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TTC_05_09_18_Vol.14-No.28.p1-12

TTC_05_09_18_Vol.14-No.28.p1-12.pdf

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Page www.TheTownCommon.com May 9 -15, 2018 How to Submit Letters to the Editor Theater Workshop Awards Night Marc Maravalli, B.S., R.Ph. Publisher/Editor, The Town Common Letters to the Editor provide a useful way of communicating concerns, issues, or suggestions to all members of the community. The Town Common encourages all citizens to submit letters concerning issues of interest and concern to the local community. Letters selected for publication may be edited for length and clarity. Some letters may serve as a catalyst for other articles or coverage, and community leaders and agencies will be offered an opportunity to respond to letters concerning their areas of responsibility. All letters must be signed and include a daytime telephone number. Letters may be submitted to: The Editor c/o The Town Common 77 Wethersfield St. Rowley, MA 01969 or preferably via e-mail to: editor@thetowncommon.com. 6th Grade Graduating Class 2018 The Town Common Courtesy Photos The Town Common deadline is 5pm Wednesday (except when a federal holiday necessitates an earlier deadline). The Town Common serves the communities of the Upper North Shore of Mass. & Coastal New Hampshire and welcomes your participation. Send your Organization or Group Notices, Birth or Engagement Announcements, Photos, Articles and Letters to the Editor, by mail, phone, fax, or e-mail to: 77 Wethersfield St., Rowley, MA 01969 Phone: 978-948-8696 Fax: 978-948-2564 E-mail: news@thetowncommon.com The Town Common Marc Maravalli, Publisher / Editor editor@thetowncommon.com Graphic Design Services graphics@thetowncommon.com Advertising Opportunities advertise@thetowncommon.com Event and Announcement Submissions events@thetowncommon.com 77 Wethersfield Street Rowley, MA 01969-1713 Phone: (978) 948-8696 Fax: (978) 948-2564 www.thetowncommon.com The Town Common is not responsible for typographical errors or omissions, but reprint opportunities do exist for prompt notification of such errors. Advertisers should notify The Town Common of any errors in ads on the first day of issuance. No credits &/or refunds are offered or implied. All material and content cannot be duplicated without written consent of the publisher. The right is reserved to reject, omit, or edit any copy offered for publication. Copyright 2004-2018 The Town Common © - All Rights Reserved In loving memory of Liz Ichizawa, Reporter (1956 - 2005) Recipient of Artistic Achievement Award - Sally McIsaac, Newbury Rocco’s BaRBeRshop Friendly & Experienced Staff & Family Atmosphere “Come in for a haircut and let us be your barber!” (978)948-2555 OLD FASHIONED BARBERSHOP EXPERIENCE! Across from Agawam Diner at TD Bank Plaza See us on Senior Scholarship Winners - Benjamin Hall (L) - Byfield, Triton High School & Lila Roy (R) - Newbury, Berwick Academy Alzheimer’s Research Cycling Event Includes Ride through Rowley ROWLEY, MA (May 4, 2018) – Celebrating its 22nd year, the Alzheimer’s Association, Massachusetts/New Hampshire Chapter’s RIDE to End Alzheimer’s is ready to roll through TOWN on Saturday, June 9. Starting and finishing at Odiorne State Park in Rye, NH cyclists will take on the two through one-hundred mile course to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s research. “Each year, ninety percent of the funds raised from the RIDE are given to research restricted grants,” shares Jim Wessler, President and CEO of the Alzheimer’s Association, MA/NH Chapter. “The Association is currently funding thirty-five active research grants at eleven institutions in our region thanks to the proceeds from this event and our generous donors year-round.” Started by the Noonan family, the RIDE to End Alzheimer’s formerly called Memory Ride, grew from a small, family-inspired event to a cycling challenge attracting riders throughout New England and beyond. The remaining ten percent of the proceeds fund programs and services in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. To date, the event has raised over $5,000,000 for Alzheimer’s and dementia research. For more information about the RIDE to End Alzheimer’s visit alzmassnh.org/ride. HELP WANTED: Experienced Barber Wanted Please Call Open Every Day from Apr 1st - Nov 15th Open Fri, Sat, Sun & Holidays Nov 15th - Apr 1st 6th Grade Highest Achievement and Spirit Award Recipients - Back Row: Olivia Aloia, Jenna Young, Anna Webb; Front Row: Elise Blanchet, Hudson Murphy, Ellie Northup BROWN’S Seabrook Lobster Pound GROW YOUR BUSINESS IN 2018! ADVERTISE TODAY IN The Town Common call 978-948-8696 “A New England Favorite Since 1950” Boiled Lobster * Steamed Clams Fried & Baked Seafood * Sandwiches Route 286, Seabrook Beach, NH 603-474-3331 Call Ahead Take Out

Happy Halloween May 9 - 15, 2018 www.TheTownCommon.com Page 3 Leveling the Playing Field in Literacy Continued from page 1 and literacy skills.” More simply, St. Peter said, “Dialogic reading opens the door to wonderment (in the child).” Students are asked to predict what is going to happen, or how could the student change the ending of the story, she said. The adult may begin a sentence and let the student finish it. The adult may ask the student to recall what happened in the story and how it might relate to something in their life. (Students call that Text to Self.) The teacher or patent may point to an illustration on the cover or on a page and ask the student to predict what the story is about or what will happen in the story. St. Peter, who is expanding on the research by Dr. Grover Whitehurst and others, introduced Thinking Maps and Venn diagrams to encourage the students to do critical thinking about the stories they read or heard. Two years ago St. Peter took her research to Hill View Montessori Charter Public School in Haverhill. She worked with 12 kindergarten students in two classes. About 30 percent were considered at risk from initial testing. She created two groups of six Continued from page 1 careers and families, they had never thought about owning the club. But after talking with Woodman and fellow owner, former Mayor Byron Matthews, they realized they had the resources to “give back to the club and the community,” Colden said. Woodman and Matthews built the six-court facility in 1973 when Newburyport, as Woodman described it last week, “was a hole in the wall.” Matthews, as mayor and leading champion of revitalizing Newburyport, asked a homebuilder if he would sell them the five acres he owned on Low Street. The builder, who was planning to construct homes on the property, was not thrilled with the proposal, but when Matthews told him he would do whatever it took, the homebuilder acquiesced. “We were building an all-around community,” Matthews said. “There was a lot of emphasis on recreation. We needed a tennis facility.” Woodman, a prominent architect, who has Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, apologized to the crowd of about 45 people who came to celebrate the changing of the guard. “I’m sorry I can’t play tonight,” he said. He and Matthews had hoped to own the club for 50 years, he said. “In all those years, we never had a bad word,” Matthews said, calling students each. One was a control group that received no additional attention and the other was an intervention group that was exposed to dialogic reading. Both groups were tested before and after she worked with the intervention group for 12 weeks. At the start, the six students in the control group averaged a level of 4.78 years. After the 12 weeks, the average expressive language age of the control group had risen to 5.81 years. All students progressed, and one student who started at 5.1 years rose to 7.2 years, the highest of any student in the control group. The six students in the intervention group started out with an average level of 4.37 years, a half year lower than the control group at the start. After working with St. Peter and the kindergarten teacher using her dialogic reading program five days a week for the 12 weeks, the average of the students was 6.55 years – nearly a year higher than the control group. That meant they progressed a year and a half in about three months. One student, who started at a 5.5-year level progressed to 7.8 years, a strong third-grade level. Two students, who started the program at the very tall Woodman “a gentle giant.” “We had lots of options (for the 5 acres on Low Street,)” Woodman said. “But we wanted to keep it a tennis facility. We looked for the next generation (of owners) to take it to the next level. We found that in Daryl and Gary. They are committed to tennis, to the city.” The tennis club, which is changing its name to Newburyport Tennis Club, has been up for sale for several years at an asking price of $3 to $4 million. Colden and Gastman declined to say how much they are paying for the club. They plan to make improvements in infrastructure, particularly fixing the roof that leaks in rain storms and when the snows melt. The common areas, including the locker rooms, will be renovated with new furniture and paint. The courts this summer will be resurfaced. The court fee system will be upgraded to include accepting credit cards. The club has about 500 members with 200 being regulars, said manager Mike Perrotta. “We have great members, great coaches,” Gastman said. Colden suggested that the club might add a Friday night mixed doubles event. And they plan to work to bring more youth players into the club. The new owners said regulars should expect a modest increase in less than 5 years of attainment, rose to 7.1 years. “It is amazing what a five-year-old can do,” St. Peter said. “It makes me jump up and down for joy.” Asked why she tried dialogic reading in kindergarten, she said she “felt” that five-year-olds could do more in language than they were being asked to do in traditional classes. St. Peter concluded from her research that “dialogic reading can increase oral language skills and early literacy skills in children (who are) initially assessed during kindergarten screening as ‘at risk’ for learning.” While excited about the test results, she believes that she has only begun to understand the power of dialogic reading to help young children achieve greater results in literacy, writing and reading. St. Peter wants to share her passion for dialogic reading with teachers to enhance the reading experience for their students. She is offering training programs and consulting with teachers and schools to add dialogic reading to their literacy programs. To contact St. Peter, email her at kstpeter39@gmail.com. Popular Tennis Club Sold to Avid Players court fees, the primary source of revenue for the club. Courts rent now for $30 to $40 an hour. Gastman said they plan to hold focus groups to determine what other improvements are needed. For more information, call 978- 462-3121. Sea View Retreat -Since 1954 An extended Care Community www.seaviewretreat.com Come in for a visit and compare! (978)-948-2552 •Private & Semi-Private Rooms with Baths and Beautiful Views • Medicare/ Medicaid certified The • Social Town Services-Speech, Co Physical, Occupational, & Massage Therapies • Full Activity Program • and much more... The North Shore’s Largest Independent Co MANSION DRIVE • ROWLEY, MA • JUST OFF ROUTE 1A GiuseppesFineFood.com check out our: PRO SHOP now selling: Skateboard, BMX and Scooter gear Thelocalflavortastesbetterthanever. Route 1, Portsmouth • 436-0717 www.dinnerhorn.com www.bratskellar.com New Dining Room Full Bar Italian Deli & Marketplace Take out Grab & Go The Town Party Trays 978-465-2225 257 Low St . Newburyport Fi A Paint birthdays Ask us! We are experts! Potte Danvers Agway F 9 Wenham St Adu Cla (978) 774-1069 CLAY Also in Waltham, MA at 72 Miro 978-948-8696 • www.thetowncommon.com • adver Call for 54 a tour Emerson (603)379-1898 Rd www.sanctuarycarerye.com (781)894-4880 ww rentals private lessons $20 Family Deal New England’s Premier Skate and Bike Park www.RYEAIRFIELD.com 603.964.2800 Palmer Cleanouts & Disposal LLC JUNK Visit REMOVAL Your SERVICE WE DO ALL THE LOADING single item to whole house cleanout Friendly Neighborhood 10 & 15 yard dumpsters available Garden Center! 60 Turnpike Road Ipswich, Ma 01938 (978) 3566342 Call for Free Estimate 603-770-7551 gerrypalmer@palmercleanouts.com www.palmercleanouts.com 104 Eastern Ave. Gloucester, Ma 01930 (978) 2814480 www.wolillgardencenter.com • • • • Veggie & Flower Seeds Bark mulch/loom Daily deliveries Organic soil and more Looking for the perfect Mother's Day gift? Greg De is your Advert 77 Weth Rowley, M Telephone: Fax: 978 advertise@theto 88 Elm Street Salisbury, Ma 01952 (978) 4653542 *New Location!*

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