Viva Lewes Issue #141 June 2018

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141

VIVALEWES

EDITORIAL

If only, I’ve often thought, the Argos carpark could be

turned into a pub garden for the John Harvey Tavern,

then Lewes would have the chance to make something of

its riverside location.

But when you think of it, we’ve pretty much done our

best to turn our back on the Ouse, in recent times. If you

get the right seats at either of the cafés in the Riverside, you can see a stretch of water, and the

Harvey’s ‘cathedral’ is in a fine location, but beyond that, the only business that really makes

the most of the river running past it is Tesco.

Which is one of the reasons why the redevelopment of the Phoenix Industrial Estate is such a

hot topic. Whatever you think should happen there, you’ve got to agree that increasing public

access to the river must be one of the developers’ priorities.

We’ve made ‘water’ the theme of this issue, and it’s been a blast researching it, especially since

our succession of mini heatwaves has made splashing around in the wet stuff such an attractive

proposition. We join some all-weather swimmers in Seaford, we go out to sea with the RNLI,

we mull over the benefits of wild swimming, and we go back in time to the Pells Pool, fed by a

supply of fresh spring water from the aquifer below.

Will the summer of 2018 be a hot one? The Express promises a ‘SCORCHER’ (as they always

do): whatever the weather, we hope you get the chance to spend some of it by the water’s edge.

Enjoy the issue…

THE TEAM

.....................

EDITOR: Alex Leith alex@vivamagazines.com

SUB-EDITOR: David Jarman

DEPUTY EDITOR: Rebecca Cunningham rebecca@vivamagazines.com

ART DIRECTOR: Katie Moorman katie@vivamagazines.com

ADVERTISING: Sarah Hunnisett, Amanda Meynell advertising@vivamagazines.com

EDITORIAL / ADMIN ASSISTANT: Kelly Hill admin@vivamagazines.com

DISTRIBUTION: David Pardue distribution@vivamagazines.com

CONTRIBUTORS: Jacky Adams, William Andrews, Ben Bailey, Michael Blencowe, Sarah Boughton, Mark Bridge,

Emma Chaplin, Daniel Etherington, Mark Greco, Anita Hall, John Henty, Mat Homewood, Chloë King,

Jo Jackson, Dexter Lee, Lizzie Lower, Carlotta Luke, Richard Madden, Galia Pike and Marcus Taylor

PUBLISHER: Becky Ramsden becky@vivamagazines.com

Viva Lewes is based at Pipe Passage, 151b High Street, Lewes, BN7 1XU, 01273 480131. Advertising 01273 488882


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PUTTING

LEARNING

TO WORK


THE ‘WATER’ ISSUE

CONTENTS

Bits and bobs.

Mary Fellows on the making of this

month’s colourful cover (8-9); Chris

Oakley’s Lewes (11); into the brine with

the Seaford Mermaids (19), and various

other clocks and snaps and plaques and

books and pubs and bobs.

8

Columns.

Our columnists go to the pictures…

Chloë King is left holding the baby

(27), while David Jarman gets zero for

conduct (29).

On this month.

mr jukes dismounts his Bombay bike at

Love Supreme (31); William Andrews

gets us in the mood for Edinburgh

Festival (33); it’s Dallowday at Monk’s

House (35); we look forward to the

South of England Show at Ardingly

(37); we talk to Richard Power Sayeed

about the false promise(s) of 1997 (39);

one-offs and festivals at the Depot

(41); Annika Brown sympathises with

the devil… and John Agard (43), and

there’s plenty of classical music, from

New Sussex Opera (45) to the Lewes

Chamber Music Festival (47).

Art.

Patricia Thornton is on the move at

Martyrs’ Gallery (49), and there’s plenty

more on our gallery walls, in Lewes and

beyond, from Jason Tremlett to Alison

Wilding (51-55).

Listings and Free Time.

If it’s on, it’s in, basically. We bring

you a smorgasbord of economists and

comedians, shows and booze-ups,

quizzes and festivals, gardens and gin,

plays and walks (57-63).

Photo by Alison Buchanan


THE ‘WATER’ ISSUE

Plus a super-full classical round-up

(64-65) and a fine array of live bands,

including old punks Spear of Destiny

and, excitingly, The Members (67-69).

Then there’s sick stuff from legends

catering for the town’s U16s (71-73).

Food.

Vegan pulled pork and legendary

banana bread at Trading Post (75);

barbecued mackerel, Mamoosh-style

(76-77); falafels at the Friday Market

(79), and all the other food news (81).

86

The way we work.

Alison Buchanan gets taken out to sea

by the brave chaps (and chapesses) of

the Newhaven RNLI, asking them:

what do you do on dry land? (82-85).

Features.

Ryan Kearley, Barcombe boat-builder

(86-87); Michael Blencowe suggests

wariness towards water shrews (89);

Todd by the lake (91); the health

benefits of wild swimming (92), and

Mark Bridge on stoolball, a game he

liked so much he was almost tempted to

play it (95). Plus John Henty out loud

(97), and Business News (99).

82

Photo by Alison Buchanan

Photo by Chloë King

Inside Left.

A trip back in time to the Pells Pool,

1966/67 (114).

VIVA DEADLINES

We plan each magazine six weeks ahead, with a mid-month

advertising/copy deadline. Please send details of planned events

to admin@vivamagazines.com, and for any advertising queries:

advertising@vivamagazines.com, or call 01273 434567.

Remember to recycle your Viva.

Every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of our content.

Viva Lewes magazine cannot be held responsible for any omissions, errors

or alterations. The views expressed by columnists do not necessarily

represent the view of Viva Lewes.

Love me or recycle me. Illustration by Chloë King

6


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THIS MONTH’S COVER ARTIST

“It’s a very visual theme, water,” says Mary Fellows,

this month’s cover artist. “I thought about it in

my head for quite a long time, and then when I

sat down to work on it, it was that unexpectedly

hot weekend in May, so I wanted to do something

summery and pretty.”

We love the way Mary layers bold graphics and fonts

with more intricate patterns and details to create the

attention-grabbing designs that many people in

Lewes will be so familiar with. “I’m used to screen

printing,” she says. “With screen printing you can

create lovely big solid chunks of colour, but when

you use other types of print, especially digital, sometimes

those areas of colour just don’t work as well.

By putting those layers and textures in, I’ve found a

better way of working within the restrictions of the

process.” Over time she’s built up a library of patterns,

drawn by hand and digitised, which she can

draw from when she’s working on a design. “I have

8


MARY FELLOWS

my favourites,” she says, pointing out the matchboxstrike

honeycomb pattern layered across the Viva

masthead, which she’s borrowed from her illustration

Waste Not Want Not.

This is Mary’s fourth Viva cover; it follows her Rodin’s

The Kiss in a snow globe in February 2010,

her festive Babycham reindeer design for Christmas

2013 and her retro soapbox-style cover for our

‘Keep it Clean’ May 2015 issue. Since we last spoke

to her, Mary made the big decision to shut up shop

at the Needlemakers and relocate her business to a

new premises, Sun Studios, tucked away on Mount

Place. “I loved the shop,” she says, “and I still love

the shop, but there was just never enough time to get

everything done. Now I don’t have so many people

coming in, I’ve got a bit more time to be creative and

make things. I’ve been able to get my hands on some

clay again…”

One of her new ventures now that she’s moved into

Sun Studios is designing and producing promotional

mugs for local businesses. “I get asked to do commissions

a lot, but because I’ve always screen printed my

designs onto transfers, I’ve had to do them in batches

of 100. Now I’ve started working with a digital

printer, which means that I can print just a couple of

sheets at a time, so I’m able to offer people small runs

of mugs.” Mary designs the artwork herself, at no

charge, and the company simply pays for the mugs.

“I like that challenge of creating something that is

essentially a promotional product, but that someone

actually wants,” she says. If you’re interested in

commissioning a design for your business, or to see

Mary’s other products, go to maryfellows.co.uk. RC

9


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MY LEWES: CHRIS OAKLEY, CHARTERED SURVEYOR

Photo by Alex Leith

Are you local? Brighton born and bred. My wife

Helen always says ‘you can take the boy out of

Brighton, but you can’t take Brighton out of the

boy’. I started my estate agent business there 25

years ago – we’re celebrating our anniversary in

Shoreham, as we have just opened there. I moved to

Lewes in 2000, and set up a branch here in 2007. So,

yes, I guess I’m local.

What did you think of Lewes as a Brighton kid?

My first memory is that we used to go to Piltdown

in the car at the weekend to mess about on boats

my dad made for us, and I always remember driving

through Lewes past what was the YMCA in the

bottleneck singing Onward Christian Soldiers with

my four brothers. It’s funny, that, because Helen and

I ended up buying the building to renovate and live

in, when we first came to Lewes!

What do you do for exercise? Lewes is a

wonderful place to be a runner. I’m getting more

into cycling, as well. Myself and some colleagues

are just back from a charity run from Brussels to

Brighton, which included an attempt to get in the

Guinness Book of Records for cycling for a mile round

the i360 pod, while in the air, the most people to

do a mile in the sky on a bike! We’ve raised over

£50,000 so far for the Brighton Mayor’s charity.

I’ve also recently got into paddle boarding on the

Ouse, which I love.

Does Lewes turn its back on the river? It has

done in modern times, but things are changing,

and we’re starting to realise that it’s the life blood

that runs through our town. That’s why we’re the

main sponsors of Ouse Day, which is a fantastic

annual event, taking place this year on July 1st.

I went to the first one two years ago and it was

great to see the whole community together on

the riverbanks – and in the river! We decided it

would be good to sponsor it, which we did last year

and are doing again this year. It’s a way of saying

thank you to the town for all the support it’s given

Oakley over the years.

Tell us about your favourite pub, and restaurant,

and building. My local is the Pelham Arms, who

do great food and are within convenient stumbling

distance. My favourite restaurant is Lemongrass,

lovely atmosphere. My favourite building is Pelham

House. I sold it for the County Council when they

finished with it, and I really got into the history of it.

If you were an all-powerful mayor, what would

you do? Make the Phoenix development happen,

and quickly. The development will focus the town

onto the river and help support local businesses with

the extra chimney pots.

Where would you live, if not here? In New

Zealand. I toured around there for my 40th, and was

really blown away by the beauty. It’s like going back

into England of the 1950s, and the landscapes are

spectacular. Interview by Alex Leith

11


PHOTO OF THE MONTH

SPELLBOUND

June’s winning entry, from Sam Crawley, comes

with a heart-warming story attached. ‘I’ve been

recuperating after a period of serious ill health,’

says Sam, who is 43 but ‘I’ve been feeling more

like I’m 100’. She’d been on crutches since

Christmas, but by mid-April was starting to feel

a lot better, and so took her first trip for a month

without their help on the 19th (‘the first of our

heatwave days’).

‘I was walking up the hill from town via the

Lewes Arms on my way home to Keere Street,’

she adds. ‘As I was walking home I was filled with

great optimism and confidence, thinking how

good it was to be living in Lewes and to have such

great neighbours and generally feeling that life

was going to get better and better - which I am

happy to report it has! As I was thinking and feeling

so happy walking up the hill, this scene came

alive in front of me - the sight of the sun setting

through the trees and the shadow of an unknown

other human walking towards me. I whipped out

my phone and caught it - just like that! It was

a magical moment I will never forget because I

had been struggling for so long and then BAM!

that beautiful scene was there to lift me. I was

spellbound!’

It sounds like a magical moment, which we hope

will be made more magical when Sam opens the

magazine, and sees the fruit of her efforts printed

on the page: her quotes come from an accompanying

email and that will be the first she knows

of winning the prize. In the meantime we’ll leave

you with the send-off of her message: ‘There really

is startling hope and beauty… even if we have

to wait a while to see it.’

Please send your pictures, taken in and around

Lewes, to photos@vivamagazines.com, or tweet

@VivaLewes, with comments on why and where

you took them, and your phone number. We’ll

choose our favourite for this page, which wins the

photographer £20, to be picked up from our office

after publication. Unless previously arranged, we

reserve the right to use all pictures in future issues

of Viva magazines or online.

13


BITS AND BOBS

OPEN GARDEN FOR SATURDAY CIRCLES

There are plenty of local open gardens in June,

which we round up on pg 63. There’s one in

particular that we recommend making a trip out

of town for on the 24th, in aid of Saturday Circles

(Lewes) Club, a social club for adults with learning

difficulties. It’s a cottage garden with densely

planted borders: roses, honeysuckles and clematis.

Plus a wide range of perennials are on view as you

walk along meandering paths, some ending with

secluded seating. Colour-themed borders have

been planted for year-round interest. There’s a

fruitcage, large productive greenhouse, and raised

vegetable beds, including two trial ‘no dig’ beds.

Pots of tea and home-made cakes will be served on

pretty china, with delightful table cloths.

David Jarman

Sunday 24th June (11am-5pm) 1 Rose Cottage,

Chalvington Road, Golden Cross near Hailsham,

BN27 35S. Admission £4, children free. No wheelchair

access. rosecottagegarden.co.uk

CHARITY BOX: CHAILEY HERITAGE FOCUS RUN

Chailey Heritage Foundation

was established in

1903 by Dame Grace Kimmins,

who took over a former

parish workhouse in rural

East Sussex and created the

first purpose-built school for

children with disabilities. Today

we have an international

reputation for our work and

support hundreds of children, young people and

families by providing a range of services, especially

for those with a neurological motor impairment

such as cerebral palsy. Our aim is to provide an

environment where young people develop life

skills in preparation for adulthood.

The off-road Focus Run is the first of its

kind to take place in the beautiful grounds of

Borde Hill Garden. We are raising funds for the

DREAM Centre Appeal. We want to build a stateof-the-art

environment where our community can

come together to take part

in sports such as wheelchair

football, trampolining,

drama and dance. The

activities in the DREAM

Centre will enable young

people to gain confidence

by being able to express

themselves and develop

relationships with their

peers. If we raise the funding, we’d like it to open

by spring/summer 2019.

The Focus Run will be chip-timed, and there’s

a 10k and 5k option, or a mini-mile for children.

If you want to help but aren’t keen on running, we

do need volunteer marshals. And donations via our

website are very welcome too!

As told to Emma Chaplin by Simon Everest

3rd June, 10am-2pm, Borde Hill Garden, Haywards

Heath, RH16 1XP. For entry fees and to sign up,

visit runchaileyheritage.org.uk/enter

14


BITS AND BOBS

CLOCKS OF LEWES #19: LEWES PRIORY SCHOOL

In keeping with the ‘water’ theme

this issue, Priory School is not

only adjacent to the Wave Leisure

Centre swimming pool and

built on flood plain, it also has a

splendid green clock tower – the

colour a copper patina, the result

of exposure to the elements. It’s

one of Lewes’s finest horological

landmarks, from when the building

was constructed in 1937. It’s

just a shame it’s dead.

Indeed, it’s not worked for

decades. One former student recalls it working in

1987 or 88, when they “climbed up the internal

ladder and into the loft space to have a poke about

with the clock.” School bursar Ian Fine says he’s

“been here over 20 years and it’s

never worked during that time”.

The clock is in a sorry state, its

classic faces, white with black

numerals, even missing hands.

Still, the school roof has another

great feature now: a 35kW array

of solar panels, installed by

community-owned renewable

energy group OVESCO in

2012. Images of investors on

the roof, with the panels and

clock tower in the background,

became somewhat iconic.

Given the state of public finances, the clock is

unlikely to be repaired. Still, the solar panels have

given the roof new import. Daniel Etherington

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BITS AND BOBS

SPREAD THE WORD

Lewes residents Norman and Fiona Moles took us along

on their week-long trip to Rome. Here’s Fiona spreading

the word with our ‘word’-themed April issue at the

Colosseum. ‘We love Viva Lewes’ they tell us, ‘keep up

the good work!’ We’ll do our best.

Here we are with

Martyn and Terry

Wallwork, on

their Caribbean

Adventure and

into the Panama

Canal to see the

new locks that

have been added

to those constructed over 100 years ago.

Keep taking us with you and keep spreading the word.

Send your photos and a few words about your trip to

hello@vivamagazines.com

Award-winning

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Tel: 01273 472360

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#nationaltrust

Waterlily Festival at Sheffield Park and

Garden

Join us over five weeks to celebrate the

impressive display of waterlilies on the lakes.

With a variety of talks, workshops and early

evening openings, enjoy the garden in early

summer and learn more about these fascinating

plants.

The Waterlily Festival runs 9 June - 15 July with

Midsummer Evenings on 22 & 23 June.

Call 01825 790231 for details

nationaltrust.org.uk/sheffieldpark

© National Trust 2018. The National Trust is an independent registered charity,

number 205846. Photography © National Trust Images\Nina Elliot-Newman.


PHOTOGRAPHY

CARLOTTA LUKE

THE SEAFORD MERMAIDS

Meet ‘The Seaford Mermaids’, a group of intrepid

all-year swimmers who take a dip off Tide Mills or

Buckle Beach in Seaford – depending on how calm

the sea is – every single morning of the year (unless

it’s really rough). Carlotta Luke joined them, for

a special swim celebrating organiser Ruth’s 85th

birthday: “There was a visceral feeling of joy and

love of life for the people swimming,” she reports.

If you are interested in joining the group – and

everyone’s welcome, male or female, young or old -

contact ruth7rose@yahoo.co.uk. You can see more

of Carlotta’s photos at carlottaluke.com.

19


New farm opening near

Lewes, April 2019

In. Out..

Splashing

all about

At Chestnut Tree House we provide hospice care

for local children with life-shortening conditions.

We help them – and their families – live life to

the full, for as long as they have left together.

All with the help of our kind supporters. nt.

Donate. Fundraise. Get involved.

For Today. For Tomorrow. For the .

01903 871820 / 01323 725095

fundraising@chestnut-tree-house.org.uk

www.chestnut-tree-house.org.uk

#ForTheNow

Registered charity no 256789


BITS AND BOBS

TOWN PLAQUE #39: PINWELL FOUNTAIN

In her 2012 book The Twittens of Lewes, Kim Clark

notes that ‘the wellhead of the ancient Pinwell Spring,

a powerful source of fresh water’ was first recorded in

1280. In A Day’s Ramble in and about the Ancient Town

of Lewes (1846) Gideon Mantell wrote: ‘Across the

way from the Friends’ Meeting House… is a perennial

spring that bursts forth from the chalk ridge and

rushes into the neighbouring brooks’.

Subsequently it appears to have been channelled to a pump and in 1874 this was moved to the opposite side

of the road and a drinking fountain was erected by subscription. It stands at the eastern end of All Saints’

churchyard, beside a fifteenth-century archway, once part of Greyfriars, situated further along Friars Walk,

which was reconstructed here in the nineteenth century. The fountain was restored by the Friends of Lewes

in 1981. Marcus Taylor

THE OUSE IN NUMBERS

The heyday of river navigation upstream of Lewes was in the early 19th century, when 19 locks were built

over 22 miles to enable boats to reach Upper Ryelands Bridge at Balcombe by 1812. This was used for the

construction of the Ouse Valley viaduct at Balcombe, which carries the railway across 37 arches and is now

designated a Grade II* listed building. Completed in 1841, the viaduct required 11 million bricks from the

Netherlands, which were brought up the river from Newhaven to Balcombe. The coming of the railways,

however, caused river traffic to cease by 1868 and the locks fell into disrepair. Sarah Boughton

GHOST PUB #44: THE WHITE HART TAP, HIGH STREET

In keeping with this month’s theme of ‘water’, I bring you the

White Hart Tap. Many hotels had a tap ‘out the back’. The Star,

Crown, and Bear Hotels in Lewes all had one, and the White

Hart’s was by the stables at the rear of the hotel. These taps had

their own landlords, who often doubled up as the stable keeper. Sarah

Miles ran the White Hart Tap with her sister Caroline during

the 1850s. In 1862 she married her assistant James Rusbridge, and

they ran the pub together until James retired due to ill health in

1878. The couple were well respected in the town. However, in 1868 Sarah was caught illegally selling beer on

a Sunday morning. PC Higginson had dressed in plain clothes and entered the pub with ‘a local celebrity called

‘Shalligo’ and a youth’, and caught her out by ordering a beer. The Gardner family then ran the Tap and the

stables, remaining for over thirty years. Around 1903 the White Hart Tap became known as the ‘White Hart

Shades’. Frank and Rosina Holford took over in 1926. During the war Rosina donated her Christmas money

to help those affected by the Blitz in Coventry, Portsmouth, and other towns. This small gesture inspired many

people, and soon Rosina was collecting donations from people all over the town. This photograph shows Frank

and Rosina serving the last beer at the White Hart Shades on 31st August 1954. Mat Homewood

21


BITS AND BOBS

RESCUE PETS OF LEWES #1

Name(s): (left to right) Jade, Jesy, Perrie

and Leigh Anne. This gang of adorable

miniature ladies have been named after the

members of girl band Little Mix.

Background: Adopted from Raystede as

a foursome, they’re now living out their

golden years in a luxuriant open-topped

run watching Flashdance on repeat and enjoying

unfettered access to alfalfa sprouts.

Likes: Brian Blessed, Pak Choi, triangles.

Dislikes: Hard house, namedropping,

ironic cross stitching, the male gaze and

nail clippings in the bath.

Did you know... Guinea pigs originate from Peru where historically they have been enjoyed not as pets but

as a protein-rich ceremonial food. Loud-noise haters, guinea pigs shouldn’t be homed with rabbits who have

a tendency to bully them and play death metal at antisocial hours. Words by @dogsoflewes

If you’re thinking about adopting a pet, check out Raystede Centre for Animal Welfare: raystede.org

LEWES FRIDAY FOOD MARKET

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If someone in your family needs a little help

please call Alison Scutt on 01273 437040

lewesfoodmarket.co.uk

info.lewes@homeinstead.co.uk

www.homeinstead.co.uk/

lewesdistrict&uckfield

22


BITS AND BOBS

LOCAL LITERATURE

LEWES DOORTRAITS #1

Steve Ankers is a

serious writer with a

comic touch: think

Chris Stewart with

a social conscience.

Northern Soles is his

fourth book: he’s

penned two satires

on the world of

planning (!) and a

memoir about being married to a vet. This

one is about a coast-to-coast walk he did

from the Irish Sea to the North Sea – a total

of 200 miles. He chose the route (through

the industrial heartland of Northern England)

so as not to make his wife, staying at

home, too jealous. By the end, his feet were

killing him. Alex Leith

Jo Jackson, from the blog theleweshome.com, snaps a

front door in Lewes, and asks the owner a nosy question.

If you could give your door a characteristic what

would it be? Secretive: it’s hiding the clutter within.

Office Space to Let

At the beginning of July Viva Lewes will be leaving their

offce base in Pipe Passage where they started 12 years ago, to

move into bigger premises in central Lewes.

We will have office space to rent in the centre of Lewes.

The floor which Viva Lewes currently occupies is in a

lovely wooden beamed room in an old building just off

the High Street. It can be rented in one piece or could

be rented as individual work spaces which the room

accommodates quite naturally.

Leases would be for a minimum of 3 months and would

include rates, utilities, broadband and cleaning.

Please get in touch if you are interested:

john.kenward@gmail.com / jleeburn@yahoo.com

Tel: 01273 486444

We are sorry to be saying 'Goodbye' to Viva Lewes and we

would like to wish them well in their new home.

23


BITS AND BOBS

REFILL LEWES

WATER, WATER EVERYWHERE

Refill Lewes – part of the nationwide Refill campaign –

launched on Saturday 26th of May at Pell’s Pool, and to mark

the occasion, they set themselves a challenge: to get together

the largest number of Phils at any one time in history. We’re

interested to know how many Phils turned up!

That idea was a bit of fun, but the campaign behind it is

deadly serious. The idea of Refill is to wipe out the need for

single-use plastic bottles by creating a network of refill stations

– bars, cafés and other businesses – where passers-by

can drop in and fill up their reusable water bottles. Participating

venues pop a sticker in their window to let you know

that they’re part of the scheme, and will appear on the Refill

app, so when you’re out and about you can easily locate your

nearest one. The Brighton scheme launched in autumn last

year and there are already more than 200 businesses signed up. To download the app – or to sign your business

up to become a refill station – visit refill.org.uk.


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COLUMN

Chloë King

Scream test

It’s lovely having a small

baby, and even more

precious when there’s a

long-enough gap between

your first and second that

you had almost entirely

forgotten how crap people

can be.

Like when you’re walking

your dog and buggy and

you tuck in to let another

person hurry past, and

then you turn to hear

them mumble loudly,

plugged into headphones,

that you’re using too much

pavement.

Or when a man pauses to watch you struggling

to get your buggy over a 30-degree curb at the

brow of a hill, only to offer bits of advice like: “it’s

because it’s all weighed down with shopping Luv.”

And when you’ve nipped into the library for

some respite on a rainy day, to read a board book,

change a nappy and give baby a feed, happy as

Larry. And you put babe in the buggy and buckle

her in, and she squeals for maybe 20 seconds, and

when you stand up to leave you meet a face peering

at you over a bookcase.

“Excuse me,” the face says. “Some of us are trying

to work.”

If you are ever in doubt as to where society’s most

insidious priorities lie, try being out with a pram

or, better, a wheelchair. Only then can you assume

the position of being simultaneously invisible and

taking up too much space.

Bearing in mind how burdensome us carers of

small children can be, it’s pleasing to find dark

places in public buildings in which we cannot

pose too much of a menace.

With my first, I pilgrimaged

every week to the Big

Scream parent and baby

screening at the Duke of

York’s. I’d never been so

up-to-date with the latest

releases, which has plenty

of benefits. You can still

appear cultured, for one,

and if you have the pleasure

of watching a psychological

thriller like Beast, which I

highly recommend, tense

moments are elevated by

the appearance of someone

else’s strange-looking

offspring appearing from behind a seat.

Now the Depot has one, at noon on Tuesdays,

and I needn’t even bother getting the bus.

The thing about the Depot, however, is they

seem to think that all parents of under-ones

have a predilection for second-pop rom coms,

end-of-life dramas, and documentaries. This isn’t

always an issue. I really enjoyed Even When I Fall,

a documentary about a Nepalese circus troupe

comprised of victims of child trafficking.

The dilemma is, of course, that most daytime

cinema audiences are composed of people of

retirement age. It’s hard enough trying to tell

them that carers of under-ones have priority on

Tuesday lunchtimes. I’ve heard it myself – groans

of “ugh, will we even be able to hear it?” in the

ticket queue.

It just so happened, however, that the same person

left the film that day, loudly praising the gaggle

of snoozy babies for being the most pleasant

audience they had ever shared a cinema with.

But shhh, don’t spread the word, or I’ll have

nowhere left to hide.

Illustration by Chloë King

27


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COLUMN

David Jarman

Lindsay who?

In July 1990 the film director Lindsay

Anderson wrote an article in the

Independent on Sunday entitled L’Atalante,

the Forgotten Masterpiece. Jean Vigo’s

film had been ‘devotedly restored’.

Anderson’s tribute began in

characteristically caustic style: ‘I

was talking the other day to a

young film-maker, a graduate

of our National Film School

and already the author of two

reputable features. I mentioned

the name of John Garfield.

“Who’s John Garfield?” He

had never heard of Jean Arthur

either and had no idea what films

Capra had made. I was startled.

I began to wonder how many

distinguished names, knowledge

of whom we would assume to be an essential

for cinematic literacy, were unknown to the

talented young of today. “Have you ever”, I

asked, “heard of Jean Vigo?” “Jean who?” he

asked.

Anderson concluded: ‘I know we have to accept

that today nobody knows anything, and is quite

happy that way’.

Doubtless things have only got worse since

then, so it was encouraging that someone

at the Brighton Festival had the wit to show

Anderson’s best known film, If…., released fifty

years ago, in an intelligent double bill with

Vigo’s Zéro de conduite. Intelligent, not only

because both films are set in rather anarchic

boarding schools, but because Anderson

acknowledged the debt that If…. owed to

Vigo’s film. Seeing them together enabled

me to appreciate the many correspondences

between the two.

When my friend John Cartwright was

running the British Council’s film

department he had many

dealings with Lindsay Anderson.

Listening to John’s anecdotes

over the years, I have concluded

that the thing you were most likely to

hear Lindsay Anderson say was “well, it’s

not very good, is it?”. John once showed me

a postcard from Anderson that was typically

brief and dismissive: ‘John –

Did I tell you I went to Turin?

Nice city – quite silly Festival

as usual. Greetings. Best for

1992. As always – Lindsay’.

Alan Bennett published his Memories

of Lindsay Anderson in July 2000. In it he

recalls acting in a 1964 revival of a Ben Travers

farce with, among others, Arthur Lowe,

Nicol Williamson and John Osborne. It was ‘a

disaster’. Bennett continues: ‘I suppose Lindsay

must have seen it (Arthur Lowe was one of his

favourite actors) but it would have been with

a good deal of heavy sighs, looks of despair to

his neighbours and even groans, a visit to the

theatre with Lindsay was generally something

of a pantomime.’

My one experience of Lindsay Anderson at the

theatre (actually there were two though there’s

no reason to mention that) was at Notting Hill’s

Gate Theatre Club in 1989; the occasion the

world premiere of Bulgakov’s Adam and Eve.

Written in 1931, it had been banned by Stalin.

Anderson was sitting in front of me. The play

wasn’t very good. As he got up to leave, after

two long hours, Anderson muttered to his

companion: “Stalin was right”.

29


ON THIS MONTH: MUSIC

mr jukes

Freewheelin’

“I made the decision to end it,” says Jack Steadman,

erstwhile front man of Bombay Bicycle Club, now

the inspiration behind the much funkier mr jukes.

“It was a terribly difficult decision,” he continues,

down the phone from his North London home.

“We’d been together since school. We’d grown

up together in the band. But both musically and

personally I couldn’t have done anything else. I had

to listen to what my heart was saying. Otherwise

we would have made a really mediocre Bombay

Bicycle album.”

Jack was the creative one of the group, the one

whose ideas they all worked on and fashioned into

guitar-rich indie-soaked pop songs. So you get the

feeling the decision has been a good one for him,

but not necessarily the others: their last album So

Long, See You Tomorrow was UK no 1, and their

previous two had made the top ten.

“A lot of bands lose touch with the fact that they

haven’t got anything to say, and I could feel that

creeping up,” he continues. He talks about the

loss of the sort of “burning desire” that fuelled the

making of their first two albums.

It was while on a cargo ship sailing from Shanghai

to Alaska that he came up with the name for his new

project. He was reading Joseph Conrad’s Typhoon. “I

liked the sound of the name of the First Mate,” he

says. “I thought an album by ‘Jack Steadman’ would

have sounded like a folk album.”

“Also having another name gives you an alter ego

that affects the way you perform… as mr jukes I

become very energetic; it’s a weird contrast when

I go backstage afterwards and resume my normal

personality, sitting in the corner being quiet.”

One limitation Jack wanted to overcome in the old

band was his own voice. “I was singing all the songs,

and I’d listen back and wish someone else was able

to take them off into a different direction.” As mr

jukes he’s forged collaborations with the likes of

Horace Andy, BJ the Chicago Kid, and De La Soul.

“Suddenly I had the freedom to choose anyone in

the world… I was like a kid in a candy shop.”

The band he’s touring with are a nine-piece, with

a brass section, and three other singers. “But not

backing singers,” he says, “if anything I’m the

backing singer”. And who goes to the gigs? “Some

people like the style of music we’re doing: jazz, funk,

hip-hop. Others are Bombay Bicycle fans who have

heard a thread from before that’s been continued.”

So could a reconciliation with his old band

members ever be on the cards? “It’s healthy in some

relationships to spend time apart and to come back

stronger having got that ‘grass is greener’ thing out

of the way. So I’m not ruling it out… we just have to

wait until that burning desire is there again.”

Alex Leith

mr jukes play the Love Supreme Festival, Glynde

Place, Fri 29th June – Sun 1st July

31


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ON THIS MONTH: COMEDY

William Andrews

Stand up… and be counted

I’m madly excited to be putting on two days of

live comedy this summer (one in June and one in

July) and as I’ve gone around bangin’ my drum

I’ve been struck by people’s idea of what the live

comedy scene is like. It’s often way broader than

folk realise. It’s rich with fruitcakes doing the most

amazingly inventive, creative and theatrical things.

I truly love it.

I did my first stand-up gig in a dingy basement

at the top of the Grassmarket in Edinburgh,

something like 20 years ago. I go back to it in fits

and starts, a part-timer I suppose. The rewards

when you get it right, well, it’s like flying. When it

goes badly it’s also like flying, but into the side of

a mountain.

Full-time professionals are a different breed: up

and down the country they go, into clubs, festivals,

corners of bars, night after night after night. Those

folks have something genuinely wrong with them,

I think, and thank God they do, because the UK

comedy scene is insanely good, and broad.

‘Alternative’ doesn’t quite do justice to the scope

of what’s on offer now. The term comes with baggage

of its own, rooted as it is in images of Alexei

Sayle, French and Saunders et al. As a side note, it

might interest you to know that one of the founders

of that scene lives here in Lewes, the inimitable

Kit Hollerbach, who, along with Mike Myers,

brought and taught an American style of improvisation

to the Comedy Store players including Paul

Merton and Jeremy Hardy. The Chicago Method

is what formed the basis of Whose Line Is It Anyway

and its off-shoots.

But maybe the left field is not your thing, and why

should it be? The best comedians on the more

traditional circuit are a true joy to watch: it’s a real

skill, and it can be tough. You try making a crowd

of 300 people – made up of office parties, stags and

hens – laugh. Big stars have come out of that scene.

Michael McIntyre was a club comic, and a good

one. Dave Johns too, actually – and if you don’t

know Dave from gigs, you might know him as having

the starring role in Ken Loach’s I, Daniel Blake.

Funny old world.

In reality the lines are blurred and continue to be.

At David Mounfield’s superb Comedy at the Con

Club (this month on the 7th) you will see masters

of the club circuit alongside acts who would challenge

most people’s expectations of what a comedian

should be like - well, apart from the obvious

one - you know, #funny.

‘Little Edinburgh’ (my event at the All Saints) is

a cohort of talent gearing up for the Edinburgh

Festival Fringe. Each of these brilliant comics will

preview their entire one hour Edinburgh show

for just £6.50/£4.50 or you can pay a £13/£9 to

see everyone who’s on that day. You should come.

Should be a laugh.

Little Edinburgh, All Saints, June 16th (also July

14th) 4-9pm

33


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ON THIS MONTH: LITERATURE

Dallowday

Celebrating Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf’s modernist novel

Mrs Dalloway details a day in

the life of Clarissa Dalloway, a

high-society woman in post–

First World War England. It

follows her as she takes a walk

through London to prepare for

a party that she will host that

evening, and begins: ‘Mrs Dalloway

said she would buy the

flowers herself’. We speak to Alli

Pritchard, operations manager of

Monk’s House in Rodmell, once

Woolf’s home, about her drive

to establish an annual ‘Dallowday’

to celebrate Woolf, in the

way that ‘Bloomsday’ celebrates

James Joyce.

You’re a big fan of Virginia

Woolf? I really am. I’m a

Woolfie. Age 13, I saw the film of

Mrs Dalloway, bought the book,

then started reading everything

else she’d written.

Tell us about Dallowday.

The aim is to celebrate and raise the profile of

Virginia Woolf. Over the last couple of years,

some celebrations have taken place in America

and London, but there wasn’t one agreed date, or

indeed name. Woolf’s novel takes place in mid-

June 1923, but not on a specified date. We’ve now

agreed that, henceforth, Dallowday will be on the

third Wednesday of June.

What will be happening at Monk’s House?

We are essentially holding our own garden party.

We’ll decorate the house with extra flowers and

bunting with Woolf quotations. We will be offering

refreshments in the garden, something we don’t

normally do. We will have readings from the novel

in the garden. We’ve also got Ink

Spot Press printers coming, so

visitors can make book marks and

greetings cards with a selection

of quotations. Although it can be

hard to find short ones.

So she wouldn’t have been on

Twitter? Well, I don’t know.

She and Leonard loved the latest

technology. She’d definitely have

a Mac.

You clearly remain a fan. I do.

Many people visit who know very

little about Virginia or Leonard

Woolf. Most people seem only

to know the salacious elements

of her life. They think of her

as a gay icon. They know that

she committed suicide and was

depressive. That’s far from the

whole truth and part of the joy

of the job is filling in the gaps for

them. She was formidable and

complicated, but also incredible

fun, and vivacious. Above all, she

was a supreme talent whose work is thoroughly

deserving of this annual celebration each June. We

often hear people say that they’ve attempted but

failed to finish her novels. But even if people don’t

like those, her diaries demonstrate how funny and

wicked she could be. I defy anyone not to love

them. Interview by Emma Chaplin

Dallowday, Wednesday 20th, 12.30-5pm, at Monk’s

House, Rodmell. Free, but normal admission charges

apply. Also at Monk’s House in June, Sunday 17th,

book signing and talk with Nino Strachey, author of

Rooms of their Own, which explores the homes of

Virginia Woolf, her lover Vita Sackville-West, and

Vita’s first cousin Eddy. nationaltrust.org.uk

Photos by Lizzie Lower

35


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ON THIS MONTH: COUNTRY SHOW

Atkinson Action Horses

At the South of England Show

We speak to Mark Atkinson

of Atkinson Action

Horses, whose live show

will be the new main

arena highlight of the

South of England Show.

You’re horse master

for a lot of TV shows,

such as Poldark, Peaky

Blinders and Victoria.

What’s a horse master?

Someone who’s in charge

of all the horses on set,

making sure everyone is safe. I assess the abilities

of the actors and decide what they are capable of,

and which of our horses would be most appropriate

for them and the scene. We can train actors to ride,

and we also have stunt doubles. The hero horses

have their own identical stunt doubles, sometimes

two. Seamus our Irish draught hero horse for Poldark

(‘Darkie’ in the show) is very famous. We get

journalists coming to Cornwall to spend the day

with him. Both leads, Aidan Turner and Eleanor

Tomlinson are very able riders. Victoria is filmed

near where we’re based in East Yorkshire which is

great for us.

What do you enjoy most about your job? I enjoy

teaching the actors, and the challenge of delivering

on set what the director wants. When the production

stretches over a few months, there’s such a

good atmosphere.

What is most challenging? Teaching the horses to

stand still. Filming involves a lot of waiting around.

What makes for a good action horse? Patience,

bravery, charisma and personality. We’ve got some

beautiful horses, and some common-bred ones.

They all have their place.

Where do your riders come from? All over

the place. Most start as ground crew and can ride

already. We teach them

gymnastics, but occasionally

we’ve recruited gymnasts

and taught them to ride.

All must be incredibly fit.

How did you get into

this line of work? My

dad was a farmer, and I

carried on the business

when he retired. My

hobby was show jumping,

and 28 years ago, my wife

Jill suggested we diversify

into more horse-orientated work. We started offering

livery services, opened a riding school, then

began doing re-enactment and Sealed Knot work,

went onto jousting with English Heritage, and it’s

snowballed since then. It’s a family business. Jill

does the logistics. My son Ben trains the horses and

choreographs the live shows. He’s just come back

from training horses for a Bollywood film. His wife

Katharine is heavily involved, and our daughter

Lucy works with us part of the time too.

What can people expect from the live show?

Thirty minutes of extremely exciting, entertaining

live action by our team of eight male and female

riders, and our fantastic horses. Expect trick riding,

airs above the ground and liberty, which is when

the horse has no tack.

Which horses are you bringing? A mixture, including

Spanish stallions, famous for their skills in

Spanish High School, and some of our film horses,

all of whom have a huge following on Instagram.

Emma Chaplin

Atkinson Action Horses will be performing two live

shows per day at the South of England Show 7/8/9th

June, 9am-6.30pm, Ardingly. Under 16s enter for

free and free parking. Visit seas.org.uk/summershow

for online ticket discounts.

37


ON THIS MONTH: TALK

1997, and all that

‘The future that never happened’

What have New Labour, The

Spice Girls, the Young British

Artists and Britpop got in common?

And where do the Stephen

Lawrence enquiry and the Royal

Family’s reaction to Diana’s

death come into the equation?

In his book 1997 – The Future

That Never Happened, journalist

and broadcaster Richard Power

Sayeed argues that the year in

question was one in which “a

series of huge characters had

an enormous impact on our

culture.” Unfortunately, these

‘characters’ were not all they

seemed, he tells me down the phone: a lot of

powerful people were using seemingly subversive

messages as a smokescreen to make money, or to

promote reactionary or power-boosting agendas.

This was the year, of course, when ‘New Labour’

were overwhelmingly voted into power, and, if

the book were to have an index, the ‘Tony Blair’

entries would take up a couple of pages or more.

And Sayeed doesn’t give him an easy ride: he sees

the Brexit fiasco and the post-2007 austerity drive

as direct results of the failures of Blair’s tenure in

office. There was enormous hope surrounding his

project, but its seeming subversion of the status

quo proved to be illusory, and its many failures

have “led to huge social, political and cultural

upheaval”.

There was something in the air, obviously. The

Spice Girls’ watered-down feminist message was a

positive one, but it was used as a vehicle enabling

them and their management to get enormously

rich. The Royal Family were forced into acting

more ‘humanly’ after public reaction to how they

dealt with Diana’s death, but the PR machine

they built around them has since

enabled them to consolidate their

power and wealth. The YBAs

were not really rebels: in causing

a massively inflated art market,

they merely helped “make reaction

seem subversive”. And then

there was Oasis.

But it was New Labour who

were the biggest exponents of the

faux-subversive trend. “I would

absolutely acknowledge what a

political operator [Blair] was and

the fact that in many ways he had

a positive impact, it’s just that he

never used his enormous political

capital to fundamentally change the free market

system that had been left behind by Thatcher.

Neither did he use it to challenge the creeping

nationalism in British politics.”

“When you disappoint people so severely, and

when supposedly liberal ideas are used to justify

an exploitative economic system, it’s not surprising

that there’s a backlash not only against the establishment

and the political elite but also against

the marginalised groups and the ethnic minority

communities”.

But there’s an upside to all the shattered hope, in

Sayeed’s opinion. “There was nonetheless something

very valuable about having aggressive radical

ideas brought so centrally into the mainstream,

even if [they] got watered down... When you look

at ‘woke’ culture - pervasive liberal progressivism

in terms of young people’s attitudes in the UK - I

think what you are seeing there is the impact of

progressive ideas being fashionable a couple of

decades ago.” Alex Leith

Richard is talking at the (open to all) Labour Party

event, Sat 9th June. Tickets via Eventbrite.

39


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ON THIS MONTH: CINEMA

Left-right: London to Brighton, The Bromley

Boys and She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry

Film '18

Dexter Lee’s June round-up

If you’re reading this mag in time and you are a

Depot fan, you’ll want to know that they’re having

a first birthday show on May 31st: they’re showing

the Charlie Chaplin classic City Lights, with a

buffet and a DJ-fuelled party afterwards.

Followers of Lewes FC will be interested in the

film The Bromley Boys, a coming-of-age movie

about a gawky teenager who finds acceptance on

the terraces of his local non-league team. The film

is on for a week from May 30th; the first screening

includes a Q&A with local (Seaford) screenwriter

Warren Dudley.

This month’s dementia-friendly screening is the

Elvis Presley film Blue Hawaii (Tues 5th), in

which our Elv swaps his sarge stripes for a lei. Another

one-off on the same day is the documentary

A Cambodian Spring, charting the wave of land

rights protests in the South-east Asian country,

and their tragic consequences. Afterwards there’s a

Q&A with the director and ‘Media Monk’ Venerable

Loun Sovath.

The Education Course this month features films

set in Sussex: the first, on May 29th, was Wish

You Were Here; it continues with Paul Andrew

Williams’ brutal drama London to Brighton

(June 5th), and Philip Trevelyan’s brilliant cult

documentary The Moon & the Sledgehammer

(9th, highly recommended).

Another three-film series is the latest from the

U3A lot: this time the theme is ‘music’ and the

movies are Louis Malle’s jazz-rich debut Lift to

the Scaffold (10th), Chico & Rita (17th) and

Whiplash (24th). More music from the Lewes

Chamber Music Festival, who are holding an

open rehearsal in the studio on the 13th, and

screening the noir classic, starring Orson Welles,

The Third Man, on the 15th, presumably chosen

for Anton Karas’ mesmeric zither score. On the

same day, aptly enough, The Piano, directed

by Jane Campion, starts a week of screenings to

celebrate the 25th anniversary of its release (that’ll

make a few of us realise our age!).

Meanwhile June sees four of the six films in

Depot’s Queer Film Course: it kicks off with the

documentary My Genderation (7th), followed by

Beginners (with Christopher Plummer and Ewan

McGregor, 14th) Female Trouble (a John Waters

film starring Divine, 21st) and Desert Hearts

(directed by Donna Deitch, 28th).

June sees the 20th celebration of Refugee Week

and Depot are marking this with two films, The

Idol (15th-21st), about the Palestinian version of

Pop Idol, and Those Who Jump (18th), a rather

more hard-hitting documentary about refugees

who attempt to get into the Spanish city of Melilla

(an enclave on the north coast of Africa) by scaling

the wall which divides it from Morocco.

On the 25th, in conjunction with Ditchling

Museum of Art + Craft, there’s a two-film series

connected to their exciting exhibition about the

graphic designer/nun Corina Kent, She’s Beautiful

When She’s Angry (25th) and Citizen Jane

(26th). And finally, on the 26th, the pod doors

open on another anniversary: this time a 50th,

with a screening of Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece

2001: A Space Odyssey.

41


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ON THIS MONTH: PERFORMANCE ART

Annika Brown

Sympathy for the devil

Cabaret singer and

storyteller Annika

Brown joins local

legend John Agard

on a double bill at

the All Saints Centre

this month.

Tell us about the

show… John’s play,

Pushkin’s Half Hour is

a satirical homage to

Alexander Pushkin’s

novel Eugene Onegin,

whereas mine is a

homage to the devil archetype. The connection is

that between my songs I’m performing a selection

of poems from John’s From The Devil’s Pulpit.

Doing so takes the audience on a journey, much

like a play.

What is The Devil’s Storybook? It’s the name

of the album I released last November, which

includes predominantly what I’d call ‘story songs’.

After having recorded it, I decided to develop

a show, performed in the character of the devil,

singing songs from the album, framed by John’s

poems, which creates a narrator – and a narration.

What made you decide to use his poems in

your show? I stumbled upon them by accident.

I had wanted to turn my set into a cabaret-esque

show, but at that time I had no clue how to do it.

The moment I read the poems I knew they were

the missing piece of the puzzle. They just seemed

to fit in perfectly.

What’s John Agard like when he’s not stage?

I’ve mostly been living in and around Lewes over

the last 12 years, but I didn’t actually know John

before I contacted him about performing his work.

What’s he like off stage? Is one ever off stage? As

captivating and mischievous as on stage, I’d say.

Can you explain what you mean by the ‘devil

archetype’? Apart

from being considered

the root of

all evil, the devil

archetype is mostly

known for hedonism,

for temptation

and excess. On a

deeper level it’s

also the force that

questions the status

quo and instigates

rebellions and revolutions,

which can

Photo by Xavier Clarke

be preferable to accepting an insufferable state of

affairs. You could see the devil as the voice of the

people, if you will… showing solidarity by marching

through paradise holding up signs saying:

‘Rights for Mankind’ and ‘Knowledge for All’.

How did this project start? Music’s always

been my passion, along with words, and I’ve been

engaging in both from a very young age. I spent

about ten years performing as a singer/songwriter

until I felt something was missing, and in this

project I found the change I was looking for – to

start charting new, unexplored territory.

Are you playing the devil’s advocate? Satan is a

mythological construct. I don’t believe in a devil.

It’s important not to project our own shadow

onto something or someone else, and to own it.

‘This thing of darkness I acknowledge mine,’ as

Shakespeare wrote. In other cultures that force

isn’t banished into the underworld; it’s considered

necessary to maintain balance in the world. Dark

gods and trickster gods are worshipped alongside

the ones we’d consider more acceptable. You can’t

have light without shadow.

Interview by Ben Bailey

Lewes Live Lit, All Saints Centre, Tues 26th June,

7.45pm, £10/8

43


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ON THIS MONTH: MUSIC

New Sussex Opera

Forty years young

‘How refreshing, how delightful, to be resting by

the ocean, factor twenty five sun lotion and a glass

of lemonade.’

Not only has New Sussex Opera director David

Foster transformed the setting of Donizetti’s The

Elixir of Love from an 18th century Italian village

to a contemporary Sussex beach, he’s also made a

few lyrical changes to suit the new seaside location.

“The story is a timeless theme of love, jealousy and

greed”, David explains. “This was an opportunity

to make it a bit fresher for people who might not

normally go and see what they might consider to

be a stuffy old opera from the 1800s. It’s also quite

good because it’s funny and it doesn’t end up with

everybody dying.”

The tour starts at the All Saints centre in Lewes,

where NSO’s first-ever performance happened 40

years ago. The group previously existed as Breaky

Bottom Opera, performing at the local vineyard,

before moving and changing its name. If you’ve

missed the opening night in Lewes on 26th May,

you can still catch the show when it moves along

the coast to venues including Brighton (Saturday

2nd June) and Eastbourne (Sunday 3rd June).

Next on the agenda is a special invite-only anniversary

celebration, again at the All Saints centre,

on 1st July. This will include songs from previous

shows as well as an auction of NSO memorabilia. In

addition, there’ll be more details of the company’s

forthcoming autumn show: The Travelling Companion

by Charles Villiers Stanford. “It’s an opera that

hasn’t been put on since the 60s”, says David. “It

was his last opera – he’s mainly known for choral

music – and he never saw it performed. So it’s quite

an exciting adventure from our point of view.”

Whilst The Travelling Companion will be a major

production with a full orchestra, professional soloists

and a professional director, The Elixir of Love is

described as a New Sussex Opera Chorus production.

It’s an opportunity for the whole chorus to

perform and lets other company members develop

their talents. “Our soloists are professionals but

they’re all very young; a couple are still at college

and a couple have just left college.” David honed

his own skills on these in-house shows. “I hadn’t

directed anything since I was at school”, he says.

“There was always that nagging thing of ‘nah, I’ve

left it too late’”. However, the chance to be an assistant

director on NSO’s production of King Arthur

in 2016 led to him directing Trial by Jury later that

year, followed by Orfeo ed Euridice in 2017 and now

the current production.

Current opportunities with NSO include the chorus

– “particularly tenors”, says David – as well as

backstage help and people with a passion for stage

direction or design. “We’ve been around for forty

years but obviously we still need to attract more

people to come and see us – and to come and join

us. It’s always that challenge ahead of us.”

Mark Bridge

newsussexopera.org

45


LBNP VivaLewes 66x94_6.qxp 08/03/2018 20:26 Page 1

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louisbrownenotary.co.uk

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REGULATED BY THE FACULTY OFFICE


ON THIS MONTH: MUSIC

Photo by Anna Patarakina

Lewes Chamber Music Festival

Bengt into shape

A conversation on the other side of the world

first brought Swedish pianist Bengt Forsberg to

the Lewes Chamber Music Festival. Although

he’d visited the area previously – “I was here with

my family many years ago for a performance of

Carmen at Glyndebourne and we fell in love with

your town”, he tells me – it was a chat in Australia

that led to him returning as a performer. Viola

player James Boyd mentioned “this festival of

interesting, not always well known music” run by

violinist Beatrice Philips; Bengt was convinced

and made his festival debut in 2015.

This year, Bengt, Beatrice and James are all

back in town as part of a three-day festival that’s

now a well-established part of the classical

music calendar. Over twenty artists – a blend of

internationally-acclaimed professional musicians

and some of today’s top young performers – will

be presenting seven concerts in historic buildings.

“Chamber music is in no way less intense in

emotional impact or passion than music written

for larger forces, such as a symphony orchestra”,

Bengt explains. “The only actual difference is the

number of players involved; and you can really

come close to the audience in a smaller room.”

Playing with a group of other musicians is “very

much a shared venture”, he says. “You always have

to find a mutual understanding of the music.”

Last year, some of Bengt’s rehearsals were open to

visitors. For 2018, there’s a formal open rehearsal

ahead of the opening night. I wondered how

comfortable he was with an audience hearing what

could be thought of as an imperfect performance.

He tells me the process is inspiring: “There is no

such thing as a ‘perfect performance’; interpreting

music is an ongoing process of finding hidden secrets

and revealing possible truths in it.” His definition

of a good pianist is similarly broad and relaxed.

“Someone who can think ‘outside the box’, so to

speak; who enjoys discovering also the established

masters... and, above all, feels great joy in music

making; but that goes for all musicians, I believe.”

The musical theme for this year’s festival is

‘Exploring Vienna’, which Bengt describes as

“a subject very dear to me”. It’s Beatrice who’s

chosen most of the music “but I might have come

with some suggestions”, Bengt adds. He’s become

known as someone who enjoys uncovering and

playing lesser-known works: does he have any interest

in composing for himself? “No, not at all –

there is too much music composed today. I prefer

to discover exciting but dead composers who can’t

defend themselves; there’s so much fantastic music

out there waiting to be played!” Mark Bridge

Lewes Chamber Music Festival runs from 14th to

16th June. leweschambermusicfestival.com

47


AT ALTITUDE

AN ARTS COUNCIL COLLECTION NATIONAL PARTNER EXHIBITION

AND

OMER FAST: 5000 FEET IS THE BEST

2 JUNE – 30 SEPTEMBER

FREE ADMISSION

townereastbourne.org.uk

Image: Mishka Henner, Unknown Site, Noordwijk aan Zee, South Holland, 2011.

Arts Council Collection, Southbank Centre, London, Courtesy of the artist. © the artist


ON THIS MONTH: ART

Focus on: ‘On Foot’

By Patricia Thornton. Oil on primed paper, 20x16cms

What’s the subject of this picture? I did

a residency with Rachael Adams and Robert

Littleford at Martyrs’ two years ago, about

‘periphery’ and ‘journeys’ and I’m still working

on those themes. I’ve been preoccupied with the

theme of refugees – of people on the move – since

the upheaval in the Middle East started. I’m always

interested in narrative – in open-ended stories.

Did the image come out of your head? No. I

like to work from images I find on the internet, or

photos taken on my mobile, however badly, and

go from there. This came from a series of pictures

I found of a group of refugees walking on the side

of the autobahn from Hungary to Austria. I was

moved by the desperation that must have driven

them to leave their homes, and the hope they must

have carried in their hearts about a new future.

Does it have any personal relevance to your

family history? Perhaps, indirectly. As a child, I

never knew where half of my family came from,

and I recently did a DNA test, with fascinating

results. It seems that some of my ancestry is from

Turkey, Yugoslavia and the South Mediterranean,

so my relatives might well have been displaced.

Do you always work in oils? Along with other

materials: there is often an element of collage to my

work. I like the way I can move oils around, it gives

me time to change my mind, and acrylics dry too fast.

Has anyone directly influenced your work?

Peter Doig comes to mind, among many others.

Tell us about your working practice… I work

in a converted garage in the summer, and in a

spare room in the winter. I usually start with some

music on, and I get so absorbed that often the

cd’s been finished an hour before I notice. I don’t

wear special clothes, with unfortunate results, but I

always turn my jumper inside out.

Take us to a gallery… We’re spoilt for choice

around here, even if Brighton should up its game.

The Towner has a wonderful collection, as does

Pallant House. But, because of its rural setting,

let’s go to Farleys Farm to see some Lee Miller. I

particularly admire her war photographs. AL

Patricia Thornton, Maps and Dreams, Martyrs’

Gallery, June 2nd – 22nd, Thur-Sun, 12-5pm (PV

June 1st, 6pm)

49


ART

ART & ABOUT

In town this month

Street, an exhibition of photographs by Vic Hind, is at

21 Priory Street on the 2nd and 3rd. Always a keen

photographer, Vic has recently turned her camera – and

her voyeuristic eye – on those around her. “This exhibition

is about what we see when we’re out and about;

what people are doing, wearing, how they move, how

they communicate.”

From the 1st until the 3rd you can

catch the open studio of classically

trained painter Jason Tremlett, who

teaches a traditional approach to

drawing and painting from life from

his Fisher Street atelier. This informal

exhibition will showcase the

best of the twelve students’ work, as

well as pieces by Jason himself.

[jasontremlett.com/studio]

Exodus 2

Maps and Dreams, an

exhibition of paintings

about great journeys by

Patricia Thornton, is at

Martyrs’ Gallery from

the 2nd until the 22nd.

More on pg 49.

Ursula Stone

Ursula Stone

is the featured

artist at Chalk

Gallery from

the 11th, exhibiting

works

including her

popular drawings

in Chinese

ink. Meanwhile,

some of the

other Chalkies

decamp to the seaside, exhibiting their work at Grey Walls Gallery,

in The Laughing Dog at Brighton Marina. Janice Thurston,

Leila Godden, Lyndsey Smith, Nadia Chalk, Sue Collins

and Susan Lynch are amongst the artists who feature in the fourweek

exhibition opening on the 2nd.

51


ART

Out of town

Newhaven Open Call is an artist-led initiative inviting local

people and visitors to the area to make a new piece of art, in

any medium, about Newhaven. Works should be based on

a personal experience of being in the town, responding to

locations, artefacts, nature, or social and political agendas. One

piece by each artist will be exhibited at UTC Harbourside,

as part of Artwave in August. Workshops for would-be but

inexperienced artists will be held during July. Find more

details at the Newhaven Town Council office in Fort Road, the

Newhaven Museum at Paradise Park or at newhavenprojects.co.uk from the 1st of June.

Annemarie O’Sullivan

And there are more opportunities to get making. Monk’s House has a

programme of events that includes twilight tours, a bookbinding workshop

and a wood engraving weekend with Keith Pettit [nationaltrust.org.uk/

monks-house]. Over at Charleston, meanwhile, there’s an Introduction

to Basketry coming up, where you can create your own ‘Sciathog’ basket,

with Annemarie O’Sullivan. And now is the time to book places on the

Young Bohemians Summer School in July, with drawing, painting,

collage, printing and sculpture courses for 8-17 year olds [charleston.org.uk].

Open every Sunday from April - October 2018

Experience the extraordinary atmosphere of the Sussex

home of the Surrealists Lee Miller and Roland Penrose

whose friends and guests included Picasso, Carrington,

Man Ray and Miró. We open to visitors on Sundays from

10am, offering 50 minute guided tours, exhibitions in our

gallery and a sculpture garden to explore.

Muddles Green, Chiddingly

East Sussex, BN8 6HW

Tel: 01825 872856

www.farleyshouseandgallery.co.uk

@ FarleysHG


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SAVE THE DATE


ART

Out of town (cont)

Anita Chester

Anita Chester has been

collecting plastic rubbish

from the beach since 2011.

She uses it to create textile

hangings, printed designs

and three-dimensional

works, with the underlying

and timely message that

we should be very worried

about our throwaway

culture. Fretting, an

exhibition of her work, is at Devonshire Collective

Café and Gallery in Eastbourne from the 5th-9th.

Worthing Artists Open

Houses takes place on weekends

from the 16th of June until

the 1st of July, with over 325

participating artists presenting

their work in 57 different

venues throughout the town

[worthingartistsopenhouses.

com]. Further west, Virginia

Woolf: an exhibition inspired by

her writings continues at Pallant House. Featuring 80

female artists working from 1854 to the present day,

the selected work ‘seeks to show how her perspectives

on feminism and creativity have remained relevant to a

community of creative women across time’.

If you’re heading

east, visit three

award-winning

galleries in one

day on the Coastal

Culture Trail. The

Towner Gallery

in Eastbourne, the

De La Warr Pavilion in Bexhill and the Jerwood

Gallery in Hastings are all within 17 miles of each

other and an easy cycle or train ride (or an intrepid

weekend’s walk!). Visit coastalculturetrail.com to

explore the options. There’s much to see.

Anna Vartiainen, Venue 11

Assembly by Alison Wilding

Mishka Henner, Unknown Site, Noordwijk aan Zee,

South Holland, 2011 Arts Council Collection,

Southbank Centre, London, courtesy of the artist

At Altitude is at Towner Gallery from

the 2nd. A book illustration from 1786,

A Circular View from the Balloon at its

greatest Elevation, is considered to be

one of the first ever ‘real’ aerial views and

sets the context for this exhibition, which

explores ‘how our experience of landscape,

space and territory has been transformed

through new aerial perspectives of the

world’. Once again working in partnership

with the Arts Council, the exhibition brings

together painting, sculpture, photography

and film around the theme.

Continue

on down to

De La Warr

Pavilion for

an exhibition

of new and

existing works by leading UK sculptor and

Royal Academician, Alison Wilding. From

the 23rd, Right Here and Out There unfolds

both inside and outside of the gallery, with

works selected in response to the landscape

and the light. In her own words, ‘The sharp

lines of the building reflect the sharp lines

of the sculptures, and the flatness of the

horizon… the sculptures seem to hold the

same weight as those ships’. The exhibition

continues until the 16th of September.

55


Sussex Community Festival

Join us for a day of free

entertainment, fun and discovery

SUNDAY 24 JUNE 2018, 11AM–3PM

UNIVERSITY OF SUSSEX CAMPUS, FALMER, BRIGHTON

Our beautiful campus is nestled in the South Downs countryside right next to Falmer Station.

We invite you to a fun-filled day of free activities and entertainment for all ages.

COME ALONG TO ENJOY:

bands and music research demos treasure trail workshops children’s activities

sports tasters bouncy castle face painting fun experiments aerial circus skills

storytelling food stalls World Cup football shown in our campus bar

FIND OUT MORE AND BOOK YOUR FREE TICKETS:

www.sussex.ac.uk/festival


JUNE listings

SATURDAY 2 & SUNDAY 3

THURSDAY 7

Comedy at the Con. With

Pierre Hollins (right), Paddy

Lennox, Dave Fensome and

Andrea Hubert. Con Club,

7.30pm, £8-£12.

THURSDAY 7 – SATURDAY 9

Living History Festival. Weald & Downland

Living Museum, Chichester, 10.30am-5pm,

£6.50-£14 (family ticket offers available).

SUNDAY 3

Chailey Heritage Focus Run. Raising funds for

the DREAM Centre Appeal (see pg 14). Borde

Hill Garden, £5-£20. runchaileyheritage.org.uk.

MONDAY 4

Greening Tomorrow. Alan Simpson, adviser on

sustainable economics to the Shadow Chancellor

John McDonnell, opens a Lewes Labour discussion.

Phoenix Centre, 7.30pm, free.

TUESDAY 5

Attempting Green Living in a Sussex Wood.

Chris Yarrow provides a brief résumé of British

forestry. Council Chamber, Lewes Town Hall,

2.30pm, free.

Headstrong Club talk and discussion. Guy

Standing speaks on ‘Basic income and how we

can make it happen’. Elly, 8pm, £3.

WEDNESDAY 6

Gardening with the Best Beloved. Talk with

Val Bourne, writer for The Telegraph and author

of books including The Living Jigsaw. St Thomas

Church Hall, 7.30pm for 7.45pm, £3.

South of England Show. The best of British

countryside living: the biggest such jamboree in

the South East, in Ardingly. See page 37.

FRIDAY 8

Gin tasting and book reading. An evening

of botanical gins, readings and lists inspired by

Lewesian Lulah Ellender’s book Elisabeth’s Lists.

AS Apothecary, 7.30pm, £25 (tickets limited).

Lewes Barbican Rotary Annual Quiz. General

knowledge quiz, teams of up to six. Bring a picnic,

bar available. Kingston Village Hall, 7.30pm, £5.

SATURDAY 9

Never in a Million Years. Astronomy presentation

with Jane Green FRAS. Willingdon Community

School, Eastbourne, 7.30pm, £5-£12.

Corbynism. Lewes Labour meeting with Guardian

writer Zoe Williams, Momentum’s Laura

Parker and author Richard Power Sayeed (see pg

39). Town Hall, 10.30am, £5.

SATURDAY 9 – SUNDAY 15 JULY

Waterlily Festival.

Enjoy the waterlilies

on the lakes at

Sheffield Park and

Garden, through

a variety of tours,

events and workshops.

See

nationaltrust.org.uk/sheffield-park-and-garden.

57


Lewes Castle

& Anne of Cleves

House

Anne of Cleves House

Princess & the Pea

29 th May, 1pm -4pm

Drop in for storytelling,

dressing up & craft activities.

Tudor Weekend

14 th & 15 th July

Discover how the Tudors lived;

dance classes, cooking demos,

textile making & much more!

Lewes Castle*

Digging for Treasure - 31 st May

Dig, sort, draw & make your

own treasure to take home.

Ages 4-8. Adult to stay.

*Tickets £5 per child

*Booking required for

Lewes Castle activities

www.sussexpast.co.uk

Half

Term

Fun in

Lewes

WEALD & DOWNLAND LIVING MUSEUM

2-3 June 2018 10.30am-5.00pm

Singleton, Chichester,

West Sussex PO18 OEU

wealddown.co.uk

01243 811363 |


JUNE listings (cont)

Image courtesy of

Dave & Albert ‘Les’ Scott

MONDAY 11

History of the

Lewes Workhouse

Building. Mat

Homewood tells the

story of the Lewes

workhouse building

and its various uses from construction in 1868 to

demolition in the 1950s. King’s Church, 7pm for

7.30pm, £1/£3.

WEDNESDAY 13

The Life and

Work of Puccini.

Illustrated talk

exploring how

Puccini’s career

exemplifies the

fracturing of European culture at that time.

Uckfield Civic Centre, 2pm, £7 (members free).

THURSDAY 14

Lewes Needlewriters/South Downs Poetry

Festival Special. Poetry surgeries, open mics

and readings. See needlewriters.co.uk.

The Brighton of Aubrey Beardsley. Illustrated

talk with Alexia Lazou. The Keep, 5.30pm, £5.

The Tempest. Shakespeare’s play performed in

the open air by The Lord Chamberlain’s Men.

Charleston, 7.30pm, £20/£18.

THURS 14 – SUN 17

Brewers Arms Inaugural Cider and

Perry Festival. ‘Meet the Producer’

talk and tasting with Matt from Ascension

Cider on the 14th at 7.30pm;

the festival runs throughout the weekend. Brewers

Arms, free (£10 from pub for talk, including tastings

and nibbles from Richards Butchers).

Patricia Thornton

Maps and Dreams

2–22 June • 12–5pm • Thu–Sun

Private View • Friday 1 June • 6pm

www.martyrs.gallery


Lewes

Little

Theatre

The Home of

Lewes Theatre Club

The Merchant of Venice

Written by William Shakespeare

Directed by Shaun Hughes

Friday 29 June - Saturday 7 July 7:45pm excl.

Saturday 1 July and Sunday 2 July evenings.

Matinee Saturday 1 July and 7 July 2:45pm.

£12/Members £8

www.lewestheatre.org

Box Office: 01273 474826

Written by

WILLIAM

SHAKESPEARE

The

Directed by

SHAUN

HUGHES

Mer

chant

of

Ven ice

Trading Boundaries

proudly presents

Puccini’s

La Boheme ′

in association with

Opera D’Amore

Saturday 7 July

Featuring a cast who have

performed at Glyndebourne,

English National Opera and

the Royal Opera House.

A rare opportunity to witness a

professional production of one of

the most popular operas in such

an intimate, atmospheric venue.

Enjoy dinner by candlelight

and then experience the cast

performing around you while

they use our whole restaurant

as their canvas.

For tickets and information

on all upcoming concerts:

BOX OFFICE: 01825 790200

TRADINGBOUNDARIES.COM

Sheffield Green, Nr Fletching,

East Sussex TN22 3RB

VIVA LEWES HALF PAGE JUNE.indd 1 17/05/2018 12:51


'Summer is a-coming in'

Mid-Summer Concert on June 23rd

at 7.30pm in Piddinghoe Parish Church

featuring the Ouse Valley Singers

and student band 'Funktionality' from

Southdowns College, Lewes.

A celebration of summer with

a medley of music including

Classical, Folk, Pop and Funk.

Entry £5

children under 12 free.

Tickets on the door or from

Vanessa Giles 01273 965663.

G A R D E N

There’s something for everyone

A Summer of Music

Operatic High Tea

Sun 1st July, 3-5pm

An elegant High Tea, glass

of fizz and operatic

highlights *BE Sponsored by

A Boundless Summer

Sat 7th – Sun 8th July

UB40 and The Gipsy

Kings headline this music

festival in the parkland.

Purchase a ticket at the

shop *BE

Bordehillgarden

@bordehillgarden

Open Air Opera

La Bohème Fri 27th July

The Marriage of Figaro

Sat 28th July

Two evenings of

summer opera

performed by

Opera Brava. *BE

Musical Picnics

Sundays in August,

plus 2nd Sept

Bring a picnic and enjoy

live music in the Garden.

Free (normal admission

applies).

*BE – Booking essential at

www.bordehill.co.uk/events

Bordehillgarden

Tel: 01444 450326 www.bordehill.co.uk

JUNE listings (cont)

SATURDAY 16

Sussex Gin & Fizz

Festival. Supplier stalls,

talks by industry experts,

free samples, food and

live music. Southover

Grange Gardens, 11am-

6pm, £15.

Lewes Castle Rotary’s sponsored walk. Raising

funds for Chestnut Tree House. Registration opens

8.30am at Southover Church Hall. Contact Lewes

Castle Rotary for more details: 07957829997.

Little Edinburgh. Four comedians prep for Edinburgh

Fringe. All Saints, 4pm-9.30pm, £6.50 per

show or £13 for whole day. See pg 33.

MONDAY 18

ABCD in Palestine & Palestine Community

Co-operative talk about their work to help women,

families and communities in Palestine. White Hart,

7pm, free.

FRIDAY 22

The Turbulent Pub Life of Lewes. A Friends of

Anne of Cleves’ House talk by Viva contributor Mat

Homewood, the authority on the history of Lewes

boozers. Anne of Cleves, 7.30pm, £8/£5.

FRIDAY 22 & SATURDAY 23

South Downs Beer & Cider Festival. Nearly 90

real ales, plus ciders and perries,

plus hot and cold food.

Lewes Town Hall, 11am-

3pm & 5-10.30pm (Friday)

and 11am-6pm (Saturday),

£4-£7.

SATURDAY 23

Table-top book sale. Fundraiser for Freedom from

Torture East Sussex, selling books on the theme of

travelling/walking. Cliffe precinct, 10am-2pm. >>>

61


S T P E T E R & S T J A M E S H O S P I C E

SATURDAY 8TH SEPTEMBER 7PM

Wakehurst

Ardingly, Haywards Heath, West Sussex RH17 6TN

Join us beneath the stars as we take a walk to remember this

September. Enjoy a sponsored stroll through Wakehurst’s

beautiful botanic gardens and lay a lantern alongside

hundreds of others to remember and celebrate the people

you love. As your glistening lantern brings light to dark

hours, you’ll help our hospice nurses do the same.

Entry is £15 before 1st June and £18 thereafter.

Under 16s £5.

Family and group discounts available

Kids’ activities,

photobooth &

fantastic prizes

to be won!

Register at stpjhospice.org

or call us on 01444 471598

Registered charity number: 1056114

Kindly sponsored by


JUNE listings (cont)

SATURDAY 23 (CONT)

Summer is a-coming in. Mid-Summer concert

featuring the Ouse Valley Singers and student

band ‘Funktionality’ from Southdowns College,

Lewes. Piddinghoe Parish Church, 7.30pm, £5

(kids under 12 free).

MONDAY 25 TO FRIDAY 29

Lewes Skittles Tournament. Money raised

provides funds which enable the Rotary Club to

support charities and local people in need. Entry

will be £30 per team (teams of 6), see lewes-rotary.

org/skittles for details.

TUESDAY 26

The Alternative Alice in

Wonderland. Set in the surroundings

of the college grounds.

Eastbourne College, The Dell,

8.15pm, £5.

Open Gardens

SUNDAY 3

Rodmell Open Gardens. Proceeds to

St Peter’s Church and other village clubs

and societies. 2pm-3pm, £5 (accompanied

children free).

SATURDAY 9 & SUNDAY 10

Southease Open

Gardens. Take the

chance to look at

their beautifully restored

church tower.

12.30pm-5pm, £6

(children free).

SUNDAY 10

Fletching Garden Trail. Funds raised benefit

Fletching Church of England Primary

School. Fletching, 11am-5pm, £6 (kids free).

Southover Open Gardens. Proceeds to

Southover Bonfire Society. 2.30pm-6pm

(some gardens to 6pm), £5 (accompanied

under 16s free).

Lewes Live Lit double bill: John Agard and Annika

Brown. See page 43.

FRIDAY 29

Free NHS Health Checks. For 40-74 year olds

living in East Sussex. Check includes BMI, blood

pressure and cholesterol. Phoenix Centre, call

0300 303 3624 to book an appointment.

FRIDAY 29 – SATURDAY 7 JULY

The Merchant of Venice. Presented by Lewes

Theatre Club and directed by Shaun Hughes. See

lewestheatre.org.

SATURDAY 30

Knowlands Farm

Butterfly Walk. A

talk and walk with

conservationist Nick

Lear. Knowlands

Farm, two walks at

12pm and 2.30pm,

£15/£10 (accompanied children free).

SUNDAY 24

Rose Cottage Open Garden. In aid of

Saturday Circles Club Lewes. 1 Rose Cottage,

Chalvington Road, Golden Cross near

Hailsham, 11am-5pm, £4, children free

(see pg 16).

SATURDAY 30

Open Garden in

aid of Alzheimer’s

Research UK. High

Trees, 83 Firle Road,

Seaford, 11am-4.30pm,

£6 (kids free).

63


MUSIC

Classical round-up

SATURDAY 2, 7PM

Thibaut Garcia. Evening concert with the Franco-

Spanish guitarist as part of Glynde Place Concert

Series. Programme to include the JS Bach Chaconne

from the solo violin Partita in D minor.

Glynde Place, £30/£15

SATURDAY 9, 7.30PM

Doctors for Nepal Charity Concert. Summer

fundraising concert with proceeds toward improving

healthcare in rural Nepal. Julia Bishop (violin),

Howard Beach (harpsichord), Ana-Maria Rincon

(soprano) and the University of Chichester Baroque

Orchestra. Music will include Handel’s Concerto

Grosso op. 6 no. 6, Bach’s Oboe and violin double concerto

in C minor and Vivaldi’s Cello concerto in C minor.

St Anne’s Church, £15/£8

SUNDAY 10, 4PM

Corelli Ensemble. Features the winner of the

Segovia Competition, Paul Gregory, playing Vivaldi’s

Guitar Concerto and Cavatina from the film The Deer

Hunter. The Corelli Ensemble’s musical director,

Maeve Jenkinson plays the theme from Ladies in

Lavender. Programme will also include Elgar’s

Serenade for Strings, and Holst’s St Paul’s Suite.

St Pancras Church, £12/£10 (children free) >>>

Paul Gregory (Corelli Ensemble)

GLYNDE PLACE

CONCERT SERIES 2018

BBC Radio 3 New Generation Artists

Andrei Ionita (cello)

with Naoko Sonoda (piano)

Saturday 7pm, 7 July 2017

Beethoven•Schumann•Rachmaninov

Tickets, info and other events - glyndeplace.co.uk

12 May -Mariam Batsashvili (piano)

2 June - Thibaut Garcia (guitar)

House Open

May & June - We, Th, Su & BH Mo

Aug -26&27 Sep - 1 & 2 for Artwave

MOTETS

Bach and beyond

Choral works by

Bach | Bruckner | Duruflé | Copland

Esterházy Chamber Choir

Conductor: Richard Dawson

Saturday 23 June 2018 7.30pm

St Anne’s Church, Lewes

Tickets £10 in advance from Lewes Tourist

Information Centre or from our website.

£12 on the door (under 16s free)

See www.esterhazychoir.org for more details


MUSIC

SUNDAY 10, 6PM

Musicians of All Saints. Candlelit concert with

Anne Hodgson (Flute) Clare Worth (Oboe)

and Russ Robinson (Viola). Including works by

Holst, Hinchcliffe, Graebner and Telemann.

Hamsey Old Church, £12/£9 (under 18s free)

THURS 14 – SAT 16

Lewes Chamber Music Festival. Three days

of chamber music in Lewes, featuring works of

Schonberg, Korngold, Beethoven, Mozart and

Schubert (see pg 47). Various venues, see leweschambermusicfestival.com

for full programme

SUNDAY 17, 6PM

Musicians of All Saints. A quartet from MAS

plus two soloists perform Haydn’s String Quartet

in B minor, Op.33 no.1; Holst’s Four Songs for

Voice and Violin; Peter Warlock’s Complete Songs

with String Quartet, and Beethoven’s String

Quartet in F major.

Hamsey Old Church, £12/£9 (under 18s free)

SAT 23 – SUN 1 JULY

Villages Music Festival. Celebration of live

music in the villages of Ripe, Chalvington and

Laughton. Highlights include masterclass with

Dame Felicity Lott, Brighton Film Quartet,

Baroque flute with Neil Maclaren and the Magnard

Ensemble’s Revolting Rhymes and Marvellous

Music, based on the work of Roald Dahl.

See villagesmusicfestival.org

SATURDAY 23, 7.30PM

Esterházy Chamber Choir. Performing

motets by Bach, Bruckner, Duruflé and Copland

with conductor Richard Dawson.

St Anne’s Church, £10

Magnard (Villages Music Festival)

LEWES

FESTIVAL OF

SONG

6-8 TH JULY

2018

St. Anne’s Church, Lewes

Friday 6th at 7.30pm

YOUTH AND DREAMS

Mahler, Berg, Caplet and English songs

Saturday 7th at 1pm

NOCTURNE: CELESTIAL MUSIC

Schubert and Debussy

Saturday 7th at 7pm

WOLF’S ITALIENISCHES

LIEDERBUCH

A battle of the sexes in forty-six

miniatures

Sunday 8th at 1pm

‘IF WORDS BE MADE

OF BREATH’

songs with guitar

Dowland, Britten, De Falla, Brett Dean

Sunday 8th at 7.30pm

SACRED RAPTURES

songs and à cappella choir

Barber, Britten, Macmillan, Weir,

Pärt, commission by Orlando Gough

Festival Pass £60

Evening concerts £15, lunchtime £12

Under 16s half-price

BOOK ONLINE

www.lewesfestivalofsong.co.uk

or from Lewes Tourist Information

Centre (01273 483448)

Patron: Mark Padmore

THE

CHALK

CLIFF

TRUST


BRIGHTON IS

BEAUTIFUL

AT NIGHT,

SEE IT BY BUS

VISIT BUSES.CO.UK


GIG GUIDE // JUNE

GIG OF THE MONTH: THE MEMBERS

(SUPPORTING JOHNNY MOPED)

We have grown accustomed to the Con Club spoiling us

with at least one legendary punk gig a month, and we are

not disappointed with the line-up for June. The mighty

Members are supporting Johnny Moped on 16th June and

we can’t wait. The spiky-haired foursome were founded

in Surrey 1977 (and reformed in 2007); those who were

around at the time will remember their satirical commentary

on suburban life and true-to-punk maverick style,

encompassed in their 1979 hit The Sound of the Suburbs - a

classic single. For those who weren’t around, if you’ve a

penchant for an ‘eclectic mix of punk, reggae, surf, pop and anthemic songs’ head along and check them out.

As an added bonus, the night of punk nostalgia is headlined by Mr Moped, something of a legend in his own

right. Saturday 16, Con Club, doors 7.30pm, £15 Kelly Hill

FRIDAY 1

Jonathan Toubin Dance Party. Supercharged

RnB. Con Club, 8pm, £12

SATURDAY 2

Bob Kenward. Folk (songs from Kent). Elly,

8pm, £6

Love Action. 80s night presented by Fruitful

Soundsystem. Swan, 9pm, free

SUNDAY 3

Spear of Destiny. Post punk. Do you believe in

the West World? Con Club, 7.30pm, £16

MONDAY 4

Aurora Chanson. Jazz. Snowdrop, 8pm, free

FRIDAY 8

Too Many Crooks. Ska. The Con Club,

7.30pm, £10

SATURDAY 9

Nancy Kerr. Folk (English trad & modern). Elly,

8pm, £9

SUNDAY 10

Open Space Open Mic. Music, poetry and

performance. Elly, 7.30pm, free

MONDAY 11

Robert Fowler. Tenor sax. Snowdrop, 8pm, free

FRIDAY 15

AYU. Eight-piece funk band. The Con Club,

7.30pm, free

SATURDAY 16

Johnny Moped + The Members. See Gig of

the Month

Fourgone Confusion. Folk (contemporary).

Elly, 8pm, £6

SUNDAY 17

The Contenders (in the bar). Rock blues. Con

Club, 3.30pm, free

MONDAY 18

Gabriel Garrick. Jazz. Snowdrop, 8pm, free

>>>

67


JUN

@

LEWES

CON CLUB

1 JONATHAN TOUBIN DANCE PARTY

15 83 SPEAR OF DESTINY

TOO MANY CROOKS

AYU FUNK BAND

16 JOHNNY MOPED/THE MEMBERS

17 CONTENDERS

22TOWN OF CATS

24ARCELIA

29 LAZY SUSAN EVENT WITH GUEST DJ

30 LOOSE CABOOSE NIGHT

SEE WEBSITE FOR ANY CHANGES DETAILS AND ENTRY

Registered Charity No. 298595

SATURDAY

4th AUGUST

A COMMERCIAL SQUARE

BONFIRE LTD EVENT

LOCATION: BN7 1UU

TICKETS

ADULTS: £8.00 in advance

£10.00 on the gate

CHILDREN 5 to 16: £3.00

Under 5s: FREE

GATES OPEN - 3:00pm

MUSIC STARTS - 4:00pm

FINISH - 10:00pm

FEATURING THREE BANDS

The Supreme Collective

Soultastic

Lewes, Glynde &

Beddingham Brass

Afternoon start,

night-time finish

Firework finale

Licenced bar

Barbecue food

Side stalls

ALSO SUPPORTED BY

TICKETS AND MORE: www.promsinthepaddock.co.uk

TICKETS ALSO AVAILABLE FROM THESE LEWES OUTLETS:

Elephant & Castle • Tourist Information • Harvey’s Brewery Shop • Richards Butchers


GIG GUIDE // JUNE

FRIDAY 22

Jack Allsobrook & The Middleways. Performing

debut album. All Saints, 7.30pm, £12

Town Of Cats. Afrobeat/ska/funk. Con Club,

7.30pm, free

SATURDAY 23

Ramekins. Folk (sea songs). Elly, 8pm, £6

SUNDAY 24

Arcelia (in the bar). Soulful folk. Con Club,

3.30pm, free

MONDAY 25

Terry Smith. Jazz guitar. Snowdrop, 8pm, free

FRIDAY 29

Lazy Susan event with guest DJ. Con Club,

7.30pm, £4 (members free)

SATURDAY 30

Loose Caboose Night. Northern soul. Con Club,

7.30pm, £5

The Old Firm. Music hall songs & monologues.

Elly, 8pm, £7

Arcelia

Bright and fresh studio to LET in the centre of Lewes!

Situated on famous Fisher street, we’re proud to present Fisher Street Studios - a bespoke studio/office in the centre of Lewes!

We provide an affordable, professionally managed creative workspace. Fresh and bright open plan space suitable for any type of

creative work.

▪ Affordable studio/office space, 40 sqm

▪ 24 hour access, 365 days a year

▪ Natural light

▪ Situated in central Lewes close to the high street and transport links

▪ Diverse community of 9 art studios in the building

▪ Safe & secure

▪ WiFi

To arrange a viewing:

Call Michael @ 07789225353


ADVERTORIAL

The Alternative

Alice in Wonderland

25-29 June, Eastbourne College 8.15pm

Eastbourne College presents their annual Summer production in

the grounds of the college and their outdoor theatre The Dell,

a fantastic adaptation of Alice in Wonderland in the promenade.

Eager to help the Rabbit,

Alice dashes to his rescue

and encounters strange

and fascinating characters,

all in the surrounds of

the college’s grounds.

Faithful to the madness

and the lively humour

of the original, this revisitation

of Lewis Carroll’s

classic has unique twists.

The setting is Eastbourne

College’s wonderful

school, allowing it to be a gateway to the

imagination. Will you follow the Rabbit?

Claudine Sinnett, who is Eastbourne

College’s new Director of Drama,

and Gavin Robertson, their resident

practitioner, have adapted and directed

this great classic and worked closely

with the cast and technical team to

create a magical landscape of characters

and surroundings for the audience to

immerse themselves in in

the final Summer show,

ending the academic year

on a high.

The audience will

encounter a fantastic

set in the beautiful

Dell Theatre which was

originally built in the 70s,

deep in the heart of the

school.

The Drama department

has recently updated

their programme of events and now has

approximately 7 productions per year

including inclusion into the Edinburgh

Festival, Shakespeare Schools Festival

and they readily invite professional

theatre companies in to enrich the

learning of the pupils.

All of our productions are in support of a

registered charity and ‘Alice’ is supporting the

mental health charity MIND.

Starts outside the Nugee building, refreshments available from 7.45pm

Bring a blanket. Tickets £5

boxoffice@eastbourne-college.co.uk


FREETIME

UNDER 16

êêêê

SAT 26 MAY – FRI 1 JUNE

Magical Mayhem: Unicorn and Dragon

Week. Meet and groom the magical unicorn,

join in with the unicorn and dragon show, and

unscramble the letters on the trail to win a treat.

Spring Barn Farm, see springbarnfarm.com.

SUNDAY 3

Family Art Activities. Drop-in hosted

by volunteers; from paper lampshades to

clay models, inspired by the art and lives

of the Bloomsbury Group. Charleston,

12.30-4pm, free.

Look Think Make. Look at the

artworks, think about the ideas

behind them and be inspired to make

creations. De La Warr, 2pm, £1.

SATURDAY 23

Midsummer

Festival.

Exhibitions of

work and crafts,

sideshows, walks,

lunches and cream

teas. Michael

Hall, Forest Row,

11am-5pm, free.

SUNDAY 24

Sussex Community Festival. Fun-filled day of

activities and entertainment for all ages. Sports

tasters, face painting and fun experiments for

kids. Bands, research demos and World Cup

football in the bar. University of Sussex campus,

Falmer, 11am-3pm, free.

SATURDAY 9

Defender of the Realm:

King’s Army. Book

launch and signing with

Nick Ostler and Mark

Huckerby. Bags of Books,

11am, free.

Iford and Kingston

School Summer Fair.

Tackle the inflatable

assault course, get close to a reptile, try for a

prize at the hook-a-duck, and enjoy tea and cake

(or BBQ and beer). Iford & Kingston C of E

School, 12pm-3pm, £1 (kids free).

MONDAY 11

Isfield Village Fête. Novelty dog show,

‘Mousetown’, Scalextric, stocks, tug-o-war, egg

throwing, ‘traditional’ school sports, stalls, beer

tent, tea & cake, wood-fired pizza, ice cream,

BBQ and more. ICE Field behind Laughing

Fish Pub, Isfield, 12pm, £1.50 (50p kids).

Tales for Toddlers. Stories, songs and

imagination-inspiring activities. De La Warr,

10.15am & 11.15am, £1.

Raystede Summer Fair. Including bar, BBQ,

games and dog show. More details to be

announced, check raystede.org.

71


THE MULBERRY BEES êêêê

The Mulberry Bees is a children’s picture book

inspired by the view outside author Bethany Moore’s

office window. It’s a nice view, to be sure: a square of

lawn, backed by a steep-roofed flint building, dominated

by a large and obviously ancient mulberry

tree. She’s the Development Officer at Glyndebourne

Opera House.

Every year, Bethany has told us, the tree is visited

by a swarm of bees, who subsequently produce

purple honey. This has inspired a narrative of said

bees infiltrating the concert hall, and disrupting a

performance of Figaro. The singers and orchestra

are forced into the garden and decide to

carry on performing the opera, underneath

the mulberry tree. With,

as it happens, rather disastrous

results.

The book was written

– in rhyme – by

Bethany and her

office-mate Rich

Joyner, and illustrated,

rather beautifully, by Rich.

Alex Leith

MidSummeR

FesTivaL

Saturday 23 rd June 2018

11:00 - 17:00 - All welcome

Exhibitions of work and crafts from Kindergarten to A-Level

Pageant ~ Sideshows ~ Estate & Garden Walks ~ Alumni Tours

Lunches ~ Cream Teas ~ Strawberries & Ice-Cream

www.michaelhall.co.uk

Kidbrooke Park, Priory Road, Forest Row. East Sussex, RH18 5JA

Tel: 01342 822275 - Registered Charity Number 307006

72


KINGSTON KESTRELS: #SQUADGOALS

êêêê

Local U14 boys’ football team

the Kingston Kestrels have raised

an incredible £1,000 for Brighton’s

Clock Tower Sanctuary.

Mat Head, who co-manages

the team, says: “As a finale to

a great season, we organised

a trip to play a tournament in Holland over the

Easter weekend. One of the dads, Pete Maguire,

suggested the boys raise some money for the tour

and a local charity at the same time, so the idea

of a sponsored dribble was born.” Between them,

the 14 members of the squad dribbled a football

all the way from the top of Ditchling Beacon into

Lewes, raising the £600 they needed for their trip,

and donating the rest to the charity.

“The trip to Holland was fantastic,” Mat says.

“The boys were unbeaten and had a great time together,

and since then the squad

has visited Clock Tower to

present them with the cheque

and learn about the work they

do with young people in less

fortunate circumstances.”

“We’ve enjoyed a brilliant season

with the boys and their experiences through

the club this year have been profound. Not only

have they become a great team of footballers

(division champions and cup finalists), but their

esprit de corps has resulted in an incredibly strong

bond amongst them both on and off the pitch.

The sense of achievement and understanding

gained from the connection with Clock Tower has

also had a really positive effect. We’re all looking

forward to many more seasons together.” RC

kingstonfootball.club

SHOES ON NOW: TEAM RED VERSUS TEAM BLUE

We were armed. We were dangerous. The artillery

of The Blue Team was impressive: Super

Soaker Blaster guns, 50 water balloons and two

old washing up liquid bottles. The Red Team was

similarly armed, albeit with a slight advantage, as,

somehow, they had managed to acquire almost

double the stash of water balloons, a sprinkler and

a rather ominous bucket full of water. A whistle

was blown, and it was Game On.

The five-year-old became an instant target, his

girth and lack of speed making him an easy hit.

Mum and Dad also got blasted with water several

times for much the same reasons. The older boys

attacked with their superior collection of water

balloons, blasting The Blue Team with a speed

and ferocity they somehow lack when asked to

wash the dishes.

But Team Blue had some

secret water balloons hidden

near the fence at the

end of the garden so just

when Team Red was running

out of water, Team

Blue struck. Oldest child

was pummelled with ten

water balloons one after the other - I may have

been getting carried away - whilst middle child

was negotiating with his dad to show mercy.

Soaked, battered and much in need of a change of

clothes Team Red and Team Blue retreated into

the house with each side declaring victory. Sometimes

in the busy-ness of life, it’s simple pleasures

that remind me why I became a parent in the first

place. Jacky Adams

73


FOOD REVIEW

Trading Post

Vegan pulled pork... and banana bread

“Apparently the banana bread there

is really good,” says Kelly.

“I’ve heard the banana bread is really

good…” I wonder if we’ve got

our facts from the same person.

We’re heading down to Cliffe

to try out the new Trading Post

Coffee Roasters, which has taken

over the old Real Eating Company

premises. The space has been totally

transformed, with a big coffee

bar to the left and an impressive

copper roaster in front.

We go up to order. There are five

different coffee blends to choose

from: “Green Monkey is the one

we roast here,” says the friendly

girl behind the counter, “the others

come from our Brighton roaster.”

We go for two Green Monkey flat

whites (£2.50 each) and sit out in

the garden.

“I don’t know what to eat…” I say, scanning the

menu. Kelly already knows she wants a Benedict

(there is a whole Benedicts section on their

menu). She goes for the Salmon (£8.75). I like the

sound of the Vegan Pulled Pork Sandwich (£8.25)

but I’m so hungry that I’m worried a sandwich

won’t do it.

“We’ll have cake afterwards,” Kelly reminds me.

Who could forget about the banana bread? I go

back up to the bar to order. Shortly after I get back

to our table, the coffees arrive.

“That’s really rich,” Kelly notes.

“Very smooth,” I add. I never really know how to

describe coffee, but this one is good.

Before long the waitress emerges with our food,

and my anxiety about the sandwich not being

enough diminishes. It’s halved

and stacked on a wooden board,

standing at almost half a foot tall.

“Wow.”

Kelly’s Benedict also looks

amazing, generously drenched

in hollandaise sauce and prettily

sprinkled with little red shoots.

But back to my sandwich.

The three layers of sourdough

are stuffed with ‘pulled pork’ (seasoned

jackfruit), freshly made slaw

and slices of avocado. It’s huge and

messy and absolutely delicious.

I’m pretty stuffed, but, I think, imagine

the review if I didn’t actually

end up trying the banana bread.

So I go back to the bar. The same

lovely girl is there.

“We’ll have a slice of carrot cake,

and…” I look back at the menu in

that way that we seem to do, even

when we know exactly what we’re ordering.

“The banana bread?” she offers.

“Yes - I’ve heard it’s really good.”

“It is,” she says. “It’s vegan and gluten free, but

you wouldn’t know. It’s so good, the first time I

had it I almost wept.” Wow. I sit back down and

await its arrival.

A few minutes later the waitress is back. She sets a

board down on our table, with two thick slices of

toasted banana bread and a small dish of espresso

cashew butter. We take a slice each, and… it’s not

like any banana bread I’ve had before. It’s not too

sweet, but sweet enough. It tastes good for you,

but not in a bad way. It is delicious.

So I didn’t quite weep, but it was really good.

Rebecca Cunningham

Photos by Rebecca Cunningham

75


76

Photo by Chloë King


RECIPE

Barbecued mackerel with charmoula

Einat Chalmers from Mamoosh, throws some mackerel

on the barbie – Moroccan style – to eat with her famous pitta bread

I trained at one of the top cookery schools in the

States, The French Culinary Institute in New

York. I was young and restless, but I learnt all the

basics of French cuisine, which you can apply

to anything you do. In my family, everyone has

a business. Everyone is doing their thing, and

we’re all in the catering industry.

I grew up in a kibbutz in Israel where my

dad worked at the fish pond and my mother,

for many years, organised all the catering

events. My dad left the community because

the establishment wasn’t for him, he wanted

to be a free bird, and he went on to have many

restaurants. The last became one of the most

iconic institutions in Tel Aviv, a traditional

Middle Eastern fish restaurant named Barbunia.

When I came to the UK, I worked on and off at

Real Patisserie. I wasn’t doing all the pretty little

things - I was mainly making croissants. I always

wanted to learn how to make proper bread. I was

doing it at home, for myself, and then friends

asked if I could make bread for them as well.

My dad is my biggest supporter; he couldn’t wait

for me to start my own business. Opportunities

came, people asked if I would sell my bread but I

wasn’t ready, and then I watched a documentary

called Six Feet from Stardom and something

clicked, I thought I should just go for it.

I launched Mamoosh nearly three years ago,

and it’s going well. I sell my bread at markets

and wholesale to shops like Hisbe and Sussex

Produce Company. In Lewes, you can find

Mamoosh at May’s Farm Cart and Talicious at

Lewes Food Market.

What my dad is, is very much what I am. We like

simple, fresh food. Generally, I make classical

Israeli salads and pittas, which are my speciality.

I combine my knowledge of French baking with

what I learnt at home.

I took this recipe from a restaurant I worked for

in New York, where we cooked sardines with

Moroccan charmoula. I’m using mackerel instead

because it’s local, sustainable, affordable, and

because June 16th is Newhaven Fish Festival. It’s

a brilliant event, and yes, there’ll be a stall selling

my pittas and salad boxes!

Ingredients: 4 whole mackerel, gutted; 20g

coriander, finely chopped; 10g parsley, finely

chopped; 3 garlic cloves, crushed; grated zest

of one lemon; ½ tsp sweet paprika; ½ tsp hot

paprika (optional); ½ tsp ground cumin; 80ml

extra virgin olive oil; salt and pepper.

Method: Light the BBQ. Mix the chopped

herbs, lemon, spices and olive oil in a bowl. Rinse

the mackerel in cold water and pat dry with

kitchen paper; slice each side diagonally two to

three times, rub with olive oil and season. Place

the mackerel on the barbecue or in a hot, dry

grill pan. Cook one side until the skin separates

easily – don’t be tempted to move the fish before

it is ready. After about ten minutes, turn over and

cook for another five minutes.

Smear the cooked mackerel with charmoula and

serve with tahini dip and warm Mamoosh pitta.

As told to Chloë King

mamooshdeli.co.uk

77


FOOD

Talicious falafel

Thank **** it’s Friday

“Have you eaten falafel before?” says the lady who

serves it to me. “Make sure you don’t get any on

your clothes.” I’m first-wearing a white linen shirt,

as it happens, so I make a good note to be careful.

I’m in the Friday Market, and said lady has just

made the falafel roll in front of me. She’s heated the

unleavened bread, smeared on some Harissa, then

a splodge of home-made hummus, then carefully

placed four falafels on top. This is covered in salad,

and a big squirt of tahini, and a couple of bits of

pickled vegetable. Then she carefully folds it up in a

sheet of brown paper.

There’s a guy behind her, frying up the falafels:

as I hand over my money, he puts a fresh batch in

a brightly coloured tajine. This lunch is going to

be fresh. I walk back to our office on Pipe Passage,

holding the wrapped up falafel in front of me, like

an ice cream.

In the office, I’m very careful about how I eat it,

which is difficult, as it is gobble-up delicious. You

have to bend over your plate, for fear of it all coming

down your front. It’s worth all the effort: a mix

of tastes hits all sides of the palate, and there’s an

interesting cross of textures, too. All for £6.

Afterwards I realise that in my eagerness to eat the

thing, I’ve forgotten to take a photo, and I’ll have to

get another one a week later, on deadline day. ‘Oh

dear,’ I think, happily. ‘Never mind’.

Alex Leith

Photo by Alex Leith

Café

Du Jardin

79


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FOOD

Illustration by Chloë King

Edible Updates

We’re sad to say that Panda

Garden has closed

after more than three

decades and it’s true

that Lewes High

Street will simply

not be the same. Lin,

Jason and family will

be sorely missed but

we warmly welcome Castle

Chinese Restaurant, now trading in their place.

Congratuations to Robin Van Creveld who has

done brilliantly to win funding from The People’s

Projects to roll out his Man with a Pan cookery

courses for widowers and male carers. Well

done to Bake Out, as well. Their white seeded

sourdough won best sourdough and best overall

loaf in the Britain’s Best Loaf Awards. And while

we’re talking ovens be aware that Flint Owl are

starting up baking courses.

As summer approaches, so the events diary gets

filled, starting with the South of England Show

in Ardingly from 7th-9th June.

Food Rocks street food will come into its own at

the Precinct on the 10th. Try the Sparkling Wine

Tasting at Harvey’s Unwins Arms on the 15th;

Barcombe Supper Club on the 16th; Kimchimaking

at The Blue Kitchen on the 26th or

Cook the Books at the Lewes Arms on the 27th,

the theme is ‘Fragrant’.

On June 16th, there’s the fabulous Newhaven

Fish Festival (see pg 77) and the Sussex Gin

& Fizz Festival at the Grange. Look out for a

brand new gin from Chichester named Jarrold’s

and Amanda Saurin’s Fierce tonic

[sussexginandfizzfestival.com].

The Depot are hosting a Making Food Choices

event with Anni Townend and Greencuisine

founder Daphne Lambert on the 26th : Daphne

has also worked with the Depot to prepare a

special menu for the café all that week. Chloë King

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81


THE WAY WE WORK

This month we gave wedding/portrait photographer Alison Buchanan an

exciting brief: take a trip out to sea with the Newhaven RNLI.

She captured four of the team at work, asking them:

‘What’s your day job, and how long does it take you to get

to the boat from there in an emergency?’

alisonbuchanan.co.uk

Lee Blacknell, 2nd Coxswain

Day job: Port Authority Pilot Coxswain

Response time: 5 minutes


THE WAY WE WORK

Katie Dusart, prospective crew

Day job: Paramedic Practitioner

Response time: 9 minutes


THE WAY WE WORK

James Johnson, crew member and Press Officer

Day job: Video Producer

Response time: 5 minutes


THE WAY WE WORK

Nick Gentry, Navigator and Training Coordinator

Day job: Retired (formerly Finance Director)

Response time: 10 minutes

A message from the RNLI: The RNLI is the charity that saves lives at sea. We rely entirely on

donations from the public and an incredible team of volunteers to keep our 238 lifeboat stations

operational around the coast of the UK and the Republic of Ireland. We are recruiting at our

Sussex stations for volunteers and welcome enquiries from people wanting to join the RNLI.


Ryan Kearley

Wooden boat builder

Sometimes I can’t move

for boats, I just shimmy

in between them. At this

time of year, I get more

and more varnish work. It’s

a bit like dipping boats in

amber, all high-shine, high

gloss varnish.

I used to build scenery,

but everything used to

go in a skip at the end of

a show. I wanted to do

something that lasted

longer, that involved more

craftsmanship. I walked

past a boatyard in Richmond

upon Thames, and

soon I was working with

the owner, Mark Edwards

MBE. I was one of those

nerdy teenagers... I recognised

the place because I’d

seen a documentary about

Mark building a submarine

out of wood.

There’s magic in boats.

They have spirit to them,

and they’re just immensely

sculptural, curvaceous

things. If you get books on

woodworking, they describe

what tools you should have

and what woods you should

use… boatbuilding does all

the things you should probably

never do with wood.

86


MY SPACE

I started working on hundred-year-old

skiffs. No-one can build like they did then,

with the speed and the skill. There’s a tradition

of building here which is slightly broken but

there are still old boys you can pick up fragments

of information from.

There’s nothing like someone showing you

something through sleight of hand. You can

show someone with a gesture something that,

if you tried to explain it in words, it might take

hours to figure out. It’s wonderful if you get

the chance to work alongside other people who

know what they’re doing. We’re interested in

preserving objects, but we should also think

about preserving methods.

You never earn a lot of money as a boatbuilder,

so you don’t have impressive tools.

Most of my boatbuilding life I’ve relied on a

decent paring chisel and a block plane. You

often have to modify tools. It’s painstaking,

there’s a lot of carefully prying things apart

so there’s a bit of abuse of chisels, using them

for levers and things, and my best secret is my

bicycle spoke drill bit.

I’ve always worked next to a waterway. I

probably think about water in a different way

to a lot of people. It amazes me that people

don’t think about where their drinking

water comes from, that fresh water is a finite

resource. At the end of the day, when you’re

a child you’re 80% water, when you’re an

old crinkly you’re 60-70% water, so I’m 70%

constituent River Ouse.

I take a walk every morning along the Bevern,

which feeds into the Ouse. There are seals

that come up to the high tide mark… sea trout

travel about 30 miles upriver to spawn. Eels

come here as elvers from the Sargasso Sea. You

have this overlap between the sea and the land

which is just tremendous. You might not see

these things, but they’re there, and the more

you walk around here, the more you’ll spot.

There’ll never be a boat that’s more attractive

than a tree. I do love my work, but

perhaps the natural world is always best.

As told to Chloë King

Photos by Chloë King

87


ANIMAL RESCUE

CENTRE

We rescue, rehome and provide sanctuary

for over 2000 animals each year.

Visitors welcome!

TOTALLY

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ON YOUR

DONATIONS

Your local animal charity

www.raystede.org

Registered charity number 237696


WILDLIFE

Illustration by Mark Greco

Water Shrew

Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water

I love Jaws, the 1975 movie which sent three men

out into the Atlantic on a fishing boat in search of

a marauding Great White Shark. There’s another

aquatic monster hunting in the ponds and shallow

streams of Sussex. But to find a water shrew…

you’re gonna need a smaller boat.

Water shrews weigh 15g and measure just 16cm

(and for that you get the head, the tail, the whole

damn thing). Unlike other shrews they have an

amazing ability to swim and hunt underwater.

They’re covered in dense fur – vital insulation

against the cold and wet. This sleek wetsuit also

traps air bubbles, transforming the shrew into a

furry Aero, helping it stay buoyant. Powerful, extra

hairy hind feet propel this tiny torpedo through

the water.

Water shrews and great white sharks have a common

feature which sets them apart from their

close relatives. They both have a striking demarcation

between their dark upperparts and their white

underparts. Looking from above their black backs

blend with the pond bottom or seabed. From

below their pale bellies make them invisible in the

sunlit water. It’s a submarine survival strategy that

helps conceal both hunters and hunted. And the

water shrew is both.

With sharp, red-tipped fangs, shrews’ jaws are as

fearsome as any shark’s. But the water shrew has

a trick up its teeth. It’s Britain’s only venomous

mammal. When it bites it injects a stupefying saliva

which subdues its victims. In Jaws the grizzled

skipper Quint (Robert Shaw) relates the chilling

true tale of the torpedoed WWII cruiser Indianapolis

which sank leaving hundreds of sailors adrift

in shark-infested waters. Well, my mate Barry was

once bitten by a water shrew in Newhaven and

his finger went all tingly for about two hours. OK,

it doesn’t exactly compare to Quint’s tale about

being bitten in half by a shark but the fact that a

tiny shrew can make such an impact on a human is

pretty impressive.

Slice open a dead shrew’s stomach and rummage

inside and you’ll find bits of beetle legs, snail

shells, and fishbones. They are relentless, frenetic

hunters. If the shrew goes without a meal for more

than an hour it will die. What we are dealing with

here is a perfect engine, an eating machine. All

this machine does is swim and eat and make little

shrews. Between April and September the mating

of the shrew can produce 2-3 litters of 3-15 young.

They live a fast, brief life. Few of them will survive

for more than a year.

The best way to see a water shrew is to sit by a

Sussex stream as the sun sets. Bring a couple of

friends and some apricot brandy, share some tall

tales and wait for a shrew to strike.

Michael Blencowe, Senior Learning & Engagement

Officer, Sussex Wildlife Trust

89


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COLUMN

Walkies

#16 Arlington Reservoir

I think I’ve discovered what it must be like to be

an A-list celeb meeting the fans. Every time I pick

up Todd from his owner Andy, I am greeted with

squeals and whines of doggy delight, a slobbery

tongue licking every undefended area of bare skin

and a tail that wags with such fury that the whole

woolly mass is soon writhing in pleasure. Quite why

the human species hasn’t seen the light I can’t quite

fathom.

On my walk today I am joined by my mate, Miguel,

whose two spaniels, Daisy and Ruby, give me an

equally ecstatic reception, this time bringing out

slippers and their dog basket blanket as welcoming

gifts. In line with this month’s watery theme, I’ve

suggested to Miguel that we check out the walks

around Arlington Reservoir. We’ve both driven

past it a thousand times along the A27 but now our

curiosity has finally got the better of us.

It’s strange how easy it is not to see the treasure in

your own backyard. Ahh! those sunlit uplands in the

distance look so tempting. But, hey, what’s this right

here in front of us? A beautiful lake surrounded by

wildflower woodlands and bird-watching hides with

hand-holding couples wandering by as we take in

this unexpected Eden.

An information board tells us that the reservoir was

excavated in 1971 when a dam was built flooding a

meandering section of the Cuckmere River. Later,

30,000 native trees (oak, birch, wild cherry, hazel)

were planted. It’s now a magnet for migrating birds

with up to 10,000 wildfowl spending the winter

here. It’s also home to rare butterflies, weasels and

deer. Hardly surprising then that it’s been designated

a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI).

The footpaths and bridleways surrounding the lake

link up to a network of connecting footpaths heading

off to nearby villages. The dogs, while we are

on the paths surrounding the lake, have to be kept

on their leads to protect the wildlife but there is an

atmosphere of tranquil calm in the air as they pad

along quietly beside us.

We stop for a bite to eat in the garden of the

welcoming Yew Tree Inn in Arlington. “Apparently

they found the tusk of a woolly mammoth and the

skull of a 250,000 year-old woolly rhinoceros when

they were digging out the reservoir,” I tell Miguel.

“I think I prefer taking these three for a walk,” he

replies. “I’m not sure the welcoming committee

would have been quite so enthusiastic back then.

However woolly they were.” Richard Madden

Map: OS Explorer 123. Distance: 3 miles. Terrain:

Lakeside pathways, woodland trails and meadows.

Directions: From the reservoir car park, take the

lakeside path or bridleway north or south around

the lake before following the footpaths across the

fields to Arlington. Complete the circuit back to the

car park. Halfway Pub: Yew Tree Inn, Arlington. NB:

dogs must be kept on leads along the lakeside trails.

91


HEALTH

Wet and wild

Messing around in the water

What increases circulation,

boosts the immune system,

promotes weight loss, alleviates

depression and even

improves your sex life? The

answer, according to its advocates,

is wild swimming.

And they have scientific backing.

Studies carried out by

NASA in the seventies found

that swimming outdoors

causes ‘cold adaptation’, which

lowers blood pressure and

cholesterol, reduces body fat,

inhibits blood clotting, and

increases fertility and libido.

Daniel Start is the author

of Wild Swimming and has

had a passion for freshwater swimming since

childhood. “There are a lot of health benefits,”

he enthuses. “One of the greatest things about

jumping into a river or lake is the endorphin

kick. After you’ve got over your initial fears about

what might be lurking in the water, you feel

enormous exhilaration. It’s the perfect way to reboot,

and you will always feel better afterwards.”

Cold adaptation is triggered by both the water

temperature and the body’s full immersion, he

explains. “Your whole body comes alive, and

it’s really good for the immune system. In fact,

studies show that people who swim outdoors

regularly have much stronger immune systems

and suffer half the amount of colds as others.”

But it’s not just physically advantageous, he continues,

as wild swimming also offers emotional

benefits. “It has a strong effect on mood and

wellbeing and is known to be good for depression.

Beyond that, there’s the impact of getting

out in nature and spending time surrounded by

dragonflies and kingfishers.

Gaining a frog’s eye view of

the world is a wonderful form

of mindfulness meditation.”

Lifelong wild swimmer Beryl

Round agrees. “For me it’s

about having your nose at the

same level as the wildlife and

feeling a part of it,” says the

Lewes grandmother. “I also

love the stillness and silence,

as there’s always noise if you

go to the swimming baths.

Above all, though, there’s a

sense of freedom. I’ve always

loved it. When I was a child,

if it was wet, I’d get in it!”

“The river at Barcombe is a

lovely place to swim,” she adds, “and I sometimes

go there with my daughter and grandchildren, as

it’s great for families. My dog, Fleck, loves it too.

She always comes in with me.”

Beginners tempted to dip a toe may want to enlist

a (non-canine) friend, Daniel suggests. “Take

someone with you and choose a place where

there are others swimming, to inspire confidence.

The easiest places are often rivers, as most lowland

ones have natural beaches in the inside of

their loops, where you can start by paddling and

then gradually go deeper. Smaller rivers often

have weirs where you can find deeper, stiller

waters. If you’re nervous about what might be

underfoot, wear old trainers or sandals. And

imagine you can swim a tenth of the distance that

you can indoors, as it can feel very different to

start with.”

So why not come on in? The water’s lovely…

Anita Hall

wildswimming.com

92


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WE (DON’T) TRY...

Stoolball for all

Turning the joint upside down

I like working as part of a team. I’m less happy

about playing in one. So I’m already feeling uncomfortable

when my editor proposes an article

about stoolball. Things take a turn for the worse

when I receive an email from Ian Goldsmith of

the Lewes Arms stoolball team. “You can take part

in the warm up if you like”, he says. “If you look

promising, you might get a game.”

I’m wearing trainers and an unpromising expression

when I arrive at The Paddock. The team

plays there at 6.30pm on most Wednesdays from

May to early September. Team member Rick

Mason explains the rules. He’s on the management

committee of Stoolball England, the sport’s

national governing body, so he should know.

“The majority of the game is the same as cricket.

The major differences are that we bowl underarm

from ten yards away, the ball doesn’t bounce on the

way to the batsman – and it comes through at about

shoulder height. The idea is to hit the ball away

from the fielders and run to the other end. Our

wicket is a white one-foot square at about shoulder

height and the ball looks like a rounders ball.”

Adam Frost, who’s been with the club since it

was formed, says the simplicity of the game is its

attraction. “Just about anyone can play it. It doesn’t

require a lot of equipment and it’s easy enough to

pick up. I mean, I played cricket and wasn’t particularly

good but I’m quite adequate at stoolball!”

It turns out that the most complicated detail is

the club’s history. The team started at the Black

Horse pub before moving to the Lewes Arms

and changing its name. “About ten years ago we

stopped being associated with the Lewes Arms

pub”, says Rick, “but we’re still called the Lewes

Arms; it’s the arms of the borough – and we’re

now an independent mixed team that plays friendlies.”

Teams usually consist of eleven players but

the Lewes Arms team expands to fit the number

of people that turn up.

The history of stoolball can be traced back to the

fifteenth century, with men and women playing

the game in churchyards. Folklore suggests the

name comes from milkmaids using their milking

stools as a target. Rick says history is clearer from

the late 19th century, when the first stoolball

clubs were formed in Sussex and the rules were

written down by the Reverend William de St

Croix of Glynde.

Here in 2018, I’ve turned down the offer of a

game. Despite this, the Lewes Arms stoolball

players are treating me like an old friend. If I was

looking for a team sport, this is certainly the place

I’d start.

The Lewes Arms team will be in action on

Wednesday evenings in June at the Paddock.

There’s also a stoolball league on Thursday evenings

at the Convent Field. Mark Bridge

95


COLUMN

Lewes Out Loud

Plenty more Henty

Let’s be clear, when I reach

the Queen’s age, I will not

be inviting Frank Skinner

to play the ukulele at my

92nd birthday bash. No, on

Saturday, March 25, 2028, I

shall hire Lewes Town Hall

and invite my favourite

band from San Francisco,

Fee Waybill and The Tubes,

to perform for me.

Fee will be 77 years of age

himself that year but he

is still touring and, if anything,

age has improved his

outrageous performances.

Make a note of the date.

For a range of reasons,

tickets will not be on sale

from the Tourist Information Centre but a few may

be available on the door.

Frank, of course, backed by the finger plucking

George Formby Society, was obliged to play the

Formby favourite When I’m Cleaning Windows for

HMTQ. Catchy little number – bit saucy – and I

found myself singing along to it recently when doing

just that – cleaning our windows.

It’s one of my lesser known domestic duties, along

with deadheading, and requires a large amount of

this month’s teasing topic, water – buckets of it.

Andy, my window cleaning pal, need have no fear

of hustling Henty moving in on his precious pitch.

My job is very occasional and smeary windows are a

speciality – ask my wife!

As a kid, I always enjoyed splashing about in

water, whether it was Purley Way swimming pool,

Croydon, or from the beach in Eastbourne. Our

illustration shows a joyous moment when a water

main burst during the long, hot summer of 1976. An

original cartoon, probably

in the Daily Mirror

newspaper, by regular artist

Keith Waite.

One warm afternoon

towards the end of April, I

decided to attend a cabinet

meeting of Lewes District

Council in Southover

House. As a young reporter

starting out in journalism

over 50 years ago, covering

council meetings was not

one of my favourite assignments.

They were always in

the evenings, long-winded

and seemingly devoid of

any humour.

In contrast, the Lewes

meeting was over in half an hour. Affordable housing

was the main topic on the 36-page agenda and

business was conducted in a very civilised manner.

My only disappointment – I had expected tea and

biscuits and what, by the way, is a District Pot on

page 13? Pot holes perhaps? Plenty of those around

to discuss I surmised.

As our friend Alice Cyr’s photograph appeared in the

April edition of Viva, I decided to send her a copy

of the relevant magazine and popped into the post

office in WH Smiths with the package. Katy, from

Eastbourne, was on duty and looked at the unusual

address to assess the postage. “Where’s the Yukon?”

she asked her colleague. After consulting his tablet,

he said “Yukon territory, North Western Canada”.

Alice always had a better answer I recall. “North of

ordinary” she would say.

Finally, the British Music Hall Society’s Day by the

Sea is at the Royal Hippodrome, Eastbourne, all day

on Saturday, June 2nd. Unmissable! John Henty

97


Because every life is unique

…we are here to help you make your

farewell as personal and individual as possible,

and to support you in every way we can.

Inc. Cooper & Son

42 High Street, Lewes

01273 475 557

Also at: Uckfield • Seaford • Cross in Hand

www.cpjfield.co.uk


BUSINESS NEWS

Photos by Alex Leith

The big news is that which we ‘stop pressed’ with

last month: Stevie and Jamie Freeman, who set

up Union Music Store on Friars Walk in November

2010, are moving on… but the shop will

continue, under the same name, with a different

pair of musos at the helm. Said pair are Del Day

and Danny Wilson, who together run the record

label Maiden Voyage: each has enormous experience

in the industry, Del as jazz buyer for HMV

and roots music PR man, and Danny as lead

singer of Danny & the Champions of the World.

I’ve heard it on the grapevine that the shop won’t

be such a niche country/Americana/folk outlet,

and there’ll be a bit more soul and funk on offer.

More ‘get on up’, less ‘yee hah’, in other words.

Stevie and Jamie will continue to run their Union

Music record label, still based in the offices below

the shop.

In other news it’s all change opposite the station,

which has seen more churn recently than Lurpak.

What used to be the newsagents is being taken

over by the storage space company as their admin

office; their old office is being taken over by Station

Wines, who are expanding into the space,

which should give a welcome bit more elbow

room while you’re queuing for your Tyskie.

The deconsecrated church on Station Street,

meanwhile, is up for sale. Simon, who has run

the antiques business inside for donkeys’ years, is

planning to move to Cliffe, but in the meantime

is fielding a number of interested potential buyers.

Just over the road, what used to be the café

PJ’s@Thirty (and various other incarnations)

is turning into a paint shop, which includes, we

hear, the house variety and the art variety. “Colour

makes people happy,” the new owner told us:

expect a whole lot of hues from some time in July.

Over to School Hill now, and the message on the

window of the SCDA, ‘Lewes’s newest charity

shop’, is no longer true; what was Brats next door

has become Charlotte’s Dragon, run by Carol

Mercer (formerly co-owner of Seasons vegetarian

restaurant) to raise money for the Teenage

Cancer Trust, in memory of her late daughter

Charlotte. Carol informs me that because she

doesn’t actually represent the registered charity,

but is more informally raising cash for them, she

needs to pay normal rates and rent: any contributions

of clothes, books etc are therefore more

than welcome. Brats, meanwhile, continue to sell

off their stock in Lewesiana.

Finally well done to Bake Out: their bakery,

Foodhaven, won the Britain’s Best Loaf award

for their White Seeded Sourdough, which also

won the sourdough category, natch. The annual

award ceremony, organised by British Baker, took

place on April 16th at NEC Birmingham; there

were over 200 entries so the 12 judges, all involved

in the industry, had quite a task choosing!

Alex Leith

99


DIRECTORY

Please note that though we aim only to take advertising from reputable businesses, we cannot guarantee

the quality of any work undertaken, and accept no responsibility or liability for any issues arising.

To advertise in Viva Lewes please call 01273 434567 or email advertising@vivamagazines.com

• Digital TV aerial upgrades & service

• TV, DAB, and FM aerials

• Extra points

• Communal systems

• Aerial repairs

• Satellite TV installs and service

• SKY installs

• Discreet fittings e.g. listed buildings, thatch roofs, flats

• European systems serviced and installed

• Gutters cleared • CCTV installed

WE FIT BIRD DETERRENTS

WE CAN BEAT ANYONE ON QUALITY AND PRICE

Free discount • over 39 years experience • OAP discount

Open 7 days a week • Fully guaranteed • Same day service

Freephone: 0800 0323255

Tel: 01273 617114 Mob: 07920 526703

We specialise in TV wall mounting

We can beat anyone else’s price on a like for like basis

www.1strateaerialsandsatellites.co.uk

a & s

aerials & satellites

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DISCOUNT

www.asltd.co.uk

*Subject to conditions & availability

WE WILL BEAT ANY PRICE

We pride ourselves on the quality and price of our work.

“We Try Harder.”

Family Run Business

Covering the area

for over 50 years

• All TV AERIALS & Satellite TV

• Extra points

• Communal systems

• Sky TV – Best offers

• All European & multi-national

satellite systems

• TV wall mounting service

• Extra phone points

FULLY Guaranteed

Free estimate for TV

aerial work

Same day

service*

Authorised

sky agent

Trading Standards

Approved

c71

LEWES

& surrounding area

01273 461579

OR FREEPHONE

0800 919737

FREE ESTIMATES

UIS OF EWES 07778987286

leweshandyman@hotmail.com

LOCAL HANDYMAN _ PAINTER AND DECORATOR

Interior and exterior painting

Plastering

Flooring & Tiling

Plasterboard

QUALITY FINISHES

All work in the house, big or small:

Carpentry

Assembling and fitting furniture

Curtains/ Door handles and locks/ ...

FINDING SOLUTIONS

REFERENCES AVAILABLE

IF YOU THINK “WHO COULD REPAIR THIS?” CALL LUIS OF LEWES


HOME

Don’t get caught out,

Locked out - put this number

in your phone NOW!

• Digital Locks fitted

• One Key For All Locks.

• Cylinder Replacement.

• 24hr / 365 days a year.

• OAP Discount, No VAT.

• No Obligation Quote &

No call Out Charge!

• Lockout within 30 minutes.

• uPVC Door & Window Locks problems.

• Garage Door Locks

• British Standard Locks.

• Mobile key cutting service.

• CRB Checked & Approved.


HOME

G L E N N H E N R Y

B U I L D I N G & C A R P E N T R Y

OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE

FREE estimates on all types of

plastering work and finishes.

TELEPHONE: 01273 472 836

MOBILE: 07974 752 491

EMAIL: cdpoulter@btinternet.com

Loft conversion and

garage conversion specialists

Extensions and renovations

Project management with

18 years’ experience

Previous customer

references available

Professional service

Glennhenrybuilding@gmail.com

Mobile 07787912297

Office 01323 845612

Aluminium windows, doors,

lantern roofs and bi-folding doors.

PAINTING AND DECORATING

SERVICES

FAST, CLEAN AND RELIABLE

AT THE RIGHT PRICE

01825 891238

07976 316911

www.thebuildteam.co.uk

info@thebuildteam.co.uk

Trading in your area for over 30 years

We guarantee all our products, installation and service

for the best doors, windows & conservatories

CLARKS GLASS LTD

Unit 10, Ringmer Business Centre,

Chamberlaines Lane, Ringmer, BN8 5NF

For your FREE no obligation consultation call us now on:

01273 814077

www.clarksglass.org.uk


HOME

LTD

Plumbing & Heating

Design & Installation

Bathrooms/Kitchens

Plumbing/Heating

Boilers/Central heating

Gas Safe Registered

Tiling / Woodwork

Free estimates & Advice

T: 01273 487 565 M. 07801 784 192

E. tonywplumbing@icloud.com

We are a building company specialising in residential

extensions, refurbishments, loft conversions

and conservation work on listed buildings.

We pride ourselves on paying attention to detail,

using bespoke materials and bringing projects

in on time and on budget.

Contact us for a free quote and please

visit the website for more info:

www.stjamesbuilding.co.uk

01273 499 641 / 07780 964 608


HOME

PAUL FURNELL

- Carpenter

- General Building

- Renovation works

Based in Lewes

Chartered Building Surveyors

• Building Surveys • Defect Analysis

• Project Management • Dilapidaaons

• Historic Building Specialists • Party Wall

Contact us for friendly professional advice

01273 840608 | www.gradientconsultants.com

t. 07717 862940 e. paul.lee.furnell@gmail.com

07784053679

tom@tbacc.co.uk

thebuildingandcarpentryco.co.uk

All trades covered

Jason Eyre Decorating

Professional Painters & Decorators

jasoneyre2@gmail.com

07976 418299/07766 118289


HOME


HOME

Bill Baynes Architecture

Pracccal and aaraccve design soluuons.

Residennal new build, extensions and renovaaons.

Alteraaons to listed buildings. Sustainable design.

Property management.

www.billbaynesarchitecture.com | 07817 868846

Painter Michael Webber

Colour Consultant

Domestic & Trade. Interior & Exterior

michael.webber6@yahoo.co.uk

01273 890779 | 07880 558 556

Also Professional Repairs and Alterations Service.

01273 470817 | 07717 855314

TheLewesSeamstress.co.uk

Handyman Services for your House and Garden

Lewes based. Free quotes.

Honest, reliable, friendly service.

Reasonable rates

Tel: 07460 828240

Email: ahbservices@outlook.com

AHB ad.indd 1 27/07/2015 17:4

Project1/NEWSIZE_Layout 1 18/01/2012 14:59 Page 1

Jack Plane Carpenter

Nice work, fair price,

totally reliable.

www.jackplanecarpentry.co.uk

01273 483339 / 07887 993396


Global

Gardens

Design,

Restoration &

Landscaping

RHS

Gold medal

Winners

Real gardeners for all your gardening needs.

From a one off blitz to regular maintenance.

07812 028704 | 01273 401962

brookhartservices@gmail.com

www.brook-hart.co.uk

GARAGES

Mobile 07941 057337

Phone 01273 488261

12 Priory Street, Lewes, BN7 1HH

info@ globalgardens.co.uk

www.globalgardens.co.uk

GGS1.001_QuarterPage_Ad_01.indd 1 12/11/10 18:24:51

Qualified & Experienced gardener

07912 606 557

Richard Gilmore

Gardener Available

Beds, borders, pruning and tidying

01273 814 926

National Diploma Horticulture


GARAGES

EXPERT

ADVICE

I N C O R P O R A T I N G F L O T Y R E S

INDEPENDENT GARAGE

CELEBRATING 12TH YEAR

SERVING LOCAL COMMUNITY.

ALL MAKES & MODELS

COMPETITIVE RATES

QUALITY PARTS

HIGHLY SKILLED TECHNICIANS

www.mechanicinlewes.co.uk

info@flomargarage.com

Units 1-3 Malling Industrial Estate, Brooks Road, Lewes BN7 2BY

Vehicle Servicing, Repairs and MOT Service: 01273 472691

www.mechanicinlewes.co.uk | info@flomargarage.com

HEALTH & WELLBEING

Doctor P. Bermingham

Retired Consultant Psychiatrist. Retired Jungian Psychoanalyst.

Assoc. Med. Psychotherapy. Psychotherapy into the core of

depression, depressive illness and relapse.

Supervision for therapists

drpbermingham@gmail.com

l Part-time Counselling & Psychotherapy training.

l Weekend courses in Understanding Self and Others,

Counselling Skills, Supervision & CPD workshops.

l Free Wellbeing events.

Based at Plumpton College,

East Sussex • www.thelinkcentre.co.uk


HEALTH & WELLBEING

Acupuncturist & Nutritionist

Hanna Evans

33 Cliffe High Street, Lewes

Book 07799 417924 | evans.hanna@gmail.com

Visit: www.hannaevans.co.uk

Periods •

Pregnancy prep •

Fertility issues •

Pregnancy •

Post-natal •

Menopause •

Acupuncture, Alexander Technique, Bowen

Technique, Children’s Clinic, Counselling,

Psychotherapy, Family Therapy,

Herbal Medicine, Homeopathy, Massage,

Nutritional Therapy, Life Coaching,

Physiotherapy, Pilates, Shiatsu,

Podiatry/Chiropody

"My Healthy Summer"

What will you be doing this summer to

improve your health?

Give up smoking | Lose weight

Exercise more | Eat healthier foods

Look out for the up coming event "BEAT THE

STREET" game in our window, and "CALORIE

CREEP". You will be able to collect your beat the

street cards from the pharmacy, and other

campaigns to improve your health will follow.

Visit NHS Choices for ideas on healthy eaang

and exercise plans and oneyoueastsussex.org.uk

for support with weight loss, stopping

smoking and alcohol advice.

(Closed between 1-2pm)

HERBALIST

Kym Murden

BA Hons Dip Phyt

Weaving wellness together

whatever your age.

Herb & Health Workshops

Visit:

kymmurden.com

Appointments 07780 252186

neck or back pain?

Lin Peters - OSTEOPATH

VALENCE ROAD OSTEOPATHS

for the treatment of:

neck or low back pain • sports injuries • rheumatic

arthritic symptoms • pulled muscles • joint pain

stiffness • sciatica - trapped nerves • slipped discs

tension • frozen shoulders • cranial osteopathy

pre and post natal

www.lewesosteopath.co.uk

20 Valence Road Lewes 01273 476371


CLIFFE OSTEOPATHS

complementary health clinic

Anthea Barbary

LicAc MBAcC Dip | Hyp GQHP

Both acupuncture and hypnotherapy

are a gentle, safe, effective and natural

way of helping many conditions such

as IBS, pain, fertility issues, menopausal

symptoms, anxiety, stress, panic

attacks, addictions, insomnia,

headaches and many more.

I have 21 years of experience as a

therapist, 16 of those in Lewes.

For more information, or for a 20

minute free consultation, please

contact me on:

07981 491942

antheabarbary@gmail.com

www.antheabarbary.com

OSTEOPATHY

Mandy Fischer BSc (Hons) Ost, DO

Steven Bettles BSc (Hons) Ost, DO

HERBAL MEDICINE & REFLEXOLOGY

Julie Padgham-Undrell BSc (Hons) MCPP

PSYCHOTHERAPY

Julia Rivas BA (Hons), MA Psychotherapy

Tom Lockyer BA (Hons), Dip Cound MBACP

ACUPUNCTURE & HYPNOTHERAPY

Anthea Barbary LicAc MBAcC Dip I Hyp GQHP

HOMEOPATHY, COACHING, NLP

& HYPNOTHERAPY

Lynne Russell BSc FSDSHom MARH MBIH(FR)

HEALTH & WELLBEING

Ruth Wharton Viva Advert 3.17 AW.qxp_6 12/05/2017 1

RUTH

WHARTON

ba (hons) bsc (hons) Ost Med dO

Nd Msc paediatric Ost

BIODYNAMIC

CRANIAL

OSTEOPATH

ruthwhartonosteopath.com

SALLY

GALLOWAY

ba (hons) dip Nat Nut CNM

MbaNt CNhC reg

NUTRITIONAL

THERAPIST

sallygallowaynutrition.co.uk

Other therapies

alsO available

fOr MOre details see:

intrinsichealthlewes.co.uk

CLINIC SPACE

available

INTRINSIC HEALTH

01273 958403

32 Cliffe high st, lewes bN7 2aN

Taking a Natural Approach

at Menopause

Offering informaaon & support for over 15 years

Appointments at The Cliffe Clinic

LYNNE RUSSELL BSc FSDSHom MARH MBIH(FR)

www.chantryhealth.com 07970 245118

01273 480900


LESSONS & COURSES

Focusing on you

Counselling, Psychotherapy

and Psychological Services

with experienced clinicians

in central Lewes

We work with individuals,

couples, families and groups.

Sam Jahara (MSc Psych UKCP Reg.)

Psychotherapist and superviser

Mark Vahrmeyer (MA Psych UKCP Reg.)

Psychotherapist and superviser

Dr. Simon Cassar (DProf UKCP Reg.)

Psychotherapist and superviser

Jane Craig (MSc ClinPsych HCPC Reg.)

Clinical psychologist and superviser

Magdalena Whitehouse (MA HCPC Reg.)

Drama therapist and superviser

Thea Beech (MA TGA UKCP Reg.)

Psychotherapist and Group Analyst

David Bor (MPhil ACP Accred)

Child and Adolescent Psychotherapist

GUITAR LESSONS

with Guy Pearce

For all ages and abilities. Fully CRB checked

• Lessons and Grades in Electric and Acoustic guitar.

• Mobile Tuition

• Guitar restringing service.

07504173888

guypearceguitarlessons@gmail.com

01273 921355

The Barn, 64 Southover High Street, Lewes, BN7 1JA

Third Floor, 6 The Drive, Hove BN3 3JA

www.brightonandhovepsychotherapy.com

admin@brightonandhovepsychotherapy.com

Ages 16 and up from an experienced, qualified teacher

Contact: Lucinda Houghton BA(Hons), AGSM (GSMD), FRSM

Kingston, Lewes (Ample parking)

07976 936024 | canto-voice.org


Directory Spotlight:

Luke Adams, drum teacher

LESSONS & COURSES

Singing Lessons

Experienced voice teacher - DBS checked - Wallands area

www.HilarySelby.com

07960 893 898

I’m a drum teacher, but that’s not all I

do. I also teach the piano and general music

lessons… and I’m learning to be a flying

instructor.

I became passionate about the drums in my

early teens and started having drum lessons

at the age of 17. I’ve been really fortunate to

have shared the stage with some really talented

musicians and had lots of mentors including

the late, great Bob Armstrong.

A drummer needs a wide skill set. Keeping

a regular rhythm requires a good sense of timing,

which you can develop, with practice. You

need a very good ear, and empathy with what

the rest of the band is doing.

People progress in different ways, but everyone

hits a wall, whether it’s right near the

start or after a few years. Whenever it comes,

it’s important to punch through that wall.

You’re never too old to learn, and can get

started early. My youngest student is five, my

oldest over seventy. Drumming is good for

your mind – musicians are smarter - and therapeutic:

a friend of mine compares it to Sudoko.

The most important thing I’ve learnt about

teaching is to genuinely care about whether

the student’s going to get good or not. Keep

involved and you will feel proud of what you’ve

achieved together.

Steve Gadd is my favourite drummer. If he

does a drum part for a song, that becomes the

part every drummer will be trying to learn.

I’m absolutely fine with the neighbours! I

do most of my lessons in the students’ houses

and do 50% of my practice on a pad.

As told to Alex Leith

07828 298507


OTHER SERVICES

The Cycling Seamstress and hairdresser

For Prom dress alterations

& prom hair contact me.

07766 103039 / nessnewmantt@gmail.com

www.andrewwells.co.uk

We can work it out

STUDIO / WORKSPACE AVAILABLE NOW | 115 sq ft | £50pw inclusive

Dry secure unit in a converted barn with other studios, rural Ringmer.

North light, sink & electrical supply for kiln/cooker if needed. Off-road

parking / wi-fi / shared kitchenette / award-winning Artwave venue

corina@upperlodgesussex.com | www.upperlodgesussex.com

• BUSINESS ACCOUNTS AND TAX

• MEDIA AND THE ARTS

• CONTRACTORS AND CONSULTANTS

• FRIENDLY AND FLEXIBLE

T: 01273 961334

E: aw@andrewwells.co.uk

FREE

initial

consultation

Andrew M Wells Accountancy

99 Western Road Lewes BN7 1RS

COMPETITIVE

PRICES

FLO TYRES

& ACCESSORIES

LOCAL INDEPENDENT RETAILER.

TYRES. BATTERIES. BULBS. WIPERS

FROM STOCK WHILE YOU WAIT.

FREE TREAD & WEAR CHECKS.

PUNCTURE REPAIRS.

WHEEL BALANCING.

WHEEL ALIGNMENT.

Andrew Wells_Viva Lewes_AW.indd 1 25/06/2012 09:0

Flo Tyres And Accessories

Unit 1 Malling Industrial Estate, Brooks Road, Lewes, BN7 2BY

Tel: 01273 481000 | Web: flotyres.com | info@flomargarage.com

EXPERT

ADVICE

O N E S T O P S H O P F O R P R E M I U M , M I D R A N G E A N D B U D G E T T Y R E S

We also stock vehicle batteries, wiper

blades, bulbs and top up engine oils.


INSIDE LEFT

COLD COMFORT

If you don’t look carefully at this picture, you

might imagine that it was taken during our recent

heatwave, but it’s actually over 50 years old, from

1966, or 67. It was found in the family collection

by Peter Gray, ten years old when it was taken.

There are a few giveaway clues as to the date: the

two sets of changing huts (known originally as

‘boxes’ and constructed in the 20s) have gone, and

– says Pells committee member Rob Read, who

kindly sourced and researched the picture – the

water is a lot murkier than it usually gets nowadays.

The pool then had a springboard at the deep end,

and a fixed 3ft diving platform. The boards were

removed in the late 80s/early 90s, due to (not

unreasonable) safety concerns.

Rob put a post on Lewes Past asking for memories

of the pool in this period, and was inundated

with replies. Many Lewesians learnt to swim

there: primary schools would take pupils down

for lessons, when this was the only swimming

bath in town. The pool also played host to many

swimming galas.

Marcus Street – whose father ran the pool for

many years - tells us admission in those days was

4d for a child, 1/3d for an adult. “The pool would

open at 9am, with an ‘adults-only’ at lunchtime

during the week. It closed when everyone left,

when the weather was too wet and windy!”

For a period after this photo was taken there was

a lowered section – the ‘hole in the wall’ which

allowed people to buy ice creams from a van that

would park up outside. There are also memories of

the ‘slabs’ next to the deep end of the pool, where

the cool kids would hang out. And it was common

practice for teenagers to climb over the wall and

use the pool after hours – keeping an eye out for

‘Blondie’, the local bobby – to go skinny dipping.

People recall how cold the water was, with the

temperature, chalked on a board outside, commonly

being as low as 58 degrees Fahrenheit (16

degrees Centigrade). Its leaky pipes and pool tank

(now replaced and repaired) meant it had to be

topped up daily with water from the spring below

the pool, which comes in at around 13°C. The water

is still sourced from the spring, but is nowadays

reliably a much warmer temperature.

The Pells Pool opened on May 5th this year. Open

weekdays 7-9am (adults only), daily 10am-7pm

(from June 2nd, before that 12pm-7pm). £4.50/£2.20

see pellspool.org.uk for more details.

114


Lewes Landlords:

Ethical, hassle-free property letting

University of Sussex considering new properties

from September 2018.

• No fees or commission

• Guaranteed rent for up to 52 weeks

• Quality property management at no cost to you

For further details, please contact:

Housing Services,

91 Lewes Road, Brighton.

Opening times Mon-Fri 10am-4pm

T +44 (01273) 678220

E housing@sussex.ac.uk


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