CPFMagazine_Summer_2018_Issue

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A national network of volunteers, parents and stakeholders who value French as an integral part of Canada. CPF Magazine is dedicated to the promotion and creation of French-second-language learning opportunities for young Canadians.

SUMMER 2018

CPF

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INCLUSION IN

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SUMMER

ACTIVITIES

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LEARNING

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OUI ou NON?


Magazine

CANADIAN PARENTS FOR FRENCH

SUMMER 2018

www.cpf.ca

SUMMER 2018

Table of Contents

EDITORIAL COMMITTEE

Michael Tryon, Nicole Thibault,

Towela Okwudire, Denise Massie

EDITORIAL MANAGER

Maryanne Bright

CONTRIBUTORS

Nancy McKeraghan, Maryanne Bright,

and other authors and organizations,

as noted in their articles.

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CPF Magazine is published three times per

year for members of Canadian Parents for

French. Our readership includes parents

of students learning French as a second

language, French language teachers,

school board or district staff, and provincial,

territorial and federal government staff

responsible for official languages education.

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FEATURES

3 Saluting the Excellence of FSL Educators

Across Canada

10 FSL Exemptions: Should Students With Learning

Disabilities Be Excused From French Class?

14 More French SVP: MJB Endowment Fund

REGULAR ARTICLES

2 PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

7 PARTNER LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

IDELLO presents “Français sans Frontières”

8 EDUCATION

The Importance of Inclusion

English Language Learners in French Immersion

13 TECH & MEDIA

The French Experiment

16 FRENCH CULTURE & LANGUAGE

Discovering Alberta’s Francophone Community

18 EVENTS

The Happenings: From Coast to Coast to Coast

19 KEY CPF CONTACTS ACROSS CANADA

20 OUR ADVERTISERS

This issue of CPF Magazine is printed

on 70lb Endurance Silk, using vegetable

based inks. The paper is FSC certified by the

Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC®), meaning

it comes from well-managed forests and

known sources, ensuring local communities

benefit and sensitive areas are protected.

Canadian Parents for French is a nationwide, research-informed, volunteer organization

that furthers bilingualism by promoting and creating opportunities to learn and use French

for all those who call Canada home.


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

W

Welcome to the second issue of the CPF Magazine for 2018. Your National and

Branch Boards have been busy advocating on behalf of French Second Language

students and programs.

National staff and I met with Minister Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage, in February.

It was a positive meeting where some of the concerns affecting FSL programs were raised.

We were pleased to hear the announcement of additional funding over the next few years

and the acknowledgement that some of the dollars would go toward addressing the teacher

supply situation that is being experienced across the country.

In April, CPF representatives, both members and staff, attended our third FSL

Awareness Breakfast in the Parliamentary dining room. More than 70 stakeholders

were present including Senators, Members of Parliament, and other Government and

Association representatives. Background information on CPF and its activities was shared.

Following the breakfast, a number of meetings were held throughout the day with specific

stakeholders. These meetings raised awareness of CPF and the issues we are facing across

the country. The meetings were very positive and some good suggestions on advancing

our mandate came forward. Thank you to all who attended.

As always, the CPF Network is here to promote the learning and use of Canada’s second

official language among youth. Branches have a wealth of knowledge to serve you and

can be a huge resource for members who are experiencing difficulties. This summer take

advantage of the service, expertise and activities available that can help sustain your young

learners language proficiency over the summer months. Last but not least, don’t forget to

let us know how we are doing – we need to hear from you, our members. n

Nancy McKeraghan, CPF National President

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2 CPF MAGAZINE SUMMER 2018


Saluting the

Excellence of

FSL Educators

Across Canada

TEACHERS INTERVIEWED BY MARYANNE BRIGHT, COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR, CPF NATIONAL

As champions of a better bilingual future for all Canadians we recognize the importance FSL teachers play in

the day to day lives of young learners across the country.

We’re back for our final installment of a three part series highlighting the excellence of FSL teachers dedicated

to French second language achievement in Canada. We know the job isn’t always easy, but it is as a result of

their unspoken commitment to the advancement of linguistic duality, that students are able to acquire the

skills necessary to lead successful and fulfilling bilingual lives.

The CPF National network thanks all the teachers who willingly took part in this series and shared their stories,

challenges and achievements. As educators, you not only teach but you inspire confidence and encourage

students to be the best version of themselves they can be - a gift that is truly priceless. Your work is a

meaningful reminder that while making a difference takes time, every little bit counts!

Continue reading and learn more about the four teachers featured in this season’s issue:

Magalie Frechette, from Alberta; Sandra Starratt, from Nova Scotia; Keri Sutton, from Saskatchewan;

Tonya Bull-Kelly, from Newfoundland and Labrador; and Amanda Powell, from British Columbia.

To learn about the teachers profiled in our last issue please visit: http://bit.ly/2CHZCyw

CPF MAGAZINE SUMMER 2018 3


Magalie Frechette

Alberta

Sandra Starratt

Nova Scotia

Born and raised in Quebec, Magalie

Frechette has been teaching French

as a second language for 19 years.

Being Francophone, Magalie early on

recognized the importance of official

language bilingualism and moved to

Northern Alberta to improve her

English where she began her career

as a FSL educator.

?

What is your favorite part

about teaching?

Seeing my students’ growth! I teach my

students from grade 3 to 6 so I get to see

their language skills develop and progress

year after year, so much so, that when

they leave they are almost proficient. The

pride and accomplishment they feel make

it all worth it.

?

What would your students

say about you?

Older students say I’m a good teacher.

I’m fun, but I’m tough. I have high

expectations for my students.

Sandra Starratt has been teaching

grades 10-12, at Halifax West High

School in Halifax, for 33 years.

During her tenure as an educator

she has taught various French second

language learning programs including

French immersion, core, extended as

well as International Baccalaureate

studies in French.

?

What is your biggest

challenge as a FSL educator?

Creating an atmosphere where students

can be fully immersed in the language.

To help facilitate this our French teaching

department has set up a ‘French

Pod’ where students and faculty are

encouraged to interact only in French.

It’s a great opportunity to engage fully in

the language and the students have fun

while becoming passionate about learning

French too!

?

When do you know

you reached a success

milestone?

I live in a rural area where many students

are transient which can make learning

French more difficult. Newer students

often feel overwhelmed but once they

start having the confidence to speak out

loud or find their own strategies to learn

the language that is one of the moments

I feel like I have reached a successful

milestone.

?

If you could wave a

magic wand and bring

one improvement to all FSL

programs, what would it be?

As educators we need to have access to

professional development and support

resources which target our programs.

The students shouldn’t be the only ones

learning, what makes good teachers is

our ability to also continuously educate

ourselves. n

?

What do your colleagues or

your students’ parents say

about you?

‘She’s committed’ – I spend a lot of time

at the school and put in long hours. I have

a lot of energy, and despite retiring soon,

I don’t see myself slowing down a bit!

?

How do you evaluate

success?

I believe measuring success varies

depending on the individual’s goals. For

one student, it might mean improving

their listening and comprehension skills,

while for others it’s about perfecting

their written and oral language skills so

that their French is more sophisticated

and authentic.

?

If you could wave a

magic wand and bring

one improvement to all FSL

programs, what would it be?

More hours, more exposure, and more

opportunities to be fully immersed in the

French language and culture. n

4 CPF MAGAZINE SUMMER 2018


Keri Sutton

Saskatchewan

Keri Sutton is a teacher at Centennial

Collegiate in Saskatoon and instructs

students from grades 9-12 in History

studies and French. Her passion for

French has always driven Keri and is

what allows her, even after 15 years

of teaching, to still bring joy to the

classroom every day!

?

How did you choose FSL

education?

I always gravitated towards working with

kids –I also have a strong appreciation

for other languages. It’s neat seeing how

language can provide you with another

perspective/way of thinking, build

self-esteem and celebrate cultural

differences.

?

How do you evaluate

success? When do you

know you reached a

success milestone?

Seeing the sense of pride the students

take in their own accomplishments, but

also watching the students take learning

into their own hands.

?

If you could wave a

magic wand and bring

one improvement to all FSL

programs, what would it be?

In immersion students are supposed to be

speaking French, but when the bell rings

it’s usually right back to English so I would

like to see them engage with the language

and culture in a more lasting and authentic

way! n

Tonya Bull-Kelly

Newfoundland

and Labrador

Tonya Bull-Kelly is a grade 4

French immersion teacher at Holy

Trinity Elementary School in Torbay,

and has been teaching French as

a second language for more than

20 years.

?

How did you choose

teaching?

My father’s passion for learning

and commitment to teaching definitely

influenced my decision to become a

teacher. Being a French immersion

teacher has given me the opportunity

to couple my passion of learning the

French language with my love

of teaching.

Core French Program / Basic French Program

A program in which French is taught as a subject among others in a regular English program. Also known as French Second Language Program

in Alberta and French Communication and Culture in Manitoba.

Intensive French / Intensive Core French

A program in which French is taught intensively during five months of the Grade 5 or 6 year. Students receive about 80% of their instruction in

French during the first half of the year and 20% during the second half; all other subjects in the curriculum (except for math) are “compressed”

into the second half of the year.

Post Intensive French

A program offered after the initial Intensive French year in which a similar pedagogical approach continues in higher grades in order to maintain/

enhance proficiency gains made in the initial year. Also known as Français approfondi, Enhanced French and other terms in various jurisdictions.

French Immersion

A FSL education program (with different variants based on entry year, amount of time and intensity, etc.) in which French is the language of

communication and most of the instruction, using the same curriculum as offered in the regular English program.

?

How do you evaluate

success? When do you

know you reached a

success milestone?

In my opinion, success is synonymous

with growth and reflection. I feel that

when students are able to recognize areas

of their improvement and apply strategies

to further guide their learning, they are

on the path to success.

?

If you could wave a

magic wand and bring

one improvement to all FSL

programs, what would it be?

I would love to see a continued interest

in French learning extend beyond the

classroom. I feel that all students should

have the opportunity to practice their

second language skills in a creative,

collaborative and more true to life kind

of way. n

continued...

CPF MAGAZINE SUMMER 2018 5


Amanda Powell

British Columbia

Amanda Powell is a core French

teacher at Tamanawis High School in

Surrey. Growing up in a family of

educators Amanda knew early on a

career in teaching was the right choice

for her. Amanda completed her Bachelor

of Education at SFU and has been

teaching for two and half years!

?

What is your biggest

challenge?

Reducing the stigma around learning

French can be difficult - sometimes even

parents don’t recognize its importance

which makes it harder for students to

appreciate its enormous benefit.

?

What would your students

say about you?

They may think I’m a little inexperienced

because I’m young but I’m not afraid to

admit that I am also still learning. I also

hope they would say I’m funny, but more

than anything I think they would say that

I just want them to succeed.

?

If you could wave a

magic wand and bring

one improvement to all FSL

programs, what would it be?

More teachers using technology. I

think we need to move away from

the traditional/textbook approach to

learning. I’m constantly looking for new

and innovative ways to engage with my

students and teach in ways that are more

up to date with the times. Follow her on

Twitter @mllepowell. n

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6 CPF MAGAZINE SUMMER 2018


PARTNER LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

COMPRÉHENSION

INTERCULTURELLE

Canada has created a society diverse in languages,

cultures and religions. According to Statistics Canada,

by 2036, 25 to 30 percent of the population will be

foreign-born*. Developing an intercultural understanding

ÉCOUTER

LISTEN

is now more important than ever.

IDÉLLO has produced the educational kit Français sans

Frontières to support the learning of French as a Second

Language, and allows to:

• Promote intercultural understanding and develop

sociolinguistic skills of French language learners from

grades 1 to 12

• Encourage the new generation to grow with respect for

cultural differences and to live in various communities

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• Interact with Francophone cultures in Canada and

around the world

• Develop abilities to listen, speak, read and write in French

LIRE ÉCRIRE

• Engage READ through WRITE fun educational activities in French, focused

on the age, interests and school year of the FSL students

Tailored by a team of FSL educators, Français sans

Frontières has been created thanks to the financial support

from the Government of Canada through the Department of

Canadian Heritage and the Government of Ontario.

Français sans Frontières is available

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* Source: Statistics Canada (2016) – Immigration and Diversity:

Population Projections for Canada and its Regions, 2011 to 2036

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CPF MAGAZINE SUMMER 2018 7


EDUCATION

The Importance of Inclusion

English Language Learners in

French Immersion

BY STEPHANIE KAWAMOTO

The demand for French immersion (FI) is rapidly increasing

across Canada and it should come as no surprise that

parents and students want in on the awesome benefits

bilingualism can bring!

8 CPF MAGAZINE SUMMER 2018


EDUCATION

Unlike when French immersion was first introduced,

families showing interest in the program now come

from more diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds.

Despite historical exclusion of English Language Learners (ELL)

from French second language programs, thanks to research by

Nipissing University Professor Callie Mady and others, we now

know ELL students are as capable of learning French as their

Anglophone counterparts.

In 2013, the Ontario Ministry of Education (OME)

released A framework for French as a second language in

Ontario schools, followed by documents regarding students

with special education needs (2015) and ELLs (2016). The

Trends in FI policies and practices

Target participants of 45 school boards…

25

13

Admissions and entry points of 18 boards

that discuss entry points...

4

12

say FI is for

non-francophone

students

state that FI is for

anglophones (including

7/18 “inclusive” boards)

have only one entry

point (kindergarten/

grade 1)

18

Only 5 are consistently inclusive, with no explicit

preference for anglophones

14

encourage FI

for all students

(“inclusive” boards)

6welcome ELLs in FI

(including 5/18

“inclusive” boards)

have multiple entry

points, but later entry

programs are often

extended French.

In 12 boards, once past an entry point, students must

pass a proficiency test, have prior FI experience,

and/or have principal permission to enroll

Only 4 are consistently inclusive, with no explicit

preference for anglophones

How Can We Change It?

Change begins at the top, and school boards have a responsibility

to improve the current system. We can start today by:

• Creating a French immersion framework agreement. It is

necessary to change the “enrichment program” mindset to

a more inclusive one.

• Developing and enforcing transparent policies that work

to ensure equitable access for all students. These policies

should reflect an inclusive stance, and require schools to

provide parents with ANY and ALL relevant information

about the programs available.

• Finally, removal of enrolment priority so that all students

have fair chance to participate.

documents convey that “[French as a Second Language (FSL)]

programs are for all students” a promise which ensures young

learners will be inspired to reach their full potential, with access

to quality opportunities that begin from infancy into adulthood.

However, since the documents discuss FSL in a general sense,

inclusivity in French immersion has been left to the discretion

of school boards.

So how far do we have to go in bridging the gap?

Let’s take a look at the level of inclusivity and equitable

access to French immersion for ELLs, or the lack thereof, by

examining some FI policies and practice trends in Ontario’s

school boards.

Having only one entry point limits access for newcomer

ELLs arriving in Canada later in childhood, both because they

miss early entry points and have less experience with French

so they may not be considered proficient enough to enter at a

later age. It also puts students’ educational trajectories in the

hands of principals, whose decisions depend on their beliefs

regarding inclusive French immersion.

Views on bilingualism

7

boards

say FI will make students

bilingual, helping them live in

two languages

9boards discuss

students’ L2

being French

Only 4 boards use inclusive language (“multilingual” or “two or

more languages”); 2 discuss “French as an additional language”

Unless educators change their mindset and recognize

French as a facet of multilingualism instead of English/French

bilingualism, they will continue to limit and exclude ELLs and

their abilities.

English language learners are a growing and diverse

population not only in Ontario but across the country. As our

understanding of the language-learning potential of students

grows it’s important to make sure opportunities are available

to learn and communicate in both official languages. For this,

it is urgent that we look not only at how to improve existing

practices but take the required steps to ensure equitable

access to French second language programming for all those

who call Canada home. n

CPF MAGAZINE SUMMER 2018 9


FRENCH SECOND LANGUAGE

EXEMPTIONS

SHOULD STUDENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES

BE EXCUSED FROM FRENCH CLASS?

BY KATY ARNETT REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION FROM EDUCATION CANADA MAGAZINE

In Canada, French Second Language

(FSL) study is compulsory in five

provinces (Ontario, New Brunswick,

Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova

Scotia, and Prince Edward Island), and

the province of British Columbia requires

that all students study a second language

– French being one of those options.

Within five of these provinces (except

Nova Scotia), it is possible for students to

be exempt from the requirement because

they have a language-related disability or

other type of exceptional need.

Is this sound policy? What are the

pros and cons of FSL exemptions for

students with exceptional learning needs?

Both my research and my experience as

a teacher have led me to conclude that

FSL education can benefit all students and

10 CPF MAGAZINE SUMMER 2018

that exemption is unwarranted. And yet,

in the current system, I believe there are

rare instances when exemption may be the

“lesser of two evils” for individual students.

The case against exemption

It’s my belief that, 95 percent of the time,

exempting students with exceptional

needs from compulsory FSL programs[1]

or compulsory second language study

should be discontinued. I believe the

exemptions are problematic because

they perpetuate the idea that FSL

study is not for all, and particularly that

exceptionalities and FSL cannot coexist.

Because of research within the

context of French immersion and

with children being raised in bilingual

households,[2] we have known since the

I believe the

exemptions are

problematic because

they perpetuate the

idea that FSL study

is not for all, and

particularly that

exceptionalities and

FSL cannot coexist.


The “system” (teacher education, school

districts, policies, school leaders, Ministries

of Education) has got to do more to support

FSL teachers in making their classrooms

inclusive, if we hope to keep FSL programs

vibrant and relevant for years to come.

1980s that a disability, in and of itself,

does not preclude a child from developing

competency in another language. We

also know that even in situations where

a child only gets additional support in the

home language (and not in the second

language), the child’s skills in the second

language benefit from the cross-lingual

support. In other words, it should not be

assumed that English-only support is a

detriment to developing FSL proficiency.

[3] Thus, research has shown that disability

is not a barrier to language study and

that any support for an individual with an

exceptionality benefits all languages the

student knows.

As well, there are changing

conceptions of what success looks like

in language education. Though there

are still programs (and policies) that are

tied to the idea that the student must

be working toward the “ideal” of native/

native-like proficiency, the introduction

of the Common European Framework

of Reference (CEFR) to language study in

Canada has promoted the idea of framing

success through what students “can

do.”[4] This approach defines success as

progress in the language, not attainment

of a single standard like “native speaker.”

This paradigm shift within second language

education, while still underway in Canada,

is consonant with the ideas of inclusion for

every type of language learner in

the classroom.

It is not the case that second language

instruction is especially unsuited to

students with learning disabilities. In fact,

I have been struck by the compatibility

between the pedagogies promoted for

good language teaching and the strategies I

have discovered are beneficial for students

who have a harder time understanding

and expressing language. My research

has shown that many of the strategies

recommended to support students with

special education needs are consonant

with good FSL pedagogy in core French.

[5] A newer model of FSL pedagogy,

Intensive French,[6] has been touted as

naturally inclusive of all learner needs

and an improvement over core French.

Some preliminary research has seemingly

confirmed this,[7] though there is still a

need to learn more about how teachers

are responding to learner needs in this

program. So in framing our questions

about exemptions, we have to be mindful

of the methods used to teach. Methods

can create barriers and provide supports,

and we need to recognize the role of the

actual pedagogy in framing the educational

experience for students. If it is the case that

our teaching methods are exclusionary,

then I do not see this as a sufficient reason

to exempt a student from the class: The

methods can (and should) change.

Finally, the practice of FSL exemption

may actually weaken FSL education

itself. To the best of my knowledge,

FSL is the only subject area in Canada

from which students can be exempted

from compulsory study because of a

disability. Students with disabilities are

not exempted from other compulsory

courses, like math, physical education, or

language arts courses, even in situations

when the disability is in “opposition” to

the content under study (e.g., a student

with a physical disability is still involved

in physical education courses; a student

with hearing loss still participates in music

classes). Perpetuating exemptions within

FSL helps to spread the idea that FSL

study is not important or worthwhile – an

attitude counterproductive to the goal of

retaining students beyond the point when

FSL study ceases to be required, and to

the goal of promoting favourable views

of second language study among parents

and others in the wider community. It is

a reasonable concern that many students

who have been exempted from FSL study

will eventually become parents who are

skeptical about FSL for their own children,

perhaps leading to new generations of

students unmotivated to pursue FSL.

Is there a case for exemption?

There are rare instances when I do

believe an exemption from FSL study is a

“necessary evil,” because of limitations

within the system and because of the FSL

program’s deep-rooted cultural history.

There is a stream of research that

has confirmed that when principals and

teachers view disability as “unfixable,” as

something totally within the child (and

therefore not receptive to support), fewer

efforts are made to actually include the

child in the learning context.[8] Thus, if a

child with a more unique set of learning

needs is in a setting where there is more

doubt than belief in his or her potential for

success, I think it may sometimes be best

to find a meaningful alternative for the

student. In arriving at this conclusion, I am

not trying to imply that there are teachers

and principals out there who are “antikids-with-disabilities.”

But I would argue

that how disabilities are viewed by key

stakeholders can impact what happens in

the classroom. While this is not true only of

FSL classrooms, there is a cultural history in

the context of FSL that has promoted the

idea that disability and FSL do not mix. This

culture persists even in today’s “inclusive”

era of education. I realize that favouring

exemptions in settings where this belief is

pervasive could be perceived as giving in to

the naysayers. But as I learned through a

case study I conducted with a colleague,[9]

it can be really hard on the family of a child

with a learning difficulty to fight against

the belief that FSL and exceptionality

are incompatible. Sometimes, it is more

CPF MAGAZINE SUMMER 2018 11


If it is the case that

our teaching methods

are exclusionary, then

I do not see this as a

sufficient reason to

exempt a student

from the class:

The methods can

(and should) change.

important to protect the child from the negative attitudes of

school personnel than to fight against it.

I also know that there are not always a lot of resources to

help FSL teachers learn how to be more inclusive. It is not just a

matter of having resource teachers who can provide support to

particular students in the classroom; classroom teachers need

information on how to adapt activities for specific learning needs,

time to locate and/or make the resources that respond to those

needs (because there often is not a bilingual resource teacher),

and opportunity to collaborate with colleagues to develop

inclusive lesson plans and share ideas on a more regular basis.

The limited resources available for supporting more specific

learning needs in French has been noted elsewhere,[10] and

there is a limit to how much individual teachers can reasonably

do on their own to facilitate an inclusive, academically beneficial

learning experience within the classroom. I have known teachers

who have metaphorically moved mountains to help all students

in their classes find success in French, but I also know the toll it

has taken on them. The “system” (teacher education, school

districts, policies, school leaders, Ministries of Education) has got

to do more to support FSL teachers in making their classrooms

inclusive, if we hope to keep FSL programs vibrant and relevant

for years to come.

The complexity of this issue cannot be fully appreciated in

a brief article. While I believe that exemptions from FSL study

are almost never a good option, I also acknowledge the flaws

that perpetuate within our current way of framing FSL and

exceptionality – and that it is sometimes hard to fight the status

quo and maintain some modicum of sanity. Yet I personally am

trying to find a way to challenge that status quo and find ways

to make all forms of language study (not just FSL) accessible

and beneficial to all students (not just those with disabilities).

I am actually quite hopeful for what can be achieved – and by

what has already been achieved – by FSL teachers who have

been inspired by their passion for the language and their deep

commitment to their students to make their classes accessible

and beneficial to all learners. I challenge my colleagues within the

profession to maintain that verve, because all educators should

always believe in the possibility of doing better. n

Réputée pour sa qualité

d’enseignement

Résultats scolaires

supérieurs

Le plus haut taux de

diplomation en Ontario

Le choix de sept

parents sur dix

#MeilleureEducation

EcolesCatholiquesOntario.ca

12 CPF MAGAZINE SUMMER 2018


TECH & MEDIA

The French

Experiment

The French Experiment: Interactive website features well-known

children’s stories translated into French and spoken by a native

French speaker. It’s great for kids... and adults too!

Les Trois Petits

Cochons

THE THREE

LITTLE PIGS

Once upon a time there were

three pigs who decide to build their own houses,

only to run afoul of a wolf with an insatiable love for

des côtelettes de porc. Lots of helpful repetition and

pork-related vocabulary in this story.

– READ MORE –

Boucles

d’or et les

Trois Ours

GOLDILOCKS AND

THE THREE BEARS

A precocious blonde

girl breaks into the home of three bears, eats

their food, destroys their furniture, and

then falls asleep in one of their beds. Plenty

of house vocabulary to enjoy in this story.

– READ MORE –

Le Petit

Chaperon

Rouge

LITTLE RED

RIDING HOOD

Little Red Riding Hood ignores

her mother’s advice to “reste sur le chemin,”

and meets a cunning cross-dressing wolf while

chasing butterflies. Are you afraid of Le Grand

Méchant Loup?

– READ MORE –

Le Vilain Caneton

THE UGLY DUCKLING

The classic tale of a goofy-looking

duckling who finds his place in the

world (after he grows into his

good looks, of course).

– READ MORE –

Visit the www.thefrenchexperiment.com/stories website or click the

– READ MORE – buttons if you are viewing the magazine online and

read along to some well-known and loved children’s classics!

CPF MAGAZINE SUMMER 2018 13


Mary Joyce Booth

Endowment Fund

Each year the CPF Network, through

the generous bequest of Dr. Mary

Joyce Booth, is able to provide

students across the country access to

French language learning opportunities

and experiences.

Dr. Mary Joyce Booth was a

professor of French at the University

of Saskatchewan, and an enthusiastic

supporter of Canadian Parents for French.

To honour her memory, an annual grant of

$1000 is made available to CPF Branches,

for activities and projects that increase

opportunities for youth to learn and use

French in their communities.

Each year, children of all ages are

encouraged to participate in cultural

excursions, arts, crafts & music, sports

and science all while improving their

French second language skills.

The Mary Joyce Booth Endowment

fund is an extension of the work CPF

does to support the advancement of

linguistic duality across Canada. Join us in

championing to make French and English

an integral part of daily life for all those

who call Canada home and learn more

about how you can make a difference

in the life of a young person today:

https://cpf.ca/en/donate/

Art Camp, ON ‘The Selfie’ Wawota Day Camp, SK

Kenosee Lake Superslides, SK

“ I developed a new attitude to dealing

with conflict and was able to help

the younger kids learning French.

My summer camp experience taught

me that being bilingual will always

be a benefit. ”

- Andronika Kelso, ON, 15

14 CPF MAGAZINE SUMMER 2018


“ I’ve always thought

that bilingualism is

one of the most

important skills

someone can have

in Canada, and this

camp definitely

reinforced that

belief. ” ”

- Sean Stilwel, ON, 17

“ This experience

encouraged me

to keep up with

my French studies

because they are

useful and can open

the door to many

more opportunities. ”

- Andreas Yates, ON, 16

‘Yarn Bugs’ Day Camp Wawota, SK

COME LEARN FRENCH

IN QUEBEC

AT THE CENTRE LINGUISTIQUE DU COLLÈGE DE JONQUIÈRE

PROGRAMS

FOR EVERYONE

Youth

Adult

Customized

Online

3 to 5 weeks French

immersion

Including workshops

& socio-cultural

activities

Home-stay

(3 meals day)

Experience

Quebec Culture

in a

100%

French

environment

langues-jonquiere.ca

1-800-622-0352

centrelinguistique@cegepjonquiere.ca

CPF MAGAZINE SUMMER 2018 15


FRENCH CULTURE & LANGUAGE

Discovering

Alberta’s

Francophone Community

FROM THE OFFICIAL BLOG OF ALBERTA CULTURE & TOURISM

Cultural diversity has

been a defining element

of Alberta since its early

days. The province is

filled with an amazing

array of diverse individuals

who come from countries

around the world.

HERITAGE

Did you know? French was the first

European language spoken in the

province and that francophone heritage

in Alberta dates back to the early days

of the fur trade.

When early Montreal entrepreneurs

came to the north-western region of

Canada in search of adventure and

business opportunities, they chose

First Nations women as their brides.

As a result, the first francophone

communities – Métis communities –

were established. Over the following

200-year-period, Francophones helped

settle the west, contributing to the

development of the territory that

would eventually become Alberta.

WHAT’S IN A NAME?

Traces of Alberta’s rich francophone

heritage can be found in the names of

many of the province’s towns and villages

such as Beaumont, Brosseau, Grande

Prairie, and Lacombe.

Over the years, most English-speaking

Albertans anglicized pronunciation of

these names, so that the municipality of

Grande Prairie, despite a French spelling

is often pronounced as “Grand” Prairie.

Given this anglicization, many Albertans

might not realize just how francophone

their communities are, even those who

live there!

Alberta and the francophone

community at a glance:

• More than 81,000 francophone

Albertans, or Franco-Albertans, call

Alberta home. More than 390,000

Albertans are of French descent and

approximately 238,000 Albertans

speak French.

• While Franco-Albertans can be found

in almost every community across the

province, the greatest concentration is

in the two major metropolitan areas of

Edmonton and Calgary.

• Alberta has the highest francophone

population net growth in Canada after

Québec and Ontario.

In addition to the services, supports

and resources available in French through

the government of Alberta, there are

more than 100 francophone community

organizations that support French speakers

in a variety of sectors such as seniors,

arts, culture, health, employment and

settlement services. n

16 CPF MAGAZINE SUMMER 2018


FRENCH CULTURE & LANGUAGE

4 WAYS TO EXPERIENCE ALBERTA’S VIBRANT FRANCOPHONE CULTURE

FOOD

Enjoy authentic poutine at Edmonton’s renowned

La Poutine, which uses cheese curds straight from

Quebec. Visit one of Calgary Farmer’s Markets most

popular vendors, A Taste of Quebec, and indulge in

Quebecois classics such as tourtière, maple syrup

and some good old sugar pie.

Craving something

sweet? Head on

over to the

Duchess Bake Shop

in Edmonton or

Yann Haute

Patisserie in Calgary

for some French

delicacies that

will be sure

to satisfy all!

COMMUNITY

Discover how Alberta’s early French-Canadian settlers lived

by taking a guided tour through one of the provinces oldest

buildings, the Father Lacombe Chapel Provincial Historic Site

in St. Albert. Then explore Edmonton’s French Quarter and

stop in for a bite at French-country bistro Café Bicyclette.

CULTURE

Catch a play at L’UniThéâtre,

which offers shows with English

subtitles. And, for the latest

in Franco-Albertan news and

events, pick up your copy of

Le Franco, the province’s

francophone newspaper.

FESTIVALS

Join Franco-Albertans in celebrating

their language and culture by

attending a summer festival. Take

a short drive to Morinville for the

annual St. Jean Baptiste Festival

(June 22-24) or escape the city

with friends and family and

enjoy a weekend of fun at

La Fête Franco Albertaine (July

6-8) in Nordegg. Music lovers can

check out Edmonton Chante

Festival (June 15-17 and 22-24)

for some local sounds and

national talent.

CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018 17


EVENTS

The Happenings:

From Coast to Coast to Coast

BY RVF BLOGGER KIRSTEN MCPHERSON

Not only in la Belle Province, but also from coast to coast to coast, Canadians will

be celebrating our French and Acadian cultural heritage at countless festivals and

events this summer.

Here are just a few of the exciting celebrations taking place in cities across Canada:

Rendez-vous Victoria

Jeu. 21 juin - dim. 24

Join the annual Rendez-vous de la Francophonie!

This year our festival will take place from June 21 st

to 24 th ! Fun for young and old awaits you in our

family area!

Festival Acadien de Clare, Nova Scotia

June 28 – August 4 & 15

Celebrating its 60 th edition, this festival in Clare, Nova Scotia is

the oldest Acadian festival in the world. In addition to music,

dance and theatre with traditional Acadian flavours, the festival

will feature a children’s parade and shows, and a craft and food

bazaar. One of the festival’s most exciting events, of course, will

include Tintamarre, the traditional boisterous march through the

streets in celebration of National Acadian Day on August 15.

Festival du Loup

Lafontaine, July 16-19

Commemorating Champlain’s

arrival in 1615 and 400 years

of French presence in

Ontario, this festival will

feature music, a legendary

wolf howling, a living

museum and storytelling

of New France.

Franco-Festival

Calgary

August 18 (11am-9pm)

Family, Olympic plaza

(downtown Calgary)

The first multicultural

Francophone festival in

Calgary, the fifth edition

of this celebration of French culture and diversity will feature

musical and dance performances, children’s attractions, food

and drink for the gourmet, workshops and art exhibitions. To

take place at Shaw Millennium Park, admission to this event

is free.

18 CPF MAGAZINE SUMMER 2018


KEY CPF CONTACTS ACROSS CANADA

National office

1104 - 170 Laurier Ave. W., Ottawa, ON K1P 5V5

T: 613.235.1481 F: 613.230.5940

cpf@cpf.ca cpf.ca

Quebec office & Nunavut support

qc.cpf.ca

British Columbia & Yukon

227-1555 W 7th Ave., Vancouver, BC V6J 1S1

T: 778.329.9115 TF: 1.800.665.1222 (in BC & Yukon only)

info@cpf.bc.ca bc-yk.cpf.ca

Alberta

211-15120 104 Ave. NW, Edmonton, AB T5P 0R5

T: 780.433.7311

cpfab@ab.cpf.ca

ab.cpf.ca

Northwest Territories

PO Box 1538, Yellowknife, NT X1A 2P2

T: 867.873.2054

cpf-nwt@northwestel.net nwt.cpf.ca

Saskatchewan

303-115 2nd Ave. N., Saskatoon, SK S7K 2B1

T: 306.244.6151 TF: 1.800.561.6151 (in Saskatchewan only)

cpfsask@sasktel.net sk.cpf.ca

Manitoba

101-475 Provencher Blvd., Winnipeg, MB R2J 4A7

T: 204.222.6537 TF: 1.877.737.7036 (in Manitoba only)

cpfmb@cpfmb.com mb.cpf.ca

Ontario

103-2055 Dundas St. E., Mississauga, ON L4X 1M2

T: 905.366.1012 TF: 1.800.667.0594 (in Ontario only)

cpfont@cpfont.on.ca on.cpf.ca

New Brunswick

PO Box 4462, Sussex, NB E4E 5L6

T: 506.434.8052 TF: 1.877.273.2800 (in New Brunswick only)

cpfnb@cpfnb.net nb.cpf.ca

Nova Scotia

8 Flamingo Dr., Halifax, NS B3M 4N8

T: 902.453.2048 TF: 1.877.273.5233 (in Nova Scotia only)

cpf@ns.sympatico.ca ns.cpf.ca

Prince Edward Island

PO Box 2785, Charlottetown, PE CIA 8C4

T: 902.368.3703 glecky@cpfpei.pe.ca pei.cpf.ca

Newfoundland & Labrador

PO Box 8601, Stn A, St. John’s, NL A1B 3P2

T: 709.579.1776 ed@cpfnl.ca nl.cpf.ca

TF: 1.877.576.1776 (in Newfoundland & Labrador only)

CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018 19

1301-1974_Can_Parents_for_French

date de parution : mai 2018


OUR ADVERTISERS

AQEFLE

T: 418.832.6244 E: info@aqefle.com

W: www.aqefle.com

Bayard Presse

T: 514.844.2111 Ext. 298

E: Karine.desrochers@bayardcanada.com

W: www.bayardjeunesse.ca

Camp Tournesol

T: 905.891.1889 E: martine@campt.ca

W: www.campt.ca

Canadian Parents for French – Saskatchewan

T: 306.244.6151 F : 306.244.8872

E: cpf.sk.ed@sasktel.net W: www.sk.cpf.ca

Centre linguistique du Collège de Jonquière

T: 418.542.0352 TF: 1.800.622.0352 F: 418.542.3536

E: centrelinguistique@cegepjonquiere.ca

W: www.langues-jonquiere.ca

Collège Boréal

T: 705.521.6024 Ext. 1062 F: 705.521.6039

E: publicite@collegeboreal.ca W: www.collegeboreal.ca

Les écoles catholiques de l’Ontario

W: www.ecolescatholiquesontario.ca

La Cité Universitaire Francophone

T: 306.585.3226 E: celine.galophe@uregina.ca

W: www.lacite.uregina.ca

Oxford Learning

T: 519.473.1207 E: info@oxfordlearning.com

W: www.oxfordlearning.com

RK Publishing Inc

T: 416.785.0312 E: frenchtextbooks@rkpublising.com

W: www.rkpublishing.com

University of Sudbury

T: 705.673.5661 E: se_noel@usudbury.ca

W: www.usudbury.ca

Viens trouVer ta place à

l’Université de Sudbury !

En septembre 2017, l’Université de Sudbury

a dévoilé son nouveau Labo médias, qui a

été rendu possible grâce au financement

des gouvernements fédéral et provincial.

Le Labo médias permet aux étudiants qui s’intéressent au

domaine des communications d’acquérir de l’expérience

pratique très valable lors de leurs études. Il comporte trois

zones principales : une zone pour la radio et l’audio; une

zone pour la vidéo et les reportages télévisés; et une zone

avec stations de travail pour la rédaction, le montage, le

partage d’idées, etc.

« Ce Labo médias aura un réel impact sur l’apprentissage des

étudiants, qui pourront très tôt créer un réseau et qui seront

prêts pour le marché du travail dès la fin de leurs études à

l’Université de Sudbury » déclare Madame Sophie Bouffard,

rectrice et vice-chancelière de l’Université de Sudbury.

705-673-5661 www.usudbury.ca

Membre de la Fédération Laurentienne

Member of the Laurentian Federation

Dibendaagozi zhinda Laurentian Federation

NEW

Je lis, je lis, littératie!

AVAILABLE IN PRINT AND ONLINE

• K–4 comprehensive LEVELLED reading program for French

Immersion and FSL classrooms.

• 150 thematically linked paired Fiction/Non-fiction Readers

• High Frequency words, sounds, blends and word families are

highlighted in the inside front cover.

• Multiple opportunities within each reader to promote discussion

and reflection before, during and after.

• Je lis! Audio online can be accessed in the classroom and at

home which strengthens the home-school connection

• Recieve a free reader with your first purchase!

Enter: CPF0618 at checkout

Online… Kids can listen, read along and

get rewarded for their progress!

For a sample of online paired readers email:

frenchtextbooks@rkpublishing.com

Visit our website for K–12 FSL resources:

www.rkpublishing.com or call 1-866-696-9549

Follow us on:

and

Textes

jumelés

20 CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018


GET READY FOR

SUMMER WITH CPF

S

chool’s out for the summer, but what about making

sure your young learners stay up to date on their

French second language skills while having fun!?

We know how important it is for students to use the

language skills they’ve learned all year round which is why

we developed the CPF Summer Camp listing. The free,

annual resource lists overnight and day camps available

across Canada offering various programs including:

adventure camps, indoor and outdoor sports camps, art

camps, scouting camps, and many other academic camps

centered around learning and using French. Attending

any of these summer camps gives your family, or young

learner, the opportunity to improve their French second

language skills throughout the summer in a welcoming

environment that inspires learning, creativity and loads

of fun! https://bit.ly/2rJ5ymk n

f

D

j j

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Set Sail for Opportunity!























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