made are customer driven.

The ability to have a geographically spread and

factory trained network of Authorized Centers will

benefit WP customers who will receive high service

levels, technician specialisation, the back-up of the

considerable expertise that WP can offer, and a more

local service. Each Authorized Center will be able to

sell, setup and service WP’s range of competitionfocused

Pro Components, such as the company’s

famed Cone Valve forks and Trax rear shock absorber.

Pro Component parts – from triple clamps and

steering dampers to T-shirts and stickers – will also be

available for those looking to tune their performance

to perfection. Each Authorized Center will be able to

supply spare parts and servicing items, either direct

to the customer or to other outlets, ensuring that

customers get back riding without delay.

THE PRO COMPONENTS RANGE

In terms of Off Road Pro

Component products, WP

can deliver Spring Cone

Valve forks and Trax shocks

to an extensive list of

Japanese models, as well

as to KTM and Husqvarna

customers looking to replace

their OEM units. Additionally,

AER Cone Valve forks, which

combine WP’s two greatest

technologies, the cone valve

damping and the AER Spring

System, can also be supplied

to KTM and Husqvarna machines. Away from the

adult market, KTM and Husqvarna customers can

buy Pro Component WP suspension for models

ranging from 50cc to 85cc, with AER Cone Valve

forks and the Trax shock available for the KTM 85 SX

and Husqvarna TC 85.

In addition to the Off Road Pro Component products

available from WP there is also a range of On Road

Competition Cartridge Kits, Competition Shocks

and steering dampers. Both Off Road and On Road

products will be available from all Authorized Centers.

Further details can be found at www.wp-suspension.

com

6 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


GET MORE DIRT

IN YOUR LIFE

NOW AT PRIME LESS 2%*!

Maximize your time in the dirt! Finance a new KTM EXC 4-stroke model at prime

less 2%*! Now only available through KTM Finance, a product of WesBank.

Photo: R. Schedl

* Promotion valid from 1 April 2018 to 30 June 2018 on all new, in-stock KTM EXC-F four-stroke 2018 models, while stocks last, at all participating KTM dealers. All information with

the proviso that mistakes, printing, setting and typing errors may occur. Please consult your local dealer for further details. Terms and Conditions apply. Finance is subject to approval.

Initiation fee and service fee may be applicable. KTM Finance is a product of WesBank - a division of First Rand Bank Ltd. Registered Bank. An Authorised Financial Services and

Registered Credit Provider. NCRCP20.


Yamaha unveil

TY-E electric trials

bike concept

Yamaha fanned the flames of the electric fire with

the TY-E electric trials bike concept at the Tokyo

Motorcycle Show. The firm has shown electric

concepts before, such as the PED-1 and PES-1 back

in 2013 and the Motoroid last year, but they’ve yet to

put anything into production. Will this be the first?

The TY-E has actually come out of Yamaha’s

‘Evolving R&D’ programme, in which employees are

given time aside to work on unusual

projects. The engineers wanted

to create an electric trials bike as

proof that you can create hightorque

motors that remain lightweight and

compact. From the outside, it appears to

be a success – the bodywork is slim and

has maintained the typical trails riding

position. It’s remained

lightweight too, at just

70kg, although you

do have to question

how much of that

is down to the

carbon-fibre

monocoque

chassis. Yamaha

say it rides well,

and interestingly,

it only has one gear

but Yamaha have

fitted a mechanical clutch, which they say is essential

for proper control.

Of all the electric concepts seen so far, the TY-E looks

the most production-ready – in fact, they’re going to

put it to the test. Yamaha will enter the TY-E in the FIM

Trial-E Cup starting in July. For now, though, there’s

no information on whether this bike will inform any

production models or when we might see them.

8 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


Zero Motorcycles

release electric

adventure tourer

Zero was imported a few years ago, but we’ve not

heard anything locally from this brand for ages…

American electric motorcycle manufacturer Zero

has just released an electric bike that it claims is

targeted at ‘the growing number of riders seeking to

tour on an electric bike.’ But is there any validity in

this claim?

According to Zero, the DSR Black Forest, which

comes with luggage as standard, has a range

of 260 km’s at city speeds or 125Km’s when on

the open highway. And if you fit the rather pricey

optional range-extending battery to it, this is

extended by around 25% to 328km in a city and

155km highway use.

While this may seem rather a short distance for

a touring bike, the Black Forest does re-charge

impressively fast with Zero claiming the battery

replenishes at up to 150km of range for every hour

the bike is plugged in – making touring on this electric

bike more possible. But this figure is if the optional

extra Charge Tank is fitted, which allows it to hook up

to level two charging points…. Which are not really

freely available in the Karoo.

“The Zero Motorcycles DSR ZF14.4 Black Forest

Edition is the first model we’ve ever developed to

meet the specific demands of Europe’s adventure

and touring riders,” said Zero Motorcycles European

Managing Director Umberto Uccelli. “Our customers

have been asking for a model like this for years.

Riding a Zero is the most connected way to move

through nature. The Zero Motorcycles DSR Black

Forest extends this to new, longer, and more fun

adventures. We invite you to experience your world

for the first time with seamless, silent and pure dual

sport propulsion.”

While its range may put some off, there is no denying

the Black Zero’s performance with its electric motor

producing a huge 107.7ft.lb of torque and it does

look pretty rugged…

Oxfords Dryphone Pro:

New from Oxford Products are these waterproof smart

phone holders. They feature a protective hard-case

design with shock absorbing silicone inner layer to keep

your phone safe and comfortable. They are touch-screen

and finger print scanner compatible. The universalmount

bracket system allows for fitting to handlebars

with diameter 22.2 to 31.8mm, and is angle adjustable.

The handle bar is protected from

scratching by plastic inserts. The

holder is attached to the bracket by

a tree-point locking system and can

be removed leaving the bracket on

the bike. Currently these holders are

available for: Samsung S6/S6 Edge

and iPhone 5/5SE; 6/7; 6+/7+ models.

For more info or where you can

buy this product, contact DMD on

011 792 7691 or visit www.dmd.

co.za RRP R665 at dealers.

Dunlops new Gummy rear tyre

Designed for all the rock hoppers

out there, Dunlop tyres have

just released the new 80/81EX

gummy. We have not tried it

just yet, but Colton Haaker won

super enduro on this rubber…

so that says a lot. The tyre is

being used by quite a few of

the local racing fraternity…

Available in 110/100-18

rear size, the AT81 EX is

made for a wide variety of

extreme conditions—not

just EnduroCross—and was

developed with the help of

Cody Webb and Destry Abbott.

The tyres are making their way

into dealerships as we speak.

Dealer enquiries HRP (011)

708-5905

10 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


40 SLIMMER INNER

HINGE FOR SUPERIOR

BIKE FEEL

ADJUSTABLE

METAL GEARED OUTER

HINGE FOR PRECISE

MOVEMENT AND DURABILITY

INJECTED CARBON

COMPOSITE FRAME

GET YOUR

THRILLON

X-FRAME KNEE BRACE

LEATT.COM

The rider’s knee is constantly at the battlefront. Intensive biomedical design at the Leatt Lab ® has

produced a brace that absorbs and deflects the knocks. Certified medical device and top-rated impact

protection, this is where science and performance mesh. The result? Pure Thrill!

leatt.com/xframe2018/


12 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


GRIPPING

ADVENTURE

THE METZELER VOLCANO EXPEDITION

This is the very first time that this here publication has cracked a nod to attend an international tyre launch

– and initially, it resulted in quite a lot of head scratching. How do you write a whole feature about a set of

tyres? Well this trip made it pretty easy because Metzeler let us loose on the mountains in Sicily aboard

some of the most delectable adventure bikes known to man… all to launch the new Metzeler Karoo Street.

Where we went:

Sicily, that island at the boot of Italy. Don’t

be fooled it’s a pretty large place – not just

sommer some little island, in fact, it’s huge

– 27000 square kilometres. We jetted in to

Catania early morning and were shuttled

off to our hotel – a castle dating from the

year Tut. On the way we caught glimpses

of the majestic Mount Etna – Europes most

active Volcano. Etna covers an area of

1,190 km2 with a basal circumference of

140 km. Anyway just a bit of useless info

for you.

Sicily is busy-busy with all sorts of

industry imaginable and almost every

square centimeter of land under some

form of cultivation. The day we landed

was an off day so we took the opportunity

to take a walk around town – no taxi – a

paltry 30 euro one way (Gulp). In town we

noticed a sign for a castle (Calatabiano)

and followed that. The main gates were

shut and it all looked very closed, so – up

the side of the mountain we walked. About

halfway up, we all came to understand why

we ride motorcycles – there is much to be

said for the internal combustion engine.

Calatabiano Castle was founded by the

Arabs, who moved from Calatabiano

to conquer Taormina in 902. Yup – 902

that’s older than your great great, great

granddad. There are still wild places in

Sicily and to explore trails that were first

made so many years ago is pretty cool.

Beautiful place well worth the (long) walk

for sure.

Back to Tyres:

That evening, we were introduced to the

team from Metzeler. When we wandered

down for dinner there was a fantastic

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018 13


The markets in the city are

a riot of colour and noise -

unchanged for centuries.

This is the castle we

wandered up to. Older than

any ruins in SA...

We found some

interesting spots...

selection of modern adventure bikes

all shod in the new Karoo Street rubber

– and we were sort of herded into the

presentation area before we drooled on

the bikes.

Ladies and Gents. To be absolutely

honest, this writer learned more about

tyre technology in the next two hours or

so than in the last twenty odd years of

having a real job. Fascinating is probably

the understatement of the century.

Modern challenges:

Motorcycle tyre manufacturers are

faced with a few hassles other than just

traction. The common ones are:

• Making the bikes handle well

(predictably).

• Making the tyres last.

• Finding compounds that suit a tyres

individual needs.

• Keeping up with modern bikes

horsepower demands.

• Here’s one that we did not know

about. Building a tyre that can cope with

modern electronic aids.

In a nutshell this means that the tyres

cannot flex so much that it interferes

with a bikes ABS system or traction

control. The electronics can read flex as

a slip… and that can create electronic

confusion which might adversely affect

your overall ride. It makes sense when

you think about it but we had no idea

that it was such a big focus in tyre

manufacture – and as you can imagine,

particularly in the world of adventure or

dual purpose bikes, this has become a

real issue.

You want the tyre to be stiff enough

that it does not flummox the electronics,

but you want it to be soft enough that

you still have some off-road traction.

Makes sense.

The Karoo Family:

The Metzeler Karoo got its name

because the original tyres were first

tested right here in our very own Karoo.

Metzeler sent some top international

riders to go as fast and as long as they

could on our loooong gravel roads. When

they got back – it made sense to them,

to adopt the use of our deserts name.

Three Karoo’s are in the family –

two have become household names

amongst adventure riders:

The Karoo Extreme: A knobbly for

your adventure – a Rally racer, noisy

on tar with very little life – but in the dirt

you will get more traction than most will

ever need.

14 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


WANDERLUST

TRAVEL THE WORLD

OFF-ROAD TYRE WITH

ON-ROAD PERFORMANCE

DEALER ENQUIRIES 011 437 4699


The Karoo 3: Dedicated to off-road trail

riding and adventure journeys, aggressively

offroady, works OK on tar albeit a bit on the

noisy side. The noise does distract and it

does not last too long…

The new Karoo Street: Is a unique

combination of off-road looks and traction

with on-road agility. A true 50/50 tyre. That’s

what we were there to sus out…

Techy stuff:

Tyre Compound:

Stiffness is needed to:

Support the profile (that characterizes the

handling), define the footprint area (which

engages the compound and generates grip),

wear resistance, thrust and load derived

from rolling tyre dynamics.

Softness is needed to:

Absorb shocks and hits, Copy terrain

asperities.

The Karoo Street has a high Silica (that’s

the sticky stuff) compound with a balanced

proportion of carbon-black (that’s the stiff

stuff under the sticky stuff) and resins to

achieve a high level of grip on road, in

both dry and wet conditions. A relevant

percentage of Carbon Black filler still is

needed to increase knobs resistance to

‘tearing’ and premature wear when used

on-road.

Tread pattern design:

Much of Karoo Street’s performance is

delivered by a tread pattern evolved from the

layout of Karoo 3 and its uniquely shaped

knobs. The main focus of its development

was to provide great on-road performance

with consistent wear, greater mileage, and

a high level of stability combined with the

ability to hit the dirt tracks.

Extra-large central blocks create a wide

and solid contact patch to ensure both

low and high speed stability on-road. The

footprint characteristics are balanced to

promote uniform wear, thus providing

valuable mileage for this class of tyre.

We asked what mileage to expect. The

answer was around 10000 kilometres on the

rear assuming that the rider does 80 percent

tar, twenty on dirt.

When riding off-road, the V-shaped knob

layout causes multiple operating edges of

blocks to ensure acceleration, traction and

braking grip.

The combination of these characteristics

(extra-large blocks and V shaped layout)

and their effect (stability, traction, wide

contact patch, smooth rolling) helps the

tyres to integrate with electronic rider aids

such as ABS and Traction Control. (See,

we told you.)

Longitudinal grooves in the middle of the

central blocks provide water evacuation

and self cleaning ability for dirt. Wide

transversal grooves contribute to make

central blocks to dig the soil, providing

offroad traction especially on dirt and hardpacked

clay soils.

The variable block shape (together with

the V-shaped knob layout) ensures several

contemporarily operating edges with mixed

orientation, capable to enhance off-road

traction in several conditions.

Big lateral blocks with narrow grooves

ensure a large contact patch, giving proper

cornering grip and stability when leaning

on-road.

It all sounds like a lot – but there you go.

And we bet that you learned a bit.

The ride:

The boys and girls from Metzeler instructed

us all to ride as hard as we liked. No sissy

stuff. “Try and slide, brake hard, enjoy

yourselves, we want to test the tyres to the

maximum.”

What a cool ride we had – everyone raves

about riding in SA – and we could not agree

more, we are truly blessed, but riding in

16 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


TRUE ADVENTURE.

From R155 000 - DCT R168 500

CRF250 Rally

READY TO WIN! R84 800

CRF250R R98 000

CRF450R R107 900

Trade-Ins welcome! Finance and insurance arranged in-house.

CRF450 RX

R110 000

CRF110

R30 000


Mt Etna in the background. Really pretty.

Europe is also fun. The team worked us a

route – all on the wrong side of the road,

from the hotel out along the beach along a

very wet puddle filled gravel road. Over an

old bridge, out through countless vineyards,

through old tunnels along ancient winding

narrow roads, down into a very sandy

riverbed for a quick stop, snack break and

photo op. From there we chased up into

spectacular alpine mountains on winding tar

roads to a coffee stop to take in the views

and – well eat a little more. In Italy eating is

more an art form than a simple meal – even

if you don’t enjoy it you can never complain

about the food…

More photo’s along one of the coolest

roads up the side of mount Etna. Seemingly

endless sweeps. The stuff that bikes are

made for. This guy accidently set off all

of the alarms by cruising up the wrong…

errr correct side of the freeway. Arrived

to a lot if wide eyes at the bottom of the

pass. A quick “Really sorry Oom”, and we

were away again. It’s amazing how even

though you know that you have to be on the

right, the moment you are not following or

consciously thinking about it – instinct kicks

in and you ride on the side that you are

accustomed to.

I traded Donovan (Fourie) my start out

Multistrada for his Honda Africa Twin – the

DCT model, so that was interesting, first

time I’d ridden one – and I’ll give you my

opinions elsewhere. As we climbed higher

– patches of snow started appearing – and

– alarmingly, sheer sheets of water were

running across the road in places thanks to

the melting ice. That was interesting – more

than a couple of butt clenching moments

were enjoyed…and guess what? We really

got to feel what these tyres are all about.

Guess what?

We stopped for lunch. AAAARGH more

food!!

It was, however almost at the peak of

the volcano in the snow all in log cabins

and superbly spectacular. We took the

opportunity to chuck snowballs around

and take lots of pics while the more rotund

European visitors ate everything. Ok that’s a

lie we had our fair share…

I traded the AT for a KTM 1290

Adventure-S for the return trip. The perfect

scalpel for this kind of riding.

Our route home was back down the

mountain – no complaints there, what a ride

– even better than on the way up because

you knew what you were in for. As usual,

more time was needed to take photo’s and

just take it all in…

We happily wound our way long through

some villages and onto the freeways, cool

place, great riding all the way back to our

starting point.

You tell me one thing better than riding a

bike all day….

A very cool few hours in the saddle.

Now this is a story about tyres, and there

is a reason that we switched out bikes. We

wanted to feel if the tyres behave the same

on bikes with different horsepower, tyre

sizes and so-on and it has to be said - the

bikes all felt great.

We need to say that we did not really get

to play on long gravel roads like we have

here, but we had miles of twisty tar roads,

some slick mud and that sandy riverbed –

and on all the bikes we rode, the tyres felt

perfect. At high speeds they run quietly

along. In the twisties they will go as fast as

the rider can – and in the sand and mud –

well they hooked up as well as anything else

we’ve used. Those water crossings were

interesting – scary to be sure but the Karoo’s

took them into their stride no problems and

there were no mishaps.

This certainly feels like a tyre that you can

use on your bike to go to work on during the

week, take a quick diversion to your local tar

track for a few laps and then head out into

the Karoo on the weekends.

Chat to your closest dealer, they’ll be here

in a month or so…

We have arranged a set for purchase and

fitment on one of our bikes. We will do a

follow up feature when they are fitted – we’ll

head for some lekker long gravel roads.

A lump of

snow fell off

the tree...

18 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


MOTO MATE BRINGS YOU

THE LARGEST BIKING & ACCESSORY

WEEKEND SALE IN SA.

3 DAYS OF PRICING MADNESS!!!

25 TH - 27 TH MAY 2018.

FRIDAY & SATURDAY - 8:00AM - 17:00PM | SUNDAY - 09:00AM - 16:00PM

15% TO 35% OFF EVERTHING IN STORE

DISCOUNT DOES NOT APPLY ON MOTORCYCLES •

DISCOUNT ONLY APPLIES TO REGULAR RETAIL PRICE

HELMETS • BOOTS • JACKETS • GLOVES • ACCESSORIES

FOR

COMMUTER • CRUISER • SUPERBIKE • ADVENTURE • MX

COMPETITION & GIVEAWAYS

MOTO MATE IN ASSOCATION WITH :

FOOD & DRINKS WIL BE ON SALE

CLEARANCE

STORE

15% OFF

CLEARANCE

PRICES DURING

WEEKEND SALE

REGULAR TRADING HOURS

Rivonia

011 234 5274/5

sales@motomate.co.za

Shop 6 Rivonia Crossing 2, Cnr Rivonia & Witkoppen road

Edenvale

011 609 0944/8

stoneridge@motomate.co.za

Stoneridge Centre, 1 Stoneridge Drive, Cnr Modderfontein & Hereford str

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK MONDAY - FRIDAY 8am – 5pm | SATURDAY 8am – 2pm | SUNDAY 9am – 1pm

Clearance Store

Shop 3, Forest Rd Design Centre, Cnr

Forest Road & Sunset Ave, Fourways

MONDAY - FRIDAY 8:30am – 5pm

SATURDAY 8am – 2pm

E & OE


THE

BIKES

One Bonus that the tyre guys give the bike

manufacturers with launches like this is that fact that

we will invariably chat about the bikes that we got

to ride. On this one, we got our mitts onto the 1200

Multistrada, the 1290KTM and Honda’s Africa twin

with DCT. We’ll give a quick rundown on each…

THE MULTISTRADA 1200 ENDURO

It has to be said that for some reason, this

bike really has snuck into our hearts. It’s a

blend of Italian finesse with a great big donk

that makes people smile non-stop.

Initially I hopped onto the smaller 950

Multi, but when we noticed that there was a

spare bike lurking, let’s face it, it would be an

absolute shame not to take advantage. We

last rode one of these probably more than a

year ago. Since then, the 1260 has made an

appearance – and we have yet to ride it.

Keyless ignition has to be one of the

doffest inventions ever. Why change

a system that has been faultless for

generations? Wander off onto another bike

with this key in your pocket and the hapless

victim who is sposed to ride this one gets

left stranded. Anyway, it is what it is.

“The Multistrada is really

easy to ride, despite the

fact that it’s such a big

girl. Fantastic throttle

actuation makes trickling

through those tight windy

Sicilian streets, or along

the footpaths a breeze,

but, open the throttle and

this Ducati taps you on the

shoulder and reminds you

of its superbike genes. It’s

seriously quick by any bike’s

standards.”

At its heart, the 1200 Enduro is powered

by a 152bhp 1198 superbike lump, retuned

to give buckets of earth-moving grunt. Like

all big Ducati V-twins it’s on the clattery

side at low rpm, but past 4000rpm it roars

through the exhaust and will set off into the

great beyond like a lunatic.

The Multistrada is really easy to ride, despite

the fact that it’s such a big girl. Fantastic

throttle actuation makes trickling through

those tight windy Sicilian streets, or along the

footpaths a breeze, but, open the throttle and

20 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


this Ducati taps you on the shoulder and

reminds you of its superbike genes. It’s

seriously quick by any bike’s standards.

In the right hands you can do anything

with it – and we proved this when we first

tested it. On this trip it just reinforced our

conviction about what a cool bike this

is to ride. The Italians certainly don’t just

make bikes. It’s as if they make rolling

works of art…

Comfortable, smooth, fast. Sport,

Touring, Urban and Enduro riding modes

change everything from the sharpness

of power the amount of traction, wheelie

and engine braking control and ABS

intervention with a flick of a button. It

also adjusts the compliance of the

electronic Sachs ‘Ducati Skyhook

Suspension’, which doesn’t just have

semi-active damping, but preload, too,

constantly adjusting, self-levelling and

keeping things in shape.

Chaps and chops – if you are looking

for a bike that is fast, stylish and

comfortable, then this is one machine

that you absolutely need to consider.

Please bear in mind that it is a “Soft-

Offroader”, Ducati freely admits that this

bike is designed for long travel with soft

off-road capabilities. The smaller front

wheel tells you this.

If you chat to any motorcycle

journalist, you’ll hear them talk about a

bikes personality. This one has a massive

presence, there is simply nothing boring

about it and we are just so glad that we

got to ride it again.

There are a few used ones knocking

around, Just, go and rob the bank, the

bond, whatever and buy one, you’ll never

be sorry.

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018 21


22 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


THE AFRICA TWIN DCT:

We were absolutely amazed at how

popular this bike is amongst the European

journalists. There was kind-of a rush to grab

the bikes at the start. The only guys who

seemed to steer clear were the shorties

because the Honda is pretty tall with its 21

inch front wheel and very off-road bias.

For the sake of a fresh photo, I reluctantly

gave up the Multi and climbed aboard – only

to discover that this one was a DCT – which,

interestingly, despite various requests, begs

and pleads, we have never been able to get

from Honda SA. So that was something.

We were in the sandy riverbed when I

climbed on – and it has to be said that it felt

a bit weird not using a clutch to get going.

You hit the starter, open the throttle and

off you go. Roll on the throttle and it pulls

strong even though the DCT seems to shift

earlier than we would like. I was constantly

reaching for the missing clutch lever and it

feels like my brain will never get used to it

being gone. Instead there is a parking brake

lever that is placed far away from your hand

but still within eyesight. That works great

when you need to hold the bike on a hill

which is, of course, the reason it’s there. But

the DCT goes into neutral when you shut

the CRF off – so it will just roll if you don’t do

something to stop it. It sounds really good

when you get it the revs up, despite having

the eco-friendly stock exhaust.

“Where some big adventure

bikes feel a bit unwieldy

and like they’re leading you

up the gravel path, when

off-road, the CRF1000L

Africa Twin is a bonafide

impressive adventure bike

from the word go.”

Once under way, the Africa Twin feels tall,

thin, light and softly sprung. We’ve always

loved the AT in off-road conditions – and for

this riverbed, or any dirt riding, the Africa

Twin is absolutely the pick of the bunch.

Where some big adventure bikes feel a bit

unwieldy and like they’re leading you up the

gravel path, when off-road, the CRF1000L

Africa Twin is a bonafide impressive

adventure bike from the word go.

With the DCT, you can feel the bike

shifting through the gears as you go along

– and it’s really an awesome system…

very impressed and we understand what

everyone has been raving about.

But - You have to ride this bike in sports

mode – otherwise it is a bit lazy.

Every time you stop and switch off, the

Honda goes back to the factory set D

Mode. D mode offers the best balance of

fuel economy and comfort cruising whilst

S mode gives three different, sportier shift

patterns to choose from. After stopping for a

photo, we headed up the mountain passes,

and forgot to switch the mode to sports. On

one of the corners, and the roads are really

narrow, I moved to overtake a vehicle – shot

into the left lane and opened the throttle… it

lazily shifted down and caused quite a lot of

alarm. Fortunately, there is a manual switch

on the left bar where you can gear down

– hit that and response was instant, there

was suddenly power to overtake… but, it

seems that the Honda’s brain was a bit fried

because it then took quite a while to gear up

again… In Sports mode it shifts a lot quicker

and is so much more responsive.

Just an observation and something

that every rider will need to become

accustomed to.

This trip again confirmed why the Honda

Africa twin has such a great global following.

It is one of those bikes that quietly gets

on with its business without any fuss. It is

enormously brilliant off the beaten paths and

more than capable on the road…

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018 23


24 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


THE KTM 1290 ADVENTURE-S:

This bike blew our minds when it was

launched right here last year. It is everything

that KTM set out for it to be, big, powerful –

and ridiculously fast.

From the lunch stop, this was our ride for

the tar route back to the hotel.

There is something raw about a KTM,

it roars along like a prop forward in the

Springbok Rugby side. This bike is a serious

machine – KTM packed their strongest,

baddest engine into a really comfortable

chassis package that handles anything that

the world can chuck at it.

It’s also keyless, and you know our

opinion on that – and it takes a little getting

used to was when switching the ignition

on, as you need to wait for three or four

seconds for the most brilliant ever TFT

display and ECU to become active, before

hitting the start button. If you try to speed

this process up, the bike doesn’t respond

until it’s ready. A bit like a teenager really.

Halfway into this ride a big warning light

came on that said “General failure.” I was

wandering if it was referring to the rider or

the bike. Fortunately, the bike was running

fine, so we kind of ignored it…

The engine is amazing and is based on

the 1290 Super Duke R’s 1301cc V-twin mill

and, with some refinements, topping out at

a whopping 160hp with 140Nm of torque.

The figure that you notice on the road is

“The engine is amazing

and is based on the 1290

Super Duke R’s 1301cc

V-twin mill and, with some

refinements, topping out

at a whopping 160hp with

140Nm of torque.”

the 108Nm of torque available at a mere

2500rpm. What does that mean? Power and

lots of it! This bike accelerates through the

gear box with ease and with the aid of the

power shift, gear changes are smooth and

seamless.

The hydraulically operated power-assisted

slipper clutch combined with the up/down

quick shifter makes back shifting without the

clutch a breeze. On closed throttle a quick

depress on the gear lever activates a spike

in engine rpm allowing the gearbox to easily

find its lower option.

On those Sicilian twisties, even if the

compression is a bit high on down shifts,

the slipper clutch takes over and controls

the chatter to allow for smooth gear shifting.

As the amazing pass twisted and turned,

we got to appreciate all of the technology

that goes into a bike like this. Amazing

handling, suspension – and, thankfully great

brakes too.

It is a lot of bike on a road like this and

there were a few butt clenching moments

when you go into a corner too hot. The

1290 S has a WP hydraulic steering damper

as standard. Lean lean… lean… the

combination of great tyres and electronic

aids do really make you a better rider.

The S model is designed to spend most

its life on the black stuff, but we have used

it before in the dirt. Gravel roads – fantastic.

More serious stuff – too big and powerful for

us mere mortals.

But for a quick squirt to Cape Town

from JHB – oh yes please. Big, powerful,

comfortable – and a sho’t left onto the

gravel roads in the Karoo? Yes please!

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018 25


QUICK

GLANCE

KAWASAKI’S

KX LINEUP

Kawasaki has a great MX range for 2018. People tend to forget that Kawasaki is also responsible

for some of the fastest mini moto’s on the planet. Here’s a quick look at their dirtbike lineup.

KX 65: FOR THE LITTLE RACERS.

The KX65 is the most compact bike in the Kawasaki

KX lineup, built to serve as a training tool for aspiring

motocross racers. Kawasaki is known for creating strong,

reliable bikes for starting off in racing. The bike Features a

six-speed box, race-ready engine, strong stopping power,

and great handling.

Its liquid-cooled, two-stroke 65cc engine and light weight

chassis delivers strong controllable power and handling.

The 33mm front forks and four-way adjustable rebound

damping are capable of performing at the highest level in

aggressive terrain, while the rear is fitted with Kawasaki’s

Uni-Trak single-shock system with adjustable rebound

damping and fully adjustable spring preload. Big features

for a little bike…

• Liquid-cooled, 64cc 2-stroke engine

• A low 29.9-inch seat height

• Adjustable 33mm leading axle conventional fork

provides great handling and 8.3 inches of wheel travel

• Adjustable Uni-Trak rear suspension with 9.4 inches

of wheel travel

• Front and rear disc brakes

• High tensile tubular steel semi-double cradle frame

R37995.00

KX 85: A FAST WEAPON FOR FUTURE MOTOCROSS CHAMPIONS.

The 85cc two-stroke engine boasts numerous features that

create strong low-end and mid-range torque. The torque

also makes it more suitable for riders whose motocross

skills are still developing. The two-stroke, single cylinder

85cc engine is equipped with the KIPS powervalve system

that generates an easy-to-use wide-spread powerband.

Other features include the advanced perimeter-frame

chassis, 36mm cartridge fork with 20-way adjustable

compression damping and a fully adjustable Uni-Trak rear

shock for great handling on the gnarliest tracks…

Features:

• 84cc 2-stroke engine

• 6-position adjustable handlebar mount helps tailor

ergonomics for a wide range of riders

• Sophisticated suspension components with a 32.7

inch seat height

• Front and rear disc brakes

• High tensile steel perimeter frame

R45995.00

26 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


BUILT TO WIN

K16253

RANGE


KX 250F: THE BIKE THAT BUILDS CHAMPIONS.

The 2018 Kawasaki KX250F is the second year of the

brand’s newest generation quarter litre motocross bike.

The 2017 model was an all-new machine, so Kawasaki

sought to improve on their newest generation bike by

making refinements to the engine and suspension. The

changes made to the engine were implemented to try and

improve the power and torque throughout the rev range

while the new suspension settings were aimed at better

overall compliance.

The changes made to the engine include a new throttle

body with a less vertical injector mounting angle, a new

fuel pump, a revised intake duct and shorter intake funnel,

a new cylinder head design, a new intake camshaft,

revised ECU settings, and a new header pipe.

The changes to the suspension were made in both the

front and rear of the bike. Up front, the Showa Separate

Function Fork (SFF) has a softer spring and added

preload in the right fork while the left fork receives a new

compression shim setting, a new rebound shim setting,

and a new BCV shim setting. The rear shock changes are

a new rebound shim setting, compression shim setting,

and new plug-bolt setting.

From R83995.00

KX 450F: THE FINAL CHAPTER.

Kawasaki redesigned this bike two years ago with weight

loss and improved handling as the primary goals. The

chassis was changed much more than the motor, which

dates back to a time before anyone thought that electric

start would be a trend in motocross. So, now the KX450F is

one of the two that still has a kickstarter. It’s the lightest of

the Japanese bikes, due in part to its air fork. Kawasaki is

using a Showa SFF fork with three separate air chambers in

the right leg.

Without a doubt, handling is the KX450F’s calling card.

It doesn’t do anything wrong, and it feels much lighter

than any of the Japanese bikes. It is, in fact, around 4

kilogrammes lighter than the Honda, Suzuki and Yamaha.

While the KX’s peak power is less than most of the others,

it has more low-end power than any of them, and that

makes it very easy to ride. The suspension, once you get

the fork dialed in, is excellent, and the bike has very neutral

ergonomics, which can be further customized with the

adjustable foot peg height and handlebar position.

From R89995.00

At a Kawasaki Dealer near you.

28 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


Incredible

KAWASAKI SAVINGS!

DEMO KX450 FI

R79 900

ONLY 6HRS - 4 MONTHS OLD

2018 KX85 BIG WHEEL

R44 888

NOW IN STOCK!

2018 KX250 FI

R85 888

NOW IN STOCK!

2017 NEW KX250 FI

R83 888

LIMITED STOCK!

2018 KX65

R37 888

NOW IN STOCK!

DEMO VERSYS 300

R59 999

LAST ONE!

2018 TERYX800 EPS LE 4X4

R275 888

*WHILE STOCKS LAST

Includes towbar,

windscreen, roof & more*

2018 BIG FOOT XC MULE

R169 888

Includes towbar,roof,

doors & more*

*WHILE STOCKS LAST

2018 KVF 300 2x4

R68 888

*WHILE STOCKS LAST

//2 YEAR WARRANTY

AND FREE OFF ROAD

SERVICE PLAN*

Official SYM and AEON dealers

SALES TEAM: Berto 079 494 2404 / James 076 827 9676 / Kyle 074 617 7305 / Donovan 072 933 6525

LANDLINES: 011 465 4591 / 011 465 4212 / 011 465 5351 / 011 467 0737

Shop 3 & 4, Showroom on Leslie, Corner William Nicol & Leslie, Fourways


The out Of Africa MX team is one of the most successful on the MX scene at the moment. They boast no less than 3 national champs

in their lineup – David Goosen, the current MX 2 champ, Tristan Purdon, MX1 national Champ and the very experienced Ian Topliss

in MX3. This year they are joined by the dynamic Miguel De Waal. We caught up with them and the guys from Motul at Terra Topia

for a quick chat… A dynamic bunch of racers for sure! Pics Kyle Lawrenson

30 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018 31


David Goosen Age 27

Nickname: Goose

Years racing: Since he was 6 with 6 years spent racing in

the UK.

Class: MX1 and MX2

Bike: YZ450F and YZ250F

Home town JHB.

Current MX2 champ

D&T: It was cool shooting with you guys – David, how do

you enjoy this sort of thing and getting away from the racing

at times?

DG : I always enjoy this sort of thing. I get to play ride a bit

and forget about being on the clock. Always fun and the

best part is doing for good reasons like sponsors and all the

people that make it happen for us.

Give us some background into your racing career?

I started racing at the age of 4 in Zimbabwe. I raced there

for many years, and traveled down to South Africa for

the National Motocross when I started becoming a bit

more competitive. We eventually moved to South Africa

and during that stay I won the South African High-School

Championship in 2007. Following that I moved over to the

UK with my mom, dad and 2 sisters. I spent 6 years racing,

working and everyday living in the UK. A few years ago I

took an opportunity to return to South Africa for some more

racing - I am still here and making the most out of it.

D&T: What was it like racing the European scene compared

to racing here?

DG: It was tough. I loved it, I was terrified of it and I miss it.

I could compare it to a soccer player in South Africa, he can

be good or even great but when he goes overseas, he is still

that same great player, yet he is just one of so many good or

great players. The struggle was real and while results were

not always where they could have been, I still put away

some really good races. It was just always very tough on

me and especially the family.

D&T: How is your 2018 season going for you so far?

DG: it’s going well, we have done two nationals now and 2

regionals. They have been steady, not exactly where

I would wish to be but I am improving each race. It’s a

long season and I can be sure to be involved at the top

by the last national of the year.

D&T: After your 2017 season winning MX2 and coming

in a close 2nd place in MX1 how do you feel about this

year?

DG: Well as I said I’m improving every race and I am in

a better position in the points now already than this time

last year. I will take each race as it comes and let’s see

where we end up.

D&T: How would you describe MX1 vs MX2?

DG: MX1 on the 450 is the premier class, the bikes are

fast, heavier and the guys ride them really well, so it’s

tough. You most definitely need good fitness for it. The

MX2 250 class compared I’d say it’s a balls to wall sprint

for 20 minutes trying your hardest to make up any time

at all. It’s an even class where we’re all riding balls to

wall, but man it’s a fun bike to ride.

D&T: This is a Motul shoot for Out of Africa Yamaha. Can

you tell us about your involvement?

DG: this is now my 3rd season with the team. Guy Henley

has always let me use Motul as a private sponsor within

the team for myself. I also work for AMP who distributes

Motul oil so I am very involved with the brand. This

year it’s great to have the whole team running the same

lubricant company as Motul. We have a cool relaxed but

great team and some good results come out our set up.

It’s healthy.

D&T: What have been some of your highlight races?

DG:My top overseas races would be winning a British

supercross round in Birmingham. That was great and

so many fans and friends were there. Another one was

round 5 of the 2010 British championship, I had a great

day qualifying in 9th and went 6-5-9 for 5th overall. That

was great for me. I had a few wins in the school boy

racing in the UK as well, they were always cool and good

fun. In Harrismith last year my dad came out to watch

me race and have a holiday from the UK, I ended up

winning both classes and I’ll remember that forever.

D&T: We had a fun day out shooting you guys and we

wish you all the best with you season ahead.

DG: Thanks to you guys for making the effort and I’m

looking forward to reading up and seeing the pics. A big

thank you to all involved. Obviously you guys. Mercia,

Jacky, Nic and Adrian from the Motul side. Guy Henley for

putting this whole programme together.

32 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


Blasting the track

or cruising the trail,

Big Boy offers a

value-packed ride.

FOR ROAD LEGAL MODELS

JNR90

R9,999.00

TTX125J

R12,499.00

TTR125S

R13,499.00

TSR125 R21,499.00

TSR250 R23,499.00

PUMA 110

R10,199.00

CRX110

R13,999.00

ATV150 R24,499.00

ATV250 R29,999.00

From our new mega-warehouse based in the West Rand, SA Motorcycles supplies our nationwide authorised

dealer network with a wide range of recreational, commuting, commercial and utility products

with our various brands; Big Boy, GoMoto, Jonway and Bajaj.

From the brand that provides More Ride for your Rand...

For the full scooter, motorcycle, ATV and commercial range visit: www.samotorcycles.co.za

IMPORTED AND DISTRIBUTED BY

Join Big Boy on

Prices include VAT and pre-delivery inspection only. Prices exclude licence, registration and any service costs unless specified. Prices are correct at the time of going to print and may

change without notice due to currency fluctuations or at dealers who are located in outer-lying areas. All advertised models are available at the time of going to print unless specified.

BBS D&T May '18.indd 1

2018/04/17 8:43 AM


TP: I would like to see our tracks at an overseas level

(USA or European) at least over 2 min lap tracks, as

we ride much shorter tracks here. Would be nice - it

would be more challenging and allow us to get used to

overseas tracks quicker.

D&T: What would your dream race be?

TP: My dream race would be to represent team SA at the

MXON not sure what track but that’s my dream

D&T: What other sports do you enjoy?

TP: I enjoy playing some golf.

D&T: What do you do to Chill out?

TP: Watch some MX or SX.

Tristan Purdon Age: 21

Home Town: Cathcart, recently moved to JHB.

Bike: YZ450F & YZ250F

Some highlights:

2015 3rd overall MX2.

2016 3rd overall MX2

2016: Competed in the “GP of lommel in Belgium, qualified

in the EMX 250 class.

2016: Represented SA at the FIM Africa MX of Nations in

Kenya.

2017: MX1 champ.

Sponsors: Out Of Africa, Yamaha South Africa, Monster

Energy, Mast Holdings, TRP Fly racing, Bridgestone,

FMF,Gaerne, 100 %, Twin Air, MOTUL, AMP, Shoei, acerbisu,

Stance, Renthal, Fist Handwear .

D&T: How did you get into riding dirt bikes?

TP: Well my dad rode bikes in his younger years and did

some club races nothing to serious. Then he helped my

cousin race. And at age 3, I was given my cousins old Honda

QR50cc and I’ve never looked back.

D&T: What’s the hardest thing about motocross in your

opinion?

TP: Keeping fit physically and mentally for the entire season,

and not been shifted or distracted from my goals.

D&T: Why do you race motocross, and what is it that drives

you to go so far in the sport?

TP: I love riding and racing my dirt bike all over the country.

What drives me is to win and win championship. And, of

course make all my sponsors proud.

What has been your greatest accomplishment to date?

Winning my first SA championship in 2011 pro mini class.

Where do you see the future of motocross in SA ? If the

sport was to get a corporate sponsor , it will grow much

faster. We have talented riders here that can achieve

overseas.

D&T: Any changes that you would like to see made in

motocross locally?

34 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


that the average teenager lives, I miss out on school parties,

birthday parties, and have to make many sacrifices

to pursue my dream if I want to become the best one day.

D&T: What’s the biggest challenge/obstacle faced so far?

MW: Injury wise, I have been very lucky. I would say my

biggest challenge or obstacle that I had to push through,

would be in 2016 when I suffered a big crash and broke

my scapular in my left shoulder. This left me struggling

for a while to get back up to race pace and pain free.

D&T: What would your advice be to someone wanting to

get involved in MX?

MW: In my opinion the best way to get yourself involved

in motocross would be to witness it first hand and really

see what it takes to race motocross. I feel like many

people don’t actually realize the physical and mental

side of the sport and don’t realize how challenging

motocross really can be. So, my best advice would be

to watch a race first hand, speak to some of the riders

and really take the time to learn about what the sport is

all about.

D&T: Why MX? What made you fall in love with the sport?

MW: There is just nothing else like the sport of motocross.

It has taught me so much along the years and

it keeps me out of trouble too as well and focused on

one goal, and that is to be the best. Having competed in

many different sports previously I have to say that the

adrenaline rush, pride, and joy that motocross brings to

my life, is something no other sport can. After everything

you have to go through to compete at the highest level

in this sport, in my eyes, it is worth all the sacrifices in

the end.

D&T: Favourite race conditions?

MW: I much rather enjoy hard pack tracks. When the

track is rough, dirt is hard pack, and the track is rutted,

that is when I enjoy the conditions the most and seem to

do my best.

Then there’s the junior team member,

Miguel de Waal Age 16

Nickname: MIGSTA

Hometown: JHB

Bike: YZ125

D&T: How does having sponsors assist you in achieving your

goals?

MW: Being blessed with my amazing sponsors I would

not be where I am today, they help me in many different

ways. They make sure I am equipped with the best possible

products out on the market to make sure I can perform the

best of my abilities. Without them, racing definitely would

not be the same.

D&T: What do you do in your time off?

MW: During my time off I like to relax a bit but other than

that I am super active and like to keep myself busy. I love

riding mountain bikes, spending time with friends and if I’m

near the beach I even enjoy doing a bit of surfing, although

I’m not the greatest.

D&T: What has been the highlight of your career to date?

MW: Since my career has only really just started, my highlight

of my career so far has got to be when I represented

my country in 2017 at the MXOAN, (Motocross Of African

Nations) and managed to achieve a Second place overall

which earned me South African Colors as a junior.

D&T: How do you compare MX racing in SA to what you see

abroad?

MW: I feel like the competition and standard of racing in

South Africa is for sure on the rise. I think our riders are

capable to compete against the best in the world. I feel as

if the sport in our country does not have the same budget

as to the racing overseas, meaning we aren’t used to riding

the same types of tracks on the same types of bikes as over

there. Their tracks and bikes are on another level.

D&T: You are still a teenager. Tell us what it’s like to commit

to racing professionally at such a young age.

MW: As a teenager that races motocross, I can’t live the life

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018 3 5


Ian Topliss Age: 41

Home Town : Boksburg

Bike : YZF450 YAMAHA

Sponsors: Out of Africa/Yamaha/motul

Ian Topliss started racing motorcycles at the tender age of

six, and since then has been racing motocross for 32 years.

Ian has won Seven South African National Championships

and has also competed overseas several times. Let’s

discover how Ian balances life, work, racing, marriage and

children.

D&T: How did you get into riding dirt bikes ?

IT: Many moons ago when I was 6 my parents bought me

a Yamaha Pw50 to play on and my dad found out that their

was racing. 35 years later I’m still at it and loving it.

D&T: What’s the hardest thing about motocross ?

IT: MX is a very demanding sport so fitness is key to a

winning career. Juggling family, work and play is not always

easy as a lot of time is spent training & racing. Crashing &

injurys suck but all part of the sport.

D&T: Why do you race motocross, and what is it that drives

you to go so far in the sport ?

IT: The adrenaline rush you get from racing is awesome,

your heart goes from zero to hero at the drop of the gate.

At the moment driving me is to win ten SA titles, hopefully

this year will be my 9th but competition is tough and you

never know what happens.

D&T: What other sports do you enjoy doing ?

IT: I enjoy mountain biking & running, it all helps toward my

fitness for MX.

D&T: What do you do to chill out ?

IT: A couple fresh draughts & steak, egg & chips is all I

need.

36 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


Behind the scenes:

Swinging spanners for this lot is the very experienced

Bryan Schwim

Bryan has 20 years of experience in the workshop, starting

out at Nicks Cyles as an appy. He has subsequently started

his own workshop, Tarstone racing. He happened to help

out at one of the MX meetings and the team asked him to

join them.

He does not race – but tries to keep up with his Mrs on his

WR450.

DT: What’s it like prepping bikes for these guys?

BS: Awesome. Love spending time at the tracks and to be

quite frank, the riders and I work together to keep the bikes

in tune with the rider. Most riders I’ve worked with are like

rockstars, these guys wash their bikes and actually climb

in to help when things get hectic. As a result, the riders understand

what has been done and it makes life a lot easier

all around. The team is well funded – parts and so on need

to be readily available – so we seem to have it waxed.

Typical race day:

Early start usually around 4am… (gulp) hectic rush to get

set-up and sorted, Bacon rolls on the go – (Thanks ladies

and race moms), final checks, refuel, tyre pressures Brolly

dollies and the racing starts… After first race – clean,

wash, feedback from riders, adjustments, refuel, airfilters,

chain adjustment – next heat. Three times every race day.

The bosses, the dads, the siblings all climb in to help. It’s

like a family affair.

D&T: Ever had a major mishap?

BS: When Neville was out, we had a Bad connection on

the wiring harness, man that was pressure 20 minutes of

hunting and troubleshooting. Things like this usually end up

being something small, but man they can create pandemonium.

Other than that – bar the odd puncture, the bikes are

kept fresh to eliminate this kind of thing.

DT: Your favourite saying in life:

BS: Just be lekker Okes!

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018 37


MOTORCYCLE PERSONALITIES

THE JEDI MASTER OF

TRIALS RIDERS

DOUGIE LAMPKIN

Dougie Lampkin is an internationally renowned English

motorcycle trials rider. With a bunch of FIM World titles

and GP wins to his name, Dougie Lampkin is arguably the

King of Trials.

Dougie Lampkin is a trials bike legend born into a family

already steeped in motorbike history. His father Martin

was the first ever trials world champion in 1975. Dougie

rode into the limelight in the late 1980s astride a trials

bike that looked way too big for him on a TV series called

Junior Kickstart.

Before long, Dougie had taken trials biking to a new level,

both in terms of skill and public interest. Dougie’s first

major victory came at the European Championships in

1993, and he has since accumulated a trophy cabinet

most international sportsmen would struggle to match.

In 2003, Dougie won his 12th individual world trials title,

coming outdoors and five indoors. More recently, Dougie

turned his hand to the discipline of Hard Enduro, and

has competed in some of the world’s toughest events,

including the Red Bull Hare Scramble and Red Bull

Romaniacs.

His successes are further testament to just how rounded

and skilled a rider Dougie is and why he is held in such

high regard in the motorsport world. Further proof of

Dougie’s talents on a motorbike came in September

2016 when he successfully wheelied the 37.7-mile Isle of

Man TT circuit on his trials bike, for a project known as

Dougie’s Wheelie.

Lampkin now lives on the Isle of Man.

In 2001, he was awarded an MBE for services to his sport.

Erzberg Podium 2011. Taddy

took the win on his factory KTM

from Brits Dougie Lampkin (Gas

Gas) and Jonny Walker (KTM).

Riding a Sri Lankan waterfall.

38 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


At the Scottish Six Days Trial

taking his 10th win.

The Tundra Log Balance

Inside a frozen

hotel in the Tundra

Riding an abandoned roller

coaster...

Dougie wheelying the

entire Isle of man circuit.

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018 3 9


2018 MERZOUGA RALLY


KEEPING THE

CLASSIC WHEELS

TURNING

1982 MAICO 490

By now regular readers are familiar with PDB’s Mark

Rowntree, the guy who restores classic dirtbikes. His latest

project is this stunning German rarity, the Maico 490.

By Super Hunky and the DT team.

BACKGROUND YOU NEED TO KNOW:

In their hey-day, Maico sold more Open Class bikes than Honda does today in total

motocross bike sales.

Maico was founded in the early ‘30s by Otto Maisch and his brother, Wilhelm.

They were equal partners in the company until the end of World War II. Things got

strange after the war, as Wilhelm had been a Nazi, while Otto and his family stayed

out of politics and concentrated on business.

Because Wilhelm had been a member of the National-Socialist Party, by law, he

was only eligible to be a minority stockholder in the new company. This gave Otto

60 percent control and 40 percent went to Wilhelm’s family. In 1957, Wilhelm was

paralyzed, and became little more than a figure head in the company, leaving the

day-to-day operations to Otto.

Wilhelm’s sons completed their education and were immediately given jobs in

the Maico company. Hans became a motocross rider and helped with input on

developing the machines. Peter was put in administration and, because of lacking

any real skills, was also made a media/press relations person. Wilhelm Jr., who had

some engineering skills, was put in charge of Technical Development and Production.

Maico grew so rapidly that it was necessary to establish a distribution network in

the United States. Maico Motorcycles Inc. was established on the East Coast and

Cooper Motors handled the booming West Coast trade.

During the early 70’s (yup that’s even before our time), you either rode a Maico, or

chased one. The 1970 400 square won because of impeccable handling and brilliant

power, despite marginal brakes…

42 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018 43


THE GLORY DAYS:

Dirt bikes started becoming enormously

popular in the mid and late 60s in the United

States. By 1970, the big hitters in the game

were CZ, Husky and Maico. If you rode one

of these, you were among the elite. You

had “Yur-peen” iron. Your bike handled,

had correct power and went where it was

pointed with no ugly surprises.

Your options were few: You rode an illhandling,

utterly reliable Japanese bike, or

some half-finished British or Italian machine

made up of ill-matched parts.

Hunky says: “Right around 1971, the

Maico was so superior in handling and

power that it was almost like cheating. I can

recall being a back-of-the-pack Novice with

a Yamaha DT-1, then almost immediately

after buying a 400 Maico, I actually started

winning races!”

The power of the big-bore Maicos was

not only there in abundance, it was smooth

from idle all the way to peak revs. A properly

jetted 400 or 440 Maico would simply eat

any other bike of that era alive in the race to

the first turn.

Certainly, they were fussy. Learning to

live with the temperature-sensitive Bing

carb required patience and a tool-box full

of jets. The primary chain driven left side

of the engine required constant attention,

and key nuts and bolts had to be secured

with industrial strength Loctite. The front

brake was more decorative than effective.

Rims, grips, air boots, cables and fiberglass

fenders were all disposable items.

All that aside, the Maicos would

turn under anything else on the track,

go straighter than a tossed spear and

accelerate like the Hounds of Hell were

after it. Forget the marginal brakes; the rider

could simply concentrate on keeping the

throttle pegged and passing everything else

in sight, with absurd ease.

Sales, during this era, were spectacular.

Dealers reported groups of riding buddies

coming into their shops and all of them

buying new Maicos at the same time. One

dealer noted that when the new ‘71 400s hit

the market, he received 40 orders for bikes

on a single Saturday.

Ah, yes, those were glorious days.

Simple days. Days when a brand new 400

Maico sold for about $1100. You could race

it for a year, then sell it for maybe $800 or

so. Guys the Rand was stronger than the

Dollar back then.

When long travel hit, Maico was right

there with the AW series. Girling gas shocks

were moved forward on a beefed-up

swingarm, and the familiar forward-axle

forks got longer to match. More and better

power was extracted from the heavily-finned

engines. All through the mid and late ‘70s,

the big Maicos dominated, in spite of an

indifference in attention to detail. When the

44 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


Darren Gray

Brian Baragwanath

Will Gillit

CRAZY COMBO

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR LIMITED OFFER NEVER-TO-BE REPEATED DEALS!

BATT TYRE BONANZA!

BATT BLUE LABEL A043 6-PLY “4-FOR-2”

• 25*8.00-12 & 25*10.00-12 – R3,599.00

• 26*9.00-12 & 26*11.00-12 – R4,200.00

• 26*9.00-14 & 26*11.00-14 – R4,200.00

4-FOR-2

SPECIAL OFFER!

LOC LITE POLARIS 14” WHEELS

• 4/156 PCD 4+3 OFFSET

R 1,899.00 EACH

4-FOR-2

SPECIAL OFFER!

4-FOR-2

SPECIAL OFFER!

BATT BLUE LABEL A033 6-PLY “4-FOR-2”

• 24*8.00-12 & 24*11.00-10 – R3,599.00

• 24*8.00-12 & 24*10.00-11 – R3,599.00

• 25*8.00-12 & 25*10.00-12 – R3,599.00

• 26*8.00-12 & 26*10.00-12 – R4,200.00

• 26*9.00-12 & 26*11.00-12 – R4,200.00

• 26*9.00-14 & 26*11.00-14 – R4,200.00

• 27*9.00-14 & 27*11.00-14 – R4,500.00

• 27*9.00-12 & 27*11.00-12 – R5,600.00

BATT BLUE LABEL A040 6-PLY “4-FOR-2”

• 25*8.00-12 & 25*10.00-12 - R3,599.00


26*9.00-12 & 26*11.00-12 - R4,200.00

BATT BLUE LABEL A045

DUAL PURPOSE RADIAL

RALLY /RACE “4-FOR-2”

• 30*10.00-14

R2,300.00 EACH

(Excludes rim)

BUY ANY OF OUR

4-FOR-2 SPECIAL OFFER

QUAD, SXS & ATV REARS & GET

A SET OF MATCHING FRONTS FOR FREE!

LIMITED OFFER WHILE STOCKS LAST !

4-FOR-2

SPECIAL OFFER!

BATT BLUE LABEL

A047 HEAVY DUTY 8-PLY

• 28*10.00-14 -

R1,999.00 EACH

BATT BLUE LABEL A027 6-PLY “4-FOR-2”

• 21*7.00-10 & 20*11.00-8 – R2,499.00

• 21*7.00-10 & 20*11.00-9 – R2,499.00

• 22*7.00-10 & 20*11.00-9 – R2,699.00

• 22*7.00-10 & 22*11.00-9 – R2,799.00

• 22*7.00-11 & 22*11.00-9 – R2,799.00

• 23*7.00-10 & 22*11.00-9 – R2,799.00

PORTABLE ELECTRIC PUMP-

COMPACT, LIGHTWEIGHT,

INCLUDES CARRY CASE WITH

ACCESSORIES- R350.00 EACH

Max pressure: 70PSI / 4,8 Bar

See the full range: www.battholdings.co.za

Batt Holdings SA Tel:+27 11 205 0216 • Cell: +27 73 777 9269

Sole Distributors for • Batt Tyres • Batt Tubes

• Battech Race Products • STI Wheels USA

GraphicWerx Advertising & Design cc


Japanese companies started learning how

to produce competitive big bikes, Maico

responded with the phenomenal 1981 490

featured here.

A brute of a bike, it had a staggering

spread of power and all the legendary Maico

handling habits, in spite of wimpy shocks.

People bought the bike in droves, and even

willingly paid the extra money for decent

aftermarket shocks.

The bike was so good, that every

Japanese factory bought several 490’s and

tore them apart down to the last nut and

bolt to study them. It took another three

years before Japan figured out how to

successfully copy the power-band of the

490 Maico ... and the copies were just that,

pale copies.

With this kind of brilliance, one might

think that success was assured at the Maico

factory, but, there were inner forces at work

to undermine all the good times…

Family feuds, poor manufacture and

budget cuts literally killed the brand.

In 1983, Maico came out with even

more outrageous power. It was so good, so

flexible, so usable, that to this very day, it’s

held up as a standard for modern MX bikes

to shoot for. I distinctly recall the press day

preview of the ‘83 490 and the introduction

of the Sand Spider models.

It was at Indian Dunes, and the gathered

magazine types and selected dealers who

got to ride the bike for a few laps came back

slack-jawed and shaking. The bike was

a pure brute, but a controllable one. After

riding the bike, I was equally impressed,

but concerned at the same time. The rear

suspension was horribly off, so much so,

that the bike sagged in the rear and the

shock did little more than move up and

down, seemingly at random.

When I expressed my concerns to the

Maico people, they shrugged and said this

was simply a prototype, and that all the

settings were off. The production bikes,

we were assured, would be correct in all

respects.

THE NIGHTMARE OF ‘83

People bought the new Maicos in droves,

based mostly on enthusiastic magazine test

reports. Few of the magazines knew that the

distributors gave the press carefully prepped

bikes, with most of the flaws removed…

But when the average rider/racer out

there bought the bike, the fan started getting

pelted with dung. Shocks broke on almost

every 1982 bike sold. In 1983, transmissions

started shredding gears like popcorn, and

even bizarre things like rear hubs exploded.

Dealers started getting bombarded with

complaints from irritated customers, and

even lawsuits from injured customers. When

a person buys a bike, he doesn’t expect the

rear end to collapse from a broken shock

when landing from a normal jump. And

he certainly wouldn’t expect a rear hub to

explode when braking at the end of a highspeed

straight-a-way!

By the end of 1983, Maico had a stake

driven into its heart. In spite of heroic

attempts by the U.S. Maico distributor to

warranty all the claims, the harm was done.

By 1984, Maico was in bankruptcy. From

that point forward, no matter who tried to

salvage the marque (M-Star being the first

futile effort), it was all over. Maico, as we

knew it, was dust…

THIS BIKE:

This is the mighty 1982 Maico 490. A

customer of Marks found the bike complete,

but it was seized and in a fairly sad

condition. In his usual fashion, Mark rubbed

his hands in glee, this is not your usual run

of the mill rebuild. This is something really

unique.

All in all, the project took around nine

months of TLC.

Chassis:

The bike was stripped to the frame which

was sent in for powdercoating. Some of

the parts were scrap – plastics, fuel tank,

spokes…

All of the electrical components and

wiring were still perfect – and the bike still

had spark, so that was a luck.

“The bike was so good, that every

Japanese factory bought several

490’s and tore them apart down

to the last nut and bolt to study

them. It took another three years

before Japan figured out how to

successfully copy the power-band

of the 490 Maico ... and the copies

were just that, pale copies.”

46 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018

8_Greeting poster_KTM Factory Racing Team_Rev1.13_A2.pdf 1 2017/12/12 9:47:13


COLOUR CHAINS AVAILABLE

RK Chains are imported and distributed by AMP. To find your nearest RK Chains dealer call 011 259 7750.


New bits and pieces needed to be sourced, Mark

contacted So Cal Maico in the States.

Mostparts like the new spokes, Maier plastics and

control cables are all freely available. The tank, which is

badly faded is not.

PDB made a new aluminium tank for the bike… we

like. Mark works magic on fuel tanks. New Excel wheels

were sourced locally. The brake hubs were relined,

powdercoated and fitted with new bearings. The brake

shoes were replaced.

The rear Ohlins shock was sent to Game services

for an overhaul and the front forks were reconditioned,

rebushed and flash chromed. The seat was recovered and

the seat decals hand painted to original spec.

Engine time:

Mark stripped the engine right down.

The pipe surprisingly was still in good nick. The

gearbox and all that was all also in pretty good shape. He

sourced a new Wossner piston kit from a dealer in Holland

and had the barrel bored to one ml oversize.

The casings were bead blasted and powder coated

back to match the original colours. All of the seals were

replaced and the motor went back together.

Lots of polishing, shining and cleaning completed the

project. The final result… a collectable rarity.

Does is run?

Well – in theory – yes. But like his other projects, this

bike is not for riding. It has been delivered to its owner

never started, to add to the vast collection of classic

motorcycles already parked in the man cave. This is a very

sad part of motorcycle history. Just imagine what we’d

have from this brand today if they had not fallen apart.

If you have an interesting bike that you’d like restored,

give these guys a call…

PDB Vereeniging: 082-333 5253

markrowntree@mweb.co.za

Crank and pistons from Game Services in Benoni.

Racing Stator and hoses imported from the UK.

Lots of other bits and bobs from Syds Racing in Bloem.

“Lots of polishing, shining

and cleaning completed the

project. The final result… a

collectable rarity.”

48 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


100%

ACERBIS

rider gear accessories adv jackets youth mx

skid plates

plastic kits

disc covers

handguards

frame

protectors

chain guides

sliders kit

rider

protections

race

materials

Acerbis products are imported and distributed by AMP.

To find your nearest Acerbis dealer call 011 259 7750.


TECH TEST

INJECTED VS CARBURETTED 2-STROKES

So – You’ve heard all the hype surrounding KTM and Husky’s fuel injected range of 2-strokes. The KTM is

called the “TPI”, The Husky is called the “I”. Many as in LOTS of you have bought them. We’ve been along to

the launch, discussed in detail, run technical features and all sorts. We were also invited out to Mamarock

by the good folks at Trax KTM to compare the carbureted against the TPI.

Here’s our opinion. And maybe a bit more background.

For years, fuel injection on two stroke

motorcycles has been like the Holy Grail.

There have been rumours, spy pics and

all sorts – and you’ll all remember when

Letti and Lars arrived at The Roof on those

KTM’s. Transfer Port Injection is KTM

and Husky’s answer to tackling perceived

emission control issues with a more efficient

fuel delivery system. It all makes good sense

– no more jetting, no more mixing fuel,

closer to the convenience of a four-stroke

than ever before.

More than 300 injected bikes have been

sold in South Africa between the two

brands.

As usual with any new bike/model, we

heard stories about failures, having to

replace top ends and all sorts. We were

quite surprised at this knowing how much

testing etc this brands R&D department

goes into. When we asked Riaan from Trax

KTM, he told us to look further, he reckons

that they have sold lots of the new models

without any comebacks or problems.

We looked further and approached

Stephan from the KTM group. He is the man

who handles all warranty claims and is the

boffin when it comes to all the technical stuff

you need to know.

He rubbished the claims. According to

Stefan, only 2 bikes have had issues –

one was an oil pump that somehow got

dirt into it – and the other was a bike that

the customer had inadvertently used the

incorrect two stroke oil. Two bikes out of

more than 300 sold locally.

50 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018 51


The choice of oil is quite critical with

this system fully synthetic – JASO

spec FD T903MA is needed. Basically

any good quality fully synthetic that

meets or exceeds JASO standards.

KTM Recommends Motorex.

So that’s that. Go and look for

yourself, there is very little on the web

and we looked – if it were an issue –

Facebook, as usual would be full of

stories.

Anyway – we digress.

The Trax boys brought along four

bikes, two carburetted – and correctly

jetted EXC’s, 300 and 250, and two of

the TPI’s.

Now bear in mind that we went

along to the launch and we gave you

that story – but until you ride these

models back to back – you don’t really

know… kapiche?

There is nothing wrong with a well

prepped carburetted 2-stroke – they

have been winning races for years –

and we took these out first just to get

a feel. Then we swapped saddles.

Within 100 metres, the Ed of this

here magazine stopped and was

shaking his head in wander. “It’s like

another bike”! How’s that throttle

response? Wow”!

“Within 100 metres, the Ed of this here

magazine stopped and was shaking his

head in wander. “It’s like another bike”!

How’s that throttle response? Wow”!”

52 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


“These bikes make power all the way

from the bottom – more like a four

stroke – no hard two stroke hit, no

bogging and they still rev to the moon.”

Fact- no BS from one of the guys who has

probably ridden more off-road motorcycles

than just about anyone! Albeit a bit slowly…

In our opinion, The KTM group really has

moved the goal posts in terms of two-stroke

power delivery. These bikes make power all

the way from the bottom – more like a four

stroke – no hard two stroke hit, no bogging

and they still rev to the moon.

And this goes for both models.

It’s literally like that. The fact that you

don’t have to ride the bikes hard will make

you fresher for longer. It’s all about useable

torque and rideability.

New tech is grand. We fully expect, just

like the four strokes for other brands to start

following suit…

Interesting times for sure.

Chat to your KTM or Husky dealer.

54 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

PERFORMANCE AND

PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

Andre 082 771 3040 / Sales: Avril 083 284 4201

Technical: Fernando 071 895 9567

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

DURABILITY

//STRIKE250

//SECTOR750

R68 100 R149 000

R121 000

R154 300 R227 000

R196 700

//SECTOR450

//SECTORE1

//SECTOR1000CREW

//STRIKE1000


A STROM FOR

EVERYONE

SUZUKI’S BABY STROM

You’ll have seen our feature on the big ‘Stroms a couple of issues ago – for this issue

it’s time to take a peek at the baby of the pack, the 250.

We parked our 800 at Suzuki’s head

office and climbed aboard, wended our

way out of the parking lot, out of the

office park, narrowly avoided a traffic

cop (Fool) who was pulling cars over on

the blind corner in the Marlboro Drive.

Good test for the brakes…. Thankfully

they work.

We peeled off onto the manic traffic

on the freeway for the 60 klick ride to

the Far East….

Ergonomics:

For a small bike, this bike is very

comfortable. In typical Suzuki Fashion,

well laid out – even for a big rider. We

like the fact that you don’t need to be

an ostrich to get your feet onto the

floor.

Zipping through the traffic is a

pleasure – it’s only a liquid cooled 250,

but it has pretty long legs and great

gear ratios.

The bike was parked for a day

while we got busy – and then it was

breakfast run time on the weekend.

Sitting around at the office we got to

chatting. We are being bombarded by

small cc bikes at the moment. Who is

the industry targeting?

Entry level riders maybe? Ladies?

Definitely.

To this end we roped in our Friend

Michelle Leppan who races 600cc road

56 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018 57


C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

bikes and rides an LTZ400 quad off-road and

headed out for what turned in to a bit of a

hectic adventure trail.

Bear in mind that she is not a dirt rider.

This was her first time on a bike like this –

and she loved every second of it. Testimony

to the little Suzuki’s capability? Maybe.

It’s a great time of the year to go riding, the

Cosmos is in full bloom, clear blue skies and

open roads.

Our route headed out roughly towards

Bapsfontein, where we found a sand road

that we’d not explored before. That was

interesting, this bike has mag wheels and

road tyres so there was quite a lot of squirling

going on… but the very user friendly nature

of the bike

At a glance:

• Comfortable

• Modern

• Ridiculously economical

• Will cruise all day at 130 top speed

around 140 – two-up.

• Great quality no rattles or shakes.

• Exhaust note is super cool.

This is Smuts Finger out near Centurion.

K

58 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


LAUNCH SPECIAL

ALL NEW

ARRIVING WITH A SUZUKI BRANDED TOP BOX

R73 250.00 incl VAT

www.suzukimotorcycle.co.za

www.suzukimotorcycle.co.za

For more information

visit your nearest

Suzuki Dealer!

@MotorcycleSA suzuki_motorcycle_s.a Terms & conditions apply


Pics by Zygmund Brodalka

Maddy Malan MX 2

HUSKY RIDERS ON POINT

SA Motocross Nationals - Maritzburg Race Report.

Round 2 of the 2018 TRP Distributors SA

Motocross National Championship took

place at the Maritzburg MX Club. Heavy

rain leading up to the race resulted in a

rough track and tough racing.

In in the MX1 Class, it was hometown

favourite Maddy Malan that made the

challenging track look easy dominating

the field and taking 1-1 for the overall. The

victory comes as redemption for Malan

who was sidelined for the majority of the

2017 season due to injury. Making the

experience even sweeter is the fact that

Malan pulled off the win at his home track

in Pietermaritzburg.

“The track was just gnarly today! It felt so

good to get back up there with the front

runners. I rode my own race, and just

stayed in control. The last MX2 moto was

tough - I didn’t get the best start and slid

out on a corner. Managed to get back to

second, and knew that if I held that I’d

take the overall win!” said an elated Malan.

Adding to the strong presence of Q4 Fuel

Husqvarna Racing was teammate Caleb

Tennant, who finished in a close second

behind Malan in MX1 . The rider had

a tougher day out in MX2 after he was

involved in an unavoidable pile up in the

second moto.

“It was a nasty pile up that caught me as

I came around the corner. I’m grateful to

come out of that without any injuries. I

Caleb Tennent MX 2

KOM MAAK N DRAAI,ONS PRAAT OOK ENGELS


lost some points in MX2, but at least I’m

going into the next round healthy,” said

Tennant.

Yamaha’s David Goosen struggled with

starts but otherwise had a great day in

the saddle and the 4-3 finish earned him

3rd for the day.

In the MX2 Class, it was Maddy Malan

again who was a cut above with a 1-2

finish, earning him the top spot for the

day and the points lead heading into

Round 3 in Bloemfontein.

Maddy however faced a different kind

of challenge in MX2 and David Goosen

came back hard in heat 2 to take a

convincing win. Goosen’s 4-1 earned him

2nd overall for the day.

After a rollercoaster day for the rest of

National Motorcross

Proudly Brought to you by:

the Red Bull KTM squad, a solid finish in

MX2 from Kerim Fitz-Gerald brought a

sigh of relief. Despite a series of events

that didn’t play in the rider’s favour, he

managed to walk away with a third spot

for the day.

“What an up and down day! I made a bit

of a comeback in the second moto of

MX2, and I’m happy with the finish. Still

a little bit disappointed that I didn’t come

away with more points though - but that’s

racing. I’ll do my best to narrow the gap

at the next round,” said Fitz-Gerald.

RED BULL KTM YOUNG GUNS PUT ON A SHOW.

It was young guns Camden Mc Lellan

and Jonathan Mlimi who stole the show

at Pietermaritzburg’s Thunder Valley on

Saturday with an overall victory and two

second spots on the podium.

As an eligible rider for both the Pro Mini

and High School Class, Mc Lellan decided

to race in both categories.

After walking away with a familiar Pro

Mini win, the rider managed to pull off a

hard-earned second place in the High

School Class.

Kyla Raaff currently tied on 47

points with Leah Haygate

Kyle Dormhel MX 2

David Goosen

Yanke Pieterse followed by her

sister Carika in the ladies class

Taryn and Kristin Huhges followed

by Amy Saywer in the ladies class

Nicol Smit currently 2nd in the 50cc

Pro standings

Willow Rock Shopping Centre, Solomon Mahlangu Drive, Equestria,

Pretoria East LANDLINE: 012 111 0190 / 012 809 1670


Pics by Zygmund Brodalka

“It’s all about getting a good start if I want

to keep up with the big boys in the High

School class. I felt a lot more comfortable

today, and was able to handle the 125cc

much better than the first round. It helped

a lot to be back on hardpack so I could

really push,” said Mc Lellan.

Adding to the celebrations was the

performance of Pro Mini’s Mlimi, who

narrowly finished behind his teammate to

take second overall and secure the red

plate.

“It was a really good day for me! I

managed to get the holeshot in both

heats. It wasn’t easy out there – the track

got fairly rough and choppy, so I had to

change my lines quite a bit. Stoked to hold

onto the red plate,” said an elated Mlimi.

The 2018 season marked a fresh start for

both Mc Lellan and Mlimi who took the

giant leap to a different category.

Kerim Fitz-Gerlad

Neil van der Vyver 4th overall 65cc

Camdon Mc Lellan Pro Mini

Justin Sangster 125 cc

High School class

Ryan Angilley MX 2

KOM MAAK N DRAAI,ONS PRAAT OOK ENGELS


National Motorcross

Proudly Brought to you by:

Team Lights by Linea

Reegan Wasmuth

2018 SA Motocross Nationals

Maritzburg Results:

MX1

1st Maddy Malan

2nd Caleb Tennant

3rd David Goosen

MX2

1st Maddy Malan

2nd David Goosen

3rd Kerim Fitz-Gerald

Highschool Class

1 Sangster, Justin (47 points)

2 Durow, Cameron (45 points)

3 Mc Lellan, Camden (42 points)

Amy Sawyer in the

Ladies Class

MX 3

1st Brett Bircher

2nd Ian Topliss

3rd Dewald van der Berg

Ladies

1st Leah Heygate

2nd Kayla Raaff

3rd Yanke Pieterse

MX 3 Brett Bircher (30) and

Jonathan Hubbard (121)

MX 3 points Leader Ian Topliss

High School

1st Justin Sangster

2nd Camden Mc Lellan

3rd Dalton Venter

Returning after a 2 year

recovery period Anton

Engelbrecht is back

Nathan Maybery 85cc class

Pro Mini

1st Camden McLellan

2nd Jonathan Mlimi

3rd Blake Young

85cc Juniors

1st Troy Muraour

2nd Luke Grundy

3rd Tyler Tarantino

Crrently 2nd in the points

standing in MX 3 Dewald

van den Berg

65cc

1st Lucca Mynhardt

2nd Emmanuel Bako

3rd Wian du Plooy

50cc

1st Andrea Manhardt

2nd Jack Pullen

3rd Nicol Smit

Zambian laidies rider Leah

Haygate

Willow Rock Shopping Centre, Solomon Mahlangu Drive, Equestria,

Pretoria East LANDLINE: 012 111 0190 / 012 809 1670


1st round National Enduro:

Sherco’s Wade Young Takes the

Podium.

The 2018 National Enduro

season kicked off a little later

than normal, the first round of

the championship was hosted

in Robertson in the Western

Cape over Easter weekend on

the 31st of March. The event

was extremely well put together

on a private farm just outside of

Robertson.

Veteran racer Altus de Wet

sorted the routes…

Everyone was very keen to see how the

new format of flag to flag racing was

going to play out as last year we had

special stages in regularity laps. Riders

set off in batches to conquer four loops of

approximately 35km.

The rugged Western Cape terrain

presented a daunting technical valley and

rocky river bed to conquer, and leading

riders took over an hour to get through

each lap.

Sherco brought a huge team along – 17

riders in all: This brand is doing marvelous

things in racing. Wade Young, Eduan

Bester, Scott Woods, Gideon Malherbe,

Sidney Strydom, Sam Hallat, Louis Knipe,

Leon Fourie, Andy Pederson, Mike Bekink,

Paul Greenwood., Thomas Greenwood,

Gideon Malherbe, Braam Campion,

Adriaan Theron and Corne Visser all the

way from Namibia! Wade took the gold in

his usual professional style.

Beta’s Trav Teasdale takes 2nd:

Travis Teasdale reigning E2 2017 Champion

, had a solid day despite some technical

issues experienced on lap 3 and 4, he put

his Factory BETA on the podium finishing

2nd in the E2 class after a long four and a

half hours of racing.

Wade Leads the pack.


KTM News:

After a testing day in the saddle, the

Brother Leader Tread KTM squad managed

to bring home two podium positions.

New to the E2 Class this season was Scott

Bouverie, who had a rollercoaster day out.

He’s stranger to rough and rocky terrain,

things looked promising for the rider as he

blitzed his way through the first loop.

After a calculation error in the second lap,

a frustrated Bouverie had to push his bike

after running out of fuel:

“The day started off really well. I made a

misjudgement on the second lap with fuel,

and lost a lot of time. I’ve been battling

with a shoulder injury, so pushing the bike

was a real challenge!”

With years of experience and a strong

sense of grit, he was able to fight his way

back up the ranks to secure a third spot in

his class behind Wade Young and Travis

Teasdale.

Commenting on his new KTM 300 TPI, he

said: “It’s an amazing bike, and it really

performed today.”

A determined Dwayne Kleynhans set off

guns blazing in the E1 category.

With his sights securely fixed on the

championship, the rider was off to a solid

start. After leading for some of the race,

it was Yamaha’s William Oosthuizen who

managed to snatch up the top spot for

the day.

Kleynhans finished less than three

minutes behind him, but was satisfied

with his result:

“This was the best start I’ve had to a

National Enduro season, so I’ve got a

good platform to build on from here. The

E1 class is stacked, and there are a lot of

hungry kids looking to beat me!” he said.

Turning his focus to round two, he added,

“Going to do some homework now - I have

a few things I want to work on so I can

come out swinging in the next race.”

Stealing the show was Kirsten Landman.

It was a first time experience for South

Africa’s leading enduro lady as she lined up

with the E2 Class.

“Today was tough, and I really had to dig

deep on that last lap. I came in after my

third lap and I was ready to finish! It was

a riding lesson for me, and I’ve just got

so much respect for the top guys and the

pace that they run at,” said Landman.

After pulling off a sixth place and adding

her name to the short list of E2 finishers,

she comments: “I’ve realised that I need

to work on my overall speed. I’m good at

the technical stuff, but I lose so much time

on the open sections. It’s a fear I have, and

one that I’m determined to overcome.”

As part of her effort to build up her speed,

Landman has taken up motocross and has

committed to the National Cross Country

season this year.

“I’m trying new things because I want

to bridge the gap and finish closer to the

guys,” she said.

Husqvarna’s tough day out in Robertson

Pepson Plastics Husqvarna Racing brought

its best to Robertson for the start of the

National Enduro season this past weekend.

Kirsten Landman on the rocks...


National Enduro Roundup.

After the crash of star rider Brett

Swanepoel at a GXcc event earlier

this year, it was up to young guns

Taki Bogiages and Matt Green

to represent the team in some

of South Africa’s most technical

terrain. A 16-year old Green

made his leap to the E1 Class

after winning the High School

Championship last year. Not only

did he face the demands of a

more experienced class and stiffer

competition, but the added change

of a brand new racing format.

After chasing household names like

Dwayne Kleynhans and Bradley

Cox, Green was able to complete

the event and add his name to

the short list of E1 finishers with a

respectable seventh place.

“It was tough - I really had to push

on that last lap! This was such a

valuable experience for me, and I

know it will get carried over to the

next race,” said Green.

With a determination to bridge

the gap and finish closer to the

top riders in his class, he added,

“The level in this class is different,

and I really enjoyed chasing down

the front runners. It’s going to

take training harder than ever to

seriously compete in E1. It’s a

learning season for me, but I still

want to achieve as many podiums

as possible.”

PEPSON PLASTICS HUSQVARNA

RACING teammate Bogiages faced

a different set of challenges.

As a new face to the E2 class and

National Enduro series entirely,

he commented before the event:

“As a cross country rider, this is

something new for me – the terrain,

the pace and the riders. It’s been a

mad rush to prepare for this since I

was called to the team last month,

but I’m looking forward to learning

and improving race by race.”

After just over four hours, Bogiages

battled to push past the pain of an

injury that he had sustained in a

training crash just a week before

the event and was unable to finish

the race.

Husqvarna South Africa’s

brand manager Fred Fensham

commented: “The hip and wrist

problems he sustained were a bit

worse than we thought. Now it’s

time to focus on recovering so he

can come back swinging at the

next event.”

Brett Hume

Travis Teasdale , Jeff Teasdale ,Darren Gray and Gareth Bell.


The Yamaha Bidvest bLU cRU team

was ready to take on the very best at

the start of the event. The challenge

proved to be tough for the riders. Denzil

Torlage managed to bring his Yamaha

home in second position in the National

Masters category. Bruce May matched

his teammates result by also finishing in

second position respectively in the national

seniors category. Kyle Flanagan struggled

with injury and brought his Yamaha home

in 11th spot and this is what he had to say

about his race; “I got off to a great start

and going into the second lap I was lying

in second position. During the second

lap I hit a rock forcing me to put my leg

down, which hyper-extended and caused

damage. I rode back to the pit area to

see the medics and from there made the

decision to continue circulating to grab as

many points as possible.”

Yamaha clinched the manufacturers Trophy.

BCR Arrow Yamaha:

Although we have a slightly smaller line up

for the 2018 season our goals are greater

as a team! Brian Capper will compete

when his shows allow him to, we were

fortunate enough to have him with us on

the opening round. The professional that he

is he delivered his expected victory in the

senior’s class leading from start to finish

managing his pace perfectly.

Janiel De Villiers arrived knowing what to

expect at a national level as he had a very

successful first season last year showing

good pace and consistency. At the age

of 17 and last season’s experience we

knew he would be impressive, we still

underestimated him challenging for a 3rd

place in the E1 class! He finished a very

close 4th in the E1 while keeping his cool

and giving us a glimpse of what to expect

from him in the future!

Jaryd Spalding moved up from the high

school class into the E1 class which

involves a greater distance and far stiffer

competition, he showed his commitment

and drive to finish 12th in E1 at a National

that was very demanding, a great result and

some premium class national points!

Keegan Phillips moved up from the silver

class to the E2 class and faced similar

challenges to Jaryd. He confirmed how far

our 2 juniors have come by finishing 7th in

the E2 class. This again is a great result first

time out in a premium National class.

Mark Garland made a rookie error and

lost his clipper card towards the end of

his second lap, this resulted in him being

excluded.

A great start to a new National season

for the BCR Arrow Yamaha team and a

fantastic effort by everyone involved.

The 2nd round of the National Enduro series

takes our riders down to Port Elizabeth on

the 28th of April and will be hosted by the

Rover club. We will push to secure better

results for our team and riders.

Team Q-Kon

Team BCR Arrow Racing

Torlage, Flanagan, May.

Noah Maartins and friends

Kyle Flanagan


SOME OF THE WORLDS MOST

EXPENSIVE DIRTBIKES

A couple of issues ago, we told you about John Lennons monkey bike that sold for a seemingly

outrageous sum. This month we’ll look at some of the world’s most expensive dirtbikes.

The rand value is as of today, the 19th of April 2018.

2 HARLEY DAVIDSON

MP119 –R338.870.00

A group of mud-loving bike builders

undertook the task of transforming

a Harley Davison Street Rod into a

fully-fledged motocross machine

– with spectacular results. The

MP119 is a striking thing of beauty,

born from the collaboration of the

Diamond Range (RD Custom Bikes),

Shaw Speed and Custom, Harley

Davidson Europe. Pro motocross

racer Mel Pocock got involved in the

project. There’s no official price tag

for this one-of-a-kind bike, but the

estimated cost floats somewhere

around £20,000.

1. STEVE MCQUEEN’S 1963

TRIUMPH BONNEVILLE DESERT

SLED – £73,133 OR - LISTEN

NICELY: R1239128.79 WE WON’T

EVEN TRY AND SAY THAT ONE…

If you’re looking for the most expensive dirt bike

about (excluding top-of-the-line genuine factory

race bikes) the 1963 Triumph Bonneville Desert

Sled owned by Steve McQueen might just be it.

This little slice of The King of Cool’s history sold at

Bonhams Auctioneers for a whopping £73,133.

3 CAKE KALK

R211.793.92

Back on electric avenue, we

have recently seen a wave of

electric e-bikes and e-dirt bikes

hit the market. These range

from electric push bikes to full

on off-road motorcycles. One

of the coolest, most unique

(in terms of looks) of these

bikes comes out of Sweden;

the Cake KALK has an eye

watering price tag of 14,000

euros – that’s approximately

R211.700K. Strange looks to

match a strange looking bike.

68 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


4 HONDA CRF450R DAVE THORPE

REPLICA – R153.321.71

For 2018 Honda offered two special editions for the

CRF450 & CRF250, a Ken Roczen race replica and the retro

look Dave Thorpe, World Championship winning design.

KTM and Husqvarna released ‘Factory Edition’ models for

2018. These limited-edition machines were sold exclusively

in the USA and – because an official price was never

announced – it’s difficult to say just how costly they are.

Honda also released a special edition for 2018. Their Dave

Thorpe Replica bike comes with a multitude of extras and

trick bits. We have not heard of and being brought into SA,

but this Bike would set you back a cool 150k plus some

change. The standard bike is 110k, so that’s quite a lot

more than the standard.

The specials are equipped with the following:

CRF450R:

Talon Evo Wheels (Roczen – Black Rim/Red Hub,

Yoshimura exhaust), (Dave Thorpe replica – Gold Rim/Silver

Hub, Akrapovic exhaust)

CRF250R:

Talon Evo Wheels (Roczen – Black Rim/Red Hub,

Yoshimura exhaust), (Dave Thorpe replica – Gold Rim/Silver

Hub, Yoshimura exhaust)

Plastics kit with graphics

Pirelli tyres (fitted to the Talon wheels)

Team seat cover

Samco Hoses (Roczen – Blue) (Dave Thorpe replica – Red).

5 ALTA REDSHIFT MXR – R144019.73

A lot of people would say that electric is the future

– the future of motorsport and the future of motoring

in general. For now, however, electric is expensive.

These huge batteries ain’t cheap to make, and so the

products that utilise them are going to reflect that.

So far, Alta Motors have been the kings of the electric

future in the dirt bike world. Currently they are the only

guys that produce fully-fledged, race-ready electric

motorcycles. Their Redshift range boasts several

models, the most expensive of which is the new MXR,

with a cost of around R144K. We did a ride impression

with Lesotho’s Charan Moore earlier this year…

70 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


PROUDLY SUPPORTS

SOUTHAFRICABIKEFESTIVAL.COM

KYALAMI GRAND PRIX CIRCUIT

25 - 27 MAY 2018

SAVE R50

ON ALL YOUR

TICKETS, USE

PROMO CODE

“DIRTTRAIL2018

CIRCUIT TEST RIDES

CUSTOM & CLASSIC

CHAMPIONSHIP

SUPER GP

600’s & 1000’s

MONSTER FMX

#FLIGHTNIGHT

KIDS ACTION

DO YOU HAVE THE SNAPSCAN APP?

SCAN THIS CODE ONCE TO GET ONE SATURDAY TICKET TO #SABIKEFEST FOR JUST R150


MOTORCYCLE PERSONALITIES

2018 WELCOMES DAYNA BACK

TO NATIONALS

International Model, business lady and avid Off-road rider…Our lady tester shines…

We often rope Dayna in for photo shoots

and all sorts for Dirt And Trail and RideFast

Magazine. Here’s a bit more about her and

her return to national racing for 2018.

Dayna Nienaber is back on the racing

scene after a brief sabatical, and boy does

she have a few exciting things coming. Not

only is she Racing under her own banner

and taking on new sponsors but she will

be launching her own brand soon … SKY

ATHLETES.

Dayna is one of South Africa’s most

followed Extreme Sports Athletes on social

media. She is a great ambassador to our

sport.

Often she gets asked whether it’s

difficult being a girl especially a girly girl in

a male dominated sport? And her reply is a

sensible one:

“Being a girl in a male dominated

sport has never been a negative to me, I

see myself as an athlete and therefore my

performance lies in the results I can deliver

and not in my gender.”

Since the last time Dayna raced she

has been a very busy girln… not only has

she been working on launching her brand,

modelling and marketing a law firm but

she has been doing motivational speaking

all over the country and training younger

72 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


JHB TO THE BAY Q4Q 2018

KICKS OFF FROM JHB 29TH SEPT

A Fantastic Trail Ride!

1000 kilometres. Four days.

Off-road all the way.

Ends in Richards Bay, 2nd October.

Dirtbikes, Quads, Adventure bikes and side by sides all welcome!

011 979 5035

Courier Services

Raising funds for the Quadpara association of SA.

www.adventurecompany.co.za

booking forms - foleyg@mweb.co.za - anette.acc@mweb.co.za


“She has taken the modelling world on

by storm by hitting SAFW 4 times in a row

and walking for 5 of SA’s top designers.

She also won Miss Queen of Gauteng and

was a Regional finalist for miss SA in 2016.

She was also the host for the SABC sports

awards for women last year and voted as an

Icon to Women in Extreme Sports in SA.”

athletes and upcoming stars how to build

themselves up as a brand.

Dayna is one of the most diverse woman

with such an incredible story to tell.

At the age of 16 she decided that she

wanted to race despite all the odds being

against her.

With her dads help, she got a part time

job after school hours and weekends as

a mechanic to learn everything she could

about dirtbikes… she knew if she was going

to race, she couldn’t rely on everyone to do

everything, especially if you stuck in a river

bed alone. After teaching herself everything

she could, she took her first steps into

racing and in 2015 she had a great year. Not

only was she winning the ladies class but in

2016, she raced against the boys and came

2nd in the OR2 pro-am class.

She has taken the modelling world on

by storm by hitting SAFW 4 times in a row

and walking for 5 of SA’s top designers.

She also won Miss Queen of Gauteng and

was a Regional finalist for miss SA in 2016.

She was also the host for the SABC sports

awards for women last year and voted as an

Icon to Women in Extreme Sports in SA.

She has made a career out of travelling

and teaching younger upcoming athletes

how to build themselves up as a brand and

conquer the journey they want to walk.

Last year, after recovering from a very

big accident and being in ICU for a week,

she got up, trained hard and completed

the Botswana 1000 Desert Race, winning

her class.

After her accident she explains,

“everyone has always told me that racing

comes with the risk of falling and every rider

will have his big accident that will forever be

a story to tell... this day is inevitable but the

comeback and recovery is what will always

determine the strength and passion of the

rider” “I will admit it has taken a huge toll on

my confidence and strength but in order to

be back to the top step I knew I had to fight

my worst enemy, my mind. I took the step to

hit the gym and track non-stop for 8 months

until the 1st of January 2018 and make the

biggest comeback I could possibly make…

not for anyone else but for me and my

absolute love of the sport.

With a following of 43.5 thousand people

and appearances on many TV programs

such as SABC SPORT, PASSELA, YO TV,

RADIO 2000 ETC. and a huge fan base

Dayna has become quite a personality in her

own right. Great to have someone like this

representing our sport.

Quickfire Q&A

Q: What bike do you ride?

KTM 350 exc-f.

Q: What is your favorite quote?

Sweat during training so you won’t have

to bleed in the battle.

Q: What advice can you give other

riders?

NEVER give up… it sounds so cliché but

I can promise you working as a mechanic

for 2 years while my friends were partying

wasn’t my ideal way of spending a

Saturday .. but I knew what I wanted in

the long run.. I DIDN’T GIVE UP!

Q: What are the funniest Questions you

have received?

- Do you have a stunt double?

- Riding bike is super easy, you just sit so

why do you need to be fit?

Q: Favourite race you have ever raced?

Botswana 1000

Dayna has definitely shown some Moxy

coming back to the Offroad Nationals and

we are keen to see what this year holds

for her, stay tuned and watch this space.

INSTA dayna_nienaber_888

FB Dayna nienaber 888

74 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MAY 2018


Wow guys and gals, the response so far is amazing!!

Here are the top few that we have selected so far, you need to

put a bit of effort in not just send a pic of boots, let the guys out

there laugh a bit.

Final selection for the winner to be announced in our July issue.

LIMITED EDITION

ANTONIO CAIROLI

www.motosport.co.za

TECHNOLOGY:

REPLACEABLE SHIN PLATE

MICRO ADJUSTABLE AND REPLACEABLE BUCKLE SYSTEM

FLEX SYSTEM UPPER

FLEX SYSTEM WITH HYPER EXTENSION BLOCK

FULLY ADJUSTABLE CALF AREA

WIDER CALF UPPER (+ 3 CM) - ADJUSTABLE SYSTEM

REPLACEABLE METATARSUS INSERTS

TOE AREA COVERED WITH A PLASTIC REINFORCEMENT

RIGID, SHOCK RESISTANT, ANATOMICALLY SHAPED HEEL CUP

ASSEMBLED AND REPLACEABLE BOOT LEG, IT IS STITCH-FREE

NYLON INNER SOLE WITH REMOVABLE ARCH SUPPORT PAD


Hey guys,

Allow me to tell you a short background about how this picture came to be. You see,

I have been dreaming of a new pair of boots for sometime now (about 5 years) and

when I came across this competition in my favorite bike magazine, I new my chance

had come for my dreams to come true.

Now, there were many factors that played a part in getting the perfect shot, I will only

tell you two for if I had to tell you more my short paragraph will most likely turn into

an essay, and no-one has time for that!

1) My imagination led me to the idea of this photo but the problem was, I needed rain

and a puddle for my ideas to come to life which I highly doubted since we are experiencing

a drought in the Cape. But then, you won’t believe it, that night, it started to

rain and it rained hard! Unbelievable. And the next morning, there was my puddle,

just like that! (surely it’s a sign)

2) My old man is really not a master with technology, in fact, he avoids it. He was my

only hope in capturing this shot as no one else was around and the common selfie

wouldn’t have done justice in bringing to life my plight. Incredibly, after exceeding my

phones memory limit due to the hitting of the capture button multiple times, we got

the shot, the last one, the perfect one on the camera roll! Just amazing.

We had so much fun putting this together and I really hope you take it into serious

consideration!

Thanks for a great mag! Keep them coming!

Yours in riding,

Bruce

This is my SIDI boots I ride with today. I got them from my Dad who

won “King of the Dirt” on that day and he finished 2nd in is class with

his new YZ465 in Swakopmund (Namibia) in December of 1979.

This is whats left of my boots. My girlfriend threw them away

because they where falling apart lol.

Really need a new pair riding barefoot is not fun

CROSSFIRE 3 SRS CROSSFIRE 3

FLU YELLOW/BLACK ASH

FLU YELLOW/BLACK

CROSSFIRE 3

WHITE/ORANGE/BLACK

CROSSFIRE 3

WHITE/BLUE/RED

CROSSFIRE 3

CROSSFIRE 3

CROSSFIRE 2

CROSSFIRE 2

BLACK/BLACK

WHITE/FLU YELLOW/BLUE

FLU YELLOW/GREY

WHITE/BLUE/FLU ORANGE


HOW TO WIN

Win a pair of Sidi Boots! (Which ones plus image)

All you have to do is send us an image of your

skankiest old boots wearing them, not wearing

them - whatever - we’ll judge the best pic - and

decide on the most deserving winner. Use your

imagination, make it entertaining, this should be

a lot of fun!

WIN A PAIR OF

LIMITED EDITION

ANTONIO CAIROLI REPLICA BOOTS

All entries will be published and we’ll announce

the winner in our June Issue!

entries to foleyg@mweb.co.za


CASH

FOR

Some gyms use machines…Base Fit builds them

Train to Win

Custom Sport Fitness

Base Fit Training is specifically designed for dirt bike

riders to dramatically improve riding fitness, explosive

power, strength endurance, stamina and core stability.

www.basefit.co.za

Fourways l Centurion l North Riding l Lanseria l Westrand l Eagle Canyon l Hillcrest l Hilton l Online

SUBSCRIBE

TO SA’S

DIRTIEST

MAGAZINE

CALL 011 979 5035 OR EMAIL anette.

acc@mweb.co.za. Digital or hard copy.

BIKES

Train to wi

training vouc

WE BUY AND SELL

GOOD CONDITION

SECOND HAND

BIKES

www.bobbyscott.co.za

Cnr. Breed & Taaifontein Road,

Montana, Pretoria.

Tel. 012 548 0040/45

Grant Scott 082 706 0070

grant@bobbyscott.co.za

GPS - S25’ 40.724’

E 028’ 16.326’


THE ALL-NEW

YZ65 WILL BE

REVEALED AT THE

EVERYONE CAN START

OUT LIKE A PRO RIDER

Smooth, Powerful and Easy to Use 65cc Engine

Light and Stable Handling Performance

Premium Front and Rear Suspension Systems

Pure YZ race-bred DNA

6-speed transmission

YAMAHA YZ65

www.yamaha.co.za · +27 11 259 7600 · Facebook: Yamaha Southern Africa · Instagram: @yamahasouthafrica · YouTube: YamahaMoto_SA


COLTON HAAKER

2016 & 2017 WORLD SUPER ENDURO CHAMPION

DUNLOP IS RACING

CHAMPIONSHIPS ARE WON ON DUNLOP TYRES

DUNLOPS EXTREME TYRE

GUMMY REAR

Dunlop AT81EX 110/100-18 EnduroCross

Gummy Rear Tire

CODY WEBB

2018 WORLD SUPER ENDURO CHAMPION

AT81EX (Endurocross) tires offer more

all-around performance plus higher levels of

ruggedness for off-road racing and riding.

Exceptional performance and high-durability

compound resists block chunking and tearing.

Shoulder knobs with lateral grooves provide

additional biting edges and allow for more

flexibility and impact absorption. The EX was

developed for use in Endurocross racing and

has a unique “gummy” compound giving

exceptional grip in extreme conditions.

To find your nearest Dunlop dealer contact:

· Henderson Racing Products - 011 708 5905

ALL NEW

geomax at81 ex

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines