SLO LIFE Oct/Nov 2014

slolife

LIFE

SLOmagazine

EXPLORING

NEW HEIGHTS

LOCALS ONLY

MUSIC

SCENE

VO

TE

CO

OP

AR

slolifemagazine.com

PRSRT STD

U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

PERMIT 113

SANTA ANA, CA

INTENTIONAL

LIVING

RECIPES

YOU

CRAVE

ON THE

RISE

MEET

ERIC MEYER

SIMPLICITY, DESIGN

OCT/NOV 2014

& SPINNING UP

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 1


2 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


805.801.9117

WWW.BAXTERMOERMAN.COM

1118 MORRO STREET . SAN LUIS OBISPO

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 3


4 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 5


SLO LIFE

magazine

CONTENTS

Volume

5

Number 5

Oct/Nov 2014

26

ERIC MEYER

We sat down the other day to

talk about business, community

and keeping things simple.

10

12

14

16

Publisher’s Message

On The Cover

Info

In Box

20

22

View

Perched on a hill in the rural community of Shandon, we

look into the history of Chapel Hill and view it in a way it

has never been seen before.

Timeline

Walk down memory lane with us as we take a look back

at some of the newsworthy events from in and around

the Central Coast over the past couple of months.

6 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


INTERIORS LANDSCAPES DESIGN CONSTRUCTION

3021 SOUTH HIGUERA, SAN LUIS OBISPO, CA 93401 805 542 0500 WWW.FORTINIINTERIORS.COM OCT/NOV WWW.FORTINILANDSCAPES.COM

2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 7


| CONTENTS

24

32

34

36

38

40

Q&A

Of course, when we met with Linnaea

Phillips we did it over a cup of coffee. And

what did she have to say for herself? It was

absolutely insightful.

On The Rise

Seventeen-year-old Ruby Callahan

impressed us with her compassion for

others and hankering for debate.

Business

Consultant Jim Rizzi discusses

the difficulties in hiring new employees

and dishes out some failproof strategies

for getting the job done.

Out and About

In search of some classic family fun,

Jeanette Trompeter is bowled over when

she heads to Pismo Beach.

Now Hear This

Alternative county band Dead Volts rocks

the Central Coast music scene with their

gritty, raw, live shows.

Local Playlist

We took a listen to new albums by local

musicians Derek Senn, Doug Groshart, Joe

Koenig and Próxima Parada.

8 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014

42

50

59

60

62

68

70

75

78

80

82

Dwelling

We dropped in with architect Laura Joines to get a glimpe

of her self-designed digs.

Real Estate

Check out the year-to-date statistics of home sales for

the city and county of San Luis Obispo.

What’s Hot Now

Get on trend and step it up with these stand out styles

and discover where to get yours now.

Inspiration

Living legend Dr. Lou Tedone shares his secret to

staying healthy, maintaining “famiglia prima,” and

perspectives on a life well-lived.

Voter Guide

Take a look at the candidates running for San Luis Obispo

city council and mayor, as well as Measures D, G, and L

and get out to vote.

Explore

Looking for a creative night out, Paden Hughes stops

into a climbing gym and discovers new heights in dating.

Health

Looking to get fit? Check out these ten kettlebell

exercises guaranteed to flex your muscles.

Kitchen

Always local and always in season, chef Jessie Rivas

shares his favorite abalone dish.

Arts

The key to this successful show? Collaboration. As they

prepare for their production of Aida, we checked in with

leaders for Opera San Luis Obispo, Civic Ballet, Central

Coast Children’s Choir, Ballet Theatre San Luis Obispo,

CORE dance company, Deyo Dances, and Studio@Ryan’s

American Dance.

Happenings

Looking to fill your calendar with fun? Browse through

the best events the Central Coast has to offer.

The Last Word

See how one neighborhood is taking a stand and building

a community among its college student population.


OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 9


| PUBLISHER’S MESSAGE

The Neti Pot

It seems that every couple of months San Luis Obispo is named to another “Best of ” list. What those

magazines fail to tell you, however, is that while it may be the “Happiest Place on Earth,” it is also the

“Allergy-est Place,” too.

For whatever reason, my allergies have been raging this year. Maybe the drought is causing something weird

to bloom, or perhaps, as a friend of mine suspects, it’s the wine grapes, which seem to be the only thing

getting any water these days. As I have bellyached about my headaches quite a bit to just about anyone who

is willing to listen, I often hear back, “Try a Neti Pot—I swear by mine.”

So, I decided to give it a whirl. For a quick tutorial, I went to YouTube and typed in “Neti Pot instruction.”

While I had expected to see a whole bunch of crunchy, granola-types demonstrating the technique, I

actually found a lot of normal, everyday-looking people who were making comments during their tutorial such as, “This has

changed my life.” I was sitting at the edge of my seat, while forcing myself to ignore the suggested video clips filed under

“Epic Neti Pot Fails.”

Still I was determined to hedge my bets and hold off spending the $15 on an authentic Neti Pot until I knew it would work.

So I went into our kitchen in search of a miniature teapot, which is what those things are anyway. Rummaging through the

cupboard I found one. As I attempted to stuff the spout into my left nostril, I realized that this was most definitely not going

to work. So, I headed out to buy one and the helpful clerk, who also “swears by” hers, gave me a dry run demonstration. Full of

confidence, I returned home to prepare the warm salt water for its unfortunate journey through the caverns in my face.

As I stood in front of the mirror at the bathroom sink, I considered the idea that I may have hit rock bottom in my war on

Central Coast allergens. I lifted the pot to my nose, stuck it in my right nostril and tilted my head to the left. The sensation

as the warm salt water flowed through my sinuses was nothing short of nasal nirvana. As I was watching the stream

coming out of my opposite nostril—I was told that there would be all sorts of cleansing going on and not to be surprised at

what might come out—I was secretly hoping to see the Pete Rose rookie baseball card I had lost many years ago magically

reappear. As I pondered the thought, the bathroom door swung open and I saw my three kids looking at me in horrified

astonishment. One of my boys yelled out, “Dad! Dad! The water is going in one nose and coming out your other nose!”

I explained to him, mid-pour, that it was not “another nose,” but a “nostril.” For whatever reason, to a five-year-old kid,

especially in the nasally way I pronounced it, the word “nostril” is hilarious. We all burst into laughter, which led to my near

drowning as the saline went down the “wrong tube.” I gasped and chocked and laughed some more. And tears streamed

down my face, as I realized how ridiculous I looked.

The next morning when I woke up, something was different. It was not a 100% black and white difference, but I felt better,

lighter, and, for once during a stretch of months, my allergy symptoms had eased. I couldn’t believe it—that little teapot really

worked! I have since continued the practice—my kids love to watch—with similar results. While I have yet to find Pete Rose

up there, I will say that it has made the “Allergy-est Place on Earth” a little less, um, “Allergy-er.”

I would like to take this opportunity to say “thank you” to everyone who had a hand in producing this issue of

SLO LIFE Magazine and, most of all, to our advertisers and subscribers—we couldn’t do it without you.

Live the SLO Life!

Tom Franciskovich

tom@slolifemagazine.com

10 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


TILE SHOWROOM & SLAB YARD

FEATURING 100+ COLORS OF STONE TO CHOOSE FROM

slmarble.com (805) 544-9133 Location: 5452 Edna Road, SLO

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 11


| ON THE COVER

A SNEAK PEEK

BEHIND the scenes

BY CHRIS BERSBACH

About halfway through our first roll of film, Eric asked if I’d like to

include a book of his in the images. “Of course,” I told him; props are

always an option for portraiture, especially when the sitter has selected

an object that’s meaningful to them. When Eric brought the book

out, I thought the choice was a bit odd, considering the boldly selfeffacing—perhaps

even self-deprecating —title. He said that he found

the cover amusing. Actually, he told me that’s why he bought the

book in the first place, and that the title reminded him of the recent

“normcore” (“normal” + “hardcore”) fashion trend, which he explained

to me is essentially an embrace of bland, anti-fashion attire to

intentionally avoid distinguishing yourself as a result of your clothing.

The full Meet Your Neighbor piece wasn’t drafted

until after the cover shoot, but when I was able to read

the article, it finally occurred to me that “Dare to be

Dull” makes perfect sense for Eric, who created Simple

Shoes, as well as several other sports clothing and

footwear brands, and then stepped away from a life that

was outwardly successful, but rather complicated, and

not personally fulfilling for him. It’s always interesting

to me the “tells” that come about in these shoots—and

Eric picking up that particular book says a lot about

him and what he’s all about. SLO LIFE

12 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 13


You never thought you would

have to make these decisions,

“Where to get care for my

parent? How Do I find the right

Assisted living for my mom”?

Elder Placements guides you through

the difficult decision making process.

After our evaluation, we take you to

tour the appropriate facility that will

give your parent the care and quality

of life they deserve.

Whether it’s Assisted Living, Alzheimer

Dementia Care or Independent Living,

we do the legwork for you at NO COST.

Nicole Pazdan, CSA, celebrating Jacks 100th birthday

Contact us today for FREE placement assistance.

(805) 546-8777

elderplacementprofessionals.com

14 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014

We Want to

Hear from You!

Have some comments or feedback

about something you’ve read here? Or,

do you have something on your mind

that you think everyone should know

about? Let us know! To have your letter

to the editor considered for publication

in the “In Box” section, please email it

to info@slolifemagazine.com. Be sure

to include your full name and city. And,

it’s best to keep it to 250 words or less.

Promote Your

Business!

Our advertisers get great results and

we would like to tell you about it, but

first we want to know about you and

the objectives of your business. Call

us at (805) 543-8600 to talk with our

publisher, Tom, about different advertising

programs—we have something for every

sized budget. Or, you can log on to

slolifemagazine.com/advertise and we can

send you a complete media kit and loads

of testimonials from happy advertisers.

Tell Us

Your Story!

So many of the stories we publish come

from our readers’ great leads. We are

always looking for interesting homes to

profile (see “Dwelling” on page 42). Know

a student who is on the rise? Is there a

band we should check out? Something to

investigate? Go to slolifemagazine.com

and click “Share Your Story.”

Subscribe!

Ready to live the SLO Life all year

long? It’s quick and easy! Just log on to

slolifemagazine.com/subscribe. It’s just

$24.95 for the year. And don’t forget

to set your friends and family up with

a subscription, too. It’s the gift that

keeps on giving!

4251 S. HIGUERA STREET, SUITE 800

SAN LUIS OBISPO, CA 93401

SLOLIFEMAGAZINE.COM

info@slolifemagazine.com

(805) 543-8600 • (805) 456-1677 fax

PUBLISHER

Tom Franciskovich

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Sheryl Disher

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Jeanette Trompeter

Paden Hughes

Dawn Janke

Jessie Rivas

Jim Rizzi

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Chris Bersbach

James A. Crawford

CONTRIBUTIONS

Submit your story ideas, events, recipes

and announcements by visiting us

online at slolifemagazine.com

Contributions chosen for publication

may be edited for clarity and space

limitations.

ADVERTISING

If you would like to advertise, please

contact Tom Franciskovich by phone

at (805) 543-8600 or by email at

tom@slolifemagazine.com

NOTE

The opinions expressed within these

pages do not necessarily reflect those

of SLO LIFE Magazine. No part of this

publication may be reproduced in whole

or in part without the expressed written

permission of the publisher.

CIRCULATION, COVERAGE AND

ADVERTISING RATES

Complete details regarding circulation,

coverage and advertising rates, space,

sizes and similar information are

available to prospective advertisers.

Please call or email for a media kit.

Closing date is 30 days before date

of issue.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

info@slolifemagazine.com

4251 S. Higuera Street, Suite 800

San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

Letters chosen for publication may be

edited for clarity and space limitations.


Watch their stories.

Share yours.

Welcome to the family.

SierraVistaMom2Mom.com

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 15


| IN BOX

You said it... SLOm a

| SPECIAL FEATURE

LEARN BY DOING

Help me, help you

Cal Poly is looking into building a hotel and conference center on its campus, but that concept concerns many

San Luis Obispo residents—particularly as it relates to student housing. Is it the right idea at the wrong time?

BY TOM FRANCISKOVICH

Early this summer, San Luis film, two of the most unlikely characters find next has been described alternatively by those in

Obispo’s City Hall chamber themselves locked into a partnership where attendance as something between an “incredibly

was full; and the energy in they are forced to work together and learn from clumsy and unfortunate presentation” to an

the room was palpable. One by one, long-time each other in order to be mutually successful. “outright personal attack on some of our most

residents—many of them wearing purple “Alta During their lowest point, Maguire, a sports respected past and current city leaders.” When

Vista” t-shirts—rose to speak during the public agent, and his only client, Rod Tidwell, a asked about the incident, Rusty Hall, an almond

comments segment. The light on the podium football player, are in the locker room after a brittle candy maker, politely demurred, “I don’t

indicating their remaining time quickly clicked game when, out of frustration, Maguire, played want to focus on that or give it any energy.” And

down on each one of them from green to yellow by Tom Cruise, goes ballistic as he finally to their credit, the administration at Cal Poly

to red while they expressed opposition to Cal overflows with a building frustration screaming acted swiftly and insisted that the presenter

Poly’s plan to build a new dormitory complex at his client. Tidwell fires back and the pair apologize to those who were called out, which

adjacent to a neighborhood. Then, Jeff Eidelman, reach an impasse. Finally, Maguire, now near a he did. Yet, the damage had been done and it

a local podiatrist and 35-year resident, dropped breaking point, changes tack. “Help me. Help served as more fuel to the fire that was already

a bomb. While the neighbors had been

me, Rod. Help me, help you,” he begs. “Help burning. And, perhaps, more importantly as Hall

encouraging Cal Poly to relocate the dorm to me, help you,” now repeating more forcefully. observed, “[The incident] seemed to reflect an

some other location on campus, preferably near After seeing his agent in a full meltdown, attitude that the university knows best, and that

the Highland Drive entrance, Eidelman, peering Tidwell bursts into laughter. An exasperated the people objecting didn’t have any credibility.”

over his round-rimmed glasses to address the Maguire leaves the room while Tidwell follows

During the city council meeting, which came

councilmembers, shared, “I’ve heard from two him out shouting, “See, that’s the difference

a week after the conference, the neighbors

different sources that Cal Poly is in the midst of between us—you think we’re fightin’, and I

remained focused on two themes: first, they

negotiating with an architecture firm in Irvine think we’re finally talkin’!”

claimed that the mitigation—a onetime fee

to design a convention center and restaurant in

It’s not clear that we have reached our “Help of $530,000 to be paid to the city for such

the area of the lemon grove between Highland

me, help you” moment, but the 9th Annual things as traffic improvements in the area

and Stenner Creek off of Santa Rosa. If this is

Town-Gown Association Conference held around the construction—was woefully

true, it’s no wonder that they could not use this

in South Carolina this June may have sped inadequate. And, second, many of them asked

site for the proposed new dormitory complex to

things along. In a workshop called “The Tale the council members, in essence, to “stick up

be constructed at Slack and Grand. Certainly,

of Two Cities,” a contingent from Cal Poly for its residents” by filing a lawsuit to stop the

once again, this is not an example of good faith

and three representatives from the City of project. In a 2-2 split decision with Mayor Jan

on the part of Cal Poly.” It felt as if the air had

San Luis Obispo made up one side of a panel, Marx recusing herself (she lives next to Cal

been sucked from the room, and the council

while representatives from Oregon State and Poly), city council was unable to take the first

members shifted anxiously in their chairs.

officials from the City of Bend, Oregon made step in exploring the possibility of litigation.

The timing of news about a conference center,

up the other. The breakout session was intended Dan Carpenter and Kathy Smith voted for the

especially in this context, could not have been

to showcase how each of the cities and their motion, but Carlyn Christianson, objecting

worse. And the whole thing got me thinking…

respective universities had dealt with issues philosophically to the idea of a lawsuit, and John

If you had to pick a movie to best represent such as student housing. Making the trip on Ashbaugh, also uncomfortable with litigation,

the current state of relations between Cal Poly their own dime and sitting in attendance were voted against. A sea of purple shirts stormed out

and many of San Luis Obispo’s permanent long-time San Luis Obispo residents, Rusty of the room in disgust, and ten days later they

residents, it would be difficult to do much and Michelle Hall who live in the Alta Vista dug into their own pockets, lawyered-up and

better than the 1996 hit Jerry Maguire. In the neighborhood near campus. What happened filed a lawsuit of their own.

Shortly after the Alliance of SLO Neighborhoods

(ASLON) had served papers, the San Luis

Obispo Chamber of Commerce circulated

an email polling its membership, on behalf of

Cal Poly, asking how they would feel about a

conference center and hotel on campus. The

10-minute survey included a series of questions

designed to judge the overall sentiments

held about the university within the business

community, but it included just a vague

description of the project. According to Cal

Poly President Jeffrey Armstrong the whole

thing is just an “idea,” but he did reveal that

a feasibility study had been completed and it

came back “very favorable.” When pressed about

exactly where it would be located, he explained

that “there had been conversations, but that

they had not gotten that far along yet.” He

mentioned the area near the baseball stadium as

a possibility. Considering the timing of the idea,

many residents have suggested that locating it

way out in left field would be most appropriate.

In many ways the challenges facing Cal Poly are

reminiscent of a politician who is having trouble

getting his message across. Consider Al Gore

in the 2000 presidential election. The guy had

some great ideas and was absolutely dead-on

about climate change and the environment, but

he lost out to someone who was simply better

at connecting. In the polling question, “Who

would you rather have a beer with?” George W.

Bush won hands down. As Armstrong shares

the specifications of the hotel project in an

unmistakable Arkansas drawl—a 150 to 200

room facility with a 1,000 person conference

center—I cannot help but think that Cal Poly

has a similar problem; because their idea for a

hotel and conference center, much like Gore’s

prescience on global warming, appears well

thought-out and perhaps even a home run for

the university and the city. But, the message will

likely be drowned-out by all the background

noise coming from the lingering questions

and uncertainty remaining over the size of the

growing student population and lack of oncampus

housing. The steady drumbeat is bound

to become louder until we arrive at our “Help

me, help you” moment. And there are signs that

we may be heading in that direction.

“In the next six-to-twelve months, we are going

to be engaging in an open discussion looking

into the appropriate size of Cal Poly with

respect to the constraints we face within the

city, especially off-campus housing,” Armstrong

begins in a conciliatory tone. “We know that

there are things we need to work on, and become

better at, and we expect that in late September,

early October we can start to have those sorts of

conversations with the community.” Although

he did not explain precisely what shape those

talks may take, it is clear that Armstrong would

much rather be thinking big ideas and moving

the university forward than picking a fight with

the neighbors. Yet, it is ASLON and the rest

of the residents of San Luis Obispo, people

referred to as “stakeholders” in the parlance

of academic conferences, who are likely to

determine the level of noise and distraction that

will exist going forward. Or, maybe it is the

building frustration that will finally allow for

a breakthrough. As the almond brittle maker,

Hall, reasons in an unhurried explanation:

“That’s why it’s best to move forward with

litigation, because it gives everyone a chance

to pause and figure out what’s best for the

campus and the community.” In other words,

what may look like fightin’ may actually mean

we’re finally talkin’. SLO LIFE

HOTEL POLY

Armstrong sees a “tremendous

opportunity” in developing a

“premier” hotel and hospitality school

at Cal Poly. Citing the fact that the

industry is booming, yet there is no

hands-on learning facility on the

West Coast, the university has a

chance to take the lead in this area.

As Armstrong notes with regard to

their current hospitality program,

“We have a lot of the pieces, but have

not put the puzzle together yet.”

The property would be an operating

hotel on-campus, but would serve as

a prime example of “learn by doing,”

as those in the program essentially

run the business with oversight from

faculty. The conference center would

be an adjunct to the hotel and would

be available to the community for

events and conferences, as well.

Further, a type of sports complex,

which may house larger events, on

the level of 5,500 to 6,000 attendees,

is part of the feasibility study and

could be adjusted to house a large

diversity of activities from basketball

games to concerts.

What are your thoughts?

Be part of the conversation

by emailing us at

info@slolifemagazine.com

POINT SAN LUIS

LIGHTHOUSE

PLEIN AIR

ART

BEHIND

THE

SCENES

HOTEL

CAL POLY

BE

LIFE

g a z i n e

MINDFUL

MEDITATION

ON THE

RISE

DANCE

THE NIGHT

AWAY

YOU

US

SHOWED

MEET

STEPHANIE

BURCHIEL

INSPIRED, SPONTANEOUS

& ORGANIC LIVING

My thoughts are that the hotel business is amply

covered by the community college system [HELP

ME, HELP YOU]. City College of San Francisco runs

a program of this nature. Is this a university or a

junior college? Is the study of hospitality a subject

worthy of university scholarship? Additionally, this

seems like just a plan to further aggrandize the

status of Cal Poly as a more unique and impressive

campus in the state.

—NAOMI HOFFMAN

Thank you for your special feature article HELP ME, HELP YOU.

You do a great job covering the concerns of ASLON, long-term

residents of Alta Vista neighborhood, and the concerns of city

council members.

For the record, I am currently a member of the Alta Vista

neighborhood association--one of those who wear my purple

t-shirt to voice my opinion on the location of Cal Poly’s proposed

dorm, and ASLON. I completely agree with Rusty Hall’s assessment

that litigation about the insufficiency of Cal Poly’s EIR viz CEQA

in relation to the proposed dorm location might actually facilitate

“talkin’ instead of fightin’.”

I am totally opposed to the Hotel Poly concept. It is a

commercialization of “learn by doing”--a sell-out of Cal Poly

to “big growth and big development” values. However, I could

accept a much-scaled down model of the idea: a Faculty/Welcome

Center that includes conference rooms and a FEW rooms to

rent to visiting faculty when they come to interview, maybe to

visiting sports teams, and the like. And, THAT COULD GO ON THE

CORNER OF GRAND AND SLACK where the proposed dorm is

planned to go.

Bottom line: Cal Poly’s administration and planners seem to be

trying to accomplish big ideas in a piecemeal fashion, which is riling

everybody up. Why don’t they do this the right way and update

their master plan so everybody can see the big picture all at once?

—SHARON WHITNEY

We would like to give photo credit for the DANCE THE NIGHT

AWAY article in the last issue. Those excellent photos of happy

dancers were published courtesy of Patrick Len.

Once again you have hit the mark in your reporting

of the Cal Poly Dorm situation in HELP ME,

HELP YOU. You present this issue very clearly

and succinctly; you represent the concerns of

ASLON fairly. Thank you for your attention to this

important city-wide issue.

—LINDA WHITE

One of my first reactions to the article HELP ME,

HELP YOU regarding a possible hotel/arena etc.

was total horror. I also began to wonder about the

new dorms and Cal Poly’s adamant refusal to build

them anywhere but on Grand Avenue. Just like Jeff

Eidelman, I became suspicious of the whole thing.

Interesting timing, eh?

I am a Cal Poly grad and my father was a professor

there, so I have many positive feelings about

the school. However, it is now TOO BIG and too

intrusive. I live in a nice residential area, but all

one has to do is walk down the street and it’s

immediately apparent where the students live.

Streets, which were once nice and wide, have

become narrower due to the fact that many

students must park on the street - just two

irritations.

Cal Poly does not need to get any bigger.

Besides, does one really need a college degree

in “hospitality?” And remember, all this is being

funded, ultimately, by YOU and ME.

—JEANETTE CLEMENTS

16 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


I was impressed by Tom Franciskovich’s essay HELP ME, HELP YOU on

the dilemma of Cal Poly’s future growth. Clearly, President Armstrong has

a master plan that could turn out to be very beneficial to both the school

and the community. However, there are many issues of growth, plus the

personalities of both sides of the issues, and I think Tom’s essay was very

factual and sensitive to the major questions.

This is a hot topic, and to summarize as well as he did is a major

achievement. Congratulations on elucidating the players, the positions and

the controversies ahead.

—JACK HARRIS

I read your HELP ME, HELP YOU editorial about Cal Poly and the SLO

community. This is an important issue and needs a balanced discussion of

ideas. Please do better fact checking - Dr. Armstrong is from Kentucky, not

Arkansas. Even simple mistakes like this take away from the serious nature of

this discussion.

—SANDY CHERTOK

You are absolutely right, Sandy. This mistake is particularly embarrassing

for us, as we had interviewed Jeffrey Armstrong in the Q&A feature of

the Apr/May 2012 issue where much of the conversation focused on his

upbringing in Lyon County, which is in Southwestern Kentucky—just upriver

on the Mississippi from Arkansas.

| DISCOVER

HISTORICAL TOUR

Pecho Coast

A

PHOTOGRAPHY BY LANCE KINNEY

gainst a stunning, wide-open backdrop of the

gleaming blue-green water far below with the

ocean breeze gently rustling the coastal oaks

framing the scene, the fact that Port San Luis

was once the world’s largest exporter of crude oil seems

inconceivable. Yet, at one point the bay became so polluted

with spilled oil and abandoned whale carcasses—whaling

had also been a major industry—that historic ship logs

are replete with notes about avoiding Port Harford, as it

was known then, for fear of “fouling the props with all the

debris floating around.”

As far back as recorded history will take us, the Pecho

Coast was Chumash territory. The first known settler to

the area, and the one responsible for the name was the

famous Spanish (some historians claim he was actually

Portuguese) explorer Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo. Sometime

during a mission along the California coastline in 1542,

Cabrillo stumbled upon the San Luis Bay and remarked

that the cliffs running along the point due south of Port

San Luis were bold and “chesty,” much like a soldier

puffing up his upper body while standing at attention. That

translated to “Pecho” and the dramatic landscape found

there today, with the exception of the Point San Luis

Lighthouse, likely looks pretty much like it did nearly 500

years ago from the decks of the San Salvador.

It has been estimated that the Chumash had been living

on the bountiful lands for approximately 9,000 years

before Cabrillo’s arrival. And, during the Spanish mission

period the lands were privatized as a sprawling ranch called

“Rancho Cañada de los Osos y Pecho y Islay.” Since that

time, those bold cliffs and secluded beaches have been offlimits

to the general public. However, in 1993, PG&E, the

current owner of the land, built a trail winding along the

rugged coastline. The Pecho Coast Trail is accessible today

to the general public through a volunteer docent-led tour.

At the end of the hike, almost two miles from the trailhead,

is something that Cabrillo himself could have never

imagined, although certainly would have appreciated: the

Point San Luis Lighthouse. On May 1, 1888 the steamship

Queen of the Pacific started taking on water 15 miles out >>

I just read your article PECHO COAST about the Point San Luis Lighthouse.

Wow, you did a wonderful job! Lance’s [Kinney] photographs looked

beautiful - as usual. Kristi’s [Balzer] quotes were outstanding and your

writing was top-notch.

Without a doubt, a lot of folks who have never heard of or have never been

to the Light Station will want to visit.

—JOHN LINDSEY

Your recent article PECHO COAST was very interesting. I would like to make

a correction regarding the Portuguese explorer, Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo.

His name is spelled in Spanish. In the Portuguese language it is spelled

João Rodrigues Cabrilho. I hope that any future articles on this Portuguese

explorer will be spelled correctly.

—ELEANOR CRAVEIRO

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 17


MEASURE G

IS A GREAT DEAL

• The typical SLO resident

invests about $1 a week

• Tourists and other

nonresidents will pay nearly

75% of Measure G

• Measure G represents 12%

of the City’s general fund

| IN BOX

You showed

us...

MOROCCO

Get the Facts

CitizensForG.org

Vote November 4th

PAID FOR BY SLO CITIZENS FOR MEASURE G

CAMPAIGN # 1368735

@scooter

“ He’s getting kind of

full of himself now...”

— STEPHANIE BURCHIEL

This is a photo of Kyle Griffith. She

is wrapping up a read of SLO LIFE

MAGAZINE before heading off to

camp out in the Sahara. No joke.

Camel ride out to an overnight

camp! I took her photo and can

vouch for all of it... even the sand

storm that happened that night. I

was sleeping (or trying to) on the

mat next to her. Photo taken 29

Aug 2014.

All the best,

FRANCIS VILLABLANCA, Professor

Cal Poly State University

CINDER HILL, EAST LAKE, OR

GO

GO

SOLAR ELECTRIC AND WATER HEATING

805.466.5595

solarponics.com/slolife

Lic:391670 Since 1975

18 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014

@mimi14e

@monicagrant

#workingslo


slolifemagazine.com

PRSRT STD

U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

PERMIT 13

SANT ANA, CA

MEDITATION

THE NIGHT

SLO LIFE BEACH DAYS

@stellatheprettyfrenchie

@mariasoles

We were headed to the beach and I grabbed the mail,

and was stoked to have SLO LIFE MAGAZINE waiting

for me;). Now I’m sitting on the beach with a glass of

wine enjoying the view and the magazine!!;)

—CHRISTINE KIMBALL

KIDS LOVE SLO LIFE

SLOm a

POINT SAN LUIS

LIGHTHOUSE

PLEIN AIR

ART

BEHIND

THE

SCENES

HOTEL

CAL POLY

BE

LIFE

g a z i n e

MINDFUL

ON THE

RISE

DANCE

AWAY

YOU

US

SHOWED

MEET

STEPHANIE

BURCHIEL

INSPIRED, SPONTANEOUS

AUG/SEP 2014 & ORGANIC LIVING

@carissa,riesen&coen

@ellie

Please send your photos and comments to info@slolifemagazine.com

Follow SLO LIFE on Facebook: Visit facebook.com/slolifemagazine

Visit us online at slolifemagazine.com

Letters may be edited for content and clarity. To be considered for publication your letter must

include your name, city, state, phone number or email address (for authentication purposes).

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 19


| VIEW

CHAPEL HILL

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAMES A. CRAWFORD

It was around this time of the year, two years

ago, that San Luis Obispo-based photographer

James A. Crawford navigated uneven footing

to find the perfect spot to anchor his tripod.

With his Canon 5D Mark III equipped with

a 70 – 200mm lens, Crawford took this shot

against a “really bland sky,” which got him

thinking about dinner the night before. Actually

it was his wife’s stoneware that had created the

inspiration. Using a technique that combines

20 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014

several different photos, Crawford believed that

the texture of the well-worn cook plate would

make the ideal backdrop when combined with

black paint drops splatted onto a sheet of white

paper. So, the image you see here is actually

an amalgamation of all three: the chapel, the

stoneware, and the black paint. When it was

combined with a careful use of the opacity tools

in his computer software, Crawford was able to

create this dramatic scene.

About 24 years earlier, near the same spot where

Crawford was snapping away, the drama was

real as William P. Clark’s mangled body was

being pulled from the wreckage of what was left

of his airplane by his long-time ranch manager,

Jesus Muñoz. Clark, formerly the Secretary of

the Interior under President Reagan, was so

grateful to have been spared after the crash that

he decided to erect a chapel on his sprawling

Shandon ranch. As a longtime friend and


confidant to Ronald Reagan, the two California

ranchers had much in common. According

to the biography Dutch, written by Edmund

Morris, Clark would walk into the Oval Office

unannounced—the practice was unheard of,

even for senior officials—to plainly speak his

mind. It is an understatement to say that Clark

had Reagan’s ear, and his trust, and he is credited

widely by historians for convincing the president

that the Soviet Union could be pushed to the

brink of collapse. After serving in Washington,

Clark returned home where he pursued a variety

of law and business interests. Last year, at the age

of 81, he passed away from complications related

to Parkinson’s disease.

Today, this hidden gem of the Central Coast

known as Chapel Hill remains open to the

public. Resting peacefully on the parched

hillside, just 18 miles east of Paso Robles,

astute locals can capture a fleeting glimpse of

the majestic structure by craning their necks

at just the right moment while speeding by

on Highway 46. And according to Crawford,

who has shot the structure often over the years,

“You have to go back many times to the same

subject. It’s not really a good idea to go just once

because things change; the weather, the lighting.

And you always see it differently. You have to

keep going back.” SLO LIFE

magazine

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 21


| TIMELINE

Five Cal Poly football players

were arrested following a botched

attempt to rob a fraternity house

by gunpoint. The investigation revealed

that they were in search of drugs, specifically the

anti-anxiety medication known as Xanax, which then

led to the arrest of the fraternity’s former president.

Many commonalities were found to the November

2013 shooting of a former Cal Poly football player and

a student assistant coach over a drug deal, again for

Xanax, gone wrong.

Cal Poly became embroiled in the Al Moriarty bankruptcy case

after the trustee sued to recover the ill-gotten gains used to

finance an athletic sponsorship. As it scrambled to remove the

convicted felon’s name from its football scoreboard prior to its

first home game of the season, the university refused to refund

the $650,000 purchase, which would have been divided up

between Moriarty’s victims, among others.

Diablo Canyon became national news when

it was revealed that Michael Peck, a Nuclear

Regulatory Commission (NRC) officer, who

had overseen operations at the facility for five

years, called for its closing citing earthquake

safety concerns. PG&E, owner of the power

plant, responded by issuing reports of its own

showing that it can hold up under seismic

forces from nearby fault lines which were

discovered after it was built.

The County Board of Supervisors passed new guidelines for

outdoor watering, which may be done only on Mondays and

Thursdays, in Cayucos, Shandon, Santa Margarita, and Avila

Valley. With no rain in sight and wells gurgling their last few

drops, officials estimate that Cambria will run out of water before

the end of this year. The draught rages on while predictions for an

El Niño winter continue to fade.

august 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

22 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


For several weeks many humpback whales

were spotted in shallow waters around

the Central Coast. Through a complex

meteorological phenomenon called

“upwelling,” high northwesterly winds causes

cold, nutrient-rich water to move toward

the surface which facilitates the growth of

phytoplankton and fish, becoming food for

the whales. The majestic 50-ton creatures

thrilled locals and visitors alike as piers

became packed with frenzied onlookers.

The bizarre saga of the Forever Never Land

event finally comes to an end as the music

festival closes quietly at the Avila Bay Golf

Resort. Valerie Wang, the 27-year-old

Marina del Ray-based event founder, did

not even bother to show up for the weekend

production. Attendees, some of whom paid

as much as $500 per ticket, were outraged as

they found none of the activities advertised

and many of the music acts canceled. Wang,

who had previously lobbied the county

for a 10,000-person event license, issued a

statement blaming “last minute financial

binds” and the drought for the disaster. Avila

residents, who wrote “Leave Wang” with

rocks on the hill above the event, hope she

will never, ever come back.

The Arroyo Grande Police Officers

Association voted unanimously that it had

no confidence in the city’s mayor, Tony

Ferrara, or its city manager, Steve Adams,

following their failure to “clean house”

after a scandal. Over the summer when

Arroyo Grande’s community development

director Teresa McClish failed to return

home after an event, her husband called

the police who responded by first checking

city hall where they found their boss in

“an uncomfortable situation” with his

subordinate, McClish. The revelation

sparked outrage from many citizens who

have called for Adams to resign.

It was a rough week for District 4 Supervisor candidate Lynn Compton,

who received a sternly written warning letter from the Fair Political

Practices Commission for her failure to report a campaign donation. But

that paled in comparison to local outcry over Compton’s plan to host a

“hobo” themed fundraiser in Oceano where attendees were encouraged

to wear “hobo attire” and dine on “hobo stew.” In light of the intractable

homelessness problem in San Luis Obispo County the idea, billed as a

“fun event” by the campaign, ignited controversy among voters.

Finally bringing an end to the intense squabble to

determine how to allocate the water in the fast-dwindling

Paso Robles water basin, Governor Jerry Brown signs

Assemblyman Katcho Achadjian’s bill 2453, which allows

for the creation of a groundwater management district.

The board will contain a mixture of residents and property

owners and is designed so that the interests of the

burgeoning wine industry, as well as citizens, have a say in

how to manage the precious resource.

SLO LIFE

september 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 23


| Q&A

Caught in the Moment

We check in with Linnaea Phillips, a longtime San Luis Obispo resident, who sold her Garden

Street coffee shop six years ago, to find out what she has been up to lately. Our conversation

covered books, gardening, entrepreneurship, as well tips for staying out of trouble with the city.

Is it true that you used to drive a bookmobile?

I grew up in Washington State, Tacoma, and went to

the College of Puget Sound, then the University of

Washington for my library degree. I got a job driving

the bookmobile as a traveling librarian. I was able

to go to Mount Ranier and eat blackberry pie on my

route. It was a great time. I got married to my first

husband and we had one son there. Four years later we

moved to Santa Barbara so that he could go to Brooks

Institute. I began to work with the art community

there. We were very poor. So, here we are struggling to

get by and I became pregnant, with twins. We heard

about a local doctor who was looking for someone

to take photographs of his research. So my husband

said, “Well, maybe we can trade his doctoring for my

photographs?” He agreed to it. And what was the

experiment? He was taking rats, and cutting body

parts from other rats and attaching them to the first

rat. It was a high price to pay.

How did you start Linnaea’s Cafe? I started in a

bookstore in 1983. I went in as a “pop up.” We didn’t

have that expression then, but that’s what we did. I

said to Tom Norwood at his Norwood Bookshop on

Chorro Street, “Could I come here and take down the

books on a couple of the tables and put tablecloths on

them and we’ll have a café.” So that’s what I did for

six months until the city decided, rightly so, that there

was no washing facility for cups and no bathroom and

there was no kitchen. [laughter] So, I had to close.

But, it’s that mentality, “Let’s try it,” that I think is

very exciting. I was very ignorant. I had no business

in business; but I had a desire. And that desire was to

bring people into an environment where they can feel

comfortable, and where you can add to their existence

with music and art and lectures.

And, when did it find its home on Garden Street?

My son was a teenager out wandering around and

found a little alleyway and climbed up and looked

over the wall and told me, “Mom, I found a spot for

a garden.” It was just a trash heap behind a wig store

on Garden Street. The place was really struggling.

Wigs were kind of out and she had very little business.

It had pink walls and branches from trees that were

painted gold with wigs scattered all over them. And

there was a magenta toilet. So I contacted the landlord

and learned that the space was coming available. All

my friends said, “You’re not going to make any money

at this. You can’t sell coffee and make money. So, what

else are you going to sell?” I told them, “I’m going

to make the scones that I’ve always made, and the

muffins.” I started baking at home, which was illegal;

and I got caught by the city, again. [laughter] After

that, about a year into it, I had to rent a commercial

kitchen and staff it. Those were big expenses back

when a cup of coffee was just a dollar.

What other sorts of challenges did you face? In

the 80’s the Goths adopted Linnaea’s as their home

because we were a liberal kind of café, and there

weren’t many options for kids to hang out, especially

if you had a little bit of a different sort of look. We

accepted them. I wanted Linnaea’s to be a place where

people of the same genre could be together and not

be marked, not be labeled. These were a bunch of very

bright high school and college kids, but they were

driving other people away, so we had a big downturn

especially since they weren’t drinking much coffee or

buying many pastries. We really struggled with the

question, “Do we get rid of the kids in order to save

the business?” So we invited them to come in and

talk to us about it. We got all the kids—there must

have been 50 of them—and all the staff together to

discuss the problem we were having. We said, “This

is how it looks to the world. How do you think it

looks to the world?” They were sprawled everywhere

with their chains and their piercings. It was quite

an experience, an experience of joining people who

wanted to be un-joined from society. They said, “We

appreciate what you are doing and we’re going to try

to be self-managing.” And they were. We got through

six months, maybe a year with them deciding that they

had put so many rules on themselves that maybe they

should go somewhere else, which they did.

What have you been up to lately? A lot of walking.

All the hills, the trails. Terrace Hill is my favorite

place. I like composing poetry in my head while I

walk. I don’t put it on paper anymore. I try to really

live every day, and do the best that I can. It used to

be very bothersome to not have a product at the end

of the day. Now I say, “Leave it alone. Do what feels

good. Pursue what you can, if you can. Give it up, a

little bit. Just see where you are right now. We need

to be together. And we need to catch up with new

people.” So, I’m trying to do a bit of that. I’m renewing

old friendships that I have sort of neglected. Writing

a few letters, not just doing email. My days seem very

full, but I also feel somewhat frustrated that they aren’t

fuller; that I haven’t accomplished more. And what do

I want to accomplish? New plants, new pots. I’m an

avid gardener, so I spend quite a bit of time gardening.

And now I garden for other people, as well. I’ve got a

couple of places around town where I do random

acts of kindness. Picking up trash and getting

their yards in order even though they don’t

really know it. I read a lot. I’m not a big

television watcher. I have a group that has

been meeting for twenty years in my house. I

live in a little, tiny apartment. We gather once

a week to chat about our experiences. Each

person has a unique quality and they wouldn’t

miss that meeting for the world. SLO LIFE

24 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


Keep the monsters at bay

by hearing what

they have

to say.

Helping You Hear the Things You Love

Call us today

for your consultation

805541-1790

www.KarenScottAudiology.com

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 25


| MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR

26 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


Keeping it

Simple

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRIS BERSBACH

As a skater growing up in Morro Bay, ERIC MEYER had an eye for fashion. Coming

of age during the excess of the 80’s, he struggled with his own desire for a simpler

existence. It turns out that he was not alone, and his shoe company, Simple, struck a

chord with others who were looking for the same thing. Yet, the massively successful

brand eventually led to more of what he was trying to escape. So, he sold his company

and spent time remodeling homes. A few years later, Meyer began serving as a planning

commissioner at the city and then the county. He lives in downtown San Luis Obispo

with his wife, Cynthia, an oil painter, and enjoys a backyard connected to the properties

of several family members. Today, he is focused on supporting the effort to create a

“massive network of interconnected off-highway bike paths,” making it a primary

tourist destination for the county. In his spare time he can be found tinkering in his

garage fixing up old bicycles, mentoring young entrepreneurs at Cal Poly’s Center for

Entrepreneurship, or in his study researching the latest fashion and societal trends.

Here is his story…

Tell us, Eric, what was it like for you growing up?

I’m from Morro Bay. There were only 300 people in the county

when my oldest relative came here in the 1850’s. I went to high

school there, then to Cuesta College and studied art; and, then

to Cal Poly to study graphic design. I was pretty heavily into

skateboarding; everyday skating super hard. I started making my

own clothing in the 80’s during the beginning of the New Wave

scene. Remember the New Wave scene? For skaters, the only thing

you had available to wear was sort of “surfy” stuff, like Gotcha;

Quicksilver was still small, but Stüssy was around. All really

colorful and bright and happy and fluffy and flowery. And skaters

were not that way. Skaters were much more street, a little more

“agro” for lack of a better word. Barbed wire and graffiti was kind

of the imagery rather than flowers and happy surfing stuff. So, I

would die things black and go to the thrift store and buy old pants

and cut them off into long shorts. Not really making clothes from

scratch, but redesigning things that already existed.

When did you get your start?

When I graduated from Cal Poly I got a job working for a print

shop in Morro Bay called A-1 Printing. That wasn’t going to go

anywhere; it was just a mom and pop print shop. I was writing

letters to a skateboard company down in Orange County called

Vision. They were making shorts called Mad Rats, which were

basically shorts with pads in them, which no skaters would

wear. But, they were really the only skateboard company making

clothing. So I wrote letters to them bagging on their Mad Rats

idea. I said, “You need to stop doing the surf colors.” I suggested

doing it more negative imagery, skulls and graffiti. I didn’t have any

money, but I quit my job and got in my VW bus and drove down

to Orange County, pulled into a motel in Santa Ana, the cheapest

one I could find. I would go down to the Orange County Register

just as the paper was coming off the press at 4 o’clock in the

morning so that I could get the newspaper just as they were being

handed to the paperboys. They would give me the first hot, inky

paper as the big web presses were roaring away in the background.

I would open up to the want ads, but there was never a graphic

design job; just never. Finally there was one job listed, it was very

vague, looking for an artist/designer. I didn’t really understand

what they were talking about, and it was obvious that the guy that

wrote the ad had no idea what he was talking about.

So, what did you do?

I drove straight over to the business at about 6:45 that morning.

I’m in my stupid bus with waves painted on the side and I pulled

up and parked in the first space right in front of the building. I

didn’t realize that the space said something like, “Reserved for

Bob So-and-so.” Around 7:30 or 7:45, Bob So-and-so shows up >>

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 27


Simple, the anti-brand, poked fun at itself with ads such as this one shown here.

Production was stopped two years ago, after Meyer sold the business in 1996.

in this big four-door Mercedes and parks next to me and rolls down

his window and says, “Hey, what are you doing here?” I said, “I’m here

about the job.” He says, “What job?” I said, “The job for the artist.” He

said, “I just wrote that job last night. I’m not ready to interview you

yet, and by the way you’re parked in my space. Come back at 11 and

we’ll talk.” So, I went back to the motel and got my typewriter and

typed up all the questions he should ask called “How to Interview an

Artist.” It had only been about an hour when I went back to drop it off

for him. I got to the secretary and gave her the questions knowing that

he would have time to read them before I came back for my interview.

His door was open as I was talking to his secretary and he yelled out,

“What are you doing here?! I told you to come back at 11!” I said,

“I could tell that you really didn’t know what you were talking about

from the way your wrote the ad, so I typed up some questions for you

to ask me.” He looked at me for a minute; then he said, “Come here!”

He sat me down in his office and looked up and down the questions

when he says, “You got the job.” I said, “I don’t even know what the

job is!” It was a Korean vacuum cleaner company and this guy owned

the distribution rights for the U.S. He hired me to be his industrial

designer and graphic designer. I was six months out of college and had

no idea what I was doing.

How did it go?

I was there for about four months when the guy from the skateboard

company called me at the office and said, “Okay, I’m ready to do it.”

And I said, “But, I already got a job.” This was in 1984 and I was

making like $32,000, which was decent money for that time. He asked

me what kind of work I was doing. I said, “Well, I’m designing for this

vacuum cleaner company.” He started laughing on the other end of the

line. I didn’t realize it at the time, but he was actually the owner of the

company, Vision. He said, “I want to do this. The time is right, we’ve

got to do this skateboard clothing company.” He says, “What are you

making?” I said, “Like, $45,000.” [laughter] He said, “I’ll give you fifty

grand a year. Let’s go!” I said, “Okay.” So, I jumped ship and became

the creative director at the new company called Vision Street Wear.

We started making clothing and shoes for the skateboard industry

just as it was taking off. By 1990 we were a $100 million company. We

became much too big and ended up selling at Nordstrom and all these

big department stores so we lost credibility with the hardcore skaters,

our primary market. The term “selling out” had not yet reached the

public vernacular, but we were one of the first companies to do just

that. It was an interesting lesson to learn.

So, when did you start your own business?

By that time I just knew that I wanted to do something on my own, so

my wife and I started a shoe company called Simple. The 80’s were all

about yuppies and BMW’s and ego, and me, me, me, mine; everything

was big. That was getting kind of old. So, what is not all of those

things? Simple. People were saying, “I want a respite from all this crap.

I want something where I’m walking down the street in my shoes

and people have no idea what I’m about. It’s just a shoe. It doesn’t say

this; it doesn’t say that.” So, we built shoes that had the components

of an athletic shoe with high-end, comfortable materials. We made a

lot of little moves that added up to a much more durable and much

more comfortable shoe. The idea behind the brand was basically to

create a non-brand, that’s why it was called Simple. It was a reaction

against the excess of the 80’s, and a reaction against ego. We did tons

of magazine advertising and our message was pretty snide and self-

28 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


depreciating. We were riffing off the Volkswagen 60’s-era advertising

campaign. We did ads like, “Sell everything you own. None of it’s

going to make you happy. All you need are the clothes on your back,

and, well, some shoes, of course.” And, one in Rolling Stone Magazine

that said, “This is not a subliminal ad,” in large type above a picture

of the shoe.

When did Simple take off ?

I was in a factory in China and there was this guy wandering around

the conveyer belts looking at my product. It was very rare to see

another American in China at that time, twenty years ago. And

so I asked, “Who’s this jerk looking at my stuff?” The factory was

supposed to keep your product secret. They told me, “That’s Peter

from Deckers.” They are a shoe company out of Santa Barbara that

sells Teva sandals and Ugg boots among other brands now. So, I

started talking with him and he told me how they were getting ready

to go public. He asked me if I would be wiling to join up with him.

He offered to buy half of Simple for $100,000, but with the caveat

that I got all the distribution, because they had massive distribution.

They took care of all of the back office, everything. So, I was able to

get rid of 99% of my work by joining with them and it allowed us to

grow exponentially. They also gave me an unlimited line of credit. I

remember the week after I joined up with Deckers, I became one of

the signers on their $100 million credit line. I rode my skateboard

to the B of A in San Luis because I needed to transfer $800,000 to

China for a purchase order. It was a complicated wire transfer and

this young girl at the bank was helping me. She had never done one

before, so she called over the manager to help her. I’m there with my

skateboard, in my shorts and a stupid t-shirt, and she says, “$800,000?”

And her eyes sort of lit up. They asked me for the account number

and looked me up. There was $35 million in the account at that time.

The first words out of her mouth, with her manager standing next to

her, were, “Are you married?” [laughter] Having access to that kind

of cash really helped us grow because otherwise, I would have had to

beg borrow and steal to do it. The first couple of years by myself it was

really hard to buy inventory. Otherwise borrowing money would have

been impossible because I was just a skateboarder with no history

and a house with maybe $5,000 in equity. Until that time the banks

would just look at me and say, “What?! How long have you been in

business? Thirteen months? Have a nice day!” I essentially gave away

half my company when it was tiny, but our growth would have never

happened without doing that deal with Deckers.

At some point when you have

a brand that is all about being

humble and simple, yet it keeps

growing and growing, the two

cross hairs meet and you realize

this isn’t so simple anymore.

Why aren’t you still making shoes?

At some point when you have a brand that is all about being humble

and simple, yet it keeps growing and growing, the two cross hairs

meet and you realize this isn’t so simple anymore. My life became

something other than what we were professing. One year I figured

that I spent 33 days in the air. I’m not talking about the airport, but

actual time flying. I was away from home, away from my wife for

months and months at a time. I was constantly somewhere else.

What I was talking about in my ads—selling everything you owned

and living simply—is what I wanted. In 1996, I was able to sell the >>

The same great team

you trust for your

dental care is moving

to a new location!

11545 LOS OSOS VALLEY ROAD

SUITE A • SAN LUIS OBISPO

Madonna Road

El Tigre

PARKING

Los Osos Valley Road

CALL US AT 805-541-5800 TO

SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT.

NEW PATIENTS WELCOME!

OPEN 5 DAYS A WEEK!

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 29


decision and move forward. But, for me, it has

been a great learning experience, which is also

why I wanted to do it. I wanted to know what

it meant to work in a bureaucracy. What does

it mean to get all of these different opinions

to come together and decide to do something?

And, most importantly, how do you make a

place better? All my life I said, “I know what

I’m doing, I know where I’m going.” But now

as a planning commissioner, my job is to listen

and not have an opinion but manage what does

this county want? Not what I want, but what

do the majority of the residents want? That’s a

hard thing to do, especially when it clashes with

your own personal, subjective opinion. Nobody

is right. There is no right answer. Everyone just

thinks they’re right. There is nothing quite like a

heart-felt opinion of someone testifying in front

of you—completely opposite of your personal

beliefs—to make you rethink how egotistical

you are in your belief systems. That surprised

me as a commissioner.

business and finally live that simple life in a small house in a little

town and caring for people. I just believe in the city and I believe in

helping people make their neighborhoods feel better, happier. Often,

the life you live, you can really enjoy it if you make some minor

How do you answer life’s big questions?

You mean religion or philosophy? My mom

was a very religious lady and I grew up in

a household where she was searching, and

looking at all different kinds of religions,

not one in particular. From Hinduism to

Buddhism to Catholicism to Protestant, we

researched all of that. They’re all just different

lanes on the same highway. They’re all asking,

“What’s the planet all about” questions. I

think more in terms of positive and negative

energy rather than a religious aspect. If you

meet somebody, like today for example, I don’t

know you from a hole in the ground, but I

want to impart something to you that allows

you to contemplate where you are going in

your life. I want you to leave the conversation

better than when you found it. If we all did

that with every interaction we had with

everybody, that would just change the world. I

call it “spinning up.” A lot of times you go into a conversation and

people are complaining about something, and if you can twist that

conversation to spin it positively somehow, I think you make peoples’

lives just a little tiny bit fractionally better, microscopically better.

I call it “spinning up.” A lot of times you go into a conversation and

people are complaining about something, and if you can twist that

conversation to spin it positively somehow, I think you make peoples’

lives just a little tiny bit fractionally better, microscopically better.

adjustments to how you live it. Depending on where you live, and

the quality of your neighborhood, can have a huge impact on how

you view the world. If it’s good, you’re happy and if it’s not, you’re

unhappy. Super basic. Working in government is quite a bit different

than being an entrepreneur. You have to build relationships and find

ways to get disparate groups to believe in the same thing. In this

county there are a wide variety of viewpoints, and none of them

are really wrong. At the extreme edges they think they’re right and

everyone else is wrong. As an entrepreneur, you just do it. You make a

But, that evolves; it spreads like fire. And I see that. When you

meet someone that is negative, it’s kind of like a sponge that

sucks a little energy off you. But if you can help someone—“help”

sounds so cheese ball—but if you can just give them a little

energy somehow, either through showing some enthusiasm or

giving just the gentlest little nudge, then you have made the

world a better place. There are times when things are negative,

but you can’t dwell on it. It’s about how you get beyond the

negativity; how you move forward. SLO LIFE

30 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


Sage Ecological Landscapes

Landscapes for Health, Happiness, and Life

Design - Construction - Maintenance - Nursery

805.574.0777 ext. 1

www.SageLandscapes.net

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 31


| ON THE RISE

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

Ruby Callahan

With a passion for helping others, there is no

debating that Ruby Callahan, a seventeen-year-old

San Luis Obispo High School senior and big sister

to little brothers, Noah and Jude, has a bright future

ahead of her.

What sort of extra-curricular activities are you involved in? I participate in Mock

Trial, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, and I volunteer with the Get-on-the-Bus

program, which serves children visiting incarcerated parents. My family and I have

raised money to purchase multiple water filters for the non-profit Seeds of Hope,

bringing clean water to families in Africa. Since my sophomore year of high school

I’ve been able to travel to Turkey, Kyrgyzstan, and Mexico where I have been able

to work in two different orphanages—life changing!

What recognition have you received? I find this question embarrassing as there

are so many kids I know accomplishing amazing things and being recognized for

it. That being said, currently I am the SLO High Girls State Representative. I

was awarded a scholarship by the local American Legion Auxiliary to represent

my school at this summer’s Girls State at Claremont McKenna. I have also

been the co-leader of the SLO High Mock Trial Team this past year and this

upcoming year, and won an honorable mention at the county level for my role as

a defense attorney.

What is your favorite memory of all time? My entire life, we’ve gone to Catalina

with my aunts and uncles and cousins for a week each summer. Eating corn dogs

on the pier, snorkeling, sharing a bathroom with 12 people and playing mini-golf

are some of the best memories for me. Maybe not the bathroom part!

What career do you see yourself in someday? One of the few things I could

perhaps see myself doing in the future is being an adoption attorney. I would

really love to be able to bring families together in the same way my family was

brought together.

What has influenced you the most? First and foremost my faith and my family.

I have learned through them the importance of living life with a heart full of love

and concern for others.

What do you dislike the most? I find it outrageous that there are more than 27

million human slaves in the world today. On a trivial and more personal level, I

really hate picking up dog poop.

What do you want people to know about you? I laugh a lot, usually at my own

mistakes. I think a sense of humor will be invaluable when facing difficult times. I

value authenticity and honesty in friendships and try to match that as best I can.

What schools are you considering for college? I’m casting the net pretty wide,

I would love to stay in California, but if a great out of state opportunity arises

hmm… I’d probably take it. SLO LIFE

Know a student ON THE RISE?

Introduce us at slolifemagazine.com/share

32 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 33


| BUSINESS

HIRING

BIG DECISIONS

for Small Companies

I had a client who joked about how he would hire a

perfectly normal person and as soon as they began

working for his company, they transformed into an alien

no one recognized that was clearly not the competent,

well-adjusted individual he met in the interview.

BY JIM RIZZI

recognizing a qualified applicant because

that person is outside the norm based on our

experience. So acknowledge your biases, and

make a conscious evaluation as to whether

they are helping or hindering the process on

a case-by-case basis.

Next, let’s identify the three to five

most important competencies needed to

successfully perform the position. Spend

some time on this. Brainstorm a much

larger list, then whittle it down to just

those three to five skills, attitudes and

behaviors necessary for success at this

position. If there are other staff members

that directly interact with the position,

bring them into this process. Involving

others will help reduce your biases and

broaden the perspective on what is critical

to be successful.

Finding and hiring good

people—more specifically,

the right person for the

position—is one of the most

important challenges for small

businesses. Making the wrong

hiring decision is expensive.

According to the website HR.com, one bad

hire can cost as much as 30% of that person’s

annual compensation.

One of the mistakes many companies

make is hiring a person based more on

their personality than on their ability

to successfully perform the job. Their

personality and fitting into the culture of

JIM RIZZI is the owner of

KickStart Solutions Group,

a San Luis Obispo-based

business coaching and

consulting firm.

the company

are important

factors for sure,

but cannot be the

sole qualification

for the position.

Most companies

here on the

Central Coast

are not large

enough to have an

HR department

to properly

find, interview

and assess

each applicant.

Therefore, the

person doing the

hiring is the manager, or perhaps the owner

of the company, which may often be the same

person depending on the size of the business.

The effort to bring on a new employee

always begins with the best intentions, but

let’s face it, everyone working at a small

business is busy, really busy. And hiring, while

important, cannot possibly compete with the

laundry list of daily urgent issues every small

businessperson faces. Hiring and interviewing

often happens only after the fires are put out,

or when the need for more help becomes

a fire itself. Not given the proper time and

attention, we fail to cast a wide enough

net to attract a broad spectrum of qualified

candidates, the interview process gets rushed,

applicants are not properly assessed, and we

end up hiring the person whose personality

best fits our own. Sound familiar?

The good news is that there are a few simple

techniques you can use to dramatically

improve your results while not taking up too

much of your time.

Let’s begin by acknowledging the inherent

subjectivity of the hiring process due to

our biases. We all have biases including the

manager, the owner of the company, and

whoever is doing the hiring. Sometimes

our biases are a good thing. Biases based on

successful experiences can enhance the hiring

process. But, other times they prevent us from

Once you have those competencies, you

will need to develop interview questions

that will tell you if the applicant has the

necessary qualifications. A good format

for this question is to ask the applicant

to site a specific example from their past

demonstrating the skill. For example, if the

competency is “being detail oriented,” the

question might be, “Give me an example

of something in your past that would

demonstrate your ability to manage and track

details.” This method of questioning prevents

the applicant from simply telling you they

have the skill, and instead forces them to

recall a demonstration of it.

Finally, your interview process should have a

structure and every interview should follow

exactly the same steps. Your questions should

be written out, and should be asked in

exactly the same fashion for each applicant.

Resist the temptation to “bond” with the

interviewee. Keep it businesslike and focused.

If time is limited, consider doing a portion

of the interview over the phone. Phone

interviews take much less time and can be

arranged and managed more efficiently; plus

you may be able to narrow down the field

to just the best of the bunch before meeting

face-to-face.

While these tips are certainly not a hiring

cure-all, hopefully they give you some tools to

help you find your next great employee.

SLO LIFE

34 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


• 0% Financing Available •

• Complimentary Whitening

with Invisalign® Treatment •

Farm fresh, locally sourced ingredients

Family owned and operated for 35 years

Mediterranean cuisine, 150+ local wines

Private dining and banquet room available

1020 Railroad Avenue, San Luis Obispo

(805) 541-6800 . CafeRomaSLO.com

Viorela Bauer DDS

121 W. Branch Street, Suite A,

Arroyo Grande

(located in the Village behind AG Framing)

805.481.6617

creeksidedentalcare.com

Open Mon - Thurs 8:30am - 4:30 pm

1930 Monterey Street

San Luis Obispo

805.544.0500

800.441.4657

SandsSuites.com

Meeting Rooms Available

Amenities Include: Hi-Speed WiFi, Stage, Podium, Easel, Whiteboard, PA

System, Digital Projector, Speaker Phone, Large Flat Screen HD TV, Beverage

Service, ADA Accessible Facility, Ample Parking and more.

Board Room . Accommodates up to 25 guests

1/4 Room . Accommodates up to 36 guests

1/2 Room . Accommodates up to 72 guests

3/4 Room . Accommodates up to 120 guests

Full Room . Accommodates up to 150 guests

Call for

pricing

and

availability

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 35


| OUT AND ABOUT

FAMILY FRIENDLY

Classic

There’s a lot about Pismo Beach that makes it a classic

beach town, and Pismo Bowl, with its Coney Island appeal

and California style, is definitely part of the picture.

Beach Town Fun

BY JEANETTE TROMPETER

Offering eight lanes of old school entertainment, Pismo Bowl harkens back to the lazy days

when school and schedules weren’t so hectic. Families and friends looking to spend quality time

together, can find it here at this Central Coast throwback.

It’s been around and operating continuously since 1939. Christine Goldie and her family are the

fourth owners of the place. They’ve had it for the last fourteen years. Most of the family works

here, and kind of feel like they’re guardians of history by keeping the place going. And they are.

JEANETTE TROMPETER,

KSBY News anchor and

reporter, hosts the “Out and

About with JT” series every

Tuesday evening at 6pm.

You can see it on the walls, in the treasures and trophies scattered

about the place, and on the smiles of the people you find here. “It

really hasn’t changed that much since I was a kid. My parents used

to bring me here. They have some new equipment, but otherwise

everything else is pretty much the same,” says Doug Alevezos. He

came here with his parents when he was a kid, and now he brings

his kids here. And even though it’s tough to text or tweet between

strikes, spares or gutter balls, they don’t think it’s hokey at all.

“No, it’s the same and it’s just comfortable and nice to come back

to,” says one of his daughters, Kirstin. “When everything changes

around, and things get rebuilt, this is still the same.”

A family of four can play for less than thirty bucks. It’s $4.10

a game and $2.95 for shoe rentals. You can also grab a burger,

beer or cappuccino.

If you’re like me, you don’t bowl very often, but it doesn’t matter

because every time you play, it’s just as much fun as the very first

time when you were a kid. “I just feel like bowling

is such a traditional sport, that I would just hate to

loose it for the next generation,” says Goldie.

You can rediscover the thrill of what it feels like to

line ‘em up and let ‘er fly... and wait for the laughs

or claps from the crowd behind you. Pismo Bowl

is open seven days a week. “Well, we do close for

Christmas!” Goldie chuckles.

There is also an arcade as well as pool tables, and

you can grab anything from breakfast to hot wings

at the little diner. And if you really want a deal,

head down at the start of the workweek for Monday

Madness from six to nine at night, $15 gets you

all the bowling and pizza you can handle. Pismo

Bowl is at the corner of Dolliver and Pomeroy. It’s a

Central Coast classic. And it’s definitely a place to

stop when you’re Out and About. SLO LIFE

36 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 37


| NOW HEAR THIS

MUSIC SCENE

Living Dead

BY DAWN JANKE

If you ask local musician Patrick Hayes, he will tell

you that all music fans should add some twangy

rock to their diets. He and his bandmates Pete

Robbins, Mark Folkrod and Keith Kurczewski have

just the thing for your daily intake: Dead Volts.

38 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


In a number of combinations, Dead Volts have been

sharing music with locals since 2011, but even before that,

Hayes, Robbins, Folkrod, and Kurczewski rocked out as

members of other local bands. Lead vocalist Hayes used

to be in the alternative country act Pennyjar and recalls,

“I used to watch Kurczewski play in Bottle back in the

day; Folkrod was in a plethora of bands and currently

also fronts the Ghosts of Guadalupe and sits on the drum

throne for our blood-brother band American Dirt; and

Robbins was in a punk outfit, the 1st Line, before joining

Dead Volts.”

While these guys have had a presence in the Central

Coast music scene for years, together as Dead Volts they

ignite a spark, and their upcoming album We Are Already

Dead promises sounds that are anything but a flat line.

The album, slated for release in late November, moves

toward what Hayes describes as a little bit country pop

and a whole lot dissonant with songs that, in the words of

former KOTR DJ and local musician Kevin Myers, sound

like country Sonic Youth.

The band is excited about the album, especially because

it has been years in the making. Frontman Hayes, bassist

Robbins, and drummer Folkrod actually began working

on it while playing with former lead guitarist Mike Cross.

After the departure of Cross last September, they began

recording as a three-piece and invited a variety of local

guitarists to fill the role of Cross during live shows. When

guitarist Kurczewski, who also currently plays in local

band the Booker Tease,

joined in, their lineup

solidified. Robbins says,

“Somehow this thing

we created seemed to

pull some great players

into our circle; and we

were fortunate to have

Kurczewski step into the

lead guitar spot.”

DAWN JANKE directs the

Writing & Rhetoric Center at

Cal Poly and keeps her pulse on

the Central Coast music scene.

According to Folkrod,

We Are Already Dead

gets the band much

closer to its live vibe than

previous recordings. And

just what kind of vibe is

that, you might wonder.

Robbins explains, “We

recorded the album

ourselves and were able to create a serious rock record

that is as gritty, raw, and sweaty as our live shows.”

When asked what song on the new album most

represents the Dead Volts’ sound, the resounding reply

is “Ain’t Dead Yet.” Folkrod says the song’s punchy,

crowd-pleasing hooks will surely invite listeners

to take a journey with the band, through cowpunk

aggressive tracks like “Don’t Wait Up” and into others

like the cantina guitar line of “California.”

Not all the Dead Volts are native Californians, but

they’ve been living the SLO Life for quite some time,

and they have lots to say about the local music scene.

Kurczewski, originally from Syracuse, New York, says

that living on the Central Coast has definitely influenced

his creativity. “Watching the really great musicians and

songwriters perform live around here is very inspirational

and pushes me to new levels,” he says. Hayes adds, “If

you love music, you have to either create it or support it;

and I think SLO has a great infrastructure for both.” His

only request? It “wouldn’t hurt if more people came out”

to support local musicians.

Hayes does his part to encourage participation in the

scene: he owns a media/marketing company with clients

including McCarthy’s and Frog ‘n Peach and is also the

founder of Twang N Bang records, a San Luis Obispo

label that supports local bands such as American Dirt,

the Cross Brothers, and Red Eye Junction among others.

Twang N Bang also hosts an annual all-day music fest in

downtown SLO; the most recent, Twang N Bang IX this

past August, boasted over 20 bands.

Anyone involved with Twang N Bang records will

agree: it’s a family with near and distant relatives that

get together whenever they can to share music. Folkrod

says that Twang N Bang is “the framework that their

community of like-minded artists and bands is built

upon… At the end of the day, it all boils down to bringing

friends together to scream, sweat, crank up guitars, and

enjoy life as much as possible.”

Hayes concludes, “None of us suffer from the delusion that

we are going to ‘make it’ in any traditional sense, so for us

it’s all about making music that we know we will like.” Dead

Volts music is easy to like; I know I like it, and I bet you

will too. If music recharges your batteries, you should check

out a Dead Volts live show and stay tuned for the release

of their upcoming album We Are Already Dead. For more

information visit thedeadvolts.com. SLO LIFE

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 39


ADVENTURE, PASSION

ZOEY’S

HOME CONSIGNMENTS

LIGHTING | FURNITURE | ART | RUGS

PATIO & GARDEN | JEWELRY | EBAY SERVICES

Where you never know

what you might find!

| LOCAL PLAYLIST

Tune In

BY DAWN JANKE

Local singer songwriter Derek Senn released The

Technological Breakthrough to rave reviews: Tim Merricks,

writer for americana-uk.com concluded, “...songs which

capture the imagination with a dynamism which matches

Senn’s enthusiasm for his art.” Saddled with beautifully

crafted liner notes, a dying addition to albums in the times

of music downloads, it’s refreshing to sit down with an IPA

and take in Senn’s voice both on the page and through the

speakers. Pick up The Technological Breakthrough at Boo

Boo Records or order it from dereksenn.com and take in

a live performance during Art after Dark on October 3 at

Haven Properties Gallery Location.

3566 S. HIGUERA ST | SAN LUIS OBISPO

596.0288 | zoeyshomeconsignments.com

Open Tues-Sat 10-6 | Closed Sun & Mon

You may recognize Doug Groshart as the keyboardist and

lead vocalist for local band The JD Project, which with

their blend of rock, blues, soul and country always leave

crowds energized and entertained. Groshart’s solo album,

Hold the River Back, offers fans another side of the singer

songwriter: mellow and melodic tunes like the lead track,

“Wasted on the Young.” You can check out Hold the River

Back on iTunes and Spotify and catch Groshart performing

with The JD Project at Pomar Junction Winery on October

17, at Ancient Peaks Winery on October 18, and at Talley

Vineyards on November 9. He also has a solo show at the

Peloton Cellars Winemaker’s Dinner on November 15.

The second album by Cayucos resident Joe Koenig brings us

more of his Texas soul sounds. While his music is certainly

impressive, equally moving is Koenig’s involvement in the

work of other local musicians: he designed the cover art

for two new releases featured here, Senn’s and Groshart’s.

Koenig is a powerful presence in the Central Coast music

scene, and Bleed Like You Bleed secures his position as a

vital member of the community. The album left me exactly

like Koenig hoped it would, “with a smile on my face and a

tear in my eye.” You can listen to Bleed Like You Bleed at

joekoenig.bandcamp.com and watch him perform live at SLO

Brew on November 21, when he opens up for The Mother Hips.

live the SLO LIFE!

SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

slolifemagazine.com

SLO LIFE

SWINGING

FOR THE

m a g a z i n e

40 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014

FENCES

ON THE

RISE

HEALTH

WORDS TO

LIVE BY

BEHIND THE

SCENES

HEATING UP

SUMMER

OUTDOOR

LIVING

AFTER

HOURS

NOW HEAR

THIS

MEET

BILL

OSTRANDER

JUN/JUL 2014 & POLITICAL ACTION

Readers might recall local band Próxima Parada featured

in the June/July issue of SLO LIFE. Supported exclusively

by an Indiegogo crowd-funding campaign, they have since

released their debut album, Songs of Music. Emerging

with 12 songs that cite influences by Ray Charles, the

Beatles, Bill Withers, and The Band, Songs of Music is sure

to capture any and all open ears. This album features no

auto-tune and no artificial additives, just ardent music in

their unique California folk and soul style. You can check

out Songs of Music on iTunes and Spotify and learn more

about the band at proximaparadamusic.com. Stop by the

Fremont Theatre on October 23 to hear the boys perform live.

SLO LIFE


Stay in the home you love safely and independently

SPECIALIZING IN

STAIR AND PORCH LIFTS

- Indoor and Outdoor

- Straight and Curved

- Elegance and Simplicity

when

- Used from $2195 available

- Ergonomic

- Easy to Use

- Safe, Powerful, and

Efficient

- Rugged and Reliable

- Up to 400lbs. Capacity

BUY, RENT, SELL

NEW & USED

358 Quintana Road | Morro Bay | (805) 772-8210 | mobilitymastersstairlifts.com

Call for a FREE Catalog & Buyers Guide | Free In-Home Estimates

Contractors License # 916845

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 41


| DWELLING

DESIGN

Modern Musing

Last year Laura Joines resigned as an architecture professor to take “learn by doing” to a whole new level

by designing and building her family’s San Luis Obispo home. Millions of viewers were able to watch the

project unfold on A&E’s reality show Extreme Builds, but they may have missed the real story...

42 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 43


spending 23 years teaching architecture

at Cal Poly, Laura Joines figured it was time

for her to apply her vast knowledge of the

subject by setting out to build her home. She

retired from her position last fall and “learn

by AAfter

doing,” as the motto goes, soon became

a very practical matter on a little sliver of

hillside dirt above the adult school in San

Luis Obispo.

“I remember thinking, ‘This is crazy, we

can’t afford this,’” recalls Joines as she

embarked upon the project. “But, what am

going to say when I’m 99 years old? I don’t

want to have regrets; I don’t want to say, ‘I

really wish I would have built something

rather than just talked about it for all those

years in the classroom.’” Around the time

she was wrapping things up at Cal Poly,

she received an email from a television

producer. The cryptic message explained

that they were looking to film a custom

home building project from start to finish.

Curious, Joines dialed the number listed in

the email and learned that the production

company was interested in profiling families

who were building homes using interesting

architecture. “The working title for the show

was something like ‘Innovative Architecture’

or something along those lines, I cannot

remember,” Joines explains. It turns out

that she and her family would be featured

in A&E’s fast-paced reality show called

Extreme Builds.

Although she now counts it as an

“interesting experience,” she expresses

disappointment that the show focused on

drama rather than architecture. At times the

job site would be filled with a camera crew

who often prompted the family on what to

say and how to react. “It turns out that the

whole reality t.v. thing is hardly reality,” she

laughs. And it may be that A&E missed

the real story of the Bowden Ranch house,

a story that is subtle yet based on hundreds

of years of history and mathematics and

science—a story that takes direction from

the mysteries of nature and the trajectories

of planets. The story of this house is the

story of the education of Laura Joines.

After spending her childhood in the sultry

climate of North Carolina, and then off to

college at Vassar in New York, Joines was

ready for a change of scenery. “I decided

44 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014

that I wanted to live in a Mediterranean

climate,” she remembers. As she began

researching areas to relocate, she identified

regions of Europe, Northern Africa,

Southwestern Australia, Central Chile,

and the Western Cape of South Africa.

But, there was one she was not aware of:

California’s Central Coast. “I came out here

after I graduated and loved it, and knew this

is where I wanted to be,” she remembers.

Then, on the day she learned that she

landed her job, she decided to head to the

beach to celebrate. Donning a new bikini,

she headed out to Cayucos where the beach

was sopped in by summer fog. Undeterred

and assuming that the Mediterranean

climate of some exotic Greek island

surrounded by perfect bathwater-like ocean

would be the same in her newly adopted

home, she plunged into the freezing, icecold

Pacific. Shivering violently on her way

back to her towel—the only one on the

beach—she thought about her research and

the fact that she had overlooked the water

temperature, “How did I miss that?” she

questioned.

Today, citing the book Blink by Malcolm

Gladwell, Joines considers herself lucky

that it did not occur to her to look into the

ocean’s warmth, or lack thereof. “Had I done

that I would have missed this incredible

opportunity to live here; I think that

sometimes the best decisions are the ones you

just make based on good information, yes, but

also with your gut, too,” she observes. And it

appears that this philosophy has been carried

through with the construction of her Lizzie

Street home. Although each detail has been

exquisitely conceived and executed, it is clear

that many of the design decisions were made

with the environment in mind; that is to say

the environment from both a conservation

standpoint and also how the home sits on

the lot. For example, the entire footprint of

the structure, including the location of the

windows, takes advantage of the sun’s path

across the sky as it changes through the

seasons. During the winter, the sun tracks

along the windows and skylights where it

provides maximum light which floods the

house and is soaked in by the concrete floors.

Those floors, which serve as a virtual “heat

sponge” soak in the energy and then slowly

release it over the course of many hours

and often through the night. During the

summer months, just the opposite occurs as

the sun follows a path that mostly misses the

windows and is also blocked by the seasonal,

kite-like shades.

While Joines, who now works as an architect

and sells an array of home products through

her firm Domu Design, pushed for not

having any central heating—instead using

only passive solar—the building code dictated

that she must include it in her plans; so she

ended up installing radiant floor heating.

And as the hot water tubes, weaving a

pattern underfoot are out of site, much of

the rest of the house is designed in the same

way. The baseboards, if they can be called

that, are recessed by a few inches to give

the perception of negative space as if the

walls are floating. The glass doors leading

outside unexpectedly fold accordion-like,

which opens the walls completely to fresh

air, bringing the outside in. And much of

the proportions of the home design follow

Fibonacci’s sequence, also known as the

“Golden Ratio,” which take their lead from

Mother Nature. Indeed, the 1,950 squarefoot

home feels much larger than it is due to

its liberal use of exceptionally high ceilings.

While the former architecture professor

becomes animated when discussing the

rationale for the various angles and degrees

and proportions found throughout her

family’s four-bedroom, three-bath home,

it is when the discussion turns to the

practical design elements that her passion

comes forth. “I took my inspiration from

the Medieval town square.” She explains

that a highlight for her was taking students

on a trip to Prague where they learned

about European architecture through the

ages. “The idea is to create an inviting

public space where people would want to

congregate.” This concept manifests itself

with the expansive and continuous kitchen

and dining room, which are joined by the

living room to create an open and airy feel

when connected with the front and back

patios on either side—a sort of miniature

town square within the home. “The kids all

tend to hang out here, which is the idea.

Their rooms are very small,” Joines reveals.

“I didn’t want everyone to hole up away

from everyone else; this design was very

intentional, and done in a way to bring us

all together.” >>


APPLIANCE CENTER

SLEEP CENTER

OUTDOOR LIVING

CABINETRY & KITCHEN DESIGN

NOW IS THE

TIME TO

REMODEL!

SAN LUIS OBISPO 122 Cross St. | (805) 543-6600

PASO ROBLES 2361 Theatre Dr. | (805) 238-6020

IDLERSHOME.COM

NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK!

/IDLERSHOME

SAN LUIS OBISPO SLEEP CENTER 189 Cross St. | (805) 269-6600

STORE HOURS: Mon.–Fri. 9 a.m.–7 p.m. | Sat. 9 a.m.–6 p.m. | Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m.

SLEEP CENTER HOURS: Mon.–Sat. 9 a.m.–6 p.m. | Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m.

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 45


1

1. High ceilings are found

throughout the home, making

small spaces feel much larger

than they really are.

2

2. Not only do the exposed

beams provide interesting

added texture, they also allow

for greater spans between

walls creating more openness.

4

3

5

3. A type of internal awning

is used to reflect natural

light which has the effect of

reducing reliance on artificial

lighting and climate controls.

4. Open shelving reduces bulk

and increases the airiness of

the room, again creating the

perception of a larger footprint.

6

5. Oversized windows are

positioned to maximize

exposure to the sun during the

winter months and minimize it

during the summer.

6. Sleek, modern appliances,

selected based on maximum

energy efficiency, are

designed to be out of sight

and out of mind.

7

7. The classic solid wood table

serves as the room’s focal

point; it’s where the family

gathers for meals and the kids

do their homework.

8. Cement slab floors act as

a heat sponge when it is cold

outside and if that is not enough,

the hot water radiant heat tubes

beneath the surface, do the rest.

46 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014

8

>>


Buying or selling a

home can be this

AWESOME!

Traci Ferguson, Realtor #01875751/ Eco Broker Certified/ LEED AP/ BA Architecture

444 Higuera Street, 3rd Floor, San Luis Obispo, Ca 93401

(805) 235-6396 www.TraciFerguson.com

FREE

iPad Mini

with purchase

of any home

theater or

audio/video

system!

World Class Home Entertainment Systems

Home Theater - Automation - Audio/Video - HiFi - Sales - Service - Installation - Free Estimates

(866) 633-7000 | (805) 395-1525 | info@coastalhomeworks.com | coastalhomeworks.com

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 47


ABOVE - Each window was placed to take advantage of

the sun’s trajectory through the sky during the year, as well

as to help the breeze flow efficiently throughout the home.

The kite-like shades are moved depending on the season to

enhance this effect.

LEFT - Joines made many sketches while conceptualizing the

home’s design, which helped her solidify a consistent plan.

The drawing you see here is an early depiction of the master

bathroom on the second floor.

SLO LIFE

48 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 49


| SLO CITY REAL ESTATE

by the numbers

laguna

lake

tank

farm

cal poly

area

country

club

down

town

foothill

blvd

johnson

ave

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

*Comparing 1/1/13 - 9/18/13 to 1/1/14 - 9/18/14

2013

47

551,635

541,853

98.28

58

2013

22

675,614

677,245

100.24

14

2013

24

565,958

555,625

98.46

27

2013

14

892,607

878,714

98.52

78

2013

31

589,482

581,690

97.06

48

2013

35

660,540

649,557

98.21

40

2013

35

605,226

602,726

98.96

23

2014

44

601,807

590,104

98.29

44

2014

18

755,092

743,855

98.61

42

2014

20

634,938

622,816

98.32

36

2014

12

1,012,750

981,131

96.92

72

2014

33

755,236

740,321

98.51

40

2014

48

681,727

662,163

98.10

37

2014

19

688,853

668,202

97.12

65

+/-

-6.38%

9.10%

8.90%

0.01%

-24.14%

+/-

-18.18%

11.76%

9.84%

-1.63%

200.00%

+/-

-16.67%

12.19%

12.09%

-0.14%

33.33%

+/-

-14.29%

13.46%

11.66%

-1.60%

-7.69%

+/-

6.45%

28.12%

27.27%

1.45%

-16.67%

+/-

37.14%

3.21%

1.94%

-0.11%

-7.50%

+/-

-45.71%

13.82%

10.86%

-1.84%

182.61%

SOURCE: San Luis Obispo Association of REALTORS

®

SLO LIFE

50 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


Relax. Let us do the work.

“Bruce Freeberg was a difference maker in many ways in the sale of our home. His professionalism and

incredible people skills made an emotional time a positive experience. He managed the presentation

of our home in a beautiful way and walked us through the entire process with great skill. We felt lucky

to have him represent us.”

- Jennifer and Mike Krukow

For the best Real Estate

Search Site look here.

Bruce Freeberg • Realtor # 01771947

444 Higuera Street, 3rd Floor • San Luis Obispo • CA 93401

(805) 748-0161 • www.BruceFreeberg.com

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 51


| SLO COUNTY REAL ESTATE

by the numbers

Helping you with

your Real Estate

needs here on

the Central Coast

with knowledge,

experience

& integrity!

REGION

Arroyo Grande

Atascadero

NUMBER OF

HOMES SOLD

2013

244

252

2014

191

261

AVERAGE DAYS ON

MARKET

2013

65

56

2014

65

60

MEDIAN SELLING

PRICE

2013

507,500

399,950

2014

572,000

430,000

Michelle Braunschweig

Broker Associate

Lic #01736789

Avila Beach

Cambria/San Simeon

10

113

15

92

96

79

60

107

994,500

485,000

800,000

575,000

805.801.1734

michelle@realestategroup.com

Cayucos

Creston

35

5

39

4

103

125

114

73

605,000

610,000

775,000

589,000

Office Lic #01320707

Grover Beach

92

64

51

50

371,000

402,500

Los Osos

119

104

45

57

368,500

436,950

Morro Bay

107

95

59

91

429,000

499,000

Nipomo

175

145

68

62

470,000

495,000

Oceano

39

48

90

57

356,000

386,000

Pismo Beach

96

79

75

94

630,000

715,000

Paso (Inside City Limits)

314

287

52

56

360,750

380,000

Paso (North 46 - East 101)

44

51

61

68

327,500

320,000

Paso (North 46 - West 101)

101

59

129

130

350,000

325,000

Paso (South 46 - East 101)

62

44

81

84

395,000

394,450

San Luis Obispo

270

248

57

49

614,500

655,000

Santa Margarita

15

11

69

54

375,000

402,550

Templeton

72

84

66

74

450,000

521,500

805 - 440 - 2050

ConcreteEnvironments.com

52 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014

Countywide

2,165 1,921

*Comparing 1/1/13 - 9/18/13 to 1/1/14 - 9/18/14

66 67 440,000 475,000

SOURCE: San Luis Obispo Association of REALTORS ®

SLO LIFE


181 Tank Farm Road, Suite 110 | 805.544.5900 | sloconsignment.com

(at Cross & Long Streets, behind Trader Joe’s)

Hours : Monday - Saturday 10-6pm

smart, eclectic, art to live on

merry maids Relax. It’s Done.®

The

HOLIDAYS

are just

around the

corner, let

Merry

Maids

Receive

$50.00 OFF

when you mention

SLO LIFE!

*New Clients Only

help your

house

SHINE!

285 Prado Road, Suite A | San Luis Obispo

805.542.9400 | merrymaids.com | merrymaidsofslo@yahoo.com

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 53


770 Capitolio Way . San Luis Obispo . 805 549 0100

Relax in confidence with state-of-the-art,

gentle and experienced dental care.

the clear alternative to braces

Cosmetic | Laser | Metal-Free Dentistry

Come experience the difference!

1250 Peach Street • Suite E • San Luis Obispo

(805) 543-0814 • www.slotownsmiles.com

54 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


VOLUME 2, ISSUE 3 FALL, 2014

FEATURING

• CORK COUTURE •

The San Luis Obispo Collection held its

2nd annual Cork Couture luau-style on

Saturday, September 13th, infusing the

Court Street Terrace with an ambience

of the Hawaiian islands. Our whole

community—friends, family, cohorts and

cronies—raised their glasses, savored

nibbles and swayed to the music of local

favorites Fialta. Walking the bamboo

carpet while eager paparazzi snapped

photos, the ladies wore flowers in their

hair, and the gents rocked fedoras and

aloha-print shirts. The terrace glittered

under swags of fairy lights and bright

swaths of sailcloth. Best of all, the event

raised awareness and funds in support of

one of SLO Collection’s favorite causes,

Big Brothers Big Sisters of SLO County.

Hope to see you at next year’s fête!

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE:

World-class office space in the heart of

downtown San Luis Obispo

• THE 805 COLLECTIVE •

• POLYPAY •

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 55


SLO OFFICE

Known for its best-in-class shopping and dining, the San Luis

Obispo Collection also features top-shelf office space.

The San Luis Obispo Collection brings together world class shopping, the

city’s finest restaurants, upscale retail, museums and theater. San Luis

Obispo, named the Happiest City in America, is the cultural hub of the

Central Coast, which embodies the California lifestyle and offers locals

and visitors alike historic architecture, sweeping vineyards, pristine

beaches, charming beach towns and mountain ranges, and is home

to Cal Poly University. In this issue of SLO Merchant, we highlight two

groups of entrepreneurs who are both bringing their unique flavor and

style to the SLO community.

805 COLLECTIVE AND THE CANA FAMILY

How a few college friends set their sights on creating their dream office space in downtown San Luis Obispo

Ten years ago a few college buddies got together and

dreamed of finding a way to continue living in San

Luis Obispo while they grew their creative enterprises.

They rented out a warehouse on South Higuera and got

busy creating art: Graphic Design, Video Production,

Painting, Photography, Coding, Woodworking, Music,

and Web Design. As their businesses—805 Collective

and The Cana Family—grew, the friends set their

sights on a studio more centrally located in the city they

loved. Soon enough, they found the perfect downtown

space, and they tricked it out with art sourced from

local artists and unique design elements, like desks repurposed

from old upright pianos. 805 Collective focuses

primarily on Web Development and Design and works

with all kinds of commercial clients, from Fortune 500

corporations to local companies. The Cana Family keeps

a busy international schedule with both commercial and

lifestyle filmmaking. They also compose and record all

the soundtracks to their films. Both firms embody the

easy-going spirit of San Luis Obispo, focusing on the

important things. (The Cana Family currently holds claim

to ‘best facial hair in the office.’) Their unofficial slogan

is ‘Every hour is happy hour.’ They invite you to drop by

their new office and verify this!

2

56 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


INTRODUCING JAMIE BARLETT AND POLYPAY

Woman-owned and San Luis Obispo-based, PolyPay—the brainchild of entrepreneur Jamie Barlett—recently relocated to Court Street.

Michigan to Saint Louis to Boston to Los

Angeles to San Francisco and finally—

San Luis Obispo. Ultimately, Jamie Barlett

found the best, like so many other business

owners here.

Jamie is the President and CEO of PolyPay, a

merchant processing business that began late

last year and established its official roots at

999 Monterey Street in the spring of this year.

PolyPay is an Independent Sales Organization

(ISO), wholly owned by Jamie and is one of

only a handful of women-owned ISOs in the

United States. As an ISO, PolyPay can provide

competitive pricing, merchant support and

customized payment processing solutions.

years continued to draw her back to the area.

When she felt she was totally equipped to

offer the services of a company centered on

serving merchants with every possible tool

for their success, San Luis Obispo was the

perfect location.

All PolyPay employees are Cal Poly graduates

and each is trained, as was Jamie’s goal when

she started PolyPay, to dedicate personal

attention and service to their clients. PolyPay

has also made a commitment to support

community services here and continues

to seek out ways to make PolyPay serviceoriented

to customers and citizens.

The Merchant Processing business was a

natural fit for Jamie as she has a credit card

services heritage in her background. Her

previous fifteen years of business experience

with a major consulting firm, plus high

tech companies both in Silicon Valley and

Southern California pointed her toward

serving merchants in a hands-on manner with

service at its core. Jamie has always enjoyed

working with data and data analysis and along

with the inherent knowledge of the credit

card industry, PolyPay has emerged both as

a service and a passion. Merchants can be

assured that their businesses receive handson

attention with representatives of PolyPay

dedicated to their success: solving issues,

answering queries and keeping merchants

updated with the latest technology—a true

imperative in 2014.

Jamie’s family had moved to San Luis Obispo

in 1999 and her visits after her undergraduate

3

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 57


Mission San Luis

Obispo De Tolosa

C HORRO ST

MORRO ST

Parking

OSOS ST

Parking

S

A N

L U

I S

O

B I S P

O C R

E E

K

Sal’s Paradise

SloCo Pasty Co.

Moondoggies Surf Shop

Space

Avail.

Urban Outfitters

Powell’s Sweet Shoppe

White House Black Market

Palazzo Giuseppe

Space

Avail.

Ian Saude Gallery

To Cal Poly

San Luis Obispo

MONTEREY ST

Bull’s Tavern

Pottery Barn

Open Air Flowers

Victoria’s Secret

Salon Lux-Aveda

Chico’s

Express

Solstice Sunglasses

Sephora

Banana Republic

HIGUERA ST

GAP

Papyrus

The Apple Store

Abercrombie & Fitch

HIGUERA ST

Sunglass Hut

Pizza Solo

Bali’s Yogurt

Cal Poly Downtown

Starbucks

Splash Café Seafood & Grill

Space

Avail.

Space

Avail.

Barnes And Noble

MARSH ST

California Pizza Kitchen

Jamba Juice

MARSH ST

The Movie Experience

Chinos Rock & Tacos

Shoe Palace

GARDEN ST

CHORRO ST

Parking

MORRO ST

OSOS ST

Abercrombie & Fitch

abercrombie.com

California Pizza Kitchen

cpk.com

Ian Saude Gallery

iansaude.com

Papyrus

papyrusonline.com

Sephora

sephora.com

Urban Outfitters

urbanoutfitters.com

The Apple Store

apple.com

Cal Poly Downtown

calpoly.edu

Jamba Juice

jambajuice.com

Pizza Solo

pizzasolo.com

SloCo Pasty Co.

slocopastyco.com

Victoria’s Secret

victoriassecret.com

Bali’s Yogurt

805-594-1172

Chico’s

chicos.com

Moondoggies Surf Shop

moondoggies.com

Pottery Barn

potterybarn.com

Solstice Sunglass Boutique

solsticesunglasses.com

White House Black Market

whitehouseblackmarket.com

Banana Republic

bananarepublic.com

Barnes and Noble

barnesandnoble.com

Chinos Rock & Tacos

chinorocks.com

Express

express.com

The Movie Experience

themovieexperience.com

Open Air Flowers

openairflowersslo.com

Powell’s Sweet Shoppe

powellsss.com

Salon Lux-Aveda

salonlux.com

Starbucks

starbucks.com

Splash Cafe Seafood & Grill

splashcafe.com

LEASING INFORMATION:

Therese Cron

Therese@copelandproperties.com

805.785.0511

Bull’s Tavern

facebook.com/bullstavernslo

GAP

gap.com

Palazzo Giuseppe

palazzogiuseppe.com

Sal’s Paradise

slosals.com

Sunglass Hut

sunglasshut.com

4

58 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


WHAT’S HOT NOW |

Vimmia’s Chalet down vest is the must have piece for fall

with style, quality, fit and performance, so you can look

and feel your best no matter where life takes you.

$195 // Assets // 853 Monterey Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 781-0119 // sloassets.com

The best mens gift ever —Mova World globes silently

and calmly turn to reflect the steady motion of Earth

using only the energy of the light in a room and the

force of the earths magnetic field. Perfect for the man

who has everything.

$142 // Hands Gallery

777 Higuera Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 543-1921 // handsgallery.com

She Sold Seashells by the Sea Shore.

Made from sand turned into gleaming

glass sculptures of sea shore life. Sizes

approximately five to eight inches. No

two are alike, and colors vary. Made by

the pros at Seattle Glassblowing Studio.

$145 - $275 // Fiona Bleu Gallery

900 Embarcadero, Morro Bay

(805) 772-0541 // fionableugallery.com

Turn To Nature now carries Robbin’s Family Farm’s beautiful olive wood kitchen

and tableware pieces. Each item is sculpted and sanded to enhance the fantastic

grain and sealed with olive oil to preserve the natural beauty. Robbin’s Family Farm

olive oils, vinegars and now the new olive wood collection all make wonderful gifts.

$16 — $140 // Turn To Nature

786 Higuera Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 540-3395 // turntonature.com

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 59


| INSPIRATION

LIVING LEGEND

Lucky Louie

With deep roots in the community, Dr. Louis Tedone

inspires with his story of strength, integrity, and humility.

BY TOM FRANCISKOVICH

It’s 4:53 a.m. and Dr. Louis Tedone is pulling into

his favorite parking spot at Club 24 in San Luis

Obispo. Behind him the crickets are sounding

off in the shrubs lining Foothill Boulevard. At 91

years old, Tedone recently decided to cut back his

workouts from five times per week to four. Born

and raised in Brooklyn, New York, “Lucky Louie”

as he refers to himself, personifies the American

Dream. His parents immigrated to New York

and started a “momma and poppa” Italian grocery

store where they sold fresh mozzarella each day.

Tedone, who has an endearing habit of resting his

hands on your shoulders when he speaks, insists

that “mozzarella should be eaten on the day it is

made.” And he should know, because he has been

hand-making the stuff daily for his daughter and

son-in-law’s market, DePalo & Sons in Shell

Beach every day for the last 24 years.

Tedone perfected his craft while he was in

medical school when he would rise at 6am and

spend a couple of hours making cheese before

heading off to class. His father had recently

passed away and the responsibilities of the family

store had fallen on his sons. Since World War

II was raging, Tedone’s brothers were called

overseas. Uncle Sam needed doctors and told

Lucky Louie to stay in school. After his brothers

returned home, one of them went on to become

a lawyer and the other took over the store. But, it

was another store called DePalo & Son, a friendly

competitor ten miles away in the Borough Park

area of Brooklyn, that was about to alter the

course of Lucky Louie’s life.

The Tedones and the DePalos were tight. The

mothers and the fathers of both families all

came from the same Italian city known as

Bari. Tedone reaches down and points to an

area above his heel at the base of his Achilles

tendon to show where it is located in the old

country. “DePalo had one son and my father

was his godfather, which is a very big deal to

Italians. That shows you how close we were,”

explains Tedone. It was toward the end of his

time in medical school, which he completed six

weeks before his 24th birthday, that he realized

he was lingering a little longer to talk to his

longtime family friend, Grace DePalo. While in

medical school he mustered the courage to ask

her out on a date and the two were inseparable

practically from that day forward.

During the Korean War, Dr. Tedone’s services

were required at Camp Roberts. “It was the

first time I had left New York,” he remembers.

So, the young couple made their way west for

a two-year stint caring for enlisted men as

they awaited deployment orders. In 1953 the

Tedones purchased a small home in the Alta

Vista neighborhood near the intersection of

Slack and Grand Avenues. At the time, the

population of San Luis Obispo was 14,750 and

Tedone became the only pediatrician in town.

As the couple expanded their family—they had

nine kids in all—their house grew along with

them. Today, Tedone, who still lives in the now

3,800 square foot home, explains, “It was a lot

less expensive to keep adding on instead of

moving around.” Reminders of family can be

found on nearly every surface of the home. The

refrigerator is covered with the smiling faces of

his 22 grandchildren, and old black and whites

are plentiful, as are mementoes from the past—

including the Olympic torch he was chosen to

carry in 2002. But, it is a poem that hangs on the

kitchen wall that occupies Tedone’s attention.

Titled “Full of Grace,” one of his grandson’s—a

big football player, he points out—who was born

a year after his wife had passed away 20 years ago,

wrote the poem as a 17-year-old student at San

Luis Obispo High School. According to Tedone,

“Everyone that comes here has to read it. I’ve lost

track of how many times I’ve read it myself, but I

get choked up every time I do.”

As he thinks back to an exceptionally busy family

life—the Tedones, both bilingual, used to speak

to one another in Italian when they needed to

communicate without the kids knowing what

was being said—things do not appear to have

slowed down much. When Lucky Louie was in

his late forties, he thought about his father who

died of a heart attack at 50 (his grandfather also

succumbed to heart disease in his fifties), and

he decided that he needed to be around for his

family, so he resolved himself to get into top

shape. He was a little overweight and could afford

to lose a few pounds, so he began going on twomile

runs followed by push-ups and sit-ups—he

60 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


Full of Grace

By Matthew Teel

now does 40 to 45 continuous push-ups and 60

to 70 sit-ups at home four to five days a week to

supplement his gym workouts, where he rotates

through 14 upper body machines followed by

ten minutes “as fast as I can go” on the treadmill.

Despite, the rigorous workouts, he claims that

the mozzarella-making, a physically demanding

activity itself, is what keeps him going.

When Tedone’s daughter and son-and-law

purchased Spyglass Liquor & Deli in Shell

Beach, they had a vision for a neighborhood

Italian market by the sea, similar to the old

family stores back in Brooklyn. To honor

Tedon’s wife, Grace, the couple changed the

name to DePalo & Sons (unlike the original

store in New York, DePalo & Son, the couple

has four boys so the word “Son” became plural).

In addition to Tedone’s daily cheese, which

he insists must be eaten at room temperature,

DePalo & Sons sells a variety of other familyinspired

foods. The pasta sauce, called “Grace’s

Marinara,” is particularly popular, and Tedone

proudly tells the story of local running phenom,

Jordan Hasay, who feasted on the sauce in an

effort to “carb load” before a race. “They would

ship three cases of the sauce at a time to her.”

But Tedone’s pride shows most when he talks

about his family. Lucky Louie, who in his

distinctive Brooklyn accent explains that he

gave himself the name because he had been

lucky in love, says “I had a fantastic wife

who raised nine kids successfully without

complaining. She was a gifted, wonderful

person.” He cites the fact that all nine of his

kids are now happily married as evidence of

Grace’s excellent example. And, in the Italian

spirit of “famiglia prima” or “family first,” he

points to the fact that six of his nine children

and their families live in the City of San

Luis Obispo (the other three families are in

Templeton, Northern California, and Orange

County—“less than three hours away” he is

quick to point out). The family gets together

often to celebrate their good fortune. “I’ve

always told the kids,” placing his hands on

my shoulders for emphasis, “You can be

happy with what you have, or miserable with

what you don’t have.” SLO LIFE

What I would give

To spend a day with her

To be in her presence

To share a laugh

A warm hug

I can only imagine the true elegance

Behind her character

Her ability to light up the darkest of rooms

Her compassion towards others

Her support of four daughters

Her patience with five sons

Her authentic Italian cooking

Her optimism

Even through her cancer

A testament to a positive and fulfilling life

I was not able to meet her

I can only dream

Before my birth

She held me in her arms

Above the clouds

Living life with a certain grace

French Hospital Gala

left to right Kevin M. Rice, Dr. Louis Tedone,

Jim Copeland, Alan Iftiniuk, Pierre Rademaker

The Louis Tedone, M.D. Humanitarian Award

In 1953, Louis Tedone sat down with Edison

French to discuss leaving Brooklyn behind to

work at the newly created French Hospital.

Tedone could not imagine staying in San

Luis Obispo, but as he recalls, “It was a very

generous offer that allowed me to build

my practice in the first year.” That fateful

meeting was the beginning of a magical

61-year journey, and allowed the pediatrician

to touch many lives locally. To recognize

and honor the legacy of the doctor, French

Hospital developed the annual Louis Tedone,

M.D. Humanitarian Award, of which Tedone

was awarded the first one. Today, the award

goes to “someone who contributed to the

community,” and this year at the French

Hospital Gala it was awarded to Jim Copeland.

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 61


| VOTER GUIDE

Candidates

Forum

We asked the candidates for San Luis

Obispo City Mayor just two questions:

What are the most pressing issues

facing the city today? And, what do

you intend to do about those issues?

DONALD HEDRICK

67, Community

Activist, Artisan

MAYOR

JAN MARX

69, Retired Lawyer

(incumbent)

MAYOR

JEFFREY SPECHT

50, Antique

Shop Owner

MAYOR

The biggest issue the city faces today is not

in the city’s daily operating activities, but the

increasing changes trickling down from the

levels of government above our city. We have

a renegade cadre of agents of the international

corporate elite that have their goal being the

destruction of this country and its democracy.

We as a city need to resist this erosion of

our Constitution and our rights that is in

process by the elite that want to replace

our country’s forefathers creation with a

retouched version of dictatorship. It is treason

to favor these international based programs

such as identified in the UN’s Agenda 21 that

express the goal of the dismantling of our

country’s industry and our rights. We need

to have our city government cease the rubber

stamping of these subversive doctrines that

are coming down the line and come up with

local solutions.

The first thing would be to appoint myself

to the APCD and bring the issue of the

international fouling of our skies with the

geo-engineering that is genocide against

the people of the world. Our protest of the

poisoning of our land, water, crops, and lungs

with the patented processes that the corporate

elite are using to poison the land, water, crops,

and the air we breathe. We need to resist the

lure of the grants that promote the objectives

of the UN’s Agenda 21 which are working

their way down to the cities. We need to

speak out against such seditious programs

and their grants with strings attached that

are designed to take away our citizen rights.

We as a city need to take back control of our

governments and get rid of the criminals that

want to replace our democracy with the new

world order.

1. How can the City best respond to climate

change that will protect our residents and

our natural resources, support a sustainable

economy, adapt to drought and fire conditions

and develop resiliency for the future in the face

of climate change? I will implement the

Climate Action Plan and advocate collaborative

regional adaptation strategies. 2. How can the

City implement the Land Use and Circulation

Element Update and plan for more housing in

the annexation areas? I will vote in favor of over

ruling the Airport Land Use Commission and

implementing Cal Trans Handbook standards,

so future housing can be built, while protecting

the viability and safety of the Airport. 3. How

to heal the Cal Poly/City relationship without

sacrificing residents’ quality of life, in light

of the university’s plan to build the freshman

dorm project at Slack and Grand and increase

student enrollment by 5,000 students? I will

urge the University to build on campus housing

to accommodate any future enrollment increase,

maintain an adequate buffer between the

neighborhoods and the elementary school, and

give faculty and staff incentives to move near

the university. 4. How to deal with the growing

unfunded pension liabilities from CalPERS?

I will vote in favor of setting aside funds for

future unpredictable pension costs, pension

cost sharing and paying down side funds when

feasible. 5. Where to cut the budget if Measure

G does not pass and the City loses 12% of

its revenue? I will preserve residents’ priorities

whenever possible, if cuts are necessary. 6. How to

best deal with the homeless situation and protect

all members of the community? I will continue

to advocate a multi-faceted approach, support

the new homeless services center at 40 Prado,

supportive housing, and a county detox facility.

How can the City best respond to

Homelessness? Homelessness is always a

major issue. Every Citizen of the nation is an

American Citizen and deserves to be treated

fairly and equally. The very fact that this has

become a major issue during the last several

years should be examined first, before we can

move forward with a realistic goal for the

future that coincides with our Constitution.

As far as the Employee Retirement Pensions

are concerned, a complete overhaul needs

to be accomplished. Accountability comes

first. Fiduciary responsibility should meet

the criterion of reality, so that we can ensure

continuing benefits in the future, without

creating deficit.

How can the City best respond to the City

Employee Retirement Pensions? We need to

create a base infrastructure that accommodates

growth and expansion. Affordable housing is

key to population influx. Instead of blaming

the homeless, we should acknowledge the

realities of undocumented immigration for

over 30 years, and a slow economy with an ever

more slowly moving recovery. The loosening of

bureaucratic constraints on new development

projects that are intended to accommodate

the population, not only in housing, but also

within the business community, would benefit

not only the City of San Luis Obispo, but

the entire county, within the long term. As

far as the Employee Retirement Pensions are

concerned, we could take out a low interest

loan, pay off the contracts immediately, and

renegotiate a new and more realistic employee

retirement benefit plan. We could then

implement a way to rehabilitate our City’s debt

problem, for which the current program is at

least partly responsible.

62 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


Soak up the Season

Thanksgiving Menu

3-Course Family Style

Traditional Gourmet Cuisine

$50 per person - kids pricing available

Call for Reservations

Local Specials

$10 Hot Tubs per person

$15 off Spa Treatments

FREE Corkage on first bottle of SLO

County Wine at Gardens Restaurant

Hot Tub and Spa Deals valid Sunday - Thursday only.

Hot Tub Prices are valid 8 am - 5 pm.

1215 AVILA BEACH DRIVE . SAN LUIS OBISPO

(805) 595-7302 . SYCAMORESPRINGS.COM

“Early to bed, early to rise,

work like hell and advertise.”

- Ted Turner

on his secret to success

1551 Bishop Street

Suite D-420

San Luis Obispo

805.547.7010

slodentalpractice.com

facebook.com/slodental

Call us. We can help your business grow.

805.543.8600

slolifemagazine.com/advertise

SLO LIFE

magazine

New Patient Special $99

Dental Consultant, Exam

X-Ray & Standard Cleaning

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 63


| VOTER GUIDE

Candidates

(cont.)

Forum

We asked the candidates for San Luis

Obispo City Council just two questions:

What are the most pressing issues

facing the city today? And, what do

you intend to do about those issues?

DANIEL CANO

42, Executive

Director of LINK

COUNCIL

Economic Development, Real Estate

Development, and Homelessness are the three

most pressing issues San Luis Obispo faces today.

All three of these issues have a direct impact on

our city’s financial health and security. As we see

an improving economy, there will be opportunities

for business growth that creates quality jobs;

and the City Council can have either a positive

or a negative impact on these opportunities.

Likewise we are already seeing large scale real

estate development proposals for housing and

commercial uses. Without strong leadership and

vision, our City Council could approve projects

that don’t properly reflect our values and projected

needs in 10 or 20 years. Lastly, homelessness has

grown significantly in our City, and it is most

visible in our downtown business district. If this

issue isn’t addressed productively, our downtown

will see a growing negative impact.

As we see an improved economy, we need to first

support our existing local businesses by staying

true to policies that maintain the environment

that inspired them to open their businesses in the

first place. This doesn’t always happen. Secondly I

would be a proactive ambassador to reach out to

high tech companies to find ways to attract those

businesses that can offer high paying jobs, career

pathways, and services to support businesses and

residents. On Development, my focus would be

on supporting the development of “affordable by

design” housing that reflects our need to provide

starter homes for our workforce that reduces the

need to commute. I would also work to ensure that

we have supportive senior housing in the pipeline

to support our aging parents and grandparents. On

homelessness, I currently manage County homeless

programs, and I would leverage my experience to

develop mental health and subsidized employment

opportunities that have been proven successful.

GORDON MULLIN

68, Financial

Advisor

COUNCIL

Neighborhoods and Cal Poly dorms are the

most pressing issues facing the city today. When

my family came to SLO in the 50’s, roughly

two-thirds of the homes were owner occupied

with one-third rentals. Now that’s reversed.

The city should collaborate with Poly as to the

timing and placement of dorms as a means to

safeguard our neighborhoods. Other cities in

similar circumstances have come to such an

agreement yet this council, on three occasions,

has refused to even discuss the issue.

Today, in California, the percentage of its

population that is between the ages of 18 to 24

is 10 percent.

In San Luis Obispo, it’s 37 percent.

Is that what we want?

To correct this imbalance, I intend to do all in

my power to get the council and Cal Poly to sit

down and make a joint decision, one that both

agree to with regard to both the timing and

placement of dorms.

More students must be housed on campus in

locations that do not impact our neighborhoods.

Three times this issue has come to the attention

of council and three times it voted to not even

agendize the topic for discussion. This council

has shown its continued indifference to the

welfare of its neighborhoods when it comes to

this vital policy and I promise to make this my

top priority if I get elected to council.

MICHAEL CLARK

69, Retired Army

Officer

COUNCIL

There are two pressing issues facing San

Luis Obispo in the immediate future. First,

the City’s financial health is fundamental,

and this includes getting our long-term

debt under control. Updated data from

CalPERS will be coming out early next

year, and that could substantially alter our

current and future financial planning and

allocation of funds.

The second, but no less important issue deals

with the proposed – but not yet adopted

or implemented – changes in the update to

the Land Use and Circulation Elements of

the City’s General Plan. They have grown

from the “focused updates” the City Council

initially directed into aggressive overhauls.

It will take considerable time for residents

and businesses alike to digest it all, and

there are likely going to be some unintended

consequences that will need to be addressed.

We must get a handle on our financial

situation no matter what CalPERS

determines our unfunded liabilities to be.

While the City has made a start at reigning

in costs, the Council must focus on spending

as carefully as we do in our private lives. My

goal is to ensure that our financial house is

in order, and I will diligently address the

potential threats to our financial well-being.

We must get to the point that we know

precisely what it costs to deliver essential city

services and budget accordingly.

The Land Use and Circulation Element

updates require careful reading and analysis.

My goal is to work with other council

members to ensure that potential problems

are identified and corrected before significant

adverse impacts become imbedded in these

critical long-term planning documents.

64 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


HOT

Yoga &

Barre

977 E Foothill Blvd Ste 111

sparkslo.com

$30 for 30 days

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 65


| VOTER GUIDE

Candidates

ForumWe asked

(cont.)

the candidates for San Luis

Obispo City Council just two questions:

What are the most pressing issues

facing the city today? And, what do

you intend to do about those issues?

CARLYN

CHRISTIANSON

60, Medical

Practice Admin.

(incumbent)

COUNCIL

The most pressing issues are those which require

finite resolution, such as the 2015-2017 budget

and the compensation contract negotiations

with city employees. A number of issues which

are absolutely crucial to SLO’s future are also

pressing, but they will need ongoing attention

and investment of resources as well as ongoing

community and regional dialogue. These include

vital concerns such as housing, transportation,

open space maintenance, climate change and

energy use, neighborhood wellness concerns,

infrastructure financing, homelessness, water,

pension liabilities and more. These issues are

obviously interrelated in many cases and very

complex, but we need to tackle them and move

towards the future. To preserve San Luis Obispo’s

fundamental values of environmental protection,

historical and cultural richness, economic vitality

and sensible government, we must address these

challenges, but as in the past, opportunities come

from challenges and I know San Luis Obispo will

meet them with energy and imagination.

I intend to continue to listen to the community and

then make my decisions based on the best interests

of the community as a whole. With the updated

Land Use and Circulation elements in place, and

given recent major city goals, plus depending on

whether Measure G (formerly Measure Y) passes, I

imagine our residents would like to focus resources

especially on housing, open space maintenance,

neighborhood wellness and civility issues, and

addressing climate change partly with bike paths

and public transit investments. Doing this as part of

the budget process will help to ensure real attention

to these issues. In that spirit, I encourage residents

to take part in the budgeting process starting in

January, including a public workshop on January 13.

Using the public budgeting process to set goals and

fund key initiatives will set the stage for action with

a realistic fiscal foundation and discussion.

DAN RIVOIRE

29, Exec. Director

of the SLO County

Bicycle Coalition

COUNCIL

San Luis Obispo residents have high

expectations of the City. I am proud to be

one of those demanding residents. In the

next four years the most pressing issues

facing our City will be: 1. Focusing revenue

on actions that address residents’ needs, such

as acting to protect neighborhood safety and

health, building necessary transportation

improvements, addressing homelessness, and

maintaining current infrastructure. 2. Preserving

fiscal health by managing debt and expenses

while encouraging economic growth that will

increase future revenue. 3. Engaging citizens in

the civic process and increasing participation to

better represent City demographics.

Each of these elements are essential to proving to

residents that City government exists to serve their

needs and the long term prosperity of our community.

I believe an even better SLO is possible.

I absolutely love this community and am

motivated by constructive, practical, focus on

completing city goals. Addressing residents’

needs is the most important issue. For

neighborhood quality of life, this means

encouraging block parties, welcome to the

neighborhood traditions, and utilizing social

media to build lines of communication

between neighbors. For circulation, we must

direct resources toward building key roadway

connections while re-striping streets around

our schools to make biking and walking an easy

transportation option. To increase workforce

housing, we need to allow development that

will increase the percentage of owner occupied

homes, respect growth limits approved by

prior councils, add head of household jobs, and

address traffic impacts. Preserving our fiscal

health success means paying down components

of our debt that accrue interest while fostering

economic development to increase revenue.

66 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


Bond

Measures

In our representative form of democracy, we customarily elect

the politicians who then make choices on our behalf. Occasionally,

such as with these bond measures, we are asked to decide the

matter, as voters, directly. The fate of these three initiatives will

have a dramatic impact on the futures of the City of San Luis

Obispo, San Luis Coastal Unified School District, and Cuesta

College. All three bond measures will likely set you back a few

bucks, but the value received in terms of the benefits to the

community may be far greater, and that’s for you to decide...

MEASURE D

San Luis Coastal Unified School District construction and renovation

With its aging school facilities in need of repair and upgrade, San Luis Coastal

Unified School District, which serves 7,500 kindergarten through high school

students residing in San Luis Obispo, Los Osos, Morro Bay, Avila Beach and

other unincorporated areas, is asking voters to approve a $177 million bond.

The cost to local property owners will be approximately $49.00 per $100,000

of assessed, not market, value. Funds will be used for capital projects only, such

as improving buildings, with some of its oldest dating back to 1936. None of

the funds will be used on salaries. And, like the other bond measures, if passed,

it will require a citizen’s oversight committee and annual audits.

MEASURE G

Extend San Luis Obispo’s one-half percent sales tax

Back in 2006, 65% of the voters agreed to increase the sales tax rate from 7.5%

to 8.0% by voting “Yes” on Measure Y. Now, the city is asking for an eight

year extension. Failure to pass the measure will result in an approximately 12%

reduction—about $6.5 million per year—in tax revenues which will trigger

across the board cuts in a variety of city programs. If passed, the measure will

come with provisions for citizen oversight and annual audits. The estimated

cost to each resident is about $4.00 per month, with nearly three-quarters of

the tax paid by tourists and non-residents.

MEASURE L

Cuesta College campus repair and

program offering expansion

Cuesta College is asking voters for a $275

million bond, which will be paid for by a

property tax increase equal to $19.45 per

year per $100,000 of assessed value, again

not market value. The proceeds will be used

for upgrading, maintaining, and expanding

facilities, programs and educational

offerings. Should the measure be approved,

funds will be audited annually and will

require citizen oversight. None of the

monies will be used to fund administrator

salaries or pensions.

SLO LIFE

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 67


| EXPLORE

DATE NIGHT

Climbing

Every successfully married couple I know

says you still have to date your spouse

and surprise them. Worried our dinner

and movie nights were far beyond cliché,

I decided it was time to take date night

to a new level.

to New Heights

BY PADEN HUGHES

68 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


Graham’s Community Outreach

San Luis Obispo Chamber of Commerce

Community Development Committee

San Luis Obispo County Habitat for Humanity

Public Relations Committee Chairperson,

SLO Association of Realtors

Local Government Relations & Grievance

Committees, SLO Association of Realtors

California Association of Realtors and

National Association of Realtors

Routes marked in colored strips of duct tape, chalky palms, soft landings

and plenty of advice from encouraging onlookers… what’s not to love about

climbing gyms? You may not know it, but San Luis Obispo is home to one

of the best rock climbing gyms in the country. Notable for its non-profit

status and creative client crowdsourcing, SLO Op is a cultural magnet for

hippies, hipsters and everyone in between.

I used to climb a lot. Climbing is one of my favorite activities. In fact, when

I first started getting to know my husband, I invited him to my climbing

gym to see if he could hang. Four years later, we were in need

of a return.

SLO Op climbing gym holds a special place in my life. I

was a dedicated climber there for a few years in college and

watched this small company grow from a little storage unit

to a beautiful creative hub of activity. Now with around 500

members, SLO Op is cranking!

SLO Op is a bouldering gym, meaning that you do not need

to tie in and that you won’t be climbing more than about 15

to 20 feet high. Every wall

is littered with colorful

holds of all shapes and

sizes and the routes are

marked with different

colored tape so you can

easily follow the lines up

the walls. Ranked from

beginner to advanced, you

can ask any crew member

where to start out. Even

beginners get a huge sense

PADEN HUGHES is

of accomplishment when

co-owner of Gymnazo

and enjoys exploring they top out on a route

the Central Coast.

and conquer it. SLO LIFE

Graham Updegrove

Broker Associate

CalBRE #01873454

Why Choose Graham?

“Graham is extremely professional and

provided an amazing amount of information

on each property we toured. His paperwork

was impeccable and he was able to refer

high quality vendors, which was a huge plus

since we are new to the area. Our purchase

would not have been possible without him

and I would recommend him to anyone

who is interested in buying or selling!”

– Adrienne, Steven & Amelie Layne

The drop-in rate is $12 per person. That includes

shoes and access to the facilities with no time limit.

SLO Op is located in the very last set of

commercial warehouses at 289 Prado Road.

805.459.1865

graham@slohomehelp.com

OCT/NOV www.slohomehelp.com

2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 69


| HEALTH

10

Get-Fit

Resembling a mini bowling ball with a

handle, kettlebells are great for cardio,

strength, and flexibility training. We

recommend finding an experienced

trainer to get started.

Kettlebell Exercises

2CLEAN

Start with the kettlebell between the

feet. Begin to swing upwards: Shrug the

shoulders, pulling the body and ‘bell up to

the shoulder. The ‘bell should end resting

on the forearm, which is tucked close to the

body, with the fist at your chest. Bring the weight back

down to the floor and repeat for 10 to 15 reps.

1SWING

This exercise is all the kettlebell rage. Stand up straight with feet a bit

wider than hip-distance apart. Grab hold of the handle with one or

both hands, keeping the palms face down and arms in front of the body.

If using one arm, alternate hands when the kettlebell is behind the legs.

Maintain a slight bend to the knee and drive the hips back, lowering

the body—but not too low, this isn’t a squat. Then, in a fluid motion, explosively drive

the hips forward while swinging the kettlebell, keeping the glutes and core engaged.

Remember: The motion should come from the hips (not the arms) as the body

returns to standing. Lower the weight back down between the legs while lowering

again, and keep this swinging motion going for the duration of the reps.

3GOBLET SQUAT

What’s a squat without a kettlebell in hand? Stand

up straight, holding the kettlebell in front of the

chest with both hands, keeping the elbows close to

the body. Start squatting by driving the heels into

the ground and pushing the hips back until the

thighs are parallel to the ground or just below. Return to standing,

and repeat for 15-20 reps. Just remember: quality over quantity.

70 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014

>>


OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 71


4WINDMILL

Hold the kettlebell in the right hand and angle the feet

45 degrees away from the right arm. Raise the kettlebell

overhead, lock the arm, and keep your eyes on the weight

(which will help keep the shoulders aligned). Shift your

weight onto the right leg and begin bending forward

at the waist. Keep the right arm extended overhead as the body bends

forward and the left arm is pointed toward the ground. (For all you

yogis out there, this should feel similar to triangle pose.) Lift back up

slowly, staying in control. Repeat for 6 to 8 reps on each side.

5SUMO HIGH-PULL

We promise no wrestling is involved. Start with the

kettlebell between the feet set a bit wider than hipdistance

apart. Grab onto the handle with both hands

with the knees bent and hips back. Then, pull the

kettlebell to the shoulders while the knees straighten and

elbows rise. Remember, the force is coming mostly from the hips, with the

arms pulling at the very end. Keeping the core engaged the whole time,

move the weight back down to the ground and repeat for 12-15 reps.

6RUSSIAN TWIST

Forget crunches. Sit with the legs bent and

feet flat on the floor, about hip-distance apart.

Hold the kettlebell with both hands at the

chest, and then lean back to a 45 degree angle.

Here’s the fun part: rotate the torso from left

to right by twisting at the waist and swinging

the kettlebell across the body. See how many

you can do with perfect form, of course.

7SINGLE-ARM SNATCH

Start with a kettlebell between the feet with the knees bent.

Then, explode up onto your toes, pulling the kettlebell until it

reaches the chest with the elbow tucked in. From there, bring

the weight overhead (hold on tight). Then bring it back down

close to the ground—that’s one rep; try for 6 to 8.

>>

72 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


MONARCH

WINDOW

MonarchWindow.com

805.242.2059

GRAND OPENING OF

OUR NEW SHOWROOM

4420 Broad St. Ste. B

DETOX SUPPORT RECOVERY

Alcohol, Opiate, Heroin & Pain Killer Addiction

1320 Van Beurden Drive #103, Los Osos

(805) 242-1360 | KenStarrMD.com

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 73


8PUSH-UP

This move is simply a push-up, but with kettlebells included. Grab hold of each handle in

the usual start position, then lower the body before pushing back up. It will definitely feel

challenging with those hands on handles rather than on the floor. Shoot for 10-15 reps.

9PUSH-UP WITH ROW

Let’s take this push-up up a notch. Begin in a push-up position with the

right arm holding the kettlebell. Perform a push-up and, at the top, lift the

right elbow by squeezing the shoulder blades together with the elbow about

six inches behind the body. Then return back to the starting push-up position,

pushin’ for 5 to 8 reps with each arm.

JOIN OUR BOOTCAMP TODAY

ALL FITNESS LEVELS WELCOME

IT’S NOT TOO LATE TO MAKE A CHANGE

755 Alphonso Street

[off Broad Street]

San Luis Obispo, Ca 93401

805.439.1881

revslo.com

74 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014

10

SINGLE-ARM FLOOR PRESS

Lie on the ground with your legs straight. (No, yoga masters, it’s not

time for savasana!) Grab a kettlebell by your side and, with the palm

facing in, press the weight straight up while rotating the wrist (so the

palms face the feet). Bring the kettlebell back down to the starting

position, and repeat for 6 to 8 reps. SLO LIFE


Dr. Arnie Horwitz

HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS

Are you feeling overwhelmed

and confused? I can help.

Specializing in

- Relationship Conflicts - Parenting & Self-Esteem

- Separation and Divorce - Personal Life Planning

- Grief and Loss - Career Uncertainty

Therapy/Counseling/Coaching

Dr. Arnie Horwitz • 30 yrs. Experience

805-541-2752

www.doctorarnie.com

Sagrada Wellness

Acupuncture

Integrative Medicine

Facial Rejuvenation Acupuncture

Emotional and Spiritual Healing

Eva Inglizian L.Ac.

30 Years Experience

Home Birth • Water Birth • Well Woman Care • Pre & Post Natal Care

Did you know?

Homebirth VBACs have an 87% success rate!

ATTENTION Alternative

Health Care Practitioners

ADVERTISE HERE

for as little as $25/mo

Call 805.543.8600

for more information

805-400-9095

SagradaWellness.com

6780 W. Pozo Rd. Santa Margarita, CA

SLO LIFE

magazine

Call for Free

Consultation

Join our mailing list, email “sign me up” to midwifeedana@gmail.com

www.facebook.com/pages/HolisticMidwiferyCare/155354324525406

Download our app: http://my.yapp.us/MIDWIFE

EDANA HALL, LICENSED MIDWIFE

(805)801-3806 • (805)462-1100

midwifeedana@gmail.com • holisticmidwiferycare.com

For more information on midwifery: cfmidwifery.org

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 75


| KITCHEN

SAVORY SEAFOOD

ABALONE TARTLET

A longtime staple of the ancient Chumash and Salinan natives living on the Central

Coast, these delightfully iridescent mollusks can be found growing at The Abalone

Farm on the ocean bluffs north of Cayucos. The California Red Abalone are delicious

as well as nutritious and do equally well as an appetizer or main course.

76 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


JESSIE’S TIP:

You will want to be very

careful to not overcook the

abalone—no more than a

minute and a half or two per

side. And tenderizing it prior

!to cooking is key.

CENTRAL COAST FARMERS’ HARVESTS

DELIVERED TO YOUR HOME OR BUSINESS

ABALONE TARTLET

serves 4

Fresh Picked & Locally Grown

Pesticide Free Produce

Weekly or Bi-weekly Delivery

No Contract Required

TARTLET

1 sheet of puff pastry (it’s ok to use

frozen) cut into 4 equal parts

4 abalone fillets

2 oz almond dust

½ oz flour

1 lb mixed variety of heirloom tomatoes

herb mix—a few sprigs each of thyme,

sage and oregano

2 cups olive oil

SAUCE

1 Tbs olive oil

1 Tbs all purpose flour

1 clove garlic, minced

1 cup white wine

½ lemon

2 Tbs capers

3 Tbs butter

GARNISH

1 Tbs parsley or microgreens

JESSIE RIVAS is the owner

and chef of The Pairing Knife

food truck which serves the

Central Coast.

1. Prepare the tomatoes by coring.

Mix them with olive oil and herbs then

slow cook in oven at 300° for one hour.

Remove from oven and let cool and

rough chop.

2. For the tartlet dough, cut four equal

squares from the sheet. Keep it cool for

better handling.

3. Dock center of portioned pieces of

dough to keep center from rising. Keep

about ½ inch from edge untouched to

allow the edge to rise.

4. Par-bake tartlet dough in a 350° oven

for 10 minutes or until edges have risen

and dough is light brown. Remove from

oven and cool.

5. For the abalone, mix the almond dust

and flour with a pinch of salt and pepper.

Dredge the abalone in mixture and

refrigerate until ready to cook.

6. Add rough chopped heirloom

tomatoes to the cooled tartlet shells and

set on a sheet pan. Cook at 350° for

10-15 minutes.

7. While tartlets are in the oven, heat

sauté pan to very hot. Add olive oil and

let heat. Add abalone fillet straight from

the refrigerator to pan and sear on both

sides for 1-2 minutes each side, until

light brown. Remove from the pan and

set aside.

8. Meanwhile, make the sauce. In a hot

pan, on high, quickly sauté minced garlic,

add wine and lemon juice and reduce to

half. Add butter and capers and season

to taste with salt and pepper.

9. Pull tartlets from oven and add the

abalone to the top. Finish by drizzling

sauce over the top and garnish with

parsley or microgreens. SLO LIFE

SERVING

San Luis Obispo | Avila | Los Osos

Five Cities | Nipomo

sloveg.com

805.709.2780

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 77


| ARTS

Show Boat Production top center clockwise Erik Austin, Allison Generux, Roger Phillips, Eli Zabala,

Tom McPhereson, Stephanie Roberson, Drew Silvaggio, Brian Asher Alhadeff, and Sharon Dobson

ALLIANCE

Brian Asher Alhadeff

photo courtesy Kathy Miller

The Curious

Mathematics

of Collaboration

Even in the best of times funding for the arts generally falls short.

But in the throes of the Great Recession, Opera San Luis Obispo was

struggling mightily to fill seats at its annual show. In 2010 its La Bohème

production filled about half the seats at the Performing Arts Center,

and the following year, Barber of Seville, yielded similar results. The

organization had cut its costs down to the bone and the conversation

centered on how to cut still more in order to survive. But, there is a

danger in those many small sacrifices as organizations who have met a

“death by a thousand cuts” can attest.

Ironically, it can be spending rather than saving that may pull an

organization back from the brink. Opera San Luis Obispo decided it

was time to do some soul searching and elected not to put on its large

annual production in 2012. For the opera, founded in 1985 by Dr. Jill

Anderson and the late Jean Cook, this was a bitter pill to swallow. Under

the direction of its new artistic director, Brian Asher Alhadeff, the

organization put on a series of more informal, low-cost shows he referred

to as “friendraisers.” According to Alhadeff, “The idea wasn’t so much

about just raising money—although that was very important, too— but

we wanted to reach out to this community, which is so tight-nit and

very supportive of the arts.” At the same time that he was reaching out

to prospective donors and expanding the organization’s audience, he was

also initiating conversations with other arts organizations locally.

When Alhadeff sat down to talk with his artistic peers, he outlined a

formula he had developed over the past fifteen years—most notably as

the artistic director and founder of the International Summer Opera

Festival in the Czech Republic—that allowed one plus one to equal

three. What Alhadeff discovered, as he was bouncing around Europe to

drum up support for his upstart festival, was that relationships really do

matter. “There were all of these little performing groups that had very

loyal followings, people who were intensely interested in what they were

doing and would go to every show,” he observed. So, he began selectively

inviting various local groups to join in performing at the festival. As this

collaboration grew to include other organizations, the festival expanded.

Not just incrementally, but exponentially. Now, Alhadeff is applying the

same math, right here on the Central Coast.

2013 Carmen Dress Rehearsal

The concept is rather simple on the surface. Each group included in the

citywide collaboration, as it has come to be known, is asked to reach out

to its supporters. These efforts are supplemented by an email marketing

campaign where each organization’s contacts are combined and sent

out as a series of massive appeals to everyone who may be interested in

the production. Following the show, Opera San Luis Obispo pays the

collaborating organization a fee for their participation. Using this tactic

for the first time last year for its production of Carmen, Opera San Luis

Obispo was able to fill 91% of the seats at the PAC—nearly doubling

attendance. The best part, however, according to Alhadeff, is “that it is so

exciting to see everyone come together.”

This year, Opera San Luis Obispo looks to build upon its success with

Carmen by upping the ante with its production of Aida by increasing its

investment in set design and props, along with an expanded collaboration

with Civic Ballet, Central Coast Children’s Choir, Ballet Theatre San

Luis Obispo, CORE dance company, Deyo Dances, and Studio@Ryan’s

American Dance. Aida, an enthralling story of an Egyptian princess

that spans love and politics, will be conducted by Adelheff, directed by

Daniel J. Witzke, and choreographed by Drew Silvaggio. The opera by

Giuseppe Verdi, is known as a “grand opera,” which as the name implies

is larger and more elaborate than other productions—a fitting description

considering the impressive results that have come from the dedicated

efforts of so many. SLO LIFE

Tickets are available for Aida, which will show during the weekend of

October 11 and 12, by logging onto pacslo.org or calling (805) 756-4849.

78 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


CRICKET HANDLER & JILL ANDERSON

Artistic Directors

Weddings

Reunions

Grad Parties

Birthdays

Corporate

Sunday, November 9, 2014 · 4 p.m.

Cuesta College CPAC

Featured guests:

The Concert Choir of the Central Coast Children’s Choir

Tickets

$20 advance · $25 at the door · $10 student

brownpapertickets.com

www.canzonawomen.org

SAN LUIS OBISPO SYMPHONY

MICHAEL NOWAK, MUSIC DIRECTOR

We’re painting the town red on Opening Night . . .

OCTOBER 4, 2014 · 8 PM

CHRISTOPHER COHAN CENTER, SAN LUIS OBISPO

Virtuoso Elizabeth Pitcairn performs the Tchaikovsky Concerto on the

instrument that inspired the Academy Award-Winning film “The Red Violin”

NOVEMBER 8, 2014 · 8 PM · Lorna McGhee, Flute

FLUTE FANTASIA · NIELSEN / Concerto for Flute and Orchestra

For Classics in the Cohan tickets visit slosymphony.org or call the PAC box office at 805.756.4849

CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERTS AROUND THE COUNTY

OCTOBER 5, 2014 · 5:30 PM · Elizabeth Pitcairn Showcase

THE RED VIOLIN SOIRÉE · EDNA VALLEY VINEYARD

NOVEMBER 23, 2014 · 3 PM

MUSIC ON THE MESA · TRILOGY AT MONARCH DUNES

SPECIAL

ARTIST

EVENT

For tickets to Chamber Music Concerts visit slosymphony.org or call 805.543.3533

SEASON SPONSORS

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 79


Errands

for Elders

Gift Certificates Available

• grocery shopping

• senior well checks

• transport to appointments

• house & pet sitting and more

We’re committed to helping you!

Jane Broshears, owner

805.748.5137

janebroshears1@gmail.com

www.errandsforelders.org

Dog Training • Premium Daycare • Boarding • Grooming

FIRST DAY OF DAYCARE FREE!

173 Buckley Road • San Luis Obispo

(805) 596-0112

thousandhillspetresort.com

SHALIMAR

INDIAN RESTAURANT

Lunch Buffet

Mon - Sat 11:30am - 3:00pm $9.99

Monday Dinner Buffet

5:00pm - 10:00pm $10.99

Sunday Brunch

$10.99

2115 Broad Street, SLO

805.781.0766 | shalimarslo.com

| HAPPENINGS

OCTOBER

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

AIDA

Enjoy this amazing citywide arts

collaboration. Witness the return of

the pharoah, armies of soldiers, slaves,

priests and priestesses all set to the

beauty of Giuseppe Verdi’s lush score.

Aida is the ultimate grand opera

experience featuring full orchestra,

choruses, ballets, soaring arias, and

an internationally acclaimed cast of

opera singers.

October 11-12 // operaslo.org

31 HAUNTED HOUSE

AT JACK HOUSE

Could ghosts be hiding in

the closets or wandering

down stairs? Come find

out! Tour the dimly-lit

house and learn Jack family

history and more.

October 19 - 26

slocity.org

PICASSO AT THE LAPIN AGILE

This long running Off-Broadway absurdist comedy places

Albert Einstein and Pablo Picasso in a Parisian cafe in 1904,

just before the renowned scientist transformed physics with

his theory of relativity and the celebrated painter set the art

world afire with cubism.

October 10 – 26 // slolittletheatre.org

VINTAGE CAMPER RALLY

See beautiful vintage campers (free)

and enjoy wine and food tastings

($30). Planning to camp? The cost is

$250 per couple for campers which

includes camping fees, cocktail hour,

Friday tour, three breakfasts, two

lunches, and wine tasting.

October 16 – 18

ccspa.info/events/stranded.html

WHY AM I TELLING YOU THIS?

British humorist, and local No Shame

Theatre favorite, Maddy Sinclair presents her

outrageous slant on how to be yourself in a

world that expects you to be someone else. This

production is intended for mature audiences.

October 17 – 26 // slolittletheatre.org

TERRIFYING TROLLEY TOUR

Have a spooktacular time at the

Point San Luis Lighthouse. Not

recommended for children under

the age of ten.

October 25 – 31 // sanluislighthouse.org

80 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


NOVEMBER

SING-A-LONG SOUND OF MUSIC

This worldwide phenomenon celebrates

the Julie Andrews classic film musical on

the PAC big screen—in all of its glorious

full-screen Technicolor—for a family-fun

experience complete with hand props and

subtitles so the whole audience can sing

along. Start working on your lederhosen

and nun habits now for the big costume

competition.

November 2 // pacslo.org

CANZONA FALL CONCERT

Canzona Women’s Ensemble will join

forces with the Concert Choir of the

Central Coast Children’s Choir for their

fall concert held at Cuesta College.

November 9 // canzonawomen.org

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

HARVEST ON THE COAST

Enjoy the annual harvest celebration,

a rambunctious extravaganza of local

food and wine. The main event is an

outdoor grand tasting and auction on

Saturday at Avila Beach Golf Resort,

featuring wine tasting, artisan foods,

live music and ocean views. The auction

features a broad selection of rare wines,

culinary treats and SLO Wine Country

destination experiences. The festivities

unfold throughout the weekend with

winemaker dinners on Friday evening

and winery open houses on Sunday.

November 7 – 9 // slowine.com

KING LEAR

With its tempestuous poetry, touches

of humor and moments of simplicity,

Shakespeare’s ultimately tragic King Lear

is one of the deepest artistic explorations

of the human condition. This riveting

evening is performed by one of England’s

premier theatre companies on a traveling

Elizabethan stage.

November 18 // pacslo.org

Hot Shaves • Cold Beer • ESPN • Quality Service

Monday - Saturday 10am-6pm • Sunday 11am-4pm

1351 Monterey Street . San Luis Obispo

(805)783-2887 . clippersbarber.com

Business Portraits :: Product :: Headshots

Commercial :: Editorial

805.448.2841

www.christopherbersbach.com

Specializing in Avila Beach

BANDFEST

Enjoy this spectacular concert featuring performers from all of the Cal Poly ensembles collaborating

on stage together.

November 23 // pacslo.org

805-900-6000

www.7svr.com

OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 81


| THE LAST WORD

OPINION

Taking Back

the Neigborhood

Tired of the constant sound of bass rattling their

homes, hearing swarms of college students coming

and going at all hours of the night, and seeing them

urinate on front lawns, one neighborhood off of

Ramona Drive got together and drafted this letter

and—along with a box of donuts—delivered it to

the doorsteps of the college rental homes on their

street “to remind the college kids to think about the

neighborhoods that they grew up in. Because these

are our homes, and this is our neighborhood.”

Welcome to the neighborhood! We wanted to take a minute to introduce

ourselves… we are your neighbors – yay!

Here’s a few things you can count on us for:

• If you ever need your trash cans taken in or out because you’re headed

out of town, let us know. Any of us would be happy to help.

• If you’re headed home for the holidays, let us know so we can keep an

eye on your place for you.

• If you’re in the middle of cooking a meal and need an egg/cup

of milk/lemon/etc., come on by. I’m sure one of us will have the

missing ingredient.

Here’s a few things we do as neighbors - and since you live here, you’re

one of us now – congratulations!

• When we see a neighbor: We smile! We wave! We say “Hi!” Sometimes

we even ask, “How are you?” And if we don’t know each other, we

introduce ourselves. It’s really great, because then we know each other.

And people who know each other are nice to each other. And help each

other. And then they become friends. It’s the most awesome part of

living in a neighborhood! Especially on a little street where we see each

other All The Time. Everyday. And you want to know the people you see

everyday. Or it just gets awkward. And that’s weird.

• When we’re outside, we use our “kid appropriate” language. Because

six-year-olds do not need to know how to use the F-bomb. And ladies

don’t like to hear that language. And because it’s just not very creative. Or

smart. And it kind of makes you sound uneducated. And stupid - to be

honest. Try this one, “Mother Earth!” Say that the next time you’re mad.

People will be like, “Whoa, that dude is super smart and creative to use a

play on words like that. AND, I still know what he means.”

• When we drive into the neighborhood, if we see kids, we slow down.

• When we drive into the neighborhood, and we do not see kids, we still

slow down – because they will totally come flying out of the bushes on

their bike/scooter/skateboard and ride right in front of your car (seriously,

this happened yesterday). Yeah, we talk to them about pulling over to the

sidewalk and putting one foot down so we know they’re not moving - but

they don’t always (hardly ever) remember this rule.

• When we back out of the driveway - we do it slowly - because of the

whole “flying out of the bushes” thing.

• When we drive into the neighborhood at night we turn down our

headlights – because, seriously everyone’s bedroom window faces the street

– and nothing is worse than being woken up by someone’s high beams

shining through your window. Especially when you are six years old. Or

when you’re 60. Really, it doesn’t matter how old you are. It just sucks to

be woken up. Especially when you’re trying to sleep. And friends don’t

wake friends up with high beams. And we’re friends.

• When it’s a beautiful day – like it Always is – we feel stoked. And we

know that everyone else is stoked. And they’re enjoying the day. And

the sounds of the wind rustling the leaves. And the birds chirping in the

distance. And we understand that they do not want to hear our music.

Or our bass. And we know that bass travels. Far. And it shakes homes.

And rings in ears. And we’re so smart that we can wrap our heads around

the concept that even though our music may not seem loud – the bass is

still loud. And annoying. And we’re friends. So we don’t want to annoy

each other. So when we want to thump it - we plug in our ear buds. And

enjoy it without making anyone else suffer through the thump thump

thumping. Because some of our neighbors work from home. And others

are retired. So they’re at home. And it makes people sad to hear bass when

they’re working. And when they’re relaxing. And then it makes them mad.

And then it makes them want call the cops. And then we won’t be friends

anymore. And we’re neighbors. So we can’t have that. We have to be

friends. And be nice. And respectful.

• When we have non-neighborhood-friends with us and they come home

late at night - we tell them that little kids live in this neighborhood and

they should use their library voices. So they don’t wake the little kids.

Who will wake the parents. Which is just as bad as high beams. Actually,

worse. Because now people are crying.

• When we get the urge to have a serious techno rave, we drive our cars

to San Francisco. Where people have serious techno raves. If we don’t

have time to drive to the city, we plug our earbuds in and dance like crazy

in our living room – with our earbuds – so the bass doesn’t shake the

foundation of the homes of our neighborhood. Because our neighborhood

homes are awesome. And so are the people who live in them. And we

want to be awesome neighbors. Not mean neighbors. Who aren’t friendly.

And act like they don’t care about one another. Because remember, we’re

friends. Who wave. And say “Hi!” And sometimes ask, “How are you? Can

I borrow some butter?”

• When we want to party all night, we go downtown. Where people do

that. Then we take Uber so that we don’t hurt ourselves or anyone else

when we come home to our awesome neighborhood. And we ask our

driver to turn down his headlights so that no one cries because of high

beams. And we use our library voices when we get out of the car and walk

to the door. And try to find our keys. So we can get into our awesome

house in the awesome neighborhood. And then we go to bed. Because we

realize everyone else on the tiny awesome street is asleep. And it would be

rude to wake them up. Because we’re all friends. And friends don’t do mean

things to each other – like wake each other up in the middle of the night.

Welcome to the neighborhood! We know you’ll be awesome!

Because you’re one of us now! Neighbors!

If you would like to have THE LAST WORD email us your 1,000 word opinion to info@slolifemagazine.com

82 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014


OCT/NOV 2014 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 83


HAVEN PROPERTIES

A PAYNE INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION

GALLERY LOCATION

1039 Chorro Street, San Luis Obispo

The HAVEN PROPERTIES GALLERY LOCATION offers the many visitors and residents of San Luis

Obispo County a window into life and Real Estate on the Central Coast. Located in the historic

brick building adjacent to the Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa in the heart of Downtown San Luis

Obispo, the Gallery provides an inviting atmosphere for visitors to come in and learn more about

Real Estate in the area while viewing artwork exhibited by local artists. Visit us 7 days a week.

EXCLUSIVE AFFILIATION

Main Office: 1212 Marsh Street, Suite 1 | Gallery Location: 1039 Chorro Street

San Luis Obispo, California 93401

805.592.2050 | inquiries@havenslo.com

HavenSLO.com

84 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2014

More magazines by this user