GLLA 2018 Pride Guide

enochmiller

LA PRIDE

PARADE

AND

FESTIVAL

All you need

to know

ONE CITY

ONE PRIDE

Calendar

of events

Celebrating

LGBTQ

HEROES

OF PRIDE

THE PRIDE ISSUE

#JUSTBE

L.A. PRIDE

How the Nation’s First

Pride Parade Got Its Start


Entertainers.

Chefs.

Drag queens.

Librarians.

Trainers.

Activists.

Change makers.

Heroes.

You give West Hollywood

all the reasons to feel pride.


CONTENTS

THE PRIDE ISSUE:

08

14

22

30

LA Pride Parade and

Festival

Could there be a gayer place to

celebrate Pride? Or to just have a gay

ole good time? All you need to know.

One City One Pride

WeHo celebrates LGBTQ art, dance,

film, history, music and more.

History of LA Pride

Important Moments In SoCal LGBT

History.

Our Heroes

Morris Kight, Troy Perry, Del Whan,

Billie Jean King.

EDITORS

LETTER

The annual L.A. Pride festival and

parade are major events for the City

of West Hollywood. And they also are

major events for Greater Los Angeles.

That’s one reason why we decided to

give LA Pride its own major presence

in this issue of West Hollywood

Magazine. But we also want to call out

GayLifeLA, the only publication that

actually covers the LGBTQ community

in Greater Los Angeles.

GayLifeLA.com currently is a welltrafficked

website. Our hope is also

to turn it into a complementary

print publication. No, we won’t be

publishing stories about what Donald

Trump did two weeks ago or about the

inside fights in the state Democratic

Party. There are other local gay

publications that do that. Our focus

will be on the life and culture of our

various communities in Los Angeles

County and on the people who are

part of those cultures.

Bears, pups, otters, dykes,

twinks, daddys – we have

them covered. Health and

fitness? We know we have

some unique issues and

unique passions there. We’ve

got them covered. Our everevolving

social scene – bars

and clubs, Grindr and Scruff

– we’re on top of it. Our local

heroes (and local villains)? We

also have our eye on them.

Oh, and we’re published by real

journalists, which means we publish

the news without fear or favor.

By Henry E. (Hank) Scott

Hank Scott is editor and

publisher of WEHOville.

com, West Hollywood

Magazine and GayLife LA.


#JUSTBE

PARADE &

FESTIVAL


10 GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

11

GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

Kehlani is scheduled to perform

on June 9 on the Park stage in

2018 PRIDE FESTIVAL HEADLINER - PARK STAGE - KEHLANI

THE YEAR’S LA PRIDE IS

ALL ABOUT DIVERSITY

The slogan for this year’s LA Pride weekend is “just be,” a call out

to the diversity of the LGBTQ community and the importance of

being proud of who you are.

That diversity is evident in this year’s lineup of performers at

the annual festival, which takes place on June 9 and 10 in and

around West Hollywood Park and will include performers of all

gender and sexual and most ethnic identities. This year’s festival

will include the traditional booths occupied by non-profits and

Pride sponsors. However, given the construction underway

in West Hollywood Park, the festival will expand across San

Vicente Boulevard and incorporate the plaza outside the Pacific

Design Center.

THAT’S

EVIDENT

IN THE

LINEUP OF

PERFORMERS

ON ALL

THREE

STAGES

There will be three performance stages, the Park

Stage, Boulevard Stage and the Plaza Stage, where

a variety of performers can be found on both June

9 and 10. This year the list of performers will be

dominated by women. Two of whom -- Kehlani and

Tove Lo -- represent the social diversity of this year’s

performers.

Kehlani represents triumph over tragedy and

diversity in many ways. She was born in Oakland

to an African-American father and a mother she

has described as “mostly white, Spanish and Native

American. Her mother struggled with drug addiction

and was in prison. Her father, also a drug addict,

died young. Kehlani was raised by her grandmother.

At the young age of 14 Kehlani was recruited to

join PopLyfe, a local pop cover band. Kehlani left

the band after a fallout with its management and

struggled for years, stealing food from grocery

stores and sleeping on friends’ couches. But Nick

Cannon, a former host of America’s Got Talent, on

which Kehlani performed with PopLyfe, rescued

her and sent her to New York to work with a record

producer.

09&10

In 2015, Kehlani released her

second mixtape “You Should Be

Here,” which Billboard called the

“year’s first great R&B album.”

In 2016 she was nominated for a

Grammy award for Best Urban

Contemporary Album.

Tove Lo, who identifies as bisexual

and is known for her grunge look

on stage is a Swedish singer and

songwriter who Rolling Stone

has called “Sweden’s darkest pop

export.” Out magazine has called

her “the world’s most brutally

honest pop star” and noted that she

has been called “the world’s saddest

pop star.” Those descriptions were

a result of the release of “Out of

Mind,” a single that chronicles the

heartbreak of a broken relationship.

Tove Lo grew up in an affluent

neighborhood near Stockholm in a

family she has described as “pretty

posh,” a life the opposite of that of

Kehlani.

Early on she formed a rock band

named Tremblebee and later

worked as a songwriter, at which

she became successful. She was

offered a recording deal in 2014

and became a hit with her debut

album “Queen of the Clouds.”

Other popular albums have been

“Lady Wood,” released in October

2016 and “Blue Lips,” released in

November 2017.

2018 PRIDE FESTIVAL HEADLINER - PARK STAGE - TOVE LO

West Hollywood Park, where

Tove Lo will perform on June 10.

Icona Pop, an international pop

duo for the platinum single “I

Love It,” will perform at the Park

Stage on June 9. Also performing

there on that date will be Kim

Petras and Lauren Ruth Ward.

On June 10, you’ll find Eve,

Allie X and Jessica 6 among the

women on the Park Stage.

PARK STAGE - ICONA POP

Over at the Boulevard Stage

on San Vicente Boulevard on

June 9, Grammy-nominated

R&B singer and songwriter

Keri Hilson, known for hits

like “Knock You Down,” will

perform. Also on that stage

BOULEVARD STAGE - KERI HILSON


12 GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

13

GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

JessLove. Cece Peniston and Keke

Wyatt are the women who will be

on the Boulevard Stage on June 10.

that day will be Leikeli47 and

Jump across San Vicente Boulevard

to the PDC Plaza Stage and you’ll

find Crista Bella performing on

June 9 along with the Karisma trio.

Crista Bella will be back on June 10

along with Karol Posadas.

PLAZA STAGE - KAROL POSADAS

BOULEVARD STAGE - JESSLOVE

BOULEVARD STAGE - CECE PENISTON

BOULEVARD STAGE - KEKE WYATT

BOULEVARD STAGE - KEKE WHATT

But it’s not just

female singers!

The Park Stage will feature the male duo

Superfruit on June 9 along with Jesse Saint

John. On June 10 you’ll see Leland on the

Park Stage and Saturn Rising. Gio Bravo will

perform on the Plaza Stage on June 9 as will

Oscar Velazquez and the Tom & Collins duo. On

June 10, Kidd Madonny will be the guy on stage

And we can’t forget the drag performers,

Vanessa “Miss Vanjie” Mateo, who

will be on the Plaza Stage on June

9 and Eureka O’Hara who will

perform there on June 10.

The festival is open from noon on

Saturday until 1 a.m. on Sunday,

and then again on Sunday from

noon to 11 p.m.

General admission tickets are $25 for

a single day and $35 for a weekend

ticket. They can be purchased in

advance at the LAPride.org website.

Tickets for those 65 and over and

for veterans and active military

personnel are $15 and available

only at the entrance to the festival.

Pride this year also offers VIP

tickets that include admission to

PARK STAGE - SUPERFRUIT

PLAZA STAGE - KIDD MADONNY

PLAZA STAGE - VANESSA “MISS VANJIE”MATEO

the festival, backstage access to the

Park Stage, two free vodka drinks

and an afternoon meal. They are

$250 for a single day and $400 for

the weekend.

And then there’s the parade, which

was first staged 48 years ago at

a time public safety officers and

Los Angeles City Council members

found the concept appalling. This

year, local public figures are proud

to be featured on the floats and

in the cars that will be part of the

parade.

PLAZA STAGE - EUREKA O’HARA

It begins at 11 a.m. on Sunday, June 10,

on Santa Monica Boulevard and

Fairfax Avenue and continues for

three hours down Santa Monica to

Doheny. Attendance (which means

watching and cheering from the

sidewalk) is open to everyone.

Public safety officers will be there

to ensure everyone’s security, and

those coming to the parade are

advised not to bring anything – a

long stick, a baseball bat, a knife

and certainly not a gun – that could

be used as a weapon


14

GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

15

GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

O N E C I T Y

ONE PRIDE

LGBTQ ARTS FESTIVAL

Each year the City of West Hollywood

celebrates Pride with its One City One

Pride LGBTQ Arts Festival, which

runs from Harvey Milk Day (May 22)

to June 30. The theme for 2018 is “I

Remember,” which celebrates our

shared history and the people and

events that paved the way for LGBTQ

rights.

Some highlights of One City One Pride

in June include:

June 2 : A special full day of screenings

and panels including previews of

documentaries about the history of

the West Hollywood Aquatics Team,

AIDS activist Connie Norman, and the

creators of the rainbow flag

June 13 : Special excerpted performances

of songs from “Considering

Matthew Shepard” with a talkback

with composer Craig Hella Johnson

June 22 to 23 : New Stages presents

“Heroic Lives,” a musical based on

LGBTQ seniors’ lives created through

a workshop process

June 24 : Summer Sounds concert with

Mariachi Arcoiris de Los Angeles, the

world’s only LGBTQ Mariachi Band

June 30 : TransLife LA PoP Up Film

Festival

40

DAYS

OF

LGBTQ

ARTS

MAY 22-JUNE 30, 2018

I

RE

MEM

BER

Events and times may change. For the

latest information please visit https://

pride.wheho.org


02 06/03

The afternoon will create a fun

GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

16 GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

17

ONE CITY ONE

PRIDE DAY OF

HISTORY

Saturday, June 2

1:30 to 9:30 p.m.

City Council Chambers

625 North San Vicente Boulevard

A day of screenings and panels

around the theme of “I Remember”

that include:

1:30 p.m. - Genitalic

A documentary made by a young

filmmaker featuring older gay men

reflecting on West Hollywood, dating

and life. Running time 40 minutes,

followed by a Q&A with filmmaker

Victor Yates.

3 p.m. - Meet the Rainbow

Flag makers

Original Rainbow Flag Artists and

Their Friends.” The first rainbow flags

PHOTO CREDIT JAMES MCNAMARA

were conceived and handmade in June

1978 at the 330 Grove Gay Community

Center in San Francisco. Several of

the artists who worked on the flags

will share their stories of creating and

flying the original rainbow flags. It will

be preceded by a slideshow of “330

Grove, the People and the Flags” from

historian and 330 Grove volunteer

Glenne McElhinney. The event is copresented

by the California LGBT Arts

Alliance and Impact Stories History

Project.

PHOTO CREDIT EITAN ALMAGOR

5 p.m. - Light in the Water

Filmmaker Lis Bartlett offers a sneak

peek of a work in progress documentary

about WH20, the West

Hollywood Aquatics team. From the

team’s founding by athletes training

for the inaugural Gay Games in 1982,

through the impact of the AIDS

epidemic, and two members getting

married after marriage equality was

passed, the story of WH20 also tells

the story of West Hollywood and the

gay community at large. Running time

45 minutes followed by a Q&A.

7 p.m. - AIDS Diva: The Legend of

Connie Norman.” This is a work in

progress screening of a film about

the self-appointed “AIDS diva” and

spokesperson for ACT UP/LA in the

late 80s and early 90s Los Angeles.

Norman described herself as “exdrag

queen, ex-hooker, ex-IV drug

user, ex-high risk youth and current

post-operative transsexual woman

who is HIV positive” and simply “a

human being seeking my humanity.”

The running time is 45 minutes,

followed by a reception and a panel

moderated by Karen Ocamb and

featuring Peter Cashman, Jess Nowlin,

Mary Lucey, Paul Langlotz and Valerie

Spencer. Directed by Dante Alencastre

(“Transvisible,” 2013; “Raising Zoey,”

2016).

Admission is free with an RSVP required

online at www.weho.org/pride

CELEBRATION THEATRE

“CABARET”

June 2 - 30

Visit the Celebration Theatre at

www.celebrationtheatre.com/cabaret

for all dates and times

6760 Lexington Avenue (Celebration

at the Lex Theatre)

Celebration Theatre, the world’s oldest

LGBTQ theatre group, presents Kander

& Ebb’s dark masterpiece directed by

the multiple Ovation Award-winning

Michael Matthews. Based on the play

by John Van Druten and the stories of

Christopher Isherwood.

Tickets are $25 to $55 and can be

purchased online at

www.celebrationtheatre.com/cabaret

REACH LA PRESENTS ICE

CREAM SUNDAY FUNDAY

Sunday, June 3, 4:30 to 8 p.m.

Mickey’s WEHO

8857 Santa Monica Boulevard

PHOTO CREDIT TONY COELHO

atmosphere through artistic drag and

House/Ballroom performance, featuring

3 House/Ballroom categories (Sex Siren,

Vogue and Runway). Presented with

Micky’s and Stefano Rosso. Creating a

fun atmosphere through artistic drag

and House/Ballroom performance.

Admission is free.

VOX FEMINA

Sunday, June 3, 3 to 5 p.m.

Congregation Kol Ami

1200 North La Brea Avenue

VOX Femina, an all-female choir that

debuted during a concert with Gay

Men’s Chorus of Los Angeles, performs

songs that offer tales of love, songs of

protest and hymns of praise from the

hills of Appalachia to the stages in

Greenwich Village. Admission is free

with an RSVP required. It can be made

online at https://bit.ly/2rsE0lX.

PHOTO CREDIT FRANK LAVERT

RAINBOW KEY AWARDS

Tuesday, June 5

6 to 8:30 p.m.

City Council Chambers, 625 North San

Vicente Boulevard.

A City of West Hollywood event

honoring people and groups who

have made outstanding contributions

to the LGBTQ. Admission is free.

This year’s honorees are:

- Rudy Akbarian, openly transgender

member of the U.S. Army who has

served as a mentor to other Trans

service members;

- Kathy Griffin, actor-comedian and

fierce LGBT ally;

- Matt Palazzolo, co-founder of Equal

Roots and a longtime member of the

Lesbian and Gay Advisory Board,

who died in January;

- Brian Pendleton, founder of Cause

Force and a leader of last year’s

#ResistMarch;

- Bamby Salcedo, trans activist who

has worked on issues such as

immigration, HIV, incarceration, and

Latinx communities; and

- Elizabeth Savage, longtime activist

who recently retired after 22 years

with the City of West Hollywood

working for LGBT rights, affordable

housing and aging-in-place.

06/06

IDEAL HOME - OUTFEST

WEST HOLLYWOOD SERIES.

Wednesday, June 6, 7:30 to 9 p.m.

City Council Chambers, 625 North San

Vicente Boulevard

06/05


GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

18 GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

19

06/16

PHOTO CREDIT THE FILM COLLABORATIVE

A pre-release screening of “Ideal

Home,” a comedy from director

Andrew Fleming (“The In-Laws,” “The

Craft”) that stars Steve Coogan and

Paul Rudd as Erasmus and Paul, a

bickering gay couple. Their lives are

turned inside out when a ten-year old

boy shows up at their door claiming to

be Erasmus’ grandson. Followed by a

Q&A with the filmmaker.

Tickets are $10 and can be purchased

at www.outfest.org/weho-series

DYKE MARCH

Friday, June 8, 6 to 10 p.m.

Sal Guarriello Veterans Memorial

8447 Santa Monica Boulevard

The annual Dyke March event,

produced by the City of West

Hollywood, begins at Sal Guarriello

Memorial at 6 p.m. with a live set

with Claudette Sexy DJ and a protest

sign making workshop led by artist

Julianna Parr with all materials

provided. There will be a rally with

speakers at 7 p.m. At 7:45 p.m. the

march begins down Santa Monica

Boulevard to San Vicente Boulevard

and back. At 9 p.m. there will live DJ

sets from Claudette Sexy DJ, WASI,

Kaleena Zanders and Niña Dioz.

Admission is free.

06/09

LA PRIDE FESTIVAL

Saturday: Noon to 1 a.m.

Sunday: 11 am to 11 pm

West Hollywood Park, 647 North San

Vicente Boulevard

The LA Pride Festival has been

organized by Christopher Street West

since the 1970s. Headliners include

Kehlani and Tove Lo, and the #SIZZLE

sober area will return. Tickets are

$25 for one day and $35 for both days

and can be purchased online at www.

lapride.org

06/10

LA PRIDE PARADE

Sunday, June 10, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Santa Monica Boulevard in West

Hollywood (between Crescent Heights

and Doheny)

PHOTO CREDIT DERICK WANKER

PHOTO CREDIT DERICK WANKER

The LA Pride Parade is the oldest pride

parade in the world and has been taking

place in West Hollywood since before

cityhood. It takes place on Santa Monica

Boulevard, beginning at Crescent

Heights and ending on Doheny.

06/12

REAL BOY: HUMAN RIGHTS

SPEAKERS SERIES

Tuesday, June 12, 6:30 to 9 p.m.

City Council Chambers, 625 North San

Vicente Boulevard

“Real Boy” is an intimate story of a

family in transition. As 19-year-old

Bennett Wallace navigates sobriety,

adolescence and the evolution of his

gender identity, his mother makes her

own transformation from resistance

to acceptance of her trans son. Light

refreshments will be offered before

the screening and a panel discussion

featuring filmmaker Shaleece Haas

will follow. Admission is free and RSVP

required at www.bit.ly/WeHoHRSS_

RealBoy.

06/13

PHOTO CREDIT MARLEE CRAWFORD

UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI

OUR JOURNEY WITH

MATTHEW SHEPARD

Wednesday, June 13, 7:30 to 9 p.m.

City Council Chambers, 625 North San

Vicente Boulevard

Grammy-winning conductor Craig

Hella Johnson and Conspirare choir

members share the story behind

creating “Considering Matthew Shepard”

in an intimate evening of song and

conversation. Admission is free, with an

RSVP required that can be made online

www.weho.org/pride.

06/15

TRANSPRIDE

Friday, June 15, 7 to 10 p.m. and

Saturday, June 16, 12 to 9:30

p.m. LA LGBT Center, 1125 North

McCadden Place, Los Angeles

Friday night will feature Big Queer

Convo, and Saturday will feature a

panel focusing on the gender nonconforming/non-binary

community

along with a clothing swap, self-defense

workshop, resource fair, dancing

and a variety show. Admission is free.

CELEBRATING ALL LIFE AND

CREATION POW WOW

Saturday, June 16 , 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Plummer Park, 7377 Santa Monica

Boulevard

Join Red Circle Project of APLA Health

for a full day of traditional Native

American music, dance, crafts and food,

along with HIV testing and prevention

resources. Admission is free.

06/19

CELEBRATION THEATRE’S

CHUCK ROWLAND AWARD

Tuesday, June 19, 7 to 8:30 p.m.

City Council Chambers, 625 North San

Vicente Boulevard

Celebration Theatre presents this

year’s Chuck Rowland Award to Billy

Porter, along with a reading of his

semi-autobiographical play, “While I

Yet Live.” Admission is free.

PHOTO CREDIT WES WHEADON

06/20

WEST HOLLYWOOD ARTISTS

AND ICONS: WHEN BETTE

MET MAE

Wednesday, June 20, 7 p.m. to 8:30

p.m. City Council Chambers, 625

North San Vicente Boulevard

The first meeting of West Hollywood

resident Bette Davis and screen icon

Mae West took place in 1972. That

evening’s conversation was captured

on cassette tape, and 40 years later

this film by Wes Wheadon is the first

effort in history to create video from

an authentic live tape. The screening

will be followed by a brief discussion

with Wheadon and a panel of people

involved in the film. Admission is

free. An RSVP is required and can be

made online at www.weho.org/pride.

PHOTO CREDIT SASHI PETERSON

NEW STAGES: “HEROIC LIVES”

Friday, June 22 and Saturday,

June 23, 7 to 9 p.m.

City Council Chambers, 625 North San

Vicente Boulevard

“Heroic Lives” is about the people who

changed our world, told by the people

who were there. Presented with the

LA LGBT Center’s Senior Services

Department and through a grant from

the City of West Hollywood’s Arts

Division, “Heroic Lives is directed by

Mark Salyer and Kay Cole and the

music directed by Debbie Lawrence.

Admission is free but those attending

are asked to RSVP by calling (323)

860-5830 or emailing seniors@

lalgbtcenter.org and referencing

event #0410.


DRAG QUEEN STORY HOUR

Saturday, June 23, 11 to 11:45 a.m.

West Hollywood Library Community

Meeting Room, 625 North San Vicente

Boulevard

Bring the kids and join the City of West

Hollywood’s Arts Division and the West

Hollywood Library for “Drag Queen Story

Hour.” Admission is free.

ALAP PRIDE PLAY READING

FESTIVAL

Saturday, June 23, 6 to 7:30 p.m.

Plummer Park Plummer Park, Rooms 1 & 2,

7377 Santa Monica Boulevard

The annual ALAP (Alliance of Los Angeles

Playwrights) Pride Play Reading Festival

features short plays around the theme

“I Remember: Our Stories, Our Courage,

Our Joy.” Admission is free with an RSVP

required at www.weho.org/pride.

SUMMER SOUNDS: MARIACHI

ARCOIRIS DE LOS ANGELES

Sunday, June 24, 5 to 6:30 p.m.

Plummer Park, 7377 Santa Monica

Boulevard

A free outdoor concert with Mariachi

Arcoiris de Los Angeles, the first and

only LGBTQ mariachi group in the

world. Free admission with seating

first come, first served. Guests are

asked to RSVP at www.weho.org/

pride.

WOMEN IN FILM: “JEWEL’S

CATCH ONE”

Monday, June 25, 7 to 9 p.m.

City Council Chambers, 625 North San

Vicente Boulevard

The documentary “Jewel’s Catch

One” chronicles four decades of

the oldest black-owned disco in

America and establishes the legacy of

businesswoman, activist, and healer

Jewel Thais-Williams. The screening

will be followed by a panel discussion.

Admission is free for WIF members

and $10 non-members. An RSVP is

required at https://womeninfilm.org/

speaker-series.

DOYOU: MEMOIRS OF

PROMETHEAN SISTERS

June 25 - 29, 1 to 5 p.m

Plummer Park’s Long Hall

7377 Santa Monica Boulevard

Yozmit will create a wearable art

installation as a performance shrine

in the Long Hall/Plummer Park, one

of the historic LGBTQ places in West

Hollywood. Admission is free.

LAMBDA LIT BOOK CLUB

Tuesday, June 26, 7 to 8:30 PM

West Hollywood Library Community

Meeting Room, 625 North San Vicente

Boulevard

Inaugural West Hollywood City

poet laureate Steven Reigns and the

Lambda Lit Book Club discuss “Simon

vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda” by

Becky Albertalli. Admission is free.

OUTFEST WEHO:COMMUNITY

COLLABORATOR FILM GUIDE

REVIEW

Wednesday, June 27, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.

City Council Chambers, 625 North San

Vicente Boulevard

06/29

GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

20 GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

21

06/24

06/25

PHOTO CREDIT KYLE KUPRESS

06/27

06/30

Outfest’s festival programmers invite

the public for a preview of the Outfest

Los Angeles LGBTQ Film Festival lineup.

Admission is free with an RSVP required

at www.outfest.org/weho-series.

NELLY QUEEN: THE LIFE AND

TIMES OF JOSÉ SARRIA

Friday, June 29, 7 to 9 p.m.

City Council Chambers, 625 North San

Vicente Boulevard

At the unexpected intersections of

politics and high camp, this preview

of “Nelly Queen” reveals an intimate

portrait of the Latino civil rights

pioneer whose heroic drag has been

overlooked as a cornerstone of the

LGBTQ rights movement. Admission

is free with donations accepted.

TRANSLIFE LA POP UP

FILM FESTIVAL

Saturday, June 30, 2 to 7 p.m.

City Council Chambers, 625 North

San Vicente Boulevard

This first annual one-day film

festival features films created by

and featuring transgender and

gender non-conforming filmmakers,

artists, actors and themes along with

filmmaking/acting workshops and

an opening reception. Admission is

free with an RSVP required at www.

popupfilmfestival.org.

ART EXHIBITIONS

LAAA “OUT THERE EXHIBIT

Friday, June 8, 6 to 9 p.m.

opening reception:

LAAA/Gallery 825, 825 North

La Cienega Boulevard.

“Out There” is an all media exhibition

by the LA Art Association during the

City’s One City One Pride festival.

Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

daily except Mondays through June

15. Admission is free.

ADELAIDE DRIVE:

CHRISTOPHER ISHERWOOD

AND DON BACHARDY

On view through the end of June

West Hollywood Library, 625 North

San Vicente Boulevard.

The city’s Arts Division presents a

new exhibit featuring photography

by Wayne Shimabukuro and original

artworks by Bachardy. Bachardy and

novelist Christopher Isherwood were

a couple for over 30 years and lived

together in Santa Monica on Adelaide

Drive, which provides the name of

the exhibit. On view during regular

library hours (Monday through

Thursday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Friday

and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and

Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Closed

holidays and June 8 through 10.

LOST & FOUND: SAFER

SEX ACTIVISM

On exhibit through June.

ONE Gallery, 626 North Robertson

Boulevard

This exhibit examines 30 years

of inspiring and defiant safer sex

and harm-reduction activism. The

exhibition presents safer sex posters,

comics, brochures, videos, PSAs and

safer sex and clean needle kits, among

other archival items, all from the

collections at ONE National Gay &

Lesbian Archives at USC Libraries.

On view Thursdays through Sundays,

11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 3 to 6 p.m. Closed

Mondays through Wednesdays and on

June 9 and 10.

TINY TIM’S SHOWCASE

On view through June

Circus of Books, 8230 Santa Monica

Boulevard

Tiny Tim’s Showcase is a window

display and performance series that

reimagines the history of this corner,

from the 20s to the present.

LGBTQ HEROES AND HISTORY

PANEL DISPLAYS

On view through June

8120 Santa Monica Boulevard

The city’s Arts Division in collaboration

with the ONE Archives presents this

outdoor exhibition of LGBTQ history

and heroes on fencing along Santa

Monica Boulevard


LA PRIDE

HISTORY


GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

24 GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

25

L.A. PRIDE

HOW THE NATIONS’S FIRST PRIDE PARADE

GOT ITS START AND WHERE IT IS NOW

With several hundred thousand people descending

upon 1.9 square miles, Los Angeles Pride is the largest

gathering of LGBT people and their allies in Southern

California. What many people don’t realize is that the

fabulously colorful parade, which has long been the

centerpiece of Pride weekend, was the first of its kind

in the nation when it began in 1970.

1971-2009

It was nearly one year after the Stonewall riots of June

1969, when Reverend Bob Humphries (United States

Mission founder), Morris Kight (Gay Liberation Front

founder), and Reverend Troy Perry (Universal Fellowship

of Metropolitan Community Churches founder) gathered

to plan a commemoration. They settled on a parade down

Hollywood Boulevard. But homosexuality was still illegal

in the state of California at the time, so securing a permit

from the city was no easy task.

Rev. Perry has recalled the L.A. Police Chief Edward M.

Davis telling him, “As far as I’m concerned, granting

a permit to a group of homosexuals to parade down

Hollywood Boulevard would be the same as giving a

permit to a group of thieves and robbers.” Grudgingly,

the Police Commission granted the permit, though there

1970

were fees exceeding $1.5 million. After the American

Civil Liberties Union stepped in, the commission

dropped all its requirements but a $1,500 fee for police

service. That, too, was dismissed when the California

Superior Court ordered the police to provide protection

as they would for any other group.

All that negotiation left the team with only two days to

throw together a parade before the June 28 anniversary.

In Los Angeles, the parade was a display of pride,

complete with a float from the Advocate magazine,

loaded with men in swimsuits, and a conservative gay

group clad in business suits. Immediately, there was

talk of making it an annual event. It would become the

model for Pride celebrations across the nation.

After controversial parade

entries in 1971 and 1972,

and internal disagreements,

the parade went on hiatus

in 1973. But it was back in

1974, when pioneering gay

filmmaker Pat Rocco came up

with the idea for a festival to

accompany the parade. The

first festival was a carnival

with rides, games, food, and

information booths held in a Hollywood parking lot at

Sunset and Cherokee. But continued LAPD hostility, as

well as redevelopment in Hollywood, led Pride to move

to what would become the city of West Hollywood in

1979. The parade and festival have found a welcoming

home there ever since.

Through the decades, LA Pride has offered an

opportunity for the LGBT community to celebrate

who we are and what we’ve accomplished and bring

attention to the work that’s still to be done. In the

1970s, the focus was largely on sexual liberation. In the

1980s, the community was primarily concerned with

empowerment in the face of the emerging HIV/AIDS

epidemic. In the 1990s, Pride was a platform for social

equality. Marriage equality has been a major issue in

the 2000s, along with family and relationship equality.

In 2017, the LA Pride parade gave way to the Resist

March, a demonstration about efforts by Donald Trump

to roll back rights and protections of LGBT people,

women and immigrants.


26 GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

27

GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

2010

AND

BEYOND

This decade got off to a trailblazing start. In 2010, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio

Villaraigosa opened the doors to the Getty House, the official mayor’s residence,

for the first-ever LA Pride Garden Party. Then, in 2011, he declared June as LGBT

Heritage Month in the city of Los Angeles, an enormous milestone. That year, the

Pride parade also included more than 350 students from the Los Angeles Unified

School District, the largest youth group contingent ever.

The replacement of the Pride parade in 2017 by the Resist March was mourned by

many, who are likely to be excited to find the parade back this year.


AL FRESCO

AT THE TAM!

Cocktails, Delivered.

Our fabulous new patio is one-of-a-kind,

just like everything else at The Tam.

Join us around the fireplace for specialty cocktails,

craft beers, and delicious “Pub & Patio Faer”!

WITH CRAFT COCKTAILS ON-DEMAND YOU'LL GET ALL THE INGREDIENTS AND

GARNISHES TO MAKE WORLD-CLASS COCKTAILS AT YOUR HOME OR OFFICE.

GET YOURS @ PINKDOT.COM/COCKTAILS

2980 Los Feliz Blvd, Los Angeles 90039

323/664 0228 • TamOShanter.com

THE TASTE

OF

CELEBRATION

SINCE 1 938

More than fine dining,

the Lawry’s The Prime Rib

experience is legendary

pinkdot.com

PinkDotLA

Beverly Hills | 3 1 0.360.628 1

LawrysOnline.com


GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

30 GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

31

OUR HEROES:

AN EMPLOYEE OF USC, SHE

FORCED THE UNIVERSITY TO

RECOGNIZE LGBT PEOPLE

Del Whan (1941 - ) These days Del Whan, who lives in Long

Beach, describes herself as a “pet sitter.” That evokes an

image of a passive and quiet woman, content to stay at home

with her dog. In so doing it belies both Whan’s early history

as a lesbian activist and her continuing advocacy today for

environmental protection, animal rights and the legalization

of marijuana, among other things.

DEL

WHAN

1975

In a chapter in “Old Lesbians and Their Brief Moments of

meetings, classes, dances and other events. Failing to

Fame,” Whan describes what got her out of the gay closet. It

attract the volunteers and money it needed, the GWSC

was 1970, and she was director of the foreign language lab

closed in 1972.

at the University of Southern California. Her nights out were

at “gay girl” bars in Los Angeles. During the day, she writes,

Whan remained active in Morris Kight’s Gay Liberation

“I suffered from hangovers, internalized homophobia, eye

Front and for a while was a member of the Lesbian

twitches and muscle cramps from hiding in the closet.” Then,

Feminists, a group that saw oppression of all as an issue

feeling a little apprehension, she went to hear a speech on

as big as homophobia. Whan eventually pulled out of that

campus that spring by gay activist Morris Kight.

group, but she continued to speak speaking out against

oppression, whether by the Republican Party, Wall Street

Kight invited his gay listeners to visit the Gay Liberation

bankers, the oil industry or the Sultan of Brunei.

Front, which he had founded, in Silver Lake. Soon Whan

was picketing a Los Angeles Police station and working with

Kight and others to create the nation’s first gay pride parade.

“I suffered from

hangovers,

internalized

homophobia,

eye twitches and

muscle cramps

from hiding in

the closet.”

Whan also stepped boldly out of the closet at USC, founding

the Gay Liberation Forum with a group of students, staff

members and faculty. In 1971, the USC Board of Trustees

refused to recognize the GLF as a legitimate student

organization. Whan pressed on, holding GLF meetings at the

Religious Center off the USC campus. For a long time she was

the only woman in the group. She hung out with gay male

students, going to their apartments to listen to Judy Garland

records.

It wasn’t until 1975 that the trustees officially recognized the

group as the “Gay Student Union,” responding from threats

by gay alumni that they would cut off their donations.

Meanwhile, Whan was making other moves. In 1970, the

year she formed GLF, she also created the Gay Women’s

Services Center (GWSC) in Echo Park, the first lesbian social

services center in the nation. It hosted consciousness-raising


GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

32 GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

33

OUR HEROES:

MORRIS

KIGHT

A FOUNDER OF THE

LA PRIDE PARADE

AND THE LA LGBT

CENTER

what Black Power was to the NAACP:

much more radical. He was 50 years

old then and described himself as a

“Sugar Daddy without the sugar.”

The GLF, Kight said, was to “break

the chains” of a “racist, sexist,

imperialistic system.” That reached

beyond the LGBT community. In

1967 Kight founded the “Dow Action

Committee” in 1967 to protest Dow

Chemical’s production of Agent

Orange and napalm, herbicides and

defoliants used during the Vietnam

War. Many LGBT people refused to

join Kight in that and other battles,

and some called him a “Communist

sympathizer.”

Morris Kight (Nov. 19, 1919 –

Jan. 19, 2003). You’re standing

on Santa Monica Boulevard,

watching the LA Gay Pride

floats and marchers move by?

You have Morris Kight to thank

for that. You’re at the LA Gay

& Lesbian Center, getting an

STD check? You have Morris

Kight to thank for that.

You’re considering checking

into the Van Ness Recovery

Center? You have Morris

Kight to thank for that.

Kight, who grew up in

Comanche County, Texas,

moved to northern New Mexico

in 1951 and to Los Angeles in

1958. Kight wasn’t just gay. He

was radical and gay, and proud

of it. He took his time getting

there. According to “Gay LA:

A History of Sexual Outlaws, Power

Politics, and Lipstick Lesbians,”

the definitive account of the LGBT

movements early years, in his earliest

days in Los Angeles Kight carried a

sign saying he was a “Heterosexual

in Support of Gay Rights” (and he did

have two daughters, born during his

time in New Mexico.)

After the famous Stonewall Riots in

New York City, an emboldened Kight

helped found the LA chapter of the

Gay Liberation Front, which was to

the existing gay rights movement

Never one to miss an opportunity to

stir the homophobic hornets nest,

Kight turned a proposal for the gay

community to take over sparsely

populated Alpine County, which is in

Sierra Nevada, between Lake Tahoe

and Yosemite National Park, into

a massive publicity stunt. He put

together a press release announcing

that 479 gays would move to Alpine,

demand a special election and take

over every county office. Kight

announced that soon Alpine would

be home to the first American

lesbian and gay university. The

announcement was covered by

the Associated Press and UPI and

hundreds of local newspapers and

radio stations, including the thenhomophobic

Los Angeles Times.

Kight founded the Christopher

Street West gay pride parade in

1970, facing opposition from L.A.

1971

Police Chief Edward Davis, who rejected an

invitation to join the parade in 1975 with a letter

saying he would “much rather celebrate ‘gay

conversion week’ which I will gladly sponsor

when the medical practitioners in this country

find a way to convert gays to heterosexuals.”

Eventually Kight and other GLF members began

focusing on the LGBT community rather than

the heterosexual culture that they saw as its

enemy. Kight worked with John Platania and Don

Kilhefner to establish the Van Ness Recovery

House, a rehab facility for gay men that is in

operation today. In 1971 he worked with others

to create what is now the Los Angeles Gay &

Lesbian Center, the largest such organization in

the world.

Kight died in 2003 at the age of 83. The City of

Los Angeles dedicated the corner of Hollywood

Boulevard and McCadden Place as “Morris Kight

Square.” It was the place at which the LA Pride

Parade, the first in the world, used to begin its

march.


GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

34 GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

35

OUR HEROES:

BILLIE

J E A N

KING

Billie Jean King (Novembeer 22,

1943-) Billie Jean King, a Long Beach

native who studied at California

State University-Los Angeles, is a

tennis icon who bested self-identified

chauvinist Bobby Riggs in the highly

publicized 1973 “Battle of the Sexes”

match that attracted an estimated 50

million viewers around the world.

A WORLD-CLASS

TENNIS PLAYER,

KING CAME OUT

OF THE CLOSET

AND BECAME A

POWERFUL LGBT

RIGHTS ADVOCATE

The Times of London. “I’ve got a

homophobic family, a tour that

will die if I come out, the world

is homophobic and, yeah, I was

homophobic. If you speak with

gays, bisexuals, lesbians and

transgenders, you will find a lot of

homophobia because of the way we

all grew up.”

King married in 1965 but filed for

divorce in 1987. While married

she began an affair with another

woman that ended in an acrimonious

lawsuit in 1981 that made public her

attraction to women. She reportedly

lost $2 million in endorsements as a

result.

King embraced her lesbian identity

and became an LGBT rights advocate.

She founded the Women’s Tennis

Association and the Women’s Tennis

Foundation and is involved in the

Elton John AIDS Foundation.

King was a tennis phenomenon from

an early age. In 1961 she became

world famous when, at the age of 17,

she won the women’s double’s title at

Wimbledon. Supporters in Long Beach

had raised $2,000 to send her there.

King won 39 Grand Slam titles during

her tennis career, with six of them at

the world-famous Wimbledon.

While King knew during her 20s that

she was a lesbian, being raised in a

homophobic family and culture kept

her in the closet.

“I couldn’t get a closet deep enough,”

King said in an interview with

King received a Presidential Medal of

Freedom in 2009 and was tapped in

2014 to be part of the U.S. delegation

to the Winter Olympics in Sochi.

She missed the opening ceremony

because of her mother’s health

problems (she died in February of

that year) and attended the closing

ceremony instead. Her inclusion was

perceived as a political statement to

the anti-LGBT laws recently passed

in Russia. The laws included bans

on gay adoptions, “propaganda of

nontraditional sexual relations,”

gay pride events and providing

children with information about

homosexuality. As a result, many

LGBT people protested the decision to

hold the Olympics in Sochi.


36

GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

37

GAYLIFE LA PRIDE ISSUE SUMMER 2018

OUR HEROES:

T R OY

PERRY

A CONSERVATIVE

CHRISTIAN ONCE

MARRIED TO A

WOMAN, PERRY

ENDED UP FOUNDING

THE LARGEST LGBT

CHURCH IN THE

WORLD

Troy Perry (July 27, 1940 ). Even as a

young man growing up in Tallahassee,

Florida, Troy Perry says he was a

“religious fanatic.” By the time he was 15

he was a Baptist preacher. By the time he

was 19, he was married to the daughter

of another preacher, with whom he had

two sons. He attended the conservative

Midwest Bible College and Moody Bible

Institute in Chicago and became a Church

of God minister before he turned 21.

continued to be pushed out of the closet

despite himself. One day his wife found

a copy of “The Homosexual in America,”

described as “one of the most influential

works in the history of the gay rights

movement,” under their mattress and

ended their marriage.

Perry spent time as a store clerk and two

years in the Army. In 1968, he saw the

police arrest his date for the night at the

Black Cat Tavern, a gay bar in Silver Lake.

That inspired him to return to preaching,

but this time to a gay audience. Three

years later Perry’s congregation swelled

to more than 1,000 people and it opened

its own church at 22nd and Union streets

in Los Angeles, which was destroyed by a

fire of mysterious origin in 1973.

Perry was interested in diversity in his

congregation and welcomed people of

color. He even had lesbians dressed in

suits serve as ushers. He encouraged

the creation of a lesbian group within

the church called De Colores. While

founding a Christian church for an

LGBT congregation was radical for

its time, Perry’s religious philosophy

was conservative. Nevertheless he

encouraged his congregants to join

even the Los Angeles Gay Liberation

Front, a group that disdained the more

mainstream efforts at acceptance of

other homophile organizations.

Even as he was preaching the Holy

Scripture Perry was struggling with an

attraction to other men. He was forced to

leave his Church of God ministry when

one sexual partner told church leaders

about a liaison. He and his wife and

children moved to Southern California,

where he became minister at a Church

of God of Prophecy. In California, Perry

Today the MCC, a Protestant denomination,

has 222 member congregations in 37

countries and continues to focus on LGBT

people. Perry lives in Los Angeles with his

long term partner, Phillip Ray De Blieck,

who he married under Canadian law

at Metropolitan Community Church of

Toronto.


The City of West Hollywood's Arts Division

presents the

2018 One City One Pride

LGBTQ Arts Festival

Celebrating pride in 2018 with the festival

theme “I Remember” which honors our

shared history, and the people and events

which paved the way for the rights we

hold dear today. Some highlights:

June 2: a full day of screenings and panels

including sneak peeks at new documentaries on

the West Hollywood Aquatics Team and Connie

Norman, transgender AIDS activist

June 13: composer Craig Hella Johnson presents

a preview of Considering Matthew Shepard and Q

& A as part of the 20th anniversary

commemoration of Matthew Shepard's death

June 20: Screening of ‘When Bette Met Mae’

June 22-23: New Stages present Heroic Lives, an

original musical based on the life stories of, and

performed by, LGBTQ seniors

June 24: Summer Sounds concert with Mariachi

Arcoiris, the world's only LGBTQ mariachi

Adelaide Drive: Christopher Isherwood and Don

Bachardy exhibition at the West Hollywood

Library

Heroes and History of The LGBTQ Civil Rights

Movement display at Santa Monica Blvd and

Crescent Heights

More info at weho.org/pride or

@WeHoArts and @WeHoCity


CELEBRATING PRIDE

IN WEST HOLLYWOOD

Obica in Sunset Plaza

obica.com

Sunset Plaza


"Keeping WeHo's down under

tight since 2013"

trainingmatela.com

323-380-5492

LOVE

FROZEN DESSERT

8826 MELROSE AVENUE WEST HOLLYWOOD CA 90069

PHONE: 310.276.1900 WWW.CRAIGS.LA

FOLLOW US @CRAIGSLA


Stop worrying about

what they see on top.

CELEBRATE PRIDE WITH

Scalp MicroPigmentation

Get intimate again with a bold, shaved look.

Pioneered and perfected by the doctors at

LA’s New Hair Institute, SMP is a permanent

cosmetic “tattoo” that mimics the very short

hairs of a closely shaved scalp.

Real Patients

(we have the best ones)

LAPCG

10% OFF ALL HOUSE COLLECTIONS:

T H C

SPECIALE

SUNFLOWER

FLOWER + PRE-ROLLS

JUNE 9TH // 11AM-7:50PM

JUNE 10TH // 12PM-6:50PM

7213 SANTA MONICA BLVD.

L A M E D I C A L M A R I J U A N A . C O M

Los Angeles

11620 Wilshire Blvd. Suite 280

Los Angeles, CA 90025

(888) NEW-HAIR

www.newhair.com

Orange County

22 Odyssey, Suite 155

Irvine, CA 92618

(888) NEW-HAIR


TAKE IT WITH

PRIDE

DROP IT

WHEREVER

WHENEVER

• Private walled & gated estate

• Private casitas - sleeps 2-10

• 6 blocks from downtown

• Warm saltwater pool

• Weddings/ Events

PAPA

Discreet, exact dosing, drop-by-drop

of cannabis tinctures.

papaandbarkley.com

papaandbarkley.com

The City of Palm Springs ID #1623 TOT-4796

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines