Hopulist issue 5

hopulist

Welcome to issue 5 of Hopulist. We bring you the latest news, brews and intrigue from the craft beer universe and we hope you will enjoy reading it as much as we enjoyed putting it together. This month we feature Hop Hideout, Home Brew Club, Writer's of Craft, our World Cup 2018 Special and much more...

IS FOR,

WELL, LOTS

OF THINGS.

THAT’S WHY

WE HAVE

DEVISED OUR

OWN BEER

GLOSSARY

FOR YOU TO

DRINK IN.

IMPROVE

YOUR

KNOWLEDGE

OF WHAT

MAKES BEER

SO GREAT

AND IMPRESS

YOUR

FRIENDS IN

THE BAR.

WHAT HAVE

YOU GOT TO

LOSE?

ESSENTIAL

HOP OILS

You know when you

pull a beer toward

your face and you’re

greeted with aromas

that tantalise you and

as you sip that first

sip the flavours rush

to match that aroma?

Most of that is down

to essential hop oils,

which are the oils

released from the

hop plant during the

brewing process that

make a beer taste

how it tastes. Some

of those oils include

myrcene, humulene,

caryophyllene and

farnesene – but to you

and me, just know that

these essential oils are

exactly that, essential.

A

EAST KENT

GOLDINGS HOP

The aromas and

flavours of East

Kent are perfectly

embodied in the

hop named after

and grown in the

area – they include

floral, slightly spice,

honey and earthy. This

relatively mild hop

in terms on intensity,

and as you would

expect is used mostly

in British beers of

traditional style. The

hop originally came

from Canterbury and

is in fact the same as

Canterbury Golding

– the two names are

often interchanged.

While perhaps

not a hop that is

quintessential with

modern craft beer

styles, this hop has its

place in beer history

and offers subtle levels

of moderate flavour.

ENGLISH IPA

As with most of life’s

great inventions,

necessity dictated

the creation of the

English IPA. Back in

the late 1700s, the

beer was brewed

for British troops

heading to India and

were essential pale

ales that had been

tweaked to be much

more malty and with

a higher alcohol

content to withstand

the journey. Over

time, it is believed that

these beers were then

watered down, which

is why modern English

IPAs are lower in

ABV. Typical examples

you can try include

Goose IPA by Goose

Island, Toasted Oak

IPA by Innis & Gunn

and Hitachina Nest

Japanese Classic Ale.

EISBOCK

Eis, eis baby… If your

German isn’t too

hot, you should now

know that eis means

ice – and it should

therefore not surprise

you that Eisbock is a

style of beer created

by freezing a Bock

or Doppelbock and

then removing the icy

water to concentrate

the alcohol and

flavour. This beer is a

heavy affair, in terms

of flavour and ABV

so probably not for

the faint-hearted –

however if you do

want to take it on,

you’ll be rewarded

with a rich beer full of

character. Examples

include Hermannator

Ice Bock by Vancouver

Island Brewing, Tank

Bender by Founders

and Kuhnhenn

Raspberry Eisbock by

Kuhnhenn Brewing Co.

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