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Subject:

OAKLAND UNIFIED SCHOOL DIl;tJGlSLATIVE FILE

State Administrator, Board of Education

Roberta Mayor, ED.D., Inte~endent

February 25, 2009

Request for Approval of Title I Schoolwide Program Applications

ACTION REQUESTED

The State Administrator is requested to approve the Title I Schoolwide Program

Applications for the following schools:

Community United

East Oakland Pride

Futures

Global Family

Greenleaf v'"

Learning WIO Limits

West Oakland Middle

Oakland International High School

File ID No. 01- f)).q ?:,

Introduction D8te_.3~;101

Enactment No,...._."",, __ '_--,- __

Enactment Date _

B~--- _

BACKGROUND

As defined in Title I - Part A of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) lact if2001, Title One

schools having 40% of the children in the school attendance area from low - income

families are provided the opportunity to change their status from Targeted Assistance

(TAS) to Schoolwide Program (SWP) status upon approval from the Local Education

Agency (LEA).

To become Title I Schoolwide Program, the school must conduct a comprehensive Needs

Assessment and develop a plan with the involvement and support of all stakeholder groups

(SSC's, Leadership team, technical assistance provider, other parents and students - at the

secondary level) that describes how the school will improve academically so that all

students are proficient on the state and academic content standards.

According to the guidance provided by the California Department of Education, the above

-listed schools are submitting the Title I Schoolwide Applications to the State

administrator and Board of Education for approval.

DISCUSSION

The above -listed schools Needs Assessment and Improvement strategies have been

previously approved as part oftheir 2007 - 2009 Single Plans for Student Achievement.

\,


FUNDING SOURCE

The above -listed schools will use funds from the following sources contained in the

district's Consolidated Application for State and Federal Funds: Title I, SIPISLIPI, EIA-

SCE and EIA-LEP.

ATTACHMENTS

Title I Schoolwide Program Applications for the above listed schools.


(Please print or type all information.)

Page 1

Request for Authorization of a Schoolwide Program

County: ~\.o..


Page 2

Certification and Signatures for Authorization of Schoolwide Program

The undersigned certify that they have been involved in the schoolwide planning process as

representatives for the programs included in this schoolwide program plan.

Chec k fed era programs add resse d'mt hesc hi' 00 wide program Dian,

Federal Programs Representatives' Signature (Required)

Title I, Part A--Improving Basic Programs Operated by

W~ t\ Local Educational Agenc ies

Title I, Part B--Student Reading Skill 1mprovement Grants

liQ A~tvI.V

i> rr:> ~~

~A1./ 't~./.v/(1/1//

Title I, Part Co-Education of Migratory Children (M igrant / .- ·~.WJf/~

Parent) /

Title I, Part Co-Education of Migratory Children (Direct~ ~--~A?

"7d: ~

...c-

Title I, Part D--Prevention and Intervention Programs fOI(

Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At Risk

!J

Title II, Preparing, Training, and Recruiting High-Quality /~-~::;;tJk 14' --

Teachers and Princioals

.:

#/~

Title III, Language Instruction for Limited-English-

Proficient and Immigrant Students

Title IV, 21 st Century Schools

~L7 ~J

'rf~~

(/~/.J

Title IV, Part A--Safe and Drug-Free Schools and

Communities ., J.4.

~ ~ .....

J.

. Title V, Promoting Informed Parental Choice and Innovative/)

Programs

jl~~,,--W

Title V, Part D, SUbpart6--Gifted and Talented Students

Title VI, Flexibility and Accountability

Title VII, Indian, Native Hawaiian, and Alaska Native

Education

Title VIII, Impact Aid Program

Title IX, General Provisions

"

/ -.

L

Title X, Part Co-Education of Homeless Children & YOUr 7L. d

-

/

or r'

Title X, Part D--Native American Education Improvement

(Program Director/Coordinator or Indian Tribal

Representative)

Re\'ised 01105

~ './'


1

Page 3

Check other programs included in the schoolwide program plan.

vichoollmprovement Program (SIP)

School-Based Coordinated Program (SBCP)

v-Economic Impact Aid/Limited English Proficient (EIAILEP)

viconomic Impact Aid/State Compensatory Education (EIAISCE)

\/'Special Education

State Preschool

Health Services

Food and Nutrition

Other _

To meet NelS requirements, each schoolwide program school must receive technical

assistance when it completes its comprehensive needs assessment and its schoolwide

program plan. Please check the box for at least one entity that has provided technical

assistance for your school. Also, identify by name the lead provider for each box checked.

D Statewide System of School Support (S4) _

~/ County Office of Education A~

M Internal District Learning Support Team -1(f;:.s,...:I


Oakland J)nified -- Tij:le I '\. Fall, 200&

Transition to Schoolwide Program: Plan pro~ and ResourcesUsed

School Name: Greenleaf ~

Comprehensive needs assessment of the entire school.

Students strengths and needs are addressed in relationship to state standards.

Multiple assessment tools are used to identifv students needs.

Evidence shows that Technical Assistance was provided by the District, and

includes information about all students

Evidence shows that representative of all stakeholders are included In the

leadershiD team for the otarmtno of schoolwide orocrern

Research-based approaches that provrde opportunities for all students to meet

state content and performance standards and promote use of effective

instructional strategies including:

1- Increased instructional time

2. Enriched and accelerated curriculum

3. Addressing needs of historically underserved popuiations

4. Coordination with the district's local Improvement plan

5. Addressing needs of all students, but particularly the needs of students

targeted by the funds coordinated in the Schoolwide orocrarn

Instruction provided by highly qualified staff

(evidence of teacher retention recruitment and teacher SUDDort\

Professional development for teachers, aids, parents, administrators, school

leadership team, and other school nersonnel

Strateaies to increase earent Involvement

Articulation between schools, grade levels

Strategies for assisting In the transition from middle school to high school or

from elementarv to middle school

Teacher involvement in decisions reaardlno the use of assessment

Timely and effective interventions and additional assistance for students who

have difficulty mastering standards including

1. Timely identification of students' learning difficulties

2. Training for teachers in techniques for diagnosing students' educational needs

3. Parent-teacher conferences for anv student who has not met the standards

Description of how the school will use title I Part A funds and other resources In

the SChoolwlde nroqrarn

ust of state, local and federal programs to be included in the Schoolwide

oroararn (example: SIP EIA IIUSP etc)

How the school will provide individual assessment results to parents

(STAR CeLDT direct maillnas to homes PI letters

Results from state and local assessments (see SARC, SPSA)

Monitoring and evaluation- the site plan is being monitored to ensure that the

instructional strategies and professional development are contributing to the

success of all students In the school: NEXO reoorts

ReViewed bY:),~","*~~:"':"";~U!d.~.LI..


School Site Council Membership Roster Elementary School

School Name: GREENLEAF ELEMENTARY @ Whittier

School Year 2008-2009

Chairperson: Sheila Loarca

SecretarY: Chelita Bolden

Members'

Names

Sheila Loarca

Araceli Hernandez

Chellta Bolden

Minerra Looez

Maria del Socorro

Yanez

Juanita Galavir-

Torres

Monica Thomas

Susan Sandoe

Katherine Gibson

Maureen Weiner

DAC

ReDresentative

Ph.: 879-1630

sse Legal Requirements:

Address

Vice ChairDerson: Minerra Lopez

D~ ec--n e: Juanita Galavir- Torres

6328 East 17 th St. 94621

6328 East 17 th St, 94621

6328 East 17 tn St. 94621

6328 East 17 tn St. 94621

6328 East 17 th St, 94621

6328 East 17 th St, 94621

6328 East 17 th St. 94621

6328 East 17 th St 94621

6328 East 17 th St. 94621

6328 East 17 th St. 94621

Check aot rooriate Re resentation

Principal Classroom

Teacher

Other

Staff

ParentI

Comm

IMeeting Schedule I Last Tues of the month, 3:30 in Library; 10/28 next mtg

(1) Members MUST be selected/elected by

peer groups;

(2) There must be an equal number of school

staff and parent/community members;

(3) Majority of school staff membership must

be classroom teachers;

(4) Parent/community members cannot be

employees at the site.

x

l-Principal

3-Classroom

Teachers

l-Other Staff

5-Parent

ICommunity

x

x

x

x

x

x

x


Thursday, September 25,2008

Invitation to Participate in a School Site Council (SSC)

Greenleaf

sse Establishment Meeting

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

3:00-4:00

GreenleaflWhittier Library

At this meeting, parents/community members will have the opportunity to elect parent and community

representatives to the council. Teachers and other staff members will be elected by their peer groups to serve as

school representatives to the council. Teachers and other staff members will be elected by their peer groups to

serve as school representatives. High school students will also elect their peer representatives to the council.

California Ed. Code (64001 (a) requires schools which receive State and Federal funding, to establish an SSC.

The major responsibilities of the SSC include the development of a Single Plan for Student Achievement (the

Site Plan), monitor its implementation, evaluate the results, and make modifications as needed.

This council offers an excellent opportunity for parents, community members and site personnel to work

together and plan for student achievement. We encourage you to attend this meeting and elect your

representatives to our School Site Council.

Thursday, September 25, 2008

Invitation to Participate in a School Site Council (SSC)

Whittier

sse Establishment Meeting

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

3:00-4:00

GreenleaflWhittier Library

At this meeting, parents/community members will have the opportunity to elect parent and community

representatives to the council. Teachers and other staff members will be elected by their peer groups to serve as

school representatives to the council. Teachers and other staff members will be elected by their peer groups to

serve as school representatives. High school students will also elect their peer representatives to the council.

California Ed. Code (64001 (a) requires schools which receive State and Federal funding, to establish an SSC.

The major responsibilities of the SSC include the development of a Single Plan for Student Achievement (the

Site Plan), monitor its implementation, evaluate the results, and make modifications as needed.

This council offers an excellent opportunity for parents, community members and site personnel to work

together and plan for student achievement. We encourage you to attend this meeting and elect your

representatives to our School Site Council.


Greenleaf

sse Establishment Meeting

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

3:00-4:00

GreenleaffWhittier Library

All parents and community members are encouraged to participate in the School Site Council. The SSC develops and

monitors the implementation of the Single Plan for Student Achievement, proposes expenditures and evaluates the results.

Please come to the SSC establishment meeting. We will elect members, receive training, and elect officers.

Proposed agenda

I. SSC Training:

• Responsibilities of the SSC

• Composition of the SSC

• Selection of Members

• Officers

• Rules of Order

• Bylaws

• Records

II. Peer Election of Members

111. Election of Officers

IV. Approve Rules and Bylaws

Whittier

sse Establishment Meeting

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

3:00-4:00

Greenleaf/Whittier Library

All parents and community members are encouraged to participate in the School Site Council. The SSC develops and

monitors the implementation of the Single Plan for Student Achievement, proposes expenditures and evaluates the results.

Please come to the SSC establishment meeting. We will elect members, receive training, and elect officers.

Proposed agenda

I. SSC Training:

• Responsibilities of the SSC

• Composition of the SSC

• Selection of Members

• Officers

• Rules of Order

• Bylaws

• Records

11 Peer Election of Members

111.Election of Officers

IV. Approve Rules and Bylaws



School rzf


School Site Council Establishment Meeting

Minutes

School:_Greenleaf/Whittier Elementary- Date:_9/30108 __

Minutes must address each agenda item. Summarize and note approval.

SSC Establishment meeting called to order on September so", 2008 at 3: 10 pm.

Principal Thomas opened with the agenda topic reviewing what the roles and

responsibilities of the SSC are. Katherine Gibson read them to the group. Next we

discussed the composition of the SSC based on state requirements. Idea was brought up

to communicate to parents via the monthly calendar when SSC meetings take place to

allow more people to participate. Next the election of members took place. Greenleaf

members include: Chair Sheila Loarca; Secretary Chelita Bolden; Vice-Chair Minerva

Lopez; Araceli Hernandez, Maria Socorro Yanez; Juanita Galaviz; Monica Thomas;

Susan Sandoe; Katherine Gibson and Maureen Weiner. We discussed the rules of order,

bylaws, records. Approved unanimously. Meeting closed at 3:40 pm. Next meeting set

for October 28 th •

The meeting was adjourned at 3:40 pm.

Next meeting date: October 28 th

Minutes submitted by: Chelita Bolden 1016108


School Site Council Membership Roster - Elementary School

School Name: GREENLEAF ELEMENTARY @ Whittier

School Year 2008-2009

chatreersom Sheila Loarca

Secretary: Chelita Bolden

Vice Chairoerson: Minerra Looez

DAe Renre tive: Juanita Galavlr- Torres

Check ace roorlate Re resentation

Members' Address Principal Classroom

Teacher

Other

Staff

Parent!

Comm

Names

Sheila Loarca 6328 East 17 tn St. 94621 X

Araceli Hernandez 6328 East 17 th St, 94621 X

Chelita Bolden 6328 East 17 th Minerra Lopez

St. 94621

6328 East 17

X

tn St. 94621 X

Maria del Socorro 6328 East 17 th St, 94621 X

Yanez

Juanita Galavir- 6328 East 17 th Torres

St, 94621 X

Monica Thomas 6328 East 17 th St. 94621 x

Susan Sandoe 6328 East lin St. 94621 x

Katherine Gibson 6328 East 17 tn Maureen Weiner

St. 94621

6328 East 17

x

th St. 94621 x

DAC Juanita Galavir-Torres X

Representative

Ph.: 879-1630

I Meeting Schedule I Last Tues of the month, 3:30 in Library; 10/28 next mtg

sse Legal Requirements:

(I) Members MUST be selected/elected by

peer groups;

(2) There must be an equal number of school

staff and parent/community members;

(3) Majority of school staff membership must

be classroom teachers;

(4) Parent/community members cannot be

employees at the site.

I- Principal

3-Classroom

Teachers

l-Other Staff

5-Parent

/Community


Invitation to Participate in English Learner Advisory Committee (ELAC)

Thursday, September 25, 2008

Greenleaf

ELAC Establishment Meeting

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

4:00-5:00

GreenleaflWhittier Library

This committee offers an excellent opportunity for parents, community members and site personnel to work together and plan for

student achievement. We encourage you to attend this meeting and elect your representatives to our English Learner Advisory

Committee (ELAC)

At this meting, parents of English Learners will have an opportunity to elect your representatives to the committee.

California Ed Code (62002.5) requires schools with 21 or more English Language Learners (ELL) to establish an ELAC. The major

responsibilities ofthe ELAC include:

• The ELAC advises the school site council (SSC) on the development of the Single School Plan for Student Achievement

• The ELAC advises the principal and staff on the school's program for English learners.

• The ELAC assists in the development of the school's Needs assessment

• Language census (form R-30LC)

• Efforts to make parents aware of the importance of regular school attendance.

The ELAC has the opportunity to elect at least one member to the DELAC or can participate in a proportionate regional representation

scheme when there are more than 31 or more English learner parent advisory committees in the district.

Invitation to Participate in English Learner Advisory Committee (ELAC)

Thursday, September 25,2008

Whittier

ELAC Establishment Meeting

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

4:00-5:00

GreenleaflWhittier Library

This committee offers an excellent opportunity for parents, community members and site personnel to work together and plan for

student achievement. We encourage you to attend this meeting and elect your representatives to our English Learner Advisory

Committee (ELAC)

At this meting, parents of English Learners will have an opportunity to elect your representatives to the committee.

California Ed Code (62002.5) requires schools with 21 or more English Language Learners (ELL) to establish an ELAC. The major

responsibilities of the ELAC include:

• The ELAC advises the school site council (SSC) on the development of the Single School Plan for Student Achievement

• The ELAC advises the principal and staff on the school's program for English learners.

• The ELAC assists in the development of the school's Needs assessment

• Language census (form R-30LC)

• Efforts to make parents aware ofthe importance of regular school attendance.

The ELAC has the opportunity to elect at least one member to the DELAC or can participate in a proportionate regional representation

scheme when there are more than 31 or more English learner parent advisory committees in the district.


Proposed Agenda:

I. Welcome

II. ELAC Training:

a. Requirement

b. Duties and responsibilities of the ELAC

c. Composition of the ELAC

d. Nomination and election of parent members

e. Nomination and selection of officers

f. Rules of order

g. Bylaws

h. Records

flI. Election of parent members

IV. School staff members

V. Election of Officers and DELAC representatives

VI. Approve Rules of Order or Bylaws

VfI. Public Input

Vfll. Establish Date of Next Meeting and Adjourn

Proposed Agenda;

I. Welcome

fl. ELAC Training;

a. Requirement

b. Duties and responsibilities of the ELAC

c. Composition of the ELAC

d. Nomination and election of parent members

e. Nomination and selection of officers

f. Rules of order

g. Bylaws

h. Records

11I. Election of parent members

IV. School staff members

V. Election of Officers and DELAC representatives

VI. Approve Rules of Order or Bylaws

VfI. Public Input

Vfll. Establish Date of Next Meeting and Adjourn

Greenleaf

ELAC Establishment Meeting

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

4:00-5:00

Greenleaf/Whittier Library

Whittier

ELAC Establishment Meeting

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

4:00-5:00

Greenleaf/Whittier Library


-Establishment Meeting

Sign-In

School l7(HV\kt _ Date,__ ~__'I_s_o.l--/o-g---

Printed Name Signature Staff Parent or Student

Community

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Oakland Unified School District

Office of State and Federal Programs

sse Handbook, August, 2008

58

4,


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, Ca\\J, ~ ,j,t -t ~p~ ~ V,;,,:p,\ Ihill'''' ' 'ReV'"" of fl.-Pre

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School Name:

ELAC Membership Roster

~ \ i

l;(een}t4--- School Year Z lTDX" 26D'1

Chairperson:

Sheila . (i'M LottrCd Vf

.

Vice Chairperson:

Minerva Lopez

Secretary:

{/ DELAC Representative:

Chelita Bolden

Juanita Galaviz

Check Aucrooriate Representation

Member's Name Address Principal School EL ParentI

Staff Parent Comm.

Sheila Loarca 6328 East 17'h St 94621 X

Araceli Hernandez 6328 East 17,n St 94621 X

Chelita Bolden 6328 East 17,nSt 94621 X

Minerva Lopez 6328 East 17'n St 94621 X

Maria Yanez 6328 East 17'n St 94621 X

Juanita Galaviz 6328 East 17 th St 94621 X

Monica Thomas 6328 East 17 th St 94621 X

Susan Sandoe 6328 East 17 tn St 94621 X

Katherine Gibson 6328 East 17,nSt 94621 X

Maureen Weiner 6328 East 17 th St 94621 X

This ELAC membership roster must be completed and submitted (hard copy) to the

Office of State and Federal Programs, Room 112, OUSD Administration Building,

c/o Linda Love-

On or before October 31, 2008.


,~~ .. ~~~



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SCHOOL SITE COUNCIL (SSC) and ELAC MEETING

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28 TH

3:15 PM

LIBRARY

ALL PARENTS AND MEMBERS OF THE

COMMUNITY ARE INVITED TO ATTEND!

,

"~ , .. 'l"'~ .... _",

_ _ I _ _ !

. " , - . ~. .

JUNTA DEL CONCILIO SSC/ELAC

JUEVES 28 de Octubre de 2008

3:15 PM

EN LA BIBLIOTECA

TODOS LOS PADRES Y LOS MIEMBROS DE LA

ESCUELA DE WHITTIER ESTAN INVITADOSl


Agenda

Greenleaf Elementary

School Site Council(SSC) Meeting

Tuesday, October 28, 2008

3:15 PM

Welcome /Roll call and establish quorum

Bienvenida/ Asistencia y establece corum

Reading and approval of minutes

Aprobacion de minutos

SSC

Review student achievement data

Revisar los datos academicos

Approve modifications of 08-09 SPSA

Aprobar modificaciones del SPSA

-*,Schoolwide Title I - review/approve Parent Involvement Policy and Home-School

Compact, present SES information and resources

~ SSC Vote to go Schoolwide Title I Program

Voto para programa TI para todo la escuela

ELAC

Implement parent involvement and education activities

Implementar actividades de participacion de padres y educacion

Review ELAC roles and responsibilities

Revisar papeles y responsabilidades del ELAC

SSC vote to accept ELAC responsibilities

DAC representative report

Reporte del representante DAC

Public Input!Announcements

Comentarios publicos/ Anuncios

Establish date of next meeting and adj ourn

Establece la fecha de la proxima junta


School Site Council Establishment Meeting

Sign-In

Date 10/1-8 Iat

I I

Printed Name Signature Staff Parent or Student

Community

tv\~n;L~~~~) li'--'KV-- v

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Isse MINUTES- Templat~

Minutes should address each agenda item, summarize discussions and note

approvals.

2a. Quorum Number in Bylaws:

Quorum Present? ~ 5

2b. Others Present _

3. Minutes of (Date) -I'-.L'L--


I ' I (I

Minutes submitted by Cbc.\,·r~B=ol~J~tv)'-L- _

bLL

Meeting adjourned at: 3: t.J S


Date: October 28, 2008

Oakland Unified School District

Family & Community Engagement Office

Subject: Designation of English Leaner Advisory Committee (ELAC) Duties and

Responsibilities to School Site Council (SSC)

The English Leaner Advisory Committee (ELAC) members have had an opportunity to discuss and

understand, that in designating the School Site Council (SSC) to function as its representative, the SSC will

advise the principal and staff on compensatory education programs.

The English Leaner Advisory Committee (ELAC) has designated the School Site Council (SSC) to

function as its representative.

ovss DNO

The vote for this decision was taken at the ELAC meeting held on September 30, 2008

The ELAC was trained on its four legal requirements on September 30, 2008 , prior to delegating its

authority to the SSC.

The SSC was trained on its four legal requirements on September 30, 2008.

The SSC meetings incorporate the four legal requirements for ELAC. ....1ES 0 NO

Socorro Yanez _

Typed Name of ELAC Chairperson

t:a


Calling all parents:

(Jree~eaf/VVhittier

Annual Title I Meetingl Junta de Titulo I

October zs-, 200S1 2S de octubre 200S

4:00-4:30 in the Library 1en la biblioteca

Calling all parents:

(Jree~eaf/VVhittier

Annual Title I Meetingl Junta de Titulo I

October zs-, 200S1 2S de octubre 200S

4:00-4:30 in the Library 1en la biblioteca


Cireenleaf!VVhittier

Title 1 Meeting

Date: October 28, 2008

1) The Title 1 Program at GreeenleaflWhittier School - description

2) Parent Involvement at GreenleaflWhittier School - presentation & discussion

3) The GreenleaflWhittier School Home-School Compact - handout & discussion

4) Parent Education at GreenleaflWhittier School- Presentation

5) Information for parents - presentation and handouts

6) Parent Involvement Policy. presentation and discussion

7) Questions & Answers


Oakland Unified School District

Office of State and Federal Programs

Annual Title I Meeting Verification Form

The Annual Title I Meeting for (name of school) : Greenleaf/Whittier

was held on (date): October 28,2008

The following topics were addressed:

• Description of the Title I Program at the school

• How parents can be involved with developing, reviewing, and modifying the Title I

Program at the school

• What training and support about how parents can help their children improve their

academic achievement

• Other information about the school's instructional program

• Presentation and review of the School's Parent Involvement Policy and Home school

Compact - with opportunity for parent discussion and input

• Opportunity for parents to ask questions and request additional information

I verify that the Annual Title I Meeting was held and the topics and actions listed above were

addressed. Documentation of the meeting (announcement, agenda, sign-in sheets, samples of

documents provided to parents, etc.) is on file at the school.

Monica Thomas

(principal's name - printed)

PTAlPTSAIPTO primary contact person

Name Address Phone email

Sch c 00I sta ff and parent liaison wit . h primary function 0f narent eneazemen t

Name Title Phone email

Outreach 879-1630 ROdolfo.perez@ousd.kI2.ca.us

Rodolfo Perez Coordinator

Print and complete this form - and then send to Office of State and Federal Programs,

Room 112, Central Administration, C/O Linda Love

Due Date: October 31, 2008


Appendix B: Home School Compact and Parent Involvement Policy

Part 1. General Expectations

Greenleaf Elementary School

Parental Involvement Policy

Greenleaf Elementary

Greenleaf Elementary School agrees to implement the following statutory requirements:

• The school willjointly develop with parents, distribute to parents of participating

children, a School Parent Involvement Policy that school and parents of participating

children agree on.

• The school will notify parents about the School Parental Involvement Policy in an

understandable and uniform format and, the extent practicable, will distribute this

policy to parents in a language the parents can understand.

• The school will make the School Parental Involvement Policy available to the local

community.

• The school will periodically update the School Parental Involvement Policy to meet the

changing needs of parents and the school

• The school will adopt the school's Home-School compact as a component of its School

Parental Involvement Policy.

• The school agrees to be governed by the following statutory definition of parental

involvement, and will carry out programs, activities and procedures in accordance

with this definition:

Parental involvement means the participation of parents in regular, two-way, and meaningful

communication involving student academic learning and other school activities, including

ensuring-

~ That parents play an integral role in assisting their child's learning

~ That parents are encouraged to be actively involved in their child's education at school

~ That parents are full partners in their child's education and are included, as

appropriate, in decision-making and on advisory committees to assist in the education of

their child

~ The carrying out of other activities, such as those described in section 1118 of the ESEA

Part 2. Description of How the School will implement required School Parental

Involvement Policy Components

I) Greenleaf Elementary School will take the following actions to involve parents in the

joint development and joint agreement of its School Parental involvement Policy and

its schoolwide plan, if applicable, in an organized, ongoing, and timely way under

section I 118(b) of the ESEA:

• Gather and disseminate to parents the current involvement policy and

family-school partnership agreement

• Hold meetings to build consensus on family-school partnership plan

• Solicit both written and oral input from families via surveys and focus

groups with Family/Community Coordinator

• Share student achievement data with families via newsletters and parent

meetings I } i

Principal Initials: N\ ~ SSC Chairperson Initials: 1>11, Date: 'i '2.'1 03' 13

I


Greenleaf Elementary

2) Greenleaf Elementary School wiIl take the following actions to distribute to parents of

participating children and the local community, the School Parental Involvement

Policy:

• Include the Family Involvement Policy in the Family Handbook

• Distribute the Family Involvement Policy at Family Meetings and Events

• Post the Family Involvement Policy around the school

• Include discussions of the Family Involvement Policy in Family Meetings

3) Greenleaf Elementary School will update periodically its School Parental Involvement

Policy to meet the changing needs of parents and the school:

• Monthly review of Family Involvement toward our goal of 95%

• SSC reviews Family Involvement Policy regularly to address safety and

school improvement issues as they arise

4) Greenleaf Elementary School will convene an annual meeting to inform parents of the

following:

• That their child's school participates in Title I

• About the requirements of Title I

• Of their rights to be involved

• Of their right to participate in the development of the District's Title 1 Plan

• About their school's participation in Title 1

The annual meeting wilI be advertised through flyers, posters and phone calls. The

meeting wiIl be scheduled at a time convenient for parents, close to the dismissal of the

Extended Day Program.

5) Greenleaf Elementary School wiIl hold a flexible number of meetings at varying times,

and will provide transportation, child care, and/or home visits, paid for with Title 1

funding as long as these services relate to parental involvement:

• AIl teachers conduct at least 5 Home Visits per year

• Family Resource Center open during school and after-school hours for

parents to meet together with the Family/Community Coordinator

• Evening and Saturday meetings and events

• Some daytime events for parents

• Daily morning community circle

6) Greenleaf Elementary School wiIl provide information about Title 1 programs to

parents of participating children in a timely manner:

• Monthly newsletter

• Phone calIs from Family Resource Center

• Postings in the Family Resource Center

• Flyers sent home with students

7) Greenleaf Elementary School will provide to parents of participating children a

description and explanation of the curriculum in use at the school, the forms of

Principallnitials: _~\ii SSC Chairperson Initials: L.. 7. Date: y It. '11 Dl, 14

, I


Greenleaf Elementary

academic assessment used to measure students progress, and the proficiency levels

students are expected to meet:

• This information will be provided in the Family Handbook as well as in

introductory letters sent home by teachers

8) Greenleaf Elementary School will provide parents of participating children if requested

by parents, opportunities for regular meetings to formulate suggestions and to

participate, as appropriate, in decisions relating to the education of their children,

and respond to any such suggestions as soon as practicably possible:

• Regular meetings in the Family Resource Center

• Twice-monthly SSC meetings

• Monthly PTA meetings

• Opportunities to meet with the Family/Community Coordinator as

desired

9) Greenleaf Elementary School will submit to the district any parent comments if the

school-wide plan (SWP)under section (1 114)(b)(2)is not satisfactory to parents of the

participating children:

• Information will be gathered by the Family/Community Coordinator and

passed on to the principal

• Principal will submit the parent comments to the district in a timely

manner

Part 3. Shared Responsibilities for High Student Academic Achievement

1) Greenleaf Elementary School will build the school's and parents' capacity for

strong parental involvement, in order to ensure effective involvement of parents

and to support a partnership among the school involved, parents, and the

community to improve student academic achievement, through the following

activities specifically described below:

• Regular trainings and workshops for parents organized by the

Family / Community Coordinator

• Trainings during SSC meetings

• Focus groups organized in the Family Resource Center

• Development of Parent leadership group via external partnerships

2) The school will incorporate the School-Parent Compact as a component of its

School Parental Involvement Policy:

Principal Initials: N\ \If

• All entering families sign the Family-School Partnership which

outlines the complementary roles of the staff, students,

families

and

sse Chairperson Initials: --"L~',........ 2-0«-_ Date: ~ 15


Greenleaf Elementary

3) The school will, with the assistance of the district, provide assistance to parents

of children served by the school in understanding topics such as the following,

by undertaking the actions described in this paragraph -

• The State of California's academic content standards

• The State of California's student academic achievement standards

• The State of California's and Oakland Unified School District's academic

assessments, including the alternate assessments

• The requirements of Title 1

• How to monitor their child's progress

• How to work with educators

4) The school will, with the assistance of the district, provide materials and

training to help parents work with their children to improve their children's

academic achievement, such as literacy training, and using technology, as

appropriate, to foster parent involvement, by:

• (Regular trainings and workshops for parents organized by the

Family ICommunity Coordinator

• Trainings during SSC meetings

• Focus groups organized in the Family Resource Center

• Development of Parent leadership group via external partnerships

5) The school will, with the assistance of its district and parents, educate its

teachers, pupil services personnel, principals and other staff, in how to reach

out to, communicate with, and work with parents as equal partners, in the

value and utility of contributions of parents, and in how to implement and

coordinate parents programs and build ties between parents and school, by:

• Development of Equity-Centered Professional Learning Community

• Workshops organized by the Family Resource Center

• Advertise external workshops organized by community partners

• Home Visits Training for all new teachers

6) The school will, to the extent feasible and appropriate, coordinate and integrate

parent involvement programs and activities with Head Start, Reading First, and

public pre-school and other programs, and conduct other activities, such as

parent resource centers, that encourage and support parents in more fully

participating in the education of their children by:

• Regular trainings and workshops for parents organized by the

FamilyI Community Coordinator

• Trainings during SSC meetings

• Focus groups organized in the Family Resource Center

• Development of Parent leadership group via external partnerships

Principal Initials: SSC Chairperson Initials: _-"L>


Greenleaf Elementary

7) The school will, to the extent feasible and appropriate, take the following

actions to ensure that information related to the school and parents-programs,

meetings, and other activities, is sent to the parents of participating children in

an understandable and uniform format, including alternative formats upon

request, and to the extent practicable, in a language that parents can

understand:

Part4. Adoption

• All notifications will be sent home in English as well as any other

languages identified by family members (with family assistance for

translation)

• Information will be sent home with students and relayed in monthly

newsletter

• Lead parents in each classroom will make phone calls to further

ensure delivery of information

This School Parental Involvement Policy has been developed jointly with, and

agreed on with, parents of children participating in Title 1, Part A programs, as evidenced

by leadership of Family/Community Coordinator and School Site Council Meetings.

This policy was adopted by the Greenleaf School Site Council on April 24, 2008

and will be in effect for the period of one year. The school will distribute this policy to all

parents of participating Title 1, Part A, children on or before September 1, 2008. It will

.be made available to the local community on or before September 1,2008. Greenleaf's

notification to parents of this policy will be in an understandable uniform format and, to

the extent practicable, provide a copy of this policy to parents in a language the parents

can understand.

~

L/1z11/ot

Principal Initials; M!fr1 SSC Chairperson Initials; ~.I-j.... ,-,7,-",-/_ Date: __ t-(f!",2~'1-1/..::0:.!.tL-_ 17


~~

:2

~ ...

5 ~

ld

"'-en

"'-


School- Parent Com1!!£!

Greenleaf Elementary School and the parents of the students agree that this compact outlines how the parents,

entire school staff, and students will share the responsibility for improved student academic achievement and

the means by which the school and parents will build and develop apartnership that will help children achieve

the State of California's high academic standards.

This School-Parent Compact is in effect during the 2007-2009 school years

School Responsibilities - Greenleaf Elementary School will:

1) Provide high-quality curriculum and instruction in a supportive and effective learning environment

that enable the participating students to meet the State of California's student academic achievement

standards as follows:

The school will provide high-quality curriculum and instruction, using California standardsaligned

instructional materials within a supportive and effective learning environment.

2) Hold parent-teacher conferences (at least annually in elementary schools) during which this compact

will be discussed as it relates to the individual child's achievement.

Parent-teacher conferences will be held twice during the school year and as needed.

3) Provide parents with frequent reports on their children's progress.

Report cards will be sent four times a year and as needed.

4) Provide parents reasonable access to staff.

School staff will be available for consultation with parents as needed.

5) Provide parents opportunities to volunteer and participate in their child's class, and to observe

classroom activities.

Parents may volunteer, participate, and observe classroom activities.

Parent Responsibilities -

We, as parents will support our children's learning in the following ways:

• Monitoring attendance

• Make sure homework is completed

• Promoting positive use of child's out of school time

Student Responsibilities -

We, as students, will share the responsibility to improve out academic achievement and achieve

the State of California's academic standards. We wUl:

• Do my homework every day

• Ask for help when I need it

• Read for at least 30 minutes every day outside of school


OAKLAND UNIFIED

SCHOOL DISTRICT

every student. every classroom. every day.

GREENLEAF ACADEMY

Site #: 112 Site Type: Elementary

KEY INDICATORS

2008·09 Non-SOC Students:

2008-09 SOC Students:

2007-08 Average Daily Attendance

395

o

94.0%

2008-09 Total Unrestricted Allocation:

2008-09 Total Categorical Allocation:

2008-09 Total Prelim Allocation Per Student:

$1,937,873

$569,565

$6,348

There are two major "buckets" of

revenue. There are unrestricted lind

restricted resources. Also known as

categorical programs, each of the

0000 General Purpose

$ 52.90 restricted resources has specific

""l\FalWA~~

guidelines tS~.1."i}t~~H19:r90

that must be followed in order

1300 Class Size Reduction

-10.8% $ (96.801

to expend the money.

4124

7090

rtli

Title IV: 21st cue

, i9iASESli

The major restricted resources such as

Title I, flA, lind the SUSG there appears

$

to be large reductions from 2007·08 to

~~ll9:-;

2008-09. ThiS appears to be the case

-37.8% $ (119.14)

because carryover funds are reflected in

~~;S"'~ %ii?fi~;i¥.:~·2$(6g:

the 2007-08 totals.

-53.7% $ (173.67)

~j);-a:_ ,\W;iCi""""""t2#JaI

0.0% $ Carryover wiIJ not be loaded for 2008-09

until September 2008.

~

Human resources represent a large portion of a school district's budget. Full-time equivalents or FTEsis the typical manner that California accounts for school district staff. It is

There are six major expenditure categories.

The first three - certificated salaries,

classified salaries, and employee benefits-

represent planned expenses for staff The

last three categories ale non-staff expenses

for items slJcll as books and supplies.

important to understand that there may be a larger number of personnel working at a school site throughout the day than the number of FTE reported forthat school. The reason is

because some personnel do not work the entire day or week at a school site. Therefore, they represent a fraction, for example 0.80 FTE.

ENROllMENT

Year I Enrollment I ADA %

2006-07 nfa nfa

2007;:..0&; ;f; ~%~:",~r1811Sit&i


Greenleaf

COMPREHENSIVE NEEDS ASSESSMENT

for Transition to Title One Schoolwide Program

Community Analysis

Analysis and Context

Greenleaf Elementary is a K-5 school located in the heart of East Oakland.

Currently we have a population of 401 students. Students and families in

our community are strongly committed to education and the school itself is

perfectly positioned to be a hub for community resources within East Oakland.

Demographics

The neighborhood community surrounding Greenleaf is racially and ethnically

diverse. According to the 2000 census, the community is about 44.1 % Latino,

46.1% African-American, 3.9% Asian, and 2.8% White. The school, however,

does not reflect these same percentages. Over the last decade the school's

Latino population has increased from 45% to 73%, while the African American

population has slowly declined from almost 50% to 21%. Much of this

demographic shift can be attributed to an aging African American population

without school-age children and an influx of young immigrant families into the

community.

Number of students I 345

African American 18.84 %

Asian 2.03 %

Hispanic or Latino 61.16 %


~

Pacific Islander

White (not Hispanic)

2.32

0.87

%

%

!

Multiple or No Response 14.78 %

i Socioeconomicaily Disadvantaged 88 %

! English Learners 65 %

i Students with Disabilities 4%

Whittier's enrollment was on the decline for over five years, with the student

population decreasing by an average of 3% for the past five years. This decline

parallels an enrollment drop for Oakland Unified as a whole, which has also

decreased between 2% and 4% each year over the past five years. High

unemployment rates and rising housing costs are contributing factors to this

1


drop. The average income for the area is $29,968.50 and over 90% of our

students qualify for the Title I funded free or reduced lunch program. While the

majority of families are designated low SES, almost 50% of housing units in our

community are owner occupied, a percentage that is expected to increase. This

suggests more stability for our community as a whole, which brings with it a

vested interest in a successful, sustainable school for the residents. By providing

the students with a learning environment that promotes high academic

achievement we hope to create more opportunities for students in our community

and foster a sense of pride and loyalty that keeps families here.

The change in demographics between African American and Latino students has

caused many tensions between the two groups both inside and outside of

Greenleaf. Our parents report minimal interaction between ethnic groups. They

do not share a common language and do not know each other. The African

American families feel marginalized and disenfranchised, while many of our

Latino families feel isolated due to minimal English skills. Both groups rely on

negative stereotypes to guide their perceptions of one another. As a result, two

different cultures simultaneously co-exist within our community. Unfortunately,

the school community has not paid particular attention to our families' needs.

Many families feel disconnected from the school and do not feel welcome or

comfortable here.

While there are a variety of community resources such as parks, small

businesses, churches, libraries, and health centers nearby, their services are

largely underutilized. Most families feel unsafe walking the streets as a result of

high crime and open prostitution. Students and families do not venture out much

after dark. Concerns around safety and security, as well as after-school

academic and enrichment opportunities are the top priorities with our parents.

Academic Context

Whittier was an underperforming school in both Language Arts and Math. CST

data in Language Arts indicate that of the entire student population, 14% scored

proficient in 2005 and 15% in 2006. In Math, 28% of students were proficient in

2005 and 26% in 2006. Over the last two years, school-wide achievement has

seen only a 1% increase in language arts and a 2% decrease in mathematics. An

analysis of our subgroup data shows that there is an achievement gap between

our Latino and African-American students. In 2006, Latino students scored 14%

proficient in Language Arts and 30 % in Math. Meanwhile, African American

students scored 18% proficient in Language Arts and 16% in Math. This data

indicates that not only are both groups achieving well below the national

standard, but our African American students are performing 4% above Latino

students in Language Arts and 14% below in Math.

2


These data indicate two considerable challenges that Greenleaf must address in

order to become a successful institution that meets the needs of all students: 1.

The school must overcome the achievement gap that exists between Latino

students and African American students in both Language Arts and Math; and 2.

The entire school must see dramatic improvements in Language arts and

Mathematics achievement. The academic programs currently in place at

Greenleaf have not enabled its students to surmount the challenges of a racial

achievement gap and low student achievement school-wide.

Our students need strong reading, writing and verbal language skills in order to

increase their academic achievement in Language Arts and to succeed after they

leave Greenleaf. Over the last four years, Whitteir-Greenleaf has used Open

Court Reading (OCR) for Language Arts instruction. Although some students

have benefited from it, the program's emphasis on direct instruction and rapid

pacing has not met all students' needs. Last year, the school was in the Intensive

Support Network under strict OCR implementation which left students with little

opportunity for enrichment or extension outside the curriculum.

In addition to English Language Arts instruction in OCR, there is also a K-2

bilingual program that serves a large percentage of our English Language

Learners. K-2 bilingual classes teach the majority of the day in Spanish, with a 50

minute block for English. Official transition occurs in 3 rd grade, where all

students are expected to immerse in English. At the beginning of 3 rd grade,

those students who are CELDT level 1 or 2 are tracked into a transition class

where half the year is taught in Spanish and the other half in English. According

to our 3 rd _5 th SEI teachers, as well as our bilingual teachers, there has not been

adequate scaffolding to support students as they transition from Spanish to

English. To address this, a few bilingual teachers in 1 st and 2 nd grade have taken

it upon themselves to early transition students they feel are ready to acquire

academic English. This scaffolding, however, has not been implemented

throughout all of the primary grades, and as a result, there is inconsistent English

instruction in the bilingual classes.

Mathematics instruction at Greenleaf-Whittier has also been insufficient,

especially in meeting the needs of our African American students. The Harcourt-

Brace mathematics program was in place at Whittier for four years. While it has

helped some students to achieve at proficient levels (mainly Latino students), it

also has underserved the majority of students at Greenleaf-Whittier. Just as

strong reading, writing, and verbal language skills are largely lacking among

Greenleaf-Whittier students, numerical literacy, algebraic reasoning, and problem

solving skills are also underdeveloped. Additional factors that contribute to low

mathematics achievement are a daily schedule which permits only 60 minutes of

mathematics instruction and limited after-school options for mathematics

enrichment.

3


Student Needs

Our students entering Kindergarten bring with them an excitement and natural

desire to learn. They are filled with questions about their world and a desire to

succeed. We notice that this curiosity and energy does not stay with them

throughout their elementary experience. By fifth grade only 7% of our students

are proficient in Language Arts and 23% in Math. From conversations with our

surrounding middle school teachers, we understand that students entering middle

school lack the ability to ask probing questions. Furthermore, they are passive

learners accustomed to receiving information rather than seeking it out and often

no longer believe in their ability to succeed. They are disengaged, uninterested,

and far below grade level. Middle school teachers did not feel that students enter

6 th grade adequately prepared for middle school.

Both families and teachers have voiced concerns about how to support struggling

learners. Many of our students seem to fall through the cracks and consistently

perform well-below grade level. They need intensive and accelerated intervention

in order to achieve at high levels. There is not a formal intervention program to

provide them with diversified support and our district-contracted after-school

program does not currently meet their academic needs. In addition to academic

support, our students also need opportunities to extend their learning in other

disciplines and develop strong language skills. They do not have regular access to

effective arts, music, sports, and technology programs that would give them new

experiences on which to develop new learning. Within the community, there are

very few chances for students to extend their learning beyond the school day.

Additionally, our students do not regularly travel outside of the immediate

community. This limits their exposure to diverse opportunities that students in

more affluent communities take for granted.

Many Greenleaf students have soclo-ernotlonal needs that must be addressed in

order for them to succeed. These physical and emotional needs that are not met

interfere directly with student learning. While we do have some services to

address these needs, there are many more that go largely unaddressed. We

have many students who come to school hungry and often visit the office asking

for food or snacks. While Greenleaf does have monthly food bag distribution

from the Alameda County Food Bank, and 90 percent of students receiving free

and reduced lunch, many students spend their time at school distracted because

of inadequate nutrition.

A significant hindrance to student learning at Greenleaf is the large number of

students with emotional needs that are not being adequately addressed.

Behaviors demonstrated by Greenleaf students indicate numerous cases of

depression, anger, defiance, exhaustion, abuse, isolation, and low-self esteem.

4


On a daily basis, students are sent to the office with aggression and defiance

referrals. Others struggle to connect with their fellow students and show signs of

low self-esteem in class participation and peer interaction. Many do not feel a

sense of community with other students and adults on the campus. Others still

demonstrate signs of abuse and abandonment at home. Very little explicit

character education, community buildinq, conflict management, and coping

strategies are taught in class, and they are not supported school-wide. Although

a social worker, two psychology interns, and a nurse are assigned to the school

several days a week, there is still a need for increased mental and physicalhealth

services. Both the wide array of unmet needs and the limited number of

services contribute to a large group of students at Greenleaf that come to school

physically and/or mentally unhealthy and cannot get the most out of their

academic day.

Another major challenge for the Greenleaf community is the instability of the

teaching staff. Over the last decade, staff turnover has been about 50% every

two years. The majority of this mobility occurred within the SEI program. As a

result, the bilingual program has maintained a higher degree of instructional

stability. Seven of the nine current bilingual teachers have been at the site for

four years or more and students, teachers and families have all benefited from

this. Many bilingual students and families know teachers well and are well-known

themselves. This is not necessarily true in the SEI classes where teacher turnover

is high. This has created the feeling of a school within a school, not only for

students and families, but for teachers as well.

The current division of bilingual and Structured English Immersion classes adds

to the tension that exists within the school community. Just as families in the

community hesitate to interact with each other our students do not have the

opportunity to interact on an academic level with one another outside of their

own classrooms. There is a small but stable core of Latino families who

consistently volunteer at the school through formal volunteer vehicles such as the

School Site Council, ELAC, PIQE, parent room representatives and the new school

design team. Our African-American and Asian/Pacific Islander parents however,

are less engaged in these structures and are therefore inadequately represented.

The school must build and maintain structures to support authentic participation

and involvement for all families and harness the collective power of the

community. Greenleaf must be a place that fosters positive interactions between

all people, regardless of race, language, or ethnicity.

Vision

Vision Statement

5


Academic excellence is our goal.

Community is our foundation.

Together, we work and live by the Greenleaf principles of learning:

Integrity, Determination, Pride, and Inquiry

Explanation of our vision

Academic excellence: Students are well-prepared for the rigors of middle

school and are proficient in all of the disciplines. They are avid readers, insightful

writers, and curious scholars. They use academic language and explain their

thinking. They are well informed about the world around them and build on their

prior knowledge. They are critical thinkers and active learners who analyze

situations from all angles and seek new knowledge to help them problem solve.

Foundation of Community: Our community provides the foundation from which

all success is built. The community includes the school, the surrounding

neighborhood, and beyond. Students know their heritage, celebrate the richness

of their community, and embrace their community resources. Adults know

students well and hold them accountable for their actions. The whole community

works to uphold and support the principles that lead to academic excellence.

Principle of Inquiry: Through the principle of Inquiry, students are

excited about learning; they seek new information on their own and are

interested in learning more. They are reflective learners and can apply their

learning to new situations. They look within themselves to understand who

they are and what they believe. They seek to solve problems through

questioning.

Principle of Integrity: Through the principle of Integrity, students are

taught to take responsibility for their actions. They know what's expected

of them and are honest with themselves and others. Students consider

how their actions affect others and act accordingly. They are able to

distinguish between right and wrong and make informed decisions. They

speak up for themselves and provide a voice for those who cannot find

their own. Adults in the community model this principle of learning and

guide students to respect themselves and all members of their school

family.

Principle of Determination: Through the principle of determination,

students set high personal and academic goals for themselves. They are

self-motivated, resilient and focused. They are college-bound. They never

give up.

6


Principle of Pride: Through the principle of pride, our students are proud

of who they are and where they come from. They are confident, competent

and inspired to succeed. They are celebrated inside and outside of school

and know that their community is proud of them.

Theory of Action to Address Student Needs:

In order to ensure that all students meet the standards of excellence at

Greenleaf, our theory of action includes the following elements:

Instruction rooted in the belief that all students can learn.

Central to our goal of high academic achievement for all students is the belief

that all students can learn. Our students are denied a rich, exciting and wellrounded

primary school education that includes the sciences, the arts, literature,

and technology because they are economically deprived minority students. Our

society has created and perpetuated a cycle of low expectations for kids of color,

which has resulted in too much emphasis on rote instruction and basic

remediation. This has, in essence, only set our kids further back and sent them

the message that they are somehow inferior learners. Furthermore, staff and

teachers often lack the belief that our students have the capacity to achieve at

high levels.

The driving force behind our Theory of Action is the belief that, like all children

everywhere, our students are not born smart, but rather they become smart. We

believe that if students think of their intelligence and aptitude as something that

grows with effort and experience, they will be motivated to learn more and

challenge themselves. (Resnick and Hall, 1998) When students not only see the

connection between effort and success, but also experience it for themselves,

they will achieve at high levels. This efforts-based learning model becomes even

more powerful when the adults in a school hold high expectations for themselves

as well as for their students. Teachers must believe that all students can learn. In

absence of high expectations and proper support, a self-fulfilling prophecy is

born: negative expectations lead students to believe they cannot perform and

leads them to give up. (Howard, 1991) One way of interrupting this pattern is by

explicitly teaching students how to learn. This includes viewing student

development as a process of building capacity, which must be effectively

managed and organized by all adults. (Howard, 1991)

Equity pedagogy that makes the school experience interesting and

relevant to students.

7


Our students bring with them a variety of rich experiences and background

knowledge that oftentimes is untapped and unvalidated. Zaretta Hammond

contends that in order to accelerate learning, instruction should be focused on

using a student's strengths in order to help her build a "cognitive toolkit."

(Hammond, 2006) This "deliberate teaching of strategies and designing of

classroom environments to help students from diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural

groups attain the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to function effectively

within a democratic society" is what Hammond defines as an "equity pedagogy."

(Hammond, 2006) We believe that recognizing student knowledge as an asset

rather than a deficit is the first step in creating an instructional environment that

sets students up for success. Hammond outlines six essential instructional norms

that must be in place in order for students in low-performing schools to succeed:

explicit scaffolding toward independent learning; consistent and effective use of

academic language; information processing e.g. developing a specific system for

memory retention and retrieval; reciprocal teaching where students teach

students; meta-cognition and self-regulation of learning; and cultural

competence. We plan to address these six norms utilizing brain-based learning

and an inquiry approach to problem solving.

Brain Based Learning

Leading brain-based theorists have developed their model around three

fundamental components: 1) Initial understanding must be engaged in

order for the learner to replace preconceived notions with new learning; 2)

In order for students to develop inquiry skills, they must have deep factual

knowledge, understand those facts in the context of a conceptual

framework and organize knowledge in a way that makes it easily accessible

and retrievable; and 3) A meta-cognitive approach to instruction i.e.

thinking about thinking, allows students to take control of their own

learning. (National Research Council, 2000) We must provide students with

strong and explicit skills instruction while actively engaging prior knowledge

and their own private understanding of concepts. When students take

control of their own learning, they recognize their role in interpreting

information and the way they use that information to generate new

knowledge.

Inquiry and investigation approach to problem solving.

In order for students to succeed in middle school and beyond, we need to

grow thinkers rather than passive learners. At this point, our students are

used to receiving information instead of seeking it out. We need to teach

and support school-wide specific habits of mind that promote everyday

inquiry. We want our students to be able to solve problems by collecting

evidence, analvzlnq the evidence, presenting an argument, considering all

sides, receiving feedback, refining the product, and developing new

questions. We believe that students learn best by doing, reflecting, thinking

8


critically and seeking new information. Our students must be adept at

developing their personal inquiry skills as well as their academic ones. The

most effective learning occurs when students transfer what they have

learned to various and diverse new situations.(NRC, 2000). Adults must

guide students through this process, providing ample opportunities to

explore different subject matters using a variety of approaches to inquiry.

These are skills that transcend academics and can be applied in all facets of

one's life.

With families as partners, students will feel valued, important, loved, and

supported.

Authentic parent involvement in the academic success of each of their students is

a critical component of individual student achievement. We believe that when

families and teachers act as true co-educators a strong foundation is laid to

support children. The inclusion and participation of the family in children's

education must be valued and supported at the school. Deborah Meier explains

that listening to families is not only an essential element to students thriving as

learners but "the only way to get the full picture of the child, an understanding of

how what we do at school might fit or not fit into what is likely to happen at

home." (Meier, 2002) When adults in children's lives share information, tools and

techniques, they develop powerful partnerships and approaches to teaching each

student. As a result, when children are known well, their needs are easily

identifiable and easily matched to resources.

Students who feel valued will succeed because they want to contribute and they

want to learn more. We believe that positive relationships between all members

of the school community will create an environment that supports high academic

achievement. A true and honest communication between parents, teachers,

students, and administrators will allow us to identify student needs and resources

that meet those needs. They feel supported at home and at school and are truly

known as individuals. They feel safe at school physically, academically, and

emotionally. They are able to take risks and feel supported.

9


(SIngle

(Plan for

(Student

(Jlchievement

School Name: Greenleaf Elementary

CDS Code: 01 612590115618

Greenleaf Eremearary

Oakland Unified School District

FileID Number,_

Introduction Date: 6-11-08

EnactmentNumber: qt 09z 9

EnactmentDate: (,:,-II W

By: (l,p

2007-2010


OAKLAND UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

2008·2009 School Year

Single Plan for Student Achievement Assurance Page

School Name:

~ceenL€6.f"

The following state and federal categorical funding source{s) will be a part of the School-Based Coordinated Program;

School Name:

.,( Title One

~ Economic Impact AidlState Compensatory Education (EINSCE)

¢"'/ Economic Impact Aidllimited English Proficiency (EIAIlEP)

ur School library Improvement Block Grant (SlIBG)

c High Priority Schools Grant (HPSG)

o Quality Education Investment Act (QEIA)

o Program Improvement (PI)

o Gifted and Talented Education (GATE)

• This School Plan has been reviewed by the school s1aff and the School Site Council (SSC). It is approved to

be submitted to the OUSD State Administrator and Board of Education for approval and implementation in the

2008-2009 school year.

• It is the responsibility of the School Site Council to mooitor the implementation and effectiveness of the actions

outlined in the SPSA throughout the 2008-2009 School Year.

• If appropriate, the ~ reviewed English learners data, priority needs, and suggested improvement

strategies on [date):

• The sse developed the 2008-09 Single Site Plan for SfJJdentAchievement through a process of meeting to

analyze student data, set priorities, and finalize action steps on [dates):

• Single Site Plan for Student Achievement 08-09 was approved by the School Site Council on (datel:

0/'

o7;{f SSC Chailp8rson's Name (printed)

$'nie,\", LOQrCoo...

ELAC Chairperson's Name (printed)

tv'1ohi,;]hom 'I S

Principal's Na~m.!JeL:(;"'p~rint--;-ed-;


SECTION 1: Site Plan Narrative

Greenleaf E'''.dIenfary

Greenleaf Elementary is a new, small, K-4 school located in the heart of East Oakland. Our student population consists of322 students, 72% of

which are Latino, 22% African American, and 6% Asian/Pacific Islander.

Academic excellence is our goal.

Community is ourfoundation.

Together, we work and live by the Greenleaf principles of learning :

Integrity, Determination, Pride, and Inquiry

Academic excellence: Students are well-prepared for the rigors of middle school and are proficient in all of the disciplines. They are avid readers,

insightful writers, and curious scholars. They use academic language and explain their thinking. They are well informed about the world around

them and build on their prior knowledge. They are critical thinkers and active learners who analyze situations from all angles and seek new

knowledge to help them problem solve.

Foundation of Community: Our community provides the foundation from which all success is built. The community includes the school, the

surrounding neighborhood, and beyond. Students know their heritage, celebrate the richness of their community, and embrace their community

resources. Adults know students well and hold them accountable for their actions. The whole community works to uphold and support the

principles that lead to academic excellence.

Principle of Inquiry: Through the principle of Inquiry, students are excited about learning; they seek new information on their own and

are interested in learning more. They are reflective learners and can apply their learning to new situations. They look within themselves to

understand who they are and what they believe. They seek to solve problems through questioning.

Principle oflntegrity: Through the principle oflntegrity, students are taught to take responsibility for their actions. They know what's

expected ofthem and are honest with themselves and others. Students consider how their actions affect others and act accordingly. They

are able to distinguish between right and wrong and make informed decisions. They speak up for themselves and provide a voice for those

who cannot find their own. Adults in the community model this principle of learning and guide students to respect themselves and all

members of their school family.

Principle of Determination: Through the principle of determination, students set high personal and academic goals for themselves. They

are self-motivated, resilient and focused. They are college-bound. They never give up.

Principle of Pride: Through the principle of pride, our students are proud of who they are and where they come from. They are confident,

competent and inspired to succeed. They are celebrated inside and outside of school and know that their community is proud of them.

Principallnilials: M Wi SSC Chairperson Initials: t

'L, Date: _'1-f0_Z--,Li/r--0-",


Greenleaf El


Greenleaf Erementary

easily accessible and retrievable; and 3) A meta-cognitive approach to instruction i.e. thinking about thinking, allows students to take

control of their own learning. (National Research Council, 2000) We must provide students with strong and explicit skills instruction while

actively eugaging prior knowledge and their own private understanding of concepts. When students take control of their own learning, they

recognize their role in interpreting information and the way they use that information to generate new knowledge.

Inquiry and investigation approach to problem solving.

In order for students to succeed in middle school and beyond, we need to grow thinkers rather than passive learners. At this point, our

students are used to receiving information instead of seeking it out. We need to teach and support school-wide specific habits of mind that

promote everyday inquiry. We want our students to be able to solve problems by collecting evidence, analyzing the evidence, presenting

an argument, considering all sides, receiving feedback, refining the product, and developing new questions. We believe that students learn

best by doing, reflecting, thinking critically and seeking new information. Our students must be adept at developing their personal inquiry

skills as well as their academic ones. The most effective learning occurs when students transfer what they have learned to various and

diverse new situations. (NRC, 2000). Adults must guide students through this process, providing ample opportunities to explore different

subject matters using a variety of approaches to inquiry. These are skills that transcend academics and can be applied in all facets of one's

life.

With families as partners, students will feel valued, important, loved, and supported.

Authentic parent involvement in the academic success of each of their students is a critical component of individual student achievement. We

believe that when families and teachers act as true co-educators a strong foundation is laid to support children. The inclusion and participation of

the family in children's education must be valued and supported at the school. Deborah Meier explains that listening to farnilies is not only an

essential element to students thriving as learners but "the only way to get the full picture of the child, an understanding of how what we do at

school might fit or not fit into what is likely to happen at home." (Meier, 2002) When adults in children's lives share information, tools and

techniques, they develop powerful partnerships and approaches to teaching each student. As a result, when children are known well, their needs

are easily identifiable and easily matched to resources.

Students who feel valued will succeed because they want to contribute and they want to learn more. We believe that positive relationships between

all members of the school community will create an environment that supports high academic achievement. A true and honest communication

between parents, teachers, students, and administrators will allow us to identify student needs and resources that meet those needs. They feel

supported at home and at school and are truly known as individuals. They feel safe at school physically, academically, and emotionally. They are

able to take risks and feel supported.

Principal In~ials; Mm SSC Chairperson Initials: _L_l-'-


SECTION 2: Needs Assessment and Data Review

Greenleaf Elementary

Your SSC has reviewed data throughout the 2006-2007 school year to inform both the revision of your current site plan and the development of

this new multi-year site plan. Please refer to data inquiry protocols and/or additional notes that your School Site Council has completed at

previous meetings. Specifically review the Goals and Targets score card and MUltiyear Data Sheet and attach both reports here. All data

reports and protocols are available online at http://dwreports.ousd.k12.ca.u5.

Principal Initials: sse Chairperson Inilials: Dale: _ 7


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Greenleaf Elementary

12


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--

Greenleaf Elementary

14


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Greenleaf Elementary

16


.' OAKLAND UNIFIED

'V SCHOOL DISTRICT

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1


ELA Mid Year Benchmark Results - Janu81Y2008

Greenleaf Elementary

0fIica': CII::IMtU, SUR'll

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"1JMittr/ "fl'Da!PS4/rH ftD lt6" 6JtridmlS

Principallnitlals: SSCChairpersonInitials: _

Ck_

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Dale: _

Greenleaf Lrementary

19


Math Mid Year Benchmark Results - January 2008

Greet11enfElementary

I

:o>mmt. 0I5ca': iC


SECTION 3: District Goals and School Targets

DISTRICT GOAL AREAS DISTRICT 5-YEAR GOALS

Academic Acceleration -> 1. All students read and write by the end of third grade

2. All students succeed in Algebra by the end of nInth grade

College Readiness -> 3. All students graduate prepared to succeed in college and the work place

Cultural Responsiveness and Emotional Security·> 4. All students and adults respect one another and work together across cultures

5. All employees are high performers

Clean, Healthy, and Safe Learning Environment -> 6. All schools are healthy, clean, and safe

Greenleaf E.~..rentary

Your school has district-set academic targets in the areas of math, English Language Arts (ELA), and English Language Development (ELD). In

math and ELA. your SMARTE target is based upon the percentage of students at or above proficiency on the CST (CAHSEE for high school). If

your school did not meet its Annual Yearly Progress (AYP), your AYP targets for all students and all subgroups is your goal. If your school did

make its AYP targets last year, your target is 5 percentage points higher than last year. For English Language Learners. your goal is for all

students to advance one CELDT Jevelper year. These targets come from your School Score Card. In addition, identify one or two school

climate SMARTE' targets from your score card for your school next year.

ACCELERATED ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AND COLLEGE READINESS

Target #1: 47.5% of students overall and in each subgroup score proficient or above in math

Target #2: 46% of students overall and in each subgroup score proficient or above in ELA

Target #3: 100% of EL students will advance 1 proficiency level per year on CELDT

Target #4:

Target #5:

CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS, EMOTIONAL SECURITY AND CLEAN, HEALTHY, SAFE lEARNING ENVIRONMENT I

Target #6: Students, staff and families contribute to a safe, clean, and healthy learning environment that supports high student

achievement.

Targel#7:

I SMARTE targets are-roe-cific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, Time-bound, and EqUila~e I

Principal Initials: /VI sse Chairperson Initials: 1 .l, Dale: "I 2":1 0 (

I J

10

. - ---------------------'


SCHOOL: Greenleaf

SECTI0NS4 & 5: Academic and Schoo IC Iimate Act on PI an WIt . hB U]!Iet d AvaIIable for2 0082009 .

Priority Actions Practices . StudentG~ups M,88ure of BUdget: . ~BOUn:e . Resource ObJ&wBa.".i : i I ! 'TEACHERS. -'~-~i-~'--

1'----------'--

,Language Before and after schoollntervenllon for ,,'Hal BeJow BasiC, 1 ~ i ; i ISALAR1ES: J'

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I

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I

English Reading Inlerventlon, Ell support, Far Below Basic, i I ; :1 ! JTEACHERS ! J 1 I

language ICultural Competency, and Academic, !Below Basic, I 'I·) iSALARIES ~., '

Arts !Lanal!~rogram Design , .. iPLCS;l--lql_J~nd Basic I,'CST lives r3010 1.!Title I. -.rl1120 /STIPENDS .. 1--t~2,900C~_ITeecl1ec Ext "" -i

English

tprofessional development in PLCs,

IReadin

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Inlervenllon. ELL support,!

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I, \' I, I . \ 1 __ ., _.

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Principal's Initials; M ~ sse Chairperson'SlnitiSIS:-..b.L

l-j/1oJ L

D.",:~g


SCHOOL: Greenleaf

SECTIONS & 5 A d dS h 'CII teActl PI -th B d A -, bl ~ 2008 2009

4 : ca emcan c 00 ma on an WI u~get val a e or 0

.rt.,ay Actions .-.Student Gr:oups Measure of BUdget Resource Rooource Object ObJectHame Posftlon fTE Budget. No'"

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SCHOOL: Greenleaf·

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IS


SCHOOL: Greenleaf

SECTION: 6 Monitorin!! Plan

PrIorlf,y _. A.Uono

.

Measureof Por$on Responslbfe

SUccesS

I i Principal. Reading Specialist. !

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i!School Climate

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;


-

Appendix A: School Site Council Memb.ership

Greenleaf Elementary

.Education Code Section 64001(g) requires that the SPSA be reviewed and updated at least annually, including

proposed expenditures of funds allocated to the through the Consolidated Application, by the school site council. The

current make-up of the school site council is as follows: 2

Names of Members

Monica Thomas X

Amy Youngs X

Victor Reynaga X

e '-

Shiela Loarca X

'0 _ ..e c: " .... ~=

«l .2

.l:-

0'"

o ~ofi "il::

"'$ ~§1 "'''' c:-o


[;'"

o ::l

E~

o..g:::; " ",,,,

0.. o .s -

0 U '"

Luis zamora X

Elizabeth Devora X

Juanita Galaviz X

Maria Socorro Yanez X

Minerva Lopez X

LuisVenero X

Numbers of members of each category I 3 1 5

2 At elementary schools, the school site council must be constitutedto ensure parity between (a) the principal, classroom

teachers, and other school personnel, and (b) parents of students attending the school or other community members. Classroom

teachers must comprise a majority of persons representedunder section (a). At secondary schools there must be, in addition, equal

numbers of parentsiX\tf:community members selectedby earenls, and students. Me!l'prs mrst be selected by their peer group.

Prtncipal lnitials: SSC Chairperson Initials: 1, 7.. Date: '1_Z'1 _0.( 12

I


OAKLAND UNIFIED

SCHOOL DISTRICT

School Accountability Report Card Reported

School Year 2007-08

(Published During 2008-09)

Executive Summary School Accountability Report Card

Greenleaf Elementary School

IAddress: 116328East 17th SI., Oakland CA 94621 IIPhone: 11510-87g-1630

IPrincipal: IIMonica Thomas IIGrade Span: IIK"----=-3 _

This executive summary of the School Accountability Report Card (SARC) is intended to provide parents and

community members with a quick snapshot of school accountability. The data presented in this report are reported for

the 2007-08 school year, except the School Finances and School Completion data that are reported for the 2006-07

school year. For additional information about the school, parents and community members should review the entire

SARC or contact the school principai or the district office.

About This School

IVision Statement

i Academic excellence is our goal.

Community is our foundation.

Together, we work and live by the Greenleaf principles of learning:

Integrity, Determination, Pride, and Inquiry

Student Enrollment

African American

American Indian or Alaska Native %

Asian

Filipino

2.03 %

Hispanic or Latino 61.45 %

Pacific isiander 2.32 %

White (not Hispanic)

%

0.87 %

Multiple or No Response

14.2 %

Socioeconomicaliy Disadvantaged

88 %

English Learners 65 %

Students with Disabilities

4 %

Total Number of students

Teachers


I dl t T h

I Teachers with full credential I 16

I

i Teachers without full credential 2

i Teachers Teaching Outside Subject Area of Competence 0

l Misassignments of Teachers of English Learners 0

! Total Teacher Misassignments 0

School Facilities

Summary of Most Recent Site Inspection - Repairs Needed - Corrective Actions Taken or Planned

IWhittier entered the New School Incubator 2 years ago, engaging in a full-scale school re-design.

IIThrOUgha collaborative process between parents, teachers, students, and administrators, Whittier

designed a new small school, Greenleaf that holds all school stakeholders to high achievement.

Whittier School was built in 1957 and has gone through several modernizations to keep pace with

the demands of the 21't century. Originally built to house 15 classrooms, the population growth over

,the years has spurred the need for 11 portables to be added to the campus.

I The latest steps in modernizing the facility are:

A new fire alarm system is installed.

Site fencing is being replaced.

I New security window screens and interior window blinds.

, New flooring and lighting in the halls.

Exterior restroom remodeled.

I

Curriculum and Instructional Materials

Core Curriculum Areas Pupils Who Lack Textbooks and lnstructlonal Materials

Reading/Language Arts 0

! ,

I

Mathematics

Science

0

0

History-Social Science 0

Foreign Language N/A

I Health N/A

Visual and Performing Arts N/A

I Science Laboratory Equipment (grades 9-12) N/A

School Finances

Student Performance

SUbject Students Proficient and Above on California Standards Tests

English-Language Arts 28 %

I Mathematics 49 %

I Science N/A

i History-Social Science N/A

Academic Progress

Indicator Result


2008 Growth API Score (from 2008 Growth API Report) 718 I

Statewide Rank (from 2007 Base API Report) I

_I

L-- ----'2:.:0:..:0:..:8_'-0:..:9_'P-'r~og"'r:..:am:.::...:l::.:m"'p:..:ro:..:ve:::m=en_'t_'S:..:la:.:t:::us'-"-(P:..:I-'Y:..:e:::ar:..:)---' _ _'N:..:o:.:l:..:in.::..:-P'-I


2007 -08 School Accountability Report Card Report (SARC)

The School Accountability Report Card (SARC), which is required by law to be published annually, contains information

about the condition and performance of each California public school. More information about SARC requirements is

avaiiable at the SARC Web site. For additional information about the school, parents and community members shouid

contact the school principal or the district office.

I. Data and Access

DataQuest

DataQuest is an online data tool that contains additional information about this school and comparisons of the school to

the district, the county, and the state. Specifically, DataQuest is a dynamic system that provides reports for accountabiiity

(e.g. Academic Performance Index [API], Adequate Yearly Progress [AYPj), test data, enrollment, graduates, dropouts,

course enrollments, staffing, and data regarding English learners.

Internet Access

Internet access is available at public libraries and other locations that are publicly accessible (e.g., the California State

Library). Access to the Internet at libraries and public locations is generally provided on a first-come, first-served basis.

Other use restrictions include the hours of operation, the length of time that a workstation may be used (depending on

availabiiity), the types of software programs avaiiable on a workstation, and the ability to print documents.

Phone Number

II. About This School

Contact Information (School Year 2008-09)

Oakland ,CA 94621

This section provides the schools contact information.

,School Name Greenleaf Elementary District Name

Street 6328 East 17th St. Phone Number

City, State, Zip

510-879-1630 Superintendent

Principal Monica Thomas E-mail Address

Web Site www.ousd.k12.ca.us

Dr. Roberta Mayor

rOberta.mayor@ousd.k12.ca.us

E-mail Address monica. thomas@ousd.k12.ca.us

CDS Code 01-61259-0115618

School Description and Mission Statement (School Year 2007-08)

This section provides Information about the school's goals and programs

Vision Statement

Academic excellence is our goal.

Community is our foundation.

Together, we work and live by the Greenleaf principles of learning:

Integrity, Determination, Pride, and Inquiry

Explanation of our vision:

Academic excellence: Students are well-prepared for the rigors of middle school and are

proficient in all of the disciplines. They are avid readers, insightful writers, and curious scholars.

Foundation of Community: Our community provides the foundation from which all success is

built. The community includes the school, the surrounding neighborhood, and beyond.

Principle of Inquiry: Through the principle of lnquiry, students are excited about learning; they

seek new information on their own and are interested in learning more. They are reflective learners

and can apply their learning to new situations.


Principle of Integrity: Through the principle of Integrity, students are taught to take responsibility

for their actions. They know what's expected of them and are honest with themselves and others.

I

I

iPrinciple of Determination: Through the principle of determination, students set high personal

land academic goals for themselves. They are self-motivated, resilient and focused.

I

i

Principle of Pride: Through the principle of pride, our students are proud of who they are and

where they come from. They are confident, competent and inspired to succeed.

Opportunities for Parental Involvement (School Year 2007-08)

This section provides information about opportunities for parents to become involved with school activities.

Greenleaf Academy actively involves parents in all aspects of its instructional programs. Families

are encouraged to attend our SSC and ELAC meetings. During our meetings, we often discuss

and analyze state data as well as District test data such as OCR/Foro Abierto and mathematics.

We also discuss our school site plane and evaluate our plan to see if our programs are serving the

needs of our students

Student Enrollment by Grade Level (School Year 2007-08)

This table displays the number of students enrolled in each grade level at the school.

Kindergarten

Grade 1

Grade 2 95

Grade 3 84

Grade 4 o

Grade 5 o

Grade 6 o

Grade 7 o

Grade 8 o

Ungraded Elementary o

Grade 9 o

Grade 10 o

Grade 11 o

Grade 12 o

Ungraded Secondary o

Total Enrollment 345

Student Enrollment by Group (School Year 2007-08)

This table displays the percent of students enrolled at the school who are identified as being in a particular group.

Group Percent of Total Enrollment

African American 19.13 %

American Indian or Alaska Native %

Asian 2.03 %

Filipino %

I Hispanic or Latino 61.45 %

Pacific Islander 2.32 %

White (not Hispanic) 0.87 %

Multiple or No Response 14.2 %

I Socioeconomically Disadvantaged 88 %

67

99


Students with Disabilities 4%

Average Class Size and Class Size Distribution (Elementary)

This table displays by grade level the average class size and the number of classrooms that fall into each size category (a

range of total students per classroom).

2005-06 2006-07 2007-08

Grade Number of Number of Number of

Level Avg. Class Classrooms Avg. Class Classrooms Avg. Class Classrooms

S· S S·

,

I 3 I 21.0 1.0 3.0

! 4 [

5 [

6 I

I K-3

i 3-4

! 4-8

I

I

I

I H

Other I I-I II II -----r-I

III. School Climate

School Safety Plan (School Year 2007-08)

This section provides information about the school's comprehensive safety plan.

The school reviewed, revised and submitted to the Board in 07-08 an updated Safety Plan that

included: school site safety programs, procedures for complying with school safety laws, and

Disaster/Emergency/Crisis Response procedures. Our comprehensive school safety plan includes

assessing the current status of school crime committed on campus, identifying appropriate

strategies and programs that will provide and maintain a high level of school safety, and addressing

procedures for complying with existing laws related to school safety.

[Yard duty occurs at all recesses and lunchtime. Students are not allowed to leave school premises

with anyone other than their parent or guardian, or any other designated adult listed on the

student's emergency card. Students must be signed out in the office by the parent or designee prior

to leaving the school grounds.

Suspensions and Expulsions

This table displays the rate of suspensions and expulsions (the total number of incidents divided by the total enrollment) at

the school and district levels for the most recent three-year period.

School District

Rate

2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08

Suspens 65

Expulsions o o 0.0 0.2 0.1 0.1

IV. School Facilities

Facility Conditions and Planned Improvements (School Year 2008-09)

This section provides information about the condition of the school's grounds, buildings, and restrooms, and a description


of any planned or recently completed facility improvements.

iWhittier entered the New School Incubator 2 years ago, engaging in a full-scale school re-design.

, .

IThrough a collaborative process between parents, teachers, students, and administrators, Whittier

Idesigned a new small school, Greenleaf that holds all school stakeholders to high achievement.

IWhittier School was built in 1957 and has gone through several modernizations to keep pace with

Ithe demands of the 21 st century. Originally built to house 15 classrooms, the population growth over

Ithe years has spurred the need for 11 portables to be added to the campus.

I

l

iThe latest steps in modernizing the facility are:

A new fire alarm system is installed.

Site fencing is being replaced.

New security window screens and interior window blinds.

New flooring and lighting in the halls.

IExterior restroom remodeled.

School Facility Good Repair Status (School Year 2008-09)

This table displays the results of the most recently completed school site inspection to determine the school facility's good

repair status.

Item Inspected

IGas Leaks X

Mechanical Systems X

IWindowslDoors/Gates (interior and exterior) X

Repair Status

Good Fair Poor

Interior Surfaces (walls, floors, and ceilings) X New floors 08

Hazardous Materials (interior or exterior) X

Structural Damage X

Fire Safety X

Electrical (interior or exterior) X

PesWermin Infestation X

iDrinking Fountains (inside and outside) X

iRestrooms X Some new

Sewer X

IPlayground/School Grounds X

Roofs X

Overall Cleanliness X

Repair Needed and Action Taken or Planned

Overall Summary of School Facility Good Repair Status (School Year 2008-09)

This table displays the overall summary of the results of the most recently completed school site inspection.

Overall Summary

v. Teachers

Teacher Credentials

This tabie displays the number of teachers assigned to the school with a full credential, without a full credential, and those

teaching outside of their subject area of competence. Detailed information about teacher qualifications can be found at the

DataQuest Web site.

School District


With Full Credential

1 Without Full Credential

_I _ Teaching Outside Subject Area of Competence

1 Misassignments

2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2007 -08

Teacher Misassignments and Vacant Teacher Positions

This table displays the number of teacher misassignments (teachers assigned without proper legal authorization) and the

number of vacant teacher positions (not filled by a single designated teacher assigned to teach the entire course at the

beginning of the school year or semester). Note: Total Teacher Misassignments includes the number of Misassignments

of Teachers of English learners.

Indicator 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09

of Teachers of English learners N/A 0 1

Total Teacher Misassignments N/A 1 0 1

r Vacant Teacher Positions N/A 0 0

Core Academic Classes Taught by No Child Left Behind Compliant Teachers

(School Year 2006-07)

This table displays the percent of classes in core academic subjects taught by No Child left Sehind (NClS) compliant and

non-NClS compliant teachers at the school, at all schools in the district, at high-poverty schools in the district, and at lowpoverty

schools in the district. More information on teacher qualifications required under NClS can be found at the NClS

Web site.

location of Classes

.. :.. .. ... :.. ..

I This School r 94.1 5.9

r All Schools in District I 88.1 11.9

IHigh-Poverty Schools in District I 91.7 8.3

I low-Poverty Schools in District I 97.9 2.1 I

VI. Support Staff

Academic Counselors and Other Support Staff (School Year 2007-08)

This table displays, in units of full-time equivalents (FTE), the number of academic counselors and other support staff who

are assigned to the school and the average number of students per academic counselor. One FTE equals one staff

member working full time; one FTE could also represent two staff members who each work 50 percent of full time.

Title

Number of FTE Assigned to Average Number of Students per Academic

School Counselor

Academic Counselor 0 N/A

Library Media Teacher (Librarian) 0 N/A

Library Media Services Staff

(paraprofessional)

1 N/A

Psychologist 0 N/A

Social Worker 0 N/A

Nurse 0.1 N/A

Speech/language/Hearing Specialist 0 N/A

I Resource Specialist (non-teaching) 2 N/A

Other 13 N/A

VII. Curriculum and Instructional Materials

Quality, Currency, Availability of Textbooks and Instructional Materials (School


I

,

,

Year 2008-09)

This table displays information about the quality, currency, and availability of the standards-aligned textbooks and other

instructional materials used at the school, and information about the school's use of any supplemental curriculum or nonadopted

textbooks or instructional materials.

Core Curriculum Area

Quality, Currency, and Availability of

Textbooks and Instructional Materials

Percent of Pupils Who Lack Their Own

Assigned Textbooks and Instructional

Materials

Reading/Language Arts I 100% 0

Mathematics I 100% 0

Science I 100% I 0

History-Social Science 100% 0

Foreign Language N/A 0

Health N/A 0

I Visual and Performing Arts N/A 0

Science Laboratory

I N/A , 0

Equipment (grades 9-12)

,

VIII. School Finances

Expenditures Per Pupil and School Site Teacher Salaries (Fiscal Year 2006-07)

School opened in 07-08

This table displays a comparison of the school's per pupil expenditures from unrestricted (basic) sources with other

schools in the district and throughout the state, and a comparison of the average teacher salary at the school site with

average teacher salaries at the district and state levels. Detailed information regarding school expenditures can be found

at the Current Expense of Education Web page and teacher salaries can be found on the Certificated Salaries and

Benefites Web page.

.- . .. . . .. - .. .- . .- Average

.. ~ .. . ... . . .

Teacher Salary

School Site N/A N/A N/A N/A

District N/A N/A N/A $53868

Percent Difference -

School Site and District

N/A N/A N/A N/A

! State N/A N/A $5300 $65008

! Percent Difference -

School Site and State

N/A N/A N/A N/A

Types of Services Funded (Fiscal Year 2007-08)

This section provides information about the programs and supplemental services that are available at the school and

funded through either categorical or other sources.

This school strategically allocates its resources to support professional development for teachers

and inside and outside of classroom intervention and extracurricular opportunities for students.

l 'specificaIlY, the school served 103 students

coaches: Math, literacy and EL.

in the after school programs, and has 3 part time site

Teacher and Administrative Salaries (Fiscal Year 2006-07)

This table displays district-level salary information for teachers, principals, and superintendents, and compares these

figures to the state averages for districts of the same type and size. The table also displays teacher and administrative

salaries as a percent of a district's budget, and compares these figures to the state averages for districts of the same type

and size. Detailed information regarding salaries may be found on the Certificated Salaries and Benefits Web page.

Category District Amount State Average For Districts In Same Category

Beginning Teacher Salary $38778 $40721


! Mid-Range Teacher Salary I $53394 I $65190

! Highest Teacher Salary I $69714 I $84151

1

I

1

Average Principal Salary (Elementary)

Average Principal Salary (Middle)

I

I

$86673

$87127

I

I

$104476

$108527

I

I Average Principal Salary (High) I $89006 I $119210

I Superintendent Salary I $240000 I $210769

,

Percent of Budget for Teacher Salaries I 29.3% I 39.9%

i

i Percent of Budget for Administrative Salaries I 6.7% I 5.5%

IX. Student Performance

California Standards Tests

The California Standards Tests (CSTs) show how well students are doing in relation to the state content standards. The

CSTs include English-language arts (ELA) and mathematics in grades 2 through 11; science in grades 5, 8, and 9 through

11; and history-social science in grades 8, and 10 through 11. Student scores are reported as performance levels.

Detailed information regarding CST results for each grade and performance level, including the percent of students not

tested, can be found on the Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Results Web page.

CST Results for All Students - Three-Year Comparison

This table displays the percent of students achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level (meeting or exceeding the state

standards).

English-Language Arts

Mathematics

Science

History-Social Science

Note: Scores are not shown when the number of students tested is 10 or less because the number of students in this

category is too small for statistical accuracy or privacy protection. In no case shall any group score be reported that

would deliberately or inadvertently make public the score or performance of any individual student.

CST Results by Student Group - Most Recent Year

This table displays the percent of students, by group, achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level (meeting or exceeding

the state standards) for the most recent testing period.

African American

American Indian or Alaska Native

Asian

Filipino

Hispanic or Latino 28

Pacific Islander


White (not Hispanic)


Male

Female

Economically Disadvantaged

English Learners 25 50

Students with Disabilities

Students Receiving Migrant Education

Services


24

32

27



Note: Scores are not shown when the number of students tested is 10 or less because the number of students in this

category is too small for statistical accuracy or privacy protection. In no case shall any group score be reported that


52


46

52

50



would deliberately or inadvertently make public the score or performance of any individual student.

X. Accountability

Academic Performance Index

The Academic Performance Index (API) is an annual measure of the academic performance and progress of schools in

California. API scores range from 200 to 1,000, with a statewide target of 800. Detailed information about the API can be

found at the API Web page.

API Ranks - Three-Year Comparison

This table displays the school's statewide and similar schools API ranks. These ranks are published when the Base API is

released each March. The statewide API rank ranges from 1 to 10. A statewide rank of 1 means that the school has an

API score in the lowest 10 percent of all schools in the state, while a statewide rank of 10 means that the school has an

API score in the highest 10 percent of all schools in the state. The similar schools API rank reflects how a school

compares to 100 statistically matched "similar schools." A similar schools rank of 1 means that the school's academic

performance is comparable to the lowest performing 10 schools of the 100 similar schools, while a similar schools rank of

10 means tha: t~e ."~hOOI'Sacademic performance is bett~~ than at least 90 of :h,e.100 similar SChOOI:~

Statewide

~

"N/A" means a number is not applicable or not available due to missing data.

"." means this API is calculated for a small school, defined as having between 11 and 99 valid Standardized Testing

and Reporting (STAR) Program test scores included in the API. The API is asterisked if the school was small either

in 2007 or 2008. APls based on small numbers of students are less reliable and therefore should be carefully

interpreted.

"A" means the school or subqroups scored at or above the statewide performance target of 800 in 2008.

"6" 0115618

"C" means the school had significant demographic changes and will not have any growth or target information.

"D" means this is either an LEA, an Alternative Schools Accountability Model (ASAM) school, or a special education

school. Target information is not applicable to LEAs, ASAM schools, or special education schools.

"E" indicates this school was an ASAM school in the 2007 Base API Report and has no target information even though

the school is no longer an ASAM school.

API Changes by Student Group - Three-Year Comparison

This table displays by student group the actual API changes in points added or lost for the past three years, and the most

recent APi score. Note: "N/A" means that the student group is not numerically significant.

All Students at the School N/A N/A

African American N/A N/A

American Indian or Alaska Native N/A N/A

Asian N/A N/A

Filipino N/A N/A

Hispanic or Latino N/A N/A 718

Pacific Islander N/A N/A

White (not Hispanic) N/A N/A

Socioeconomically Disadvantaged N/A N/A 718

English Learners N/A N/A 710

Students with Disabilities N/A N/A

"N/A" means a number is not applicable or not available due to missing data.

"." means this API is calculated for a small school, defined as having between 11 and 99 valid Standardized Testing

and Reporting (STAR) Program test scores included in the API. The API is asterisked if the school was small either

in 2007 or 2008. APls based on small numbers of students are less reliable and therefore should be carefully

interpreted.

"A" means the school or subgroups scored at or above the statewide performance target of 800 in 2008.


"B" means the school did not have a valid 2007 Base API and will not have any growth or target information.

"C" means the school had significant demographic changes and will not have any growth or target information.

"0" means this is either an lEA, an Alternative Schools Accountability Model (ASAM) schooi, or a special education

school. Target information is not applicable to lEAs, ASAM schools, or special education schools.

"E" indicates this school was an ASAM school in the 2007 Base API Report and has no target information even though

the school is no longer an ASAM school.

Adequate Yearly Progress

The federal NClB act requires that all schools and districts meet the following Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) criteria:

Participation rate on the state's standards-based assessments in English-language arts (ELA) and mathematics

Percent proficient on the state's standards-based assessments in ELA and mathematics

API as an additional indicator

Graduation rate (for secondary schools)

Detailed information about AYP, including participation rates and percent proficient results by student group, can be found

at the AYP Web page.

AYP Overall and by Criteria (School Year 2007-08)

This table displays an indication of whether the school and the district made AYP overall and whether the school and the

district met each of the AYP criteria.

AYP Criteria School District

Overall No No

Participation Rate - English-language Arts Yes No

Participation Rate - Mathematics Yes No

Percent Proficient - English-language Arts No No

Percent Proficient - Mathematics Yes No

API Yes Yes

I Graduation Rate N/A Yes

Federal Intervention Program (School Year 2008-09)

Schools and districts receiving federal Title I funding enter Program Improvement (PI) if they do not make AYP for two

consecutive years in the same content area (English-language arts or mathematics) or on the same indicator (API or

graduation rate). After entering PI, schools and districts advance to the next level of intervention with each additional year

that they do not make AYP. Detailed information about PI identification can be found at the AYP Web page.

Indicator School District

Program Improvement Status Not in PI In PI

First Year of Program Improvement 2004-2005

Year in Program Improvement Year 3

Number of Schools Currently in Program Improvement N/A 67

Percent of Schools Currently in Program Improvement N/A 46.2

XI. School Completion and Postsecondary Preparation

Not applicable for Elementary Schools

XII. Instructional Planning and Scheduling

Professional Development

This section provides information on the annual number of school days dedicated to staff development for the most recent

three-year period.


There are 3 full school days of professional development each year, and every Wednesday for one

hour and a half. We believe that our greatest resource in improving our students' achievement is

'our teachers. Just as with our students, our teachers need to have the opportunity to ponder,

!explore, and analyze in wide variety of contexts. Toward this end, we develop strong "professional

jleaming communities," where teachers are expected to collaborate on a regular basis with their

[colleaques. But simply having teachers get together does not equal collaboration. Meetings must

Icenter on student data, with measurable goals and outcomes. Teachers focus on their practice and

,use the meetings

,providing specific,

to reflect

relevant

on ways to improve student achievement. We support teachers by

professional development as well as organizational and structural

support. The School Site Plan includes funds allocated for substitutes and conferences in order to

I

Isupport teachers in their professional development. Support staff is also provided professional

[development by the district.

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