08.06.2018 Views

Teachers Resource Pack for the Kitchen Table project

Teachers Resource Pack for the Kitchen Table project

Teachers Resource Pack for the Kitchen Table project

SHOW MORE
SHOW LESS

Create successful ePaper yourself

Turn your PDF publications into a flip-book with our unique Google optimized e-Paper software.

KITC HEN TABLE

2018

Kinetika Resource Pack


KITC HEN TABLE

Building on our previous projects Thurrock 100 and Silk River, Kinetika is

excited to launch Kitchen Table.

Over the next two years we intend to explore, share and celebrate the cultures

of the many and diverse communities living and working along the lower

Thames Estuary. In 2018 we are inviting schools and community groups to

research the stories of individuals through the collection and sharing of

different recipes. This content will be the inspiration for a series of performative

events held at pop-up Kitchens in 2019.

Led by Ali Pretty, Kinetika’s artistic director, working with chef and carnival

designer Ray Mahabir and print making artist Lisa Meehan, we will explore

ways in which you can create a whole class/community recipe book that reflects

the wide range of cultural experiences of your pupils and their community.

Aims:

• To identify stories through different experiences of preparing and

sharing food as a means to unpacking what we mean by diversity,

similarity and difference.

• To reflect and communicate these stories through cross curricular

activities covering English, Art and Humanities tasks.

1


KITC HEN TABLE HAMP ER

Here we provide you with all the ingredients you need to make your whole

class/community recipe book reflecting the experiences of everyone.

INGREDIENTS:

• Ray’s Trinidadian Pelau

• Every Recipe has a Story

• A World of Ingredients

• What’s in the Container?

• Make your own Kitchen Table Hamper

• Printmaking

• Developing other activities for Literacy

• Developing further activities for Geography and History

• List of Materials and Suppliers

2


RAY’S TRINIDADIAN P ELAU

Pelau is a one-pot Trinidadian dish – it includes rice, beans/peas, vegetables,

herbs, caramelized sugar and meat. There is also a vegetarian version.

One of my fondest memories as a child was

our family Sundays known as a Beach Lime.

Lime is a Trinidadian word for hanging out.

This one-pot dish is what my mother made

for our lunch. After a nice swim and an hour

in the sun, what could be better? Lunch was

served - a warm plate of pelau served with

a salad of green watercress, coleslaw with

avocado, tomatoes or cucumber, accompanied

by hot sauce or pickle.

This dish is also ideal for a simple house

party, friends liming together, a day at the

beach, an outdoor event, a cricket match;

carnival or family occasion.

Whenever I miss home, a plate of pelau can transport me back to the good

old days, my childhood and my family, filling me with fond memories of great

moments.

Where does Pelau come from?

“Pelau, or rice layered with meats and vegetables, is a variation of

East Indian Pilau, which originated in Persia where it is called Polow.

The Anglicized version of the dish is called Pilaf. The process of

browning the meat in sugar for Pelau is an African tradition and

ketchup is a New World addition, although I suspect it has its basis

in tomato chutneys available in British India and likely brought to

Trinidad by the English.”

From the book, Sweet Hands: Island Cooking from Trinidad & Tobago

(Hippocrene Books, NY), by Ramin Ganeshram.

3


RAY’S HOME SWEET HOME TRINI P ELAU

Serve this delicious, mouth-watering Trini Pelau with coleslaw or salad and with

a generous dose of hot-sauce YUMMY!!!

INGREDIENTS:

Serves 4

• 1kg chicken, cut into bite-size pieces (thighs or drumsticks)

• 1/2 cup chopped onion, 2 cloves garlic, chopped, 2 tablespoons

chopped parsley

• 2 tablespoons chopped ginger, 2 tablespoons tomato ketchup

• 2 teaspoon of chopped fine leaf thyme and 2 teaspoons oregano

• 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

• 2 tablespoons salt, 2 teaspoons black pepper

• 5 tablespoons brown sugar

• 2 cans pigeon peas (also known as congo) or black eye peas

• 1/2 cup cubed pumpkin/squash

• 2 cups long grain or parboiled rice

• 2 cups coconut milk, 2 cups water

4


METHOD:

1. Wash and clean chicken then marinade with onion, garlic, ginger,

parsley, salt, black pepper and ketchup and set aside thyme,

oregano, Worcestershire sauce. Marinate for at least an hour or

overnight.

2. Heat a heavy pot and add sugar, sprinkling evenly over the bottom

of the pan.

3. Leave sugar to caramelize until all sugar is brown.

4. Add marinated chicken, stirring to coat all chicken in browning.

Cook for 2 to 5 minutes.

5. Drain and add peas and pumpkin/squash. Stir and cook for five

minutes.

6. Add rice and combine, mix and coat with the caramelized sugar.

7. Add coconut milk, water.

8. Bring to boil, then lower heat.

9. Season with salt and pepper to your taste.

10. Simmer until rice is cooked and all the liquid has evaporated (about

30 minutes) Use additional water if rice needs to be cooked more.

Vegetarian Option – Eliminate chicken add peas and pumpkin/squash, ¾ cup

diced sweet red pepper, ¾ cup diced carrot, ½ cup sweet corn, ¼ raisins ¾

cup diced celery- marinade with onion, garlic, ginger, parsley, salt, black

pepper, and ketchup and set aside thyme, oregano.

5


EVERY RECIP E TELLS A STORY

“At the heart of every one of my recipes is a place called Gujarat.

It’s where as long as everyone can remember, we came from,

although my family has now settled in England. In Gujarat,

cabbages and potatoes are near deities. In Lincolnshire, where they

are the main crops, the same is true. I feel as though the bones,

and the bones of my ancestors, are partly made up of these two

vegetables”

Where do recipes come from?

Meera Sodha Fresh India

Often, they have been passed down through the generations, and in so doing

reflect our lives, where we have come from and our families. By unpacking the

stories behind the recipes we can learn about each other.

Here’s a suggestion for a writing exercise to find the story behind the recipe.

6

1. Introductions - who are you, what is your recipe and who did you get

it from?

2. Writing exercise

Why did you choose the recipe?

When did you eat it, who did you share it with?

Was it a special occasion, what were you celebrating?

Where were you? Around a table, in a room, outside, at home? Or

in a public place? Describe it.

What did the food taste like, how did it smell, what colours were

on the plate?

How did you feel, what are your memories of the meal?

3. Write it up as a couple of paragraphs.

4. Write it up on a recipe card – choose a piece of paper and select a

coloured pen. Decorate the card if you wish.

5. Read it out, share with others and add it to your hamper.


A WORLD OF INGREDIENTS

Diversity and Similarity – Foods we share in common.

Breads are fundamental to many cultures – as are the things we put on them.

“Let there be work, bread, water and salt for all”

Nelson Mandela

“We have learned to see in bread an instrument of community

between men – the flavour of bread shared has no equal.”

Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Breads are common in most households but the styles are rich with variety.

There is diversity and similarity in both the breads we eat and the source of

the ingredients used to make them.

An exercise to explore these similarities and differences might be:

• What breads do you eat at home?

• When do you eat bread?

• What do you eat with your bread?

• Have you ever eaten an unusual bread that you loved?

• Ask your family and neighbours what breads they like and if they

ate different breads as children.

• Have you ever made bread?

List different types of bread: For example,

white bread, wholemeal, bagel, pitta, chapatti, corn bread, focaccia, pizza base,

injera, naan, paratha, pumpernickel, soda, sourdough, flat breads,

7


MAP YOUR INGREDIENTS

• What ingredients make bread?

• Where do those ingredients come from?

• How do they get here to us?

Research different grains (eg. wheat, rye, barley) and methods.

• What does Tilbury Port import and which countries have these grains

come from?

• What happens to the grains after they come into Tilbury?

• Where are the local mills? – eg. Rankins Flour mill, Allied Mills Ltd

• Which breads are made with these flours? Kingsmill and Sunblest.

• Historic discussions might be around windmills and watermills and

grinding grain.

• Are there bakers near you? Are there mills near you?

Jam Sandwich

What do we put in and on our bread?

An exercise here in similarities – preserves – jams, chutneys, pickles, cheeses

are common to many cultures.

Explore local produce – what happens near here?

• Tiptree Jam is a world famous jam made in Essex.

• Look at the story of fruit farming. What grows nearby? Diversity of fruits.

• What do you put in your sandwich?

• What is your favourite jam?

8


WHAT’S IN THE C ONTAINER?

Until 1967 the goods that were imported into Tilbury arrived in sacks, tea

chests and barrels etc. Since then most things come in containers, so we can’t

see what’s inside.

Here’s a list of what is going in and out of Tilbury today.

Create a map illustrating where the ingredients in your recipe come from.

(see page 21 for example)

Grain Import From Canada, Australia, Russia, Brazil, Argentina

Paper Import From Norway, Sweden, Finland, Canada

Cars Import From Korea, India, Turkey, China, Tunisia

Cars

(Jaguar, Landrover, Range Rover)

Animal Feed

(loose)

Electronics

(Samsung)

Timber Import

Export To Saudi Arabia, America, Australia, New Zealand

Import From Brazil

Import From Korea

From Ghana, Nigeria, Ivory Coast, Phillipines,

Indonesia, Scandinavia

Latex Import From Poland, Latvia, Baltic

Potatoes Import From West Ireland

Currency

(Gold, Minted sterling)

Household Rubbish Export

Fruit and Vegetables

(Bananas, Citrus fruit, Tomatoes)

Export UK to ...

To Holland & Sweden

(Fleeces made out of milk cartons.)

Import From Spain, Canaries, Egypt, Morocco

Cement

(we mix it with local Gravel)

Import From Turkey

Aid Projects Export Dept of International Development

9


MAKE YOUR OWN KITC HEN TABLE HAMP ER

AND HAND P RINTED LUNC H BOX

The Hamper will hold your story, recipe and a template to make a lunchbox.

Various printmaking techniques can be used to decorate the Hamper and the

Lunch Box

INGREDIENTS:

• 2 x A2 sheets of Card – 1 sheet for hamper and 1 sheet for lunchbox

• Brown paper sandwich bag

• Calico bags

• String for handles

• Decorative papers for collage, maps, labels, packaging

• 2 x A3 paper of hand printed fruit and vegetable images. Chosen

from your recipe.

• A3 paper for bowl and apron template.

• Recipe

• Story

• Scissors

• Craft knife

• Cutting mat

• Pencils

10


Making the Hamper:

• Draw around lunch box template on inside of the hamper (A2 card).

Fold card in half.

• Draw a second lunch box template – cut out and set aside for lunch

box (see below)

• Cut out mixing bowl and apron from paper using templates. Attach

apron ties and pocket.

• Write up and illustrate story and tuck into apron pocket.

• Write up and decorate recipe and tuck into bowl. Cut slit in bowl

for recipe.

• Decorate/collage the inside of the Hamper with your hand printed

images.

• Decorate the outside of the Hamper with the theme of ‘The World’.

Collage with maps, labels, packaging, and any suitable printed

materials.

• Attach Hamper string handles using brown tape.

• Put everything inside your Hamper and fold in half ready for your

picnic!

Making the Lunch Box:

• Trace or draw round template onto A2 card making sure to include

slits, handle detail and fold lines.

• Cut out lunch box, handle detail and slits.

•Fold the centre rectangle scoring with a craft knife along the lines.

• Assemble - put the two handles together and slid over the two

sections with the slits.

• Push down gently to secure the handles in place.

• Using printmaking methods as described below decorate flat

lunchbox shape.

11


P RINTMAKING TEC HNIQUES

The following instructions outline different printing techniques suitable for

creating images of your recipe ingredients. Images can also be drawn from

kitchen utensils and equipment. The prints will be used to decorate the Lunch

Box, brown sandwich bag, calico bags and 2 x A3 worksheets which will be

used as collage decoration for the Hamper.

1. Easy and simple printing technique that is a good introduction for

younger pupils.

a. Collect together a selection of vegetables and fruit that can easily be

cut in half and used to create a print. Try to select ingredients from

your recipes. Great for printing, apples, pears, onions, carrots,

peppers, cabbage….

b. Prepare inks, fabric paints in trays or on perspex sheets. Using either

a brush or small sponges to apply the ink. Trays can also be prepared

with a layer of ink so pupils can press the fruit or veg in to the ink.

c. Select the chosen surface to print, paper, card (lunch box) or fabric.

Remember fabric inks for fabrics so they will be fast when washed.

d. Make sure there is an even layer on the f or v and stamp on to paper,

card or fabric.

e. When the inks are dry drawings of f and v leaves, herbs and

additional details of extra ingredients can be added with pens to

create a decorative design. Fabric pens for the fabrics!

f. Kitchen utensils are also great objects to draw and add to your

designs.


2. Polystyrene sheet printing (Easy - Moderate)

Easy to moderate printing technique that is a good introduction for developing

printing skills and techniques.

a. Collect together a selection of vegetables, fruit, (try to select

ingredients from your recipes). kitchen utensils, cooking pots and

pans and crockery.

b. Produce observational line drawings from these objects. Either draw

directly on to the poly sheets or first on paper and copy.

c. Carefully transfer the drawings on to the polystyrene sheets,

pressing into the sheets with a pencil to create a groove. Cut any

excess from around the drawing leaving about 1cm all round.

Remember when you print the image will be reversed.

d. Prepare inks, fabric paints in trays or on perspex sheets. Using

either a brush or small roller to apply the ink.

e. Roll the ink evenly onto the polystyrene image.

f. Select the chosen surface to print, paper, card (lunch box) or fabric.

Remember fabric inks for fabrics so they will be fast when washed.

g. Make sure there is an even layer and press on to paper, card or fabric.

Carefully turn over and press on the reverse side with a wooden

spoon or a firm hand.

h. Peel the paper or fabric from the poly sheet carefully. Do not peel the

poly sheet from the paper as it can tear.

i. When the inks are dry drawings of f and v leaves, herbs and

additional details of extra ingredients can be added with pens to

create a decorative design. Fabric pens for the fabrics!

13


14

3. Lino printing (More difficult)

More difficult printing technique that is a good for further developing printing

skills and techniques.

a. Collect together a selection of vegetables, fruit, (try to select

ingredients from your recipes). kitchen utensils, cooking pots and

pans and crockery.

b. Produce observational line drawings from these objects. Either draw

directly on to the Lino sheets or first on paper.

c. Carefully transfer the drawings on to the Lino sheets. Reversing a

traced drawing onto the Lino is a good way to transfer the image.

Remember when you print the image will be reversed.

d. Draw over your image with a black permanent maker.

e. Using Lino cutting tools carefully cut out the unwanted Lino in order

to leave the drawn image for printing. It is often a good idea to

practice first with the tools on a small piece of scrap Lino. Health and

Safety Guidelines must be followed when using Lino cutting tools.

f. Prepare inks, fabric paints in trays or on perspex sheets. Using small

roller to apply the ink.

g. Roll the ink evenly onto the Lino image.


h. Select the chosen surface to print, paper, card (lunch box) or fabric.

Remember fabric inks for fabrics so they will be fast when washed.

i. Make sure there is an even layer and press on to paper, card or

fabric. Carefully turn over and press on the reverse side with a

wooden spoon or a firm hand.

j. Peel the paper or fabric from the Lino carefully.

k. When the inks are dry drawings of f and v leaves, herbs and

additional details of extra ingredients can be added with pens to

create a decorative design. Fabric pens for the fabrics!

Other ideas – Once you have used these skills and techniques then try working

on different papers and fabrics make up placemats, napkins, tea towels etc.


DEVELOPING OTHER ACTIVITIES FOR LITERACY

Interviewing – gathering our stories

• Ask yourself, your family, your friends, your neighbours questions

about their favourite food experiences. Using open questions ask

them what, where, why and how they felt about their experiences.

• Tell someone else’s story in writing or illustrations.

• Tell your own story to your friends

Research

• Find out about different Cultural festivals – Birthdays, Christmas,

Easter, Iftar meal at Eid celebrating the end of Ramadan. Jewish

celebrations, Chinese New Year, Diwali Carnival, Weddings, Funerals.

• What foods are prepared and eaten at these festivals?

• Do you have a personal memory of one? Tell your story

Poetry

• Do you know any good poems about food or can you find some?

• Inspired by poems you read, think of a subject to create your own

poem. It could include favourite food, messy food, least favourite

food. Where do we eat at home? Location? Who do we eat with and

what do we say? Eating outdoors.

• Many occasions can inspire poetry - School Dinners, The Birthday

Party, the picnic, trying new foods, trying unusual foods.

16


BLAC KBERRY-PIC KING

BY SEAMUS HEANEY

for Philip Hobsbaum

Late August, given heavy rain and sun

For a full week, the blackberries would ripen.

At first, just one, a glossy purple clot

Among others, red, green, hard as a knot.

You ate that first one and its flesh was sweet

Like thickened wine: summer's blood was in it

Leaving stains upon the tongue and lust for

Picking. Then red ones inked up and that hunger

Sent us out with milk cans, pea tins, jam-pots

Where briars scratched and wet grass bleached our boots.

Round hayfields, cornfields and potato-drills

We trekked and picked until the cans were full,

Until the tinkling bottom had been covered

With green ones, and on top big dark blobs burned

Like a plate of eyes. Our hands were peppered

With thorn pricks, our palms sticky as Bluebeard's.

We hoarded the fresh berries in the byre.

But when the bath was filled we found a fur,

A rat-grey fungus, glutting on our cache.

The juice was stinking too. Once off the bush

The fruit fermented, the sweet flesh would turn sour.

I always felt like crying. It wasn't fair

That all the lovely canfuls smelt of rot.

Each year I hoped they'd keep, knew they would not.

17


DEVELOPING FURTHER ACTIVITIES FOR

GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY

Mapping Restaurants in your local area

• Can you create a map of your location ? List different restaurants and

cafes and different foods served in your area.

• Arrange interviews with restaurant and café owners to talk about the

food they serve and why. It might be possible to invite them into

school to talk to the class.

• Is the restaurant or café serving food from a particular place or many

places? Take a look at the menu and try to work it out.

How has your area changed?

• Ask the restaurant and café owners how long they have been there?

What was there before?

• Ask local people what cafés and restaurants and food outlets they

remember from their childhood.

• Research how the food was sold and the different food shops people

remember.

• Compare the food shops of the past and how we buy our food now

Where does our food come from? How does it get here?

• Supermarket hunt - look at packets and read the different countries

the ingredients come from.

• Using apples as an example – how many countries can you find that

our apples come from? UK. Chile, New Zealand, France

• What is in your cupboard at home? Where is it from?

• How does it get here? Transportation – what comes through Tilbury

and local Docks? What comes by other transport and how? Where

from?

• How far does it travel? What travels the furthest?

• Can you name any food that is grown locally?

18


Variety

• Make a diary list of every type of food you had to eat on one day

eg: Corn flakes, Sugar, Milk, Bread, butter, jam, chocolate, apple,

banana, beans, sausage, rice, dahl, nan bread, cake, sweets, yoghurt,

etc

• With your partner circle all the things you ate in common, then circle

those things you had which were different.

• Talk about the usual things you eat and the special things you have

sometimes.

19


BEST RECIP E BOOK

Kitchen Table develops throughout 2018-2019 with planned walks, meals,

displays and exhibitions.

For more information do keep an eye on our websites and subscribe to our

newsletters:

www.kinetika.co.uk

www.thurrock100.com

For more details email: info@kinetika.co.uk

20


21


LIST OF USEFUL ADDRESSES

Suppliers of Aprons and calico bags:

www.bakerross.co.uk

www.craftycrocodiles.co.uk

www.stuartmorris.co.uk

www.thecleverbaggers.co.uk

Suppliers of printing inks and materials:

www.bakerross.co.uk

www.handprinted.co.uk

www.rapidonline.com

www.lawrence.co.uk

www.Ipc-stationers.co.uk

General:

Clas Ohison www.clasohison.com

Scrapstore www.thurrockplaynetwork.co.uk/pyramid-centre/scrapstore/

For information on the Docks and comings and goings of food.

http://www.tilburyandchadwellmemories.org.uk/

Trip advisor gives maps with restaurant markers.

22

Hooray! Your file is uploaded and ready to be published.

Saved successfully!

Ooh no, something went wrong!