The Pioneer, Vol. 51 Issue 9

thepioneer

The June 4, 2018 issue of The Pioneer — Pierce College Fort Steilacoom's student news publication in Lakewood, Washington.

June 4, 2018 / Vol. 51, Issue 9

Pierce College Fort Steilacoom’s student news publication, Est. 1974

How is

Social Media

impacting us?

page 20

Things to do

outdoors

this summer

pages 22-23

Catch a glimpse

of who’s

retiring this year

pages 8, 10, 13


THE

Editorial

PNAJE 2018 WINNERS IN

COLLEGE JOURNALISM CONTEST

The Pioneer staff earned three, second-place

awards this year along with numerous individual

awards in the 2018 Student Journalism Contest.

Sponsored by the Pacific Northwest Association

of Journalism Educators, the contest is open to

community, technical and small four-year institutions

in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and

Alaska. The contest drew in 339 entries, according

to contest coordinator Liz Wishaw.

In the publications sweeps category, which

counted the most first-, second- and third-place

finishes for a school, The Pioneer placed second as

well as second in best website. Pioneer production

manager Debbie Denbrook earned second in the

individual sweeps category.

Pioneer current and former staff members

winning awards included Marina Chetverikov,

Lorelei Watson, Justin Ngo, Chrystal Patterson,

Megan Quint, Megan Sokol, Hannah Nguyen,

Beatrix Cendana, Carl Carallas, Craig T. Hiblar and

SuYoung Park.

The results of the PNAJE contest reflect that

student journalism is healthy and kicking in the

Pacific Northwest,” PNAJE president Rich Riski of

Peninsula College said. “PNAJE believes the role

of a vibrant Fourth Estate is well served by this

generation of student journalists shining a light of

truth and inclusion through creative storytelling

and reporting.”

The staff of 18 judges included communications

professionals who work or worked for publications

across the United States such as The (Tacoma)

News Tribune, Tacoma Weekly, The Peninsula

Gateway, McClatchy Newspapers, The Detroit

News, Ludington (Mich.) Daily News, Holland

(Mich.) Sentinel and MSN.com. Other judges

included communication professors from Western

Washington, Pacific Lutheran University and Everett

Community College.

“Thanks to all the judges, retiring adviser Michael

Parks, and PNAJE contest coordinator Liz

Wishaw for carrying this contest into the future,”

Riski said.

2 / piercepioneernews.com

Editorial Manager

Marji Harris

maharris@pierce.ctc.edu

Co-Production Managers

Marina Chetverikov

mchetverikov@pierce.ctc.edu

Debbie Denbrook

ddenbrook@pierce.ctc.edu

Social Media Manager

Amber Smith

ansmith@pierce.ctc.edu

Web Manager

Marina Chetverikov

mchetverikov@pierce.ctc.edu

Web: piercepioneernews.com

Email: pioneer@pierce.ctc.edu

Facebook: piercepioneernews

Twitter: @piercepioneer

Phone:253-964-6604

Room: CAS 323

Staff

ABOUT THE COVER:

Graduates add decorations to

graduation caps as a symbol of

their achievements in life.

Alyssa Wilkins /

Staff Photo Illustration

Letters to The Editor

Have an opinion on our articles or about campus events, policy?

Write a letter to the editor and send to:

pioneer@pierce.ctc.edu.

We cannot publish letters that are anonymous.

THE PIONEER MISSION STATEMENT

Multimedia Manager

Justin Ngo

jngo@pierce.ctc.edu

Jennifer Burgess

Alyssa Wilkins

Beatrix Cendana

Carl Carallas

Hannah Nguyen

Nick Nelson

Lorelei Watson

Freelancers

Ashley Weaver

Caleb Hensin

Jam’mya N. Broussard

The Pioneer is an official publication of the Associated Students of Pierce College and is

sanctioned as such by the college’s Board of Trustees and funded primarily by student fees. It

is a public forum for student expression since 1974.

The Pioneer’s mission is:

(1) to inform the student body of issues and events of interest, relevance and importance;

(2) to provide students with a forum for discussion, opinion and expression; and

(3) to provide the student body with editorial leadership.

In carrying out this mission, The Pioneer will use as its ethical guide the Statement of

Principles adopted by the American Society of Newspaper Editors. Although it will strive to

represent the diverse views and interests of the student body, The Pioneer is not responsible

for representing, endorsing or promoting any person, group, organization or activity.

June 4, 2018 / Vol. 51, Issue 9

CONTENTS

CAMPUS SAFETY

New director

has positive outlook

EVENT CALENDAR

List of campus events

DOG IN CARS

Hot days ahead,

leave dogs at home

LGTBQ COMMUNITY

Resources

available to students

JOHN SIMPSON

A beloved history professor retires

BRIAN MARTIN

Digital program won’t be

the same without him

MICHAEL PARKS

Pioneer adviser retires

after 29 years

NEW GOLF CLUB

Washington colleges agree

to future tourney

SOCIAL HARM

Talk to friends about

unhealthy eating images

AFRICAN-AMERICAN MUSIC

Celebrate a rich history this month

OUTDOOR ADVENTURES

Get out this summer and explore

A&E

6 blockbusters to watch

COMMENTARY

Expectations for

future after graduation

COFFEE BREAK

Student cartoons,

Fathers crossword

4

Page layout:

Beatrix Cendana

5

Page layout:

Amber Smith

6

Page layout:

Nick Nelson

7

Page layout:

Carl Carallas

8-9

Page layout:

Beatrix Cendana

10-11

Page layout:

Debbie Denbrook

13-16

Page layout:

Marina Chetverikov,

Carl Caralas

18

Page layout:

Marina Chetverikov

20

Page layout:

Lorelei Watson

21

Page layout:

Carl Carallas

22-23

Page layout:

Lorelei Watson

24

Page layout:

Lorelei Watson

26

Page layout:

Hannah Nguyen

27

Page layout:

Marina Chetverikov

AMAZING PROFESSORS

THAT ARE RETIRING THIS YEAR

page 6

pages 8,10,13

page 22-23

page 26

June 4, 2018 / Vol. 51, Issue 9 piercepioneernews.com / 3


Campus

NEW DIRECTOR OF CAMPUS SAFETY

BRINGS POSITIVE OUTLOOK

Former Police Captain Jeffrey Schneider is optimistic about his future at Pierce

By CALEB HENSIN

Contributing Writer

There are many people working behind

the scenes at a college who students might

never see, including Jeffrey Schneider, the

new director of campus safety and district

director of safety and security.

Before coming to Pierce, Schneider

had a long career in law enforcement and

security. At age 21, he started his law

enforcement career at Central Washington

University (CWU), which has a more

traditional police force, unlike Pierce’s

non-commissioned security force.

He worked at CWU for a few years

before moving up the road to the Yakima

Police Department in 1984, where he

worked his way up from beat cop to captain

in just 13 years. He served as captain

for more than 20 years, with the last few as

captain of YPD’s detective unit, serving for

a combined total of 33 years.

In March, he retired from the Yakima

PD, and was hired on as Pierce’s director of

campus safety following the departure of

Chris MacKersie.

Schneider said one difference between a

traditional police force at a university and

campus security at a community college

is that campus security can’t make arrests

and aren’t armed. According to Schneider,

the biggest focus of a campus security

officer is providing services to the college

community: unlocking doors, jumpstarting

cars, and escorting students who feel

unsafe for any reason.

They’re a lot more proactive about

providing service here than a police

department ever was,” Schneider said.

“With a police department you have to be

in trouble first before you can get them

to help you. Here, you just need to have a

question.”

Regarding his approach to campus safety,

Schneider looks to the college’s primary

mission: education.

“It’s all about education,” he said. “How

does the safety department fit in? Most

people would say it’s completely unrelated,

but I believe that’s not

the case. You need to

have a safe and secure

campus so that students

here don’t have to worry

about things.”

Schneider reflected

on some of the broader

issues facing campuses

across the country,

particularly in the wake

of school shootings. He

stated his believes that

armed security on a

campus does not prevent

shootings, such was

the case with Parkland

and Columbine. In his

opinion, what makes the

biggest impact regarding

safety is interaction with

students and faculty.

The students, the

faculty here, all know

what’s going on,” Schneider

said. “You may know

about a person who is

having issues, or had

issues, or maybe you just

feel uncomfortable. It’s

important that you reach

out to the officers or staff

here. There’s a number of resources.”

While Schneider believes that, overall,

Pierce is a safe campus, he did emphasize

the importance of personal safety and

responsibility. Campus safety can’t be

watching over students and faculty at all

times, and disregard for personal safety

and belongings can lead to theft and other

crimes.

“We do what we can to keep people safe,

but people are always are a part of that

process,” Schneider said. “Whether it be on

campus, at home, at work, you have some

responsibility for your personal safety.

Just like you don’t drive through the worst

neighborhood in town.”

Schneider encouraged students to

always reach out to campus safety officers

Campus Safety Director,

Jeff Schneider started his

new job in April.

Nick Nelson/ Staff Photo

if they have any needs.

“Feel free at any time to talk to any officers,”

he said. “They’re more than happy to

talk to the students if you have concerns,

issues or even just to talk and shoot the

breeze. We can learn a lot just shooting the

breeze.”

Regarding Schneider, Robert Rockey,

campus safety officer, said he interacts with

him on an almost daily basis. “I like him

and I trust his experience,” Rockey said.

He believes Schneider will bring positive

changes to campus security, but could

not speak about specifics. His colleagues

at the Campus Safety Desk echoed his sentiment,

saying Schneider seemed pleasant

and easy to work with.

Cap & Gowns

June 4 - 15 All Day Student Bookstore

Caps and gowns will be available in the bookstore

until June 15.

Student Awards Ceremony

June 6 6:30 p.m. HEC Building

Come support this annual ceremony featuring

students and leaders being recognized for their

exceptional leadership qualities and achievements.

Raiders Review

June 11 4 p.m. - 9 p.m. Performance Lounge

Student Life is hosting the quarterly Raiders Review,

where students can come study for finals and

have fun. Different activities will be available.

Spring Quarter Final Exams

June 13 - 15

All Day

Good luck to all Pierce College students taking final

exams the remainder of the week.

Student Wellness Day

June 5 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Performance Lounge

Come participate in yoga, Zumba, and C.T.Y. fitness.

All experience levels welcome. There will be fresh

fruit and drinks provided.

Clubs Olympics

June 7 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Performance Lounge

Bring your competitive spirit. Various clubs on

campus will be competing in various games and

challenges. Will your team win?

Last Day of Instruction for Quarter

June 12

All Day

Enjoy your last day of classes on campus before

summer break.

Grades Due

June 18

All Day

Final grades are due by 11 p.m. Congratulations on

another quarter in the books!

The Next Generation of Leadership

June 6 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Performance Lounge

Join us to say farewell to our 2017 - 2018 leaders

and welcome our 2018 - 2019 Student Leadership

team.

Ft. Steilacoom Concert Choir

June 7 7 p.m. Performance Lounge

Come support Pierce College’s choir. Admission

free for Pierce students with I.D. and $5 for

general admission.

Board of Trustees Meeting

June 13 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. Board Room

The Board of Trustees will meet to discuss goals

and core themes. Study session starts at noon and

the meeting will start at 1 p.m.

Science Dome Movie

June 22 7 p.m. Theatre

The Science Dome is presenting “Undiscovered

Worlds: The Search Beyond Our Sun”; General admission

$6, Free admission to students with I.D.

4/ piercepioneernews.com

June 4, 2018 / Vol. 51, Issue 9

June 4, 2018 / Vol. 51, Issue 9 Photos courtesy of Pixabay piercepioneernews.com / 5


Campus

LEAVE THE POOCH AT HOME

Busted window, overheated animal are some of the outcomes, campus security says

By NICK NELSON

Staff Writer

There are animal lovers among every

group of people. Plenty of these

people will bring their dogs

with them to the store,

park or school. But

what happens when

the owner leaves the

dog in the car during

summer?

Most dogs have

thick coats of fur,

which can make it

harder to lower their

body temperatures in hot

weather.

Think of an 80-degree day. Some

people love this kind of weather – it is a

day out at the park for some.

There is an estimated vehicle temperature

versus time graphic on the American

Veterinary Medical Foundation website. It

shows that in 80-degree weather, the interior

of a car gets up to around 114 degrees

in about 30 minutes.

Even with windows cracked, it does little

to cool down the inside of a car.

Dogs don’t sweat like humans do, so

their bodies won’t cool down in the same

way. According to the American Kennel

Club, dogs mostly rely on panting to

regulate their temperature. Even so, it is

not as efficient as a human sweating. Alicia

Everson, a digital design student, said

“...THERE’S ALSO CASES

WHERE THE DOGS HAVE

BEEN SAVED.”

— DORENE PAULSON

when she see this, she feels bad for the dog,

then irritated at the owner.

“I know how hot it gets, even with windows

cracked,” she said.

Her action is to find the owner and alert

the local businesses.

“I hang around the car depending on

the situation. Then I would go into the

store and give the license plate number,”

she said. She also said she would not be

angry if someone broke into her car to

rescue her pet.

Dorene Paulson, a digital

design professor and owner

of two Whippets, believes

there are overreactions.

Dogs can’t

regulate their body

temperature well in

hot weather.

Nick Nelson / Staff Photo

There are extreme cases where people

go crazy. But there’s also cases where the

dogs have been saved. It’s also become

“THE ANIMAL WILL DIE.”

— JEFF SCHNEIDER

a stigma. If you left your dog in the car,

you’re a ‘bad owner,’ ” she said.

It could be a matter of lack of

education on the part of

the pet owner.

“More educational

push

needs to be

out there to

not leave

your dog

in the car,”

Paulson

said.

State

law RCW

16.52.340

says, “To protect

the health

and safety of an

animal, an animal

control officer or law

enforcement officer who reasonably

believes that an animal is suffering

or is likely to suffer harm from exposure

to excessive heat, cold, lack of ventilation,

or lack of necessary water is authorized to

enter a vehicle or enclosed space to remove

an animal by any means reasonable under

the circumstances if no other person is

present in the immediate area who has

access to the vehicle or enclosed space and

who will immediately remove the animal.”

Pierce College doesn’t allow pets and

animals inside the school buildings. Pierce

does not have independent procedures

regarding dogs in cars besides state law, according

to Campus Safety Director Jeffrey

Schneider.

Schneider has experience with dogs in

cars. “I came from Yakima, so we dealt

with it a lot.

“Ideally, we want to track down the

owner. The parking permits let us know

who the car owner is,” Schneider said. This

way, he said Campus Security can find the

owner in class or on campus.

“If we could not locate the owner –

whether they’re not in class or they don’t

have a parking sticker – once law enforcement

shows up, they can smash the

window to protect the animal and give

the owner a ticket when they show up,” he

said.

The animal will die,” he said about

the alternative.

Schneider suggests leaving

the dog at home. “Don’t

leave your dog in the

car if it’s hot or even

kind of hot.”

The interior of

a car will get hot

whether windows

are cracked or not.

Nick Nelson / Staff Photo

LGBTQ resources at Pierce and beyond

Where can a student go for solidarity?

By NICK NELSON

Staff Writer

When June rolls around, western Washington

celebrates LGBTQ pride every year

in Seattle. Among the crowds are those

who are accepting, loving and fighting for

gay rights.

But once Pride is over, where do they

go? Where do they find solidarity and support?

More importantly, is there anywhere

for them to go at all?

Cameron Cox, director of Student Life

at Pierce Fort Steilacoom, said there are a

few resources available on campus. There

are several brochures in the Student Life

office relating to LGBTQ topics, such as

the brochure for the Rainbow Center.

The Rainbow Center is an organization

in Tacoma that maintains a safe space for

the LGBTQ community.

The center, located at 2215 Pacific Ave.

in Tacoma, is available to people of all ages

and provides “a community hub, education

and resource services.”

The Rainbow Center hosts events yearround,

including dances, lunch gatherings,

transgender social meetups and the

Tacoma Pride Festival (happening this year

July 13 – 21).

Another resource is the Gender Alliance

of the South Sound. The organization

focuses on those who are transgender

and offer peer counseling, support and

community.

They hold meetings at the Rainbow

Center on the second Tuesday and also on

the second, fourth and fifth Friday of each

month.

The alliance also hosts discussion groups

in Olympia in the 4th Avenue Ward Building

at 408 7th Avenue Southeast at 8 p.m.

Wednesdays.

“WHICH MEANS, IT IS

NOT TOO LATE TO GET A

CLUB GOING THIS YEAR.”

— CAMERON COX,

DIRECTOR OF STUDENT

LIFE

Originally flown with eight strips,

the pride flag was created by Gilbert

Baker in 1978.

Additionally, there’s a New Boyz Club

at 7 p.m. every other Friday in the same

building.

When it comes to an LGBTQ club on

campus, Cox said, “We have had several

LGBTQ+ clubs at Pierce College over

the years. We do not have an active one

currently.

As with many clubs at Pierce, when the

students running the club graduate or

transfer, the clubs often cease to exist if no

students are here to keep them running,

which is what has happened with the

LGBTQ+ clubs.”

If there are students looking to create a

new club, there is hope.

“We do still have time to ratify some

clubs this year, and they can continue their

charter for next year as well, if they fill out

the charter continuation from this quarter,”

Cox said. “Which means, it is not too late

Features

Lorelei Watson/Staff Photo

to get a club going this year.”

Cox said there are LGBTQ resources

listed on the counseling resources page of

the Pierce website at pierce.ctc.edu/counseling-services.

There are several resources online for the

LGBTQ community. Many online groups

are open, like the “LGBT+ chat” group on

the phone application Vent, or chat servers

on the computer application Discord.

Websites that provide support for

LGBTQ individuals, like The Trevor

Project, offer online and phone therapy for

LGBTQ youth.

The Human Rights Campaign has news

reports regarding LGBTQ issues, such

as marriage equality and transgender

bathroom bills. GLAAD (formerly the Gay

and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation)

is another news-focused site for LGBTQ

people.

6/piercepioneernews.com

June 4, 2018 / Vol. 51, Issue 9

June 4, 2018 / Vol. 51, Issue 9 piercepioneernews.com / 7


Campus

A BITTERSWEET FAREWELL TO ONE OF

PIERCE’S MOST BELOVED PROFESSORS

John Simpson has led an eventful career. Now it’s time to say goodbye.

By CALEB HENSIN

Contributing Writer

John Simpson’s life has been full and

eventful: He has been embedded with the

Stryker Brigade in Afghanistan and Iraq

as a soldier and photojournalist; serves

on Lakewood’s City Council; and owns a

small coffee shop, Primo Espresso. And

for 28 years, he has taught history at Pierce

College.

Initially, Simpson didn’t study history to

become a teacher or professor. He wanted

to write novels, and didn’t foresee his

notion for writing turning into a career in

journalism either.

“I earned a degree in history because

I was good at it. I always like to say I did

what came easily to me,” Simpson said.

“When I got involved in education,

it was because, quite frankly, I needed

a job. It wasn’t because of any idealistic

notion that I was going to be the next

great teacher. I came to Pierce College in

1989 because I was looking for work, and

I wound up teaching in what was then the

alternative learning center, and I graded

reading tests.”

After he earned his master’s degree, he

was asked to teach history part-time on the

McChord Air Force Base (now Joint Base

Lewis McChord) campus. He found that

he liked teaching “and that I was halfway

decent at it.”

He also found he had a knack for photojournalism.

“I used to look at pictures in the newspaper,

and I would tell myself I could do a

better job, so I spent some time reading

about photojournalism and I literally

taught myself how to use cameras and how

to develop film,” Simpson said.

“And one day I walked into the office of

The Ranger (JBLM’s military newspaper)

and I asked the editor for a job. He gave

me an assignment and told me he’d pay

me $10 for the photo. He must have liked

it, because then I got another assignment.

And with the photography, for several

years, I was asked to write little pieces. I

wrote food reviews, automotive reviews,

not news per se, but more in the sense of

advertising.”

He found that he liked it, and his career

grew from there: writing, photographing

and editing his own stories. Simpson has

since won an Emmy for his journalistic

work while embedded in the Middle East.

These dual careers in history and journalism

interacted with each other. Simpson

said he liked to approach news stories

from a historical perspective, explaining

the background of events, which he finds

adds more color and makes them more

interesting to read.

Simpsons’ position as a standout in

Pierce’s Social Science Division began with

the passing of history professor Roland

Weis, who he was hired to replace.

Simpson teaches history as a story, with

no Power Point shows, no Canvas, no

chapter-by-chapter structure.

“In a word, it’s very qualitative-oriented,”

Simpson said.

It’s the telling of the stories, the bringing

of the color to the lectures. It’s the facts, it’s

the people, it’s the ideas. It’s done in a way

that I think is memorable.

I think that to make history come alive

and to impart some of the lessons of history,

you tell a story, you make an impact.

And I believe that although the student

may not catch everything I say in

the lectures, 25 years from now, they’re

going to hear something, read something,

see something and they’re going to say:

‘I remember when that guy said that in a

history class.’

That’s what I think teaching to the

future is all about. Not some matrix that’s

required by some outside agency that we

have to fill in.”

John Simpson calls himself an outlier

and has been an ardent critic of some of

the programs that educators are forced

to adopt to meet the standards of those

administrations.

Simpson said he listens to his students

and former students who return for a visit

“rather than listen to the people who have

never taught a day in their lives in the

classroom.”

“By listening to students, and listening to

former students, it has validated to me the

importance of telling a good story. You’re

getting facts, ideas, and lessons across,

but you’re doing it in a way that they will

remember for the rest of their lives.”

Simpson said some of the policies adopted

by the college in recent years is a large

part of the reason that he is retiring.

“I’m simply tired of hearing how we’re

not doing our job,” he said. “And I figure,

at that point, it’s time, move on. It seems to

me that all we do around here is reinvent

the wheel. I think the vast majority of faculty

here are good, hard-working people

who do truly believe in themselves and

their subject matter. A lot of us are sick

and tired of being told how to do our job

by people who don’t spend that much time

in the classroom.”

“Quite frankly, I think the administration

should keep their noses out of the

classroom and let us do our jobs. I think

things would be a lot better.”

Simpson said the decision to leave the

administrative interference behind “was

the easy part.”

The hard part was that I intensely enjoy

teaching. And every morning I talk about

this with my wife: one less class, one day

closer to ending a part of my life that I

really do not want to end.”

Simpson intends to continue his teaching

as a substitute teacher at the high

“A LOT OF US ARE

SICK AND TIRED OF

BEING TOLD HOW

TO DO OUR JOB

BY PEOPLE WHO

DON’T SPEND THAT

MUCH TIME IN THE

CLASSROOM.”

-- SIMPSON

school level, most likely within the Clover

Park School District.

He also wants to hone his skill in artistic

photography and continue to work as

an elected official on the Lakewood City

Council.

As for his last message to the college,

Simpson said: “To faculty: Question everything.

To students: Get involved. Stay involved.

Learn as much as you can. Don’t give up.

Don’t let anything get in the way of completing

your education. Take advantage of

every opportunity that you get. And don’t

forget to say ‘please,’ and ‘thank you.’”

Read more of this story at

piercepioneernews.com

Campus

“I EARNED A

DEGREE IN HISTORY

BECAUSE I WAS

GOOD AT IT.”

-- JOHN SIMPSON

John Simpson is known as an

emphatic teacher, often gesturing

as he vividly recounts history.

Pioneer File Photo

A shell is fired at a target over 22 miles away in

Afghanistan in December 2009. John Simpson

was embedded with a calvary unit at the time,

working for The Ranger.

John M. Simpson/ Courtesy Photo

8/ piercepioneernews.com

June 4, 2018 / Vol. 51, Issue 9

June 4, 2018 / Vol. 51, Issue 9

piercepioneernews.com/9


Campus

DIGITAL DESIGN CLASSES

WON’T BE THE SAME NEXT YEAR

Professor Brian Martin retires after 37 years

Campus

By DEBBIE DENBROOK

Staff Writer

AFTER 37 YEARS of teaching – 20 of

which have been teaching digital design

classes – professor Brian Martin will be

retiring following summer quarter.

Before teaching at Pierce, Martin taught

high school math and was in a hair band (a

1980s-type of heavy metal with an emphasis

on extremely long hair). Last year he

won the Distinguished Faculty Award and

brought his band, Accidental Heroes, to

play at the award banquet.

Martin said he didn’t care much for

teaching math and that pushed him into

computer graphics. Playing in a bar band

that wasn’t making much money also

played a role.

“I guess you could say playing in a hair

band brought me to Pierce College, eventually,”

Martin said.

For those that have taken a class with

Martin, students know he is engaging and

genuinely cares about each student and

their success.

Digital design student Hillary Jensen-Bergren

said, “Brian is awesome. He’s

a lot of fun. He’s really knowledgeable

and experienced, so he shares a lot from

his past jobs. He’s got a lot of practical

real-world experience so it’s not just technical

skills, although he share’s plenty of

those too.”

“He makes really complicated subjects

easy to understand and he’s really patient

with us.”

She also said that Martin is very funny.

“He’s sort of doing stand-up in the middle

of the lesson.”

MARTIN’S

OFFICE IS

FILLED WITH

TOYS AND

GADGETS.

Martin said he will miss teaching the

most after he retires.

He said he loves the teaching part, such

as student interaction.

“Seeing what they make, seeing them

progress from people who don’t have job

skills to people that do have job skills. I

like seeing the successes,” he said.

Martin said his favorite part of teaching

is “anything where I get to show students

how to blow stuff up, which is pretty much

any animation class.”

Jensen-Bergren, who is currently taking

his 3D animation class, said for her assignment,

she animated a block being thrown

through the air. When it hit a wall, it blew

up.

Martin enjoys staying in contact with

students who have graduated. He said he

gets emails every week and sometime students

have come out to see his band.

Professor Dorene Paulson who teaches

the other portion of the digital design

classes, was a student of Martin’s before she

started her Pierce teaching career.

She said, “It’s not very often that you

get to have in life a teacher — who is as

incredible as Brian Martin — be your

mentor as a teacher and then become your

mentor as an employer.”

MARTIN SAID HIS

FAVORITE PART OF

TEACHING IS “ANYTHING

WHERE I GET TO SHOW

STUDENTS HOW TO

BLOW STUFF UP, WHICH

IS PRETTY MUCH ANY

ANIMATION CLASS.”

Martin said he will be just as busy once

he retires — it just will be doing different

things than teaching. He plans on continuing

to play with his band and doing some

recording and writing projects.

“I got a whole bunch of keyboards

that I don’t know how to program and

little-by-little I’ve been collecting things

over the last few years just so that I would

have toys to tinker with and knobs to turn,

plug-ins to experiment with, and a lot of

that does revolve around music but it also

revolves around animation,” Martin said.

Martin’s band, Accidental Heroes, played last year at the Distinguished Faculty Awards at Pierce.

The band is Martin, from left, Fred McLean on guitar, Tim Monaghan on bass, and Gary Snyder on drums.

Paulson said there are some very big

shoes to fill when it comes to the digital

design program.

“You can’t think of the digital design

program right now without thinking of

Brian Martin. He’s more than the glue that

holds it all together, he is the together. So

it’s going to be a big transition,” she said.

“He’s definitely a good teacher. It’s always

a little sad when a good teacher retires,”

said Jensen-Bergren.

The most important thing I can share

with any student is that when you are

learning a skill, if you think that you’re

done after you finish college, man, you’re

just going to sink because you can’t stop

learning,” Martin said, about the wisdom

he wants to pass on.

“Life is all about evolving. As soon as

you think you’re going to stop evolving,

as soon as you rest on your laurels, you’re

going to sink and sometimes you’ll sink so

far that any time that you might have put

into college just becomes wasted because

you’ll just get bogged down.

“You have to keep up on your skills; you

have to keep up on your chops. It’s just a

necessity if you want to be successful in

life. You have to keep creating and you

might think to yourself, ‘I’m not creative;

I’m not the creative type.’ That is a falsehood

because often creativity comes out of

practice.”

For videos about Martin,

go to piercepioneernews.com.

“BRIAN IS EXCELLENT AT TAKING

SOMETHING THAT COULD BE

COMPLEX OR COULD BE FRUSTRATING

AT TIMES AND MAKING IT FUN TO DO.”

– PAULSON

“BRIAN HAS QUIETLY DONE SO MUCH FOR

STUDENTS BEHIND THE SCENES, AND [HE’S]

NOT ONE TO TAKE THE SPOTLIGHT.”

— LINDA SAARELA, PROFESSOR

OF BUSINESS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE

“GOOD DAY, AND

WELCOME TO

YOUR LECTURE.”

IS HOW ALL OF

MARTIN’S ONLINE

LESSONS START.

Martin teaches one of the 3D animation class offered.

Marina Chetverikov/

Staff Photos

10 / piercepioneernews.com

June 4, 2018 / Vol. 51, Issue 9

June 4, 2018 / Vol. 51, Issue 9 piercepioneernews.com / 11


Unexpected turns

brought Parks to

Pierce for 29 years

Campus

Random coincidence, impulses led him to reporting, teaching

By MARJI HARRIS

Staff Writer

Journalism professor and adviser Michael Parks has had a

knack for writing. Just ask his fifth-grade teacher. Although, his

fictional account of a boy in the Civil War was probably not what

his teacher had in mind as a punishment assignment.

Later, in high school, he still liked to write, but his plans were

specific – and had nothing to do with journalism.

“I had two specific plans. I was going to own a pet shop while I

traveled the world for research for my book,” he said.

But life’s reality such as being able to pay rent struck first, so

after graduating from Everett High School in 1972, off to Everett

Community College he went. Two uneventful years later, again

another graduation, this time with an associate of arts degree.

He started at Seattle Pacific College (now a university) in the

fall of 1974 and it was here that his career would begin in journalism.

He took a news writing class and started writing for The

Falcon, the college’s newspaper.

See PARKS, page 16

12/ piercepioneernews.com

June 4, 2018 / Vol. 51, Issue 9

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Campus

Campus

“It is because of Michael

Parks that I am working in

journalism. He connects with

international students and

helps them connect in an

unfamiliar world.

— Marina Chetverikov,

current web manager

“A mentor whose advice is never taken

lightly and whose guidance has led

the Pioneer to greater opportunities. A

friend who has taken jokes to another

level and created a space where everyone

feels welcome.”

— Elena Cortez, former office assistant

“I stumbled and

tumbled and fell flat on

my face multiple times.

But, I wouldn’t have

grown or have been able

to be where I am now if it

wasn’t for Michael and the

Pioneer.”

— Megan Sokol, former

staff writer

“I always enjoyed Michael Parks’

humor and listened to the E-team

meetings. Enjoy a new adventure

Parks and thank you for including

me as part of the present

adventure.”

— Andrew Paulson, former staff

photo editor

“He has never hesitated to answer questions or offer honest criticism,

and helped me understand the business of information and ethics in

a way that demanded my interest. He shredded my article and then

helped me piece them back together into a more presentable form.

Thanks to him, I have found a career that will last me a lifetime.”

— Caleb Hensin, current contributing writer

“You encouraged me to step out of my comfort

zone and into my first leadership position.

It was incredibly rewarding being in

charge of designing the look and newspaper

into a beautiful new magazine.”

— Megan Quint, former production manager

14/ piercepioneernews.com June 4, 2018 / Vol. 51, Issue 9

June 4, 2018 / Vol. 51, Issue 9 piercepioneernews.com / 15


Campus

PARKS

Continued from page 13

His first article was about a

guy in his dorm room who had a

fascination with building a better

firecracker. As the student was

hard at work with his project, the

gunpowder floating around the

room ignited from a candle and

started a fire.

He would keep writing for The Falcon,

adding a regular column. He would graduate

in 1976, not with a degree in journalism

but biblical studies.

“For a while I thought I might go into

the ministry, but then I regained my senses,”

he said.

He would go on to earn a bachelor’s in

editorial journalism at Seattle Pacific and

a master’s from the University of Washington’s

communications and docudrama

program.

After graduation, he would work as

a reporter. While at the Centralia Daily

Chronicle, Mount St. Helens started rumbling.

As a member of the press, he was

allowed access close to the mountain with

a couple of other reporters. Two months

later, the mountain erupted and wiped out

Goat Ridge, one of the points of interest on

his coverage hike.

From there, he went to Lake City Journal,

a paper that served Lynnwood.

One of his personal passions is anything

related to General Custer. He blames it on

the cover of a book that he found when he

was a kid. As soon as he picked it up and

started reading it, he said he was hooked.

So, when a fire broke out at Little

Bighorn, the site of Custer’s last stand, he

wanted to make a documentary.

Through a series of events, planning

and $1,500 in donations, he was able

to spend five weeks at the site. “History

Recovered: The Custer Battlefield Survey

of 1984” is about what happened after the

fire was put out. People who visited the

site came away with arrowheads and bullet

fragments. After some investigation, it was

determined that the site should become

closed to the public and it became an

archeological site.

He said his career is marked by half

random coincidence and half

impulse.

His Custer documentary is

an example. “I had no clue what

was involved when I started the

project. If I knew what I was

going to be doing to make it

happen, I probably would not have tried,”

Parks said.

His interview with the editor at the Daily

Chronicle is another. Once the editor saw

Parks’ first bachelor’s degree, he was hired

on the spot – the editor was a “born-again

Christian,” Parks said — and thought he

saw a pal.

Eventually he would end up in the

classroom, even though his original career

plans did not include teaching. In 1986,

the division dean from Everett Community

College called. A teacher was needed

immediately for a journalism class, would

Parks be interested?

One could say teaching was his destiny.

“I never set out to be a teacher, it was

somewhat inevitable,” he said, about the

numerous relatives on his ancestral tree

who were teachers.

Michael Parks started

his career at Pierce

College in 1989..

Pioneer File Photo

His middle name comes from prolific

writer and dictionary founder Noah Webster,

another relative in his family tree.

“My grandparents and my father taught

at ECC, so the year I taught there I was

third generation,” he said.

From there, it was just a short route to

Pierce College in 1989. He has served as

the journalism department coordinator

and taught journalism and mass communications

courses, but it was his work with

the student publication, The Pioneer, that

he said was the most rewarding.

“In the classroom, (the students) have to

be there for a degree requirement. But here

at The Pioneer, everyone wants to be here.

They are hungry to grow, to learn,” Parks

said.

Read more of this story at

piercepioneernews.com

Pierce College FORT STEILACOOM

CONCERT CHOIR presents

FROM

MOZART

Our spring performance will include Mozart’s

“Missa Brevis in C,” highlighting talented student

soloists and professional orchestral musicians. We will

also jump into jazz with guest artists from the

Tacoma Pierce County jazz community. Join us for an

amazing performance and perhaps a few surprises!

TO

GLENN

MILLER

JUNE 7 AT 7 P.M.

Pierce College Puyallup

Arts and Allied Health Theatre

1601 39th Ave. SE, Puyallup

$5 general admission

FREE for Pierce students with I.D.

Marina Chetverikov / Staff Photos

“IN THE CLASSROOM, (THE

STUDENTS) HAVE TO BE THERE FOR

A DEGREE REQUIREMENT. BUT HERE

AT THE PIONEER, EVERYONE WANTS

TO BE HERE. THEY ARE HUNGRY TO

GROW, TO LEARN.” —MICHAEL PARKS

.

Pierce College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, perceived or actual physical or

mental disability, pregnancy, genetic information, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, marital status, creed,

religion, honorably discharged veteran or military status, or use of a trained guide dog or service animal in its

programs and activities. For inquiries regarding compliance contact the Pierce College District Title IX

Coordinator, (253) 964-6519 | 9401 Farwest Drive SW, Lakewood WA 98498.

Pierce College is committed to equal access to all college sponsored events.

Persons with disabilities who anticipate needing accommodations or who

have questions about physical access provided should contact Access &

Disability Services, 253-964-6468 or ADS@pierce.ctc.edu. Requests

can be served most effectively if notice is provided at least

2 weeks before the event.

Tickets available at

PierceCollegeEvents.com

16/ piercepioneernews.com

June 4, 2018 / Vol. 51, Issue 9

June 4, 2018 / Vol. 51, Issue 9 piercepioneernews.com / 17


Campus

PIERCE GOLF CLUB WANTS TO START

A COLLEGE RIVALRY

Washington colleges have agreed to a tournament

By NICK NELSON

Staff Writer

Last March, student Matthew Lollar

started a golf club on campus.

His idea: Compete against other schools

in the National Junior College Athletic

Association (NJCAA).

“Competition is everything to me, either

on the course or in the classroom,” he said.

Although Pierce College just recently

approved the club, it is already challenging

bigger schools.

Lollar plans to start a tournament

involving local colleges, including universities.

Club adviser Terry Green, who is also a

counselor at Pierce’s TRiO program, joked

with him about calling the “big brother

schools” in the area regarding a tournament.

Lollar said when he called Alan Murray,

men’s golf coach at the University of Washington,

to suggest some coaching or play,

Murray took the offer quickly.

“I’m stoked

because it’s not

every day

a (Division 1 National Collegiate Athletic

Association) school tells a community

college, ‘Yeah, let’s do it,’ ” Lollar said. “Of

course, they have to check with the NCAA

to make sure that it is OK and within the

rules, so we can’t officially call it a tournament.

It’s a tournament and bragging

rights for us at Pierce, but vacation for

them.”

Lollar also reached out to Pacific Lutheran

University and the University of Puget

Sound, who both agreed to the challenge.

He will be getting in contact with Green

River College in Auburn, who worked to

recruit him to play golf at that school.

He said he declined the offer to start

Pierce’s new club.

He also plans to speak with Olympic

College in Bremerton and Bellevue College

in Bellevue.

Although the original plan was to have

the tournament in June, Lollar changed the

time to fall quarter. This will give colleges

time to get their teams together.

Lollar said, about Pierce’s exposure, “If

anything, it puts our students out there.

It shows the ‘big brother’ schools that

we’re here, and we want to show that what

we’ve got and we’re going to prove why we

Marina Chetverikov/Staff Illustration

belong.”

Lollar hopes for budding rivalries, but

also as a recruitment tool for Pierce.

He said, “I hope more than anything, it

will show our athletic department and our

school administration and leaders that this

is a sport we should add because we have

this as a resource to recruit more students.”

Spots are open to students is interested

in joining the golf club.

“We’re still looking for a few more players

and really want to add some ladies to

our team.

You don’t have to have experience. It’d be

nice, but it’s mainly about having fun and

networking,” Lollar said.

If a student is interested in joining the

golf club, contact Lollar at

mlollar3160@smail.pcd.edu.

Nick Nelson / Staff Photo

Pierce College Golf Club

founder, Matthew Lollar,

getting ready to putt.

“YOU DON’T HAVE TO

HAVE EXPERIENCE.

IT’D BE NICE, BUT

IT’S MAINLY ABOUT

HAVING FUN AND

NETWORKING.” —

MATTHEW LOLLAR

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Features

SOCIAL PLATFORMS PUSH

UNHEALTHY EATING HABITS,

MENTAL BREAKDOWNS

AFRICAN-AMERICAN MUSIC APPRECIATION MONTH

Much of America’s music comes from the black community

Features

Talk to friends, family about cutting, unhealthy body image, bullying

By JA’MYA N. BROUSSARD

Contributing Writer

TECHNOLOGY HAS BROUGHT A

NEW ERA IMPROVING LIVES, yet not

without its pitfalls. Social platforms used

in everyday lives making it easy to find

information. With this effortless access to

information, it is sometimes used in a way

that can cause great harm.

On the app and website Tumblr, a big

trend among young people is soft grunge.

Soft grunge is modern ‘90s grunge culture

with elements of gothic culture. These

pages give off more of a dark presence and

many unhealthy actions are advertised.

Lots of comments and pages have been

referred to eating disorder sites within this

fashion personality culture.

There is an abundant amount of post

and sites that “help” young girls lose

weight. With a quick search of “pro Ana”

multiple pages pop up showing frail bodies

and tips on how not to eat. It is easy for

young girls to go online and find other

girls that are openly encouraging each

other to starve themselves. Many young

teens currently are or have struggled with

these unhealthy actions. There is lots of

pressures for young girls to have a certain

body type. The pressure makes it extremely

difficult for them embrace a healthy

self-image that may not fit into the norm.

Girls use bully tactics on each other to be

slim, to not gain weight.

Girls also use social media sites like Instagram

to reinforce their image. Positive

comments are left on pictures showing

women with skinny bodies. In contrast,

women with more weight are being harassed

with statements like, “lose weight”

or “go for a run”. The worst ones are the

ones fat-shaming and telling them to “kill

themselves”?

Young girls share how to cut themselves

Nick Nelson / Staff Illustration

because it helps them cope. There are

pages on Tumblr where young girls/adults

show their scars. They are encouraged to

continue until they have reached a final

“option” such as suicide. Challenges like

the #BlueWhaleChallege is an evident

example. Put simply, the challenge is to

take a sharp object and carve the outline

of a whale on the inside of one’s forearm.

The completion of the challenge results in

suicide.

Suicide is another issue used among

young people. Many with pressures are

believing that they no longer should live

anymore. Sometimes it is treated as a

game, such as in the choking game. Suicide

is not a joke and never has been.

After the show, “13 Reasons Why,” was

released, many went onto social media

sites and joked about putting individuals

on tapes. In the show that was based on the

novel, a young girl named Hannah Baker

commits suicide and leaves 13 tapes for

different individuals explain the 13 reasons

why she committed suicide. Throughout

campuses and many platforms, individuals

who joke saying “kms” which means

“kill myself.” Despite all of the stories told,

suicide is still seen as a joke

Discussion is needed on these issues.

Having an eating disorder should not be

cool for young boys and girls. Joking about

suicide should not be common. Self-harm

should not be considered an option.

Society thrives better when young girls

are not encouraged by their peers to have

an eating disorders, self-harm or worse

to push their peers to committed suicide.

They are boys and girls that could grow up

and be the next president or find a cure

for cancer. These actions are real and are

desperately in need of change.

Where can help be found?

There are many resources nationwide and on campus.

Suicide lifeline nationwide at 800-273-TALK (8255).

Fort Steilacoom Counselor

Megan Irby

253-912-3602

Puyallup Counselor

Jennifer Wright

253-864-3115

Thomas Dorsey (left) and Whitney Houston were amazing examples of

African-American music, in bringing life into their generations.

By NICK NELSON

Staff Writer

Originally deemed “Black Music Month”

in 1979 by then-President Jimmy Carter,

June was intended to celebrate appreciation

for the influence that African Americans

have had on music in the U.S. Janice

Williams in Newsweek wrote in 2017, “Just

about every genre of music has, in some

way, been touched and influenced by African-Americans.”

Though Carter announced the month

long celebration in 1979, an official presidential

order wasn’t made until 2000 when

the House of Representatives approved

House Resolution 509.

The resolution officially recognized the

importance, study and celebration of African-American

music.

In 2009, it was renamed “African-American

Music Appreciation Month” by

then-President Barack Obama.

Many genres of American music have

been touched by the African-American

community.

Blues, though its musical and lyrical

elements can be traced back to West

Africa, is a product of slavery, according

to Encyclopedia.com’s “The History Of African-American

Music.” When and where

it came from is unknown. What is known

is that the blues genre spread through regions

as early bluesmen wandered around

in the late 1800s.

As blues flowed into the 20th century,

it evolved. It took on aspects from other

genres like gospel and ragtime. Before the

1920s, black women popularized a style of

blues considered “classic.”

Women like Ma Rainey, who became

known as the “Mother of the Blues,”

according to Biography.com, used her

singing to capture the genre’s theatrical

side. Others, such as Bessie Smith, dubbed

the “Empress of the Blues,” sang with raw

emotion.

Once the 1920s rolled around, interest

shifted to mostly men singing country

blues. Sometimes, the songs were accompanied

with banjo or string, but most often

guitar, according to Encyclopedia.com.

A move to Chicago developed the genre

of Chicago blues, which was native to the

industrial city. It was built around electric

instruments, like electric guitar, harmonica,

bass, and more. Urban blues also

turned into rock and roll.

Dubbed “America’s classical music,”

according to Encyclopedia.com, jazz

combines musical traditions of black New

Orleans and the blues. A popular name in

Carl Carallas/Staff Illusratation

the jazz scene was Louis Armstrong, who

received international recognition in the

20s. His talent guided the way for future

jazz artists.

Gospel music grew from African-American

spirituals combined with modern

blues sound.

Early gospel music was standardized

with Thomas Dorsey’s “Precious Lord,”

which was later popularized by Mahalia

Jackson.

Jackson is one of the best-known early

gospel singers. She was recognized for her

expressiveness and musical interpretation,

according to Encyclopedia.com.

Gospel had a greater influence on popular

black music. Artists like Sam Cooke,

Aretha Franklin and Whitney Houston all

started in black gospel choirs.

Rap is an influential form of hip-hop

culture. It has elements of blue, jazz and

soul with Caribbean calypso, dub and

dance-hall reggae.

One of the earliest innovators, DJ Kool

Herc, was popular for using large speaker

systems and multiple turntables for endless

grooves of dance beats.

Sometimes, he would talk over the music,

and this was one of the earliest forms

of rapping, according to

Encyclopedia.com.

20 / piercepioneernews.com

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Features

5 REASONS TO GET OUTDOORS

Summer is the time to travel around the region

Features

Owen Beach offers scenic views year-round.

By BEATRIX CENDANA

Staff Writer

SUMMER IS A GREAT TIME TO

RELAX, even if there is a class or work

schedule. Take some time to spend outdoors.

These are a few recommended places

to go during summer in Washington.

Lakewood

Lakewood has many kinds of beautiful

parks. Fort Steilacoom Park has a variety

of features such as a dog park and a trail

that connects to a lake. It is a favorite spot

for people to walk with their dogs.

In addition to the parks, Lakewood also

has unique hotel that looks like castle.

Located on the shore of American Lake,

Thornwood Castle is built like an authentic

English Tudor Gothic building. This

historic site is known as ‘The house that

love built’ and is also the setting for the

Stephen King movie “Rose Red.” It is a

popular tourist spot to stay overnight or

for weddings.

Tacoma

Lorelei Watson / Staff Photo

Tacoma’s main attractions in the summer

are the scenic Ruston Way on the

waterfront and Owen Beach.

Ruston Way starts at one end with

the Tacoma Reconciliation Park located

at the south end and ends at the north

with Point Ruston. With over 3 miles of

sidewalk for joggers, a sprayground and

restaurants with outdoor tables, it has a

little bit of everything.

Also, people can opt to go parasailing.

The Tacoma waterfront is the only place in

western Washington for parasailing.

Owen Beach is a hidden gem of public

beach. It has kayak rentals, picnic, trails

and a great place to gather with friends.

Picnic sites are available April 1 and Sept.

30 and reservations are recommended,

and can be made up to a year in advance.

Owen Beach has 2.1 miles of back trail and

people use them year round to walk their

dogs and/or jog.

The sprayground is open May 12-Sept.

23 on the weekends and because it has free

admission, it is a great place to take kids.

Federal Way

Federal Way, just north of Tacoma, also

has attractions for summer. Redondo

Beach is the place for people who love

scuba diving because of its calm waves

and lack of high tide. While there, visit the

Highline MaST Aquarium, operated by the

Marine Science and Technology Center of

Highline College. This aquarium displays

all species that live in the Puget Sound

waters. MaST provides public learning

and formal teaching about marine species

and has free admission, but donations are

accepted. The aquarium is open during the

summer (June-August) from 4 p.m. – 7

p.m.

Federal Way also has a beautiful garden,

Rhododendron Species Botanical Garden.

It is a nonprofit garden that displays

700 species of rhododendron from North

America, Europe, Asia and Australia.

There is an $8 admission fee for general

and $5 for students with id.

West Seattle

On a cold and windy day in November

1851, one of the founding fathers of Seattle

landed at Alki Point. David Denny looked

around and thought he found a perfect

shipping port for the timber being cut. He

quickly discovered that the ocean is not

welcoming in the colder months, so he

abandoned the point in favor of calmer

seas.

However, the view of the Sound is

breathtaking during the spring and summer

months, so its location became a favorite

spot for tourists and picnickers. The

first ferry ran from Seattle to West Seattle

in 1888, which only added to the traffic.

In 1907, a visionary built an amusement

park at the head of the Duwamish River.

It lasted only a few years before it closed.

Parts of Luna Park can still be seen at low

tide. In the 1950s in the spirit of renewed

For a full list of spraygrounds in Tacoma visit metroparkstacoma.org/spraygrounds.

patriotism, the Boy Scouts built a replica of

the Statue of Liberty in the middle of the

park.

Today skateboarders, rollerbladers, and

parents with strollers wind around each

other on the paths. Because the breeze rolls

in off the water, it is also a popular place in

the summer time.

Olympia

Olympia is the capital city of Washington

and it serves natural and historical

Dog walking is a classic summer pasttime.

sites.

One destination spot is the Nisqually

Delta. The walking trail with observation

tower allows sightseers to view different

wildlife species including bird species,

salmon, otters. Hikers should bring binoculars

so they can enjoy a close-up view of

owls, ducks and eagles. The best month to

see eagles is in July. There is also a farmers

market with food trucks nearby, revolving

lineup of musicians, and a lot of craft

shops. It is a good place to enjoy a sunny

day by trying many kinds of fresh foods

while listening to the music.

Lorelei Watson / Staff Photos

Lorelei Watson / Staff Illustration

Spanaway Park

Spanaway Park

provides a variety of

recreational activities

including two swimming

beaches, boat launch,

fishing pier and three

mile trail system.

Park hours are from

7:30 a.m until dusk.

22 / piercepioneernews.com

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A & E

6 BLOCKBUSTERS

HIT THE SCREENS THIS SUMMER

Grab your popcorn and head to the big screens to catch these flicks

By ASHLEY WEAVER

Contributing Writer

“Adrift”

June 1

A couple decide to travel across the

ocean to visit San Diego. They encounter a

catastrophic hurricane, leaving their boat

destroyed and cut off from civilization.

When one of them is too injured to move,

the other must find a way to survive in the

middle of the ocean.

> Romantic Drama

> PG-13

Chris Pratt plays Owen Grady in

“Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom.”

jurassicworld.com / Courtesy Photo

“Incredibles 2”

June 15

When Elastigirl is offered a new superhero

job, her husband, Mr. Incredible, is

left to care for their children. Tensions rise

as Mr. Incredible is struggling to handle

issues between the kids and new villains

begin to attack the city.

> Action & Adventure, Animation,

Kids & Family

> PG

“Jurassic World:

Fallen Kingdom”

June 22

When news spreads that the island of

Jurassic World is in danger of volcanic

eruption, Owen and Claire make it their

mission to save the remaining dinosaurs.

There they find Owen’s dinosaur friend

Blue and soon discover a conspiracy that

could destroy the world.

> Action & Adventure

> PG-13

“Ant-Man and the

Wasp”

July 6

Sequel to the events of Civil War (2016),

Scott must balance his role as a father and

Ant-Man. When reconnecting with Hope

and Dr. Hank Pym, his new mission to

stop a new villain. This time, Scott gets the

help of a new hero, The Wasp.

> Action & Adventure, Sci-fi

> PG-13

“Mission Impossible -

Fallout”

July 27

The IMF agency tasks Ethan Hunt

on a mission that later goes haywire.

The failure puts the lives of people

across the globe at risk, so Hunt takes

it on himself to save the mission.

Breaking his loyalty with the CIA,

Hunt races against time while being

hunted by assassins.

> Action & Adventure, Thriller

> Not Yet Rated (Blood and violence)

imdb /

Courtesy

Photo

“Hotel Transylvania 3:

Summer Vacation”

July 13

When Dracula becomes overworked

from the hotel business, Mavis decides to

take him and their friends on a cruise for

a vacation. There Dracula falls in love with

the ship captain, Ericka, who has other

plans as she is the descendant of Abraham

Van Helsing, the legendary monster killer.

> Animation, Comedy, Kids & Family

> PG

www.PierceSummer.com

Pierce College is an equal opportunity institution.

Learn more at: www.pierce.ctc.edu/policy

24 / piercepioneernews.com

June 4, 2018 / Vol. 51, Issue 9

June 4, 2018 / Vol. 51, Issue 9 piercepioneernews.com / 25


Commentary

AMAZING EXPECTATIONS FOR FUTURE

By BEATRIX CENDANA

Staff Writer

JUNE 15 IS GRADUATION

DAY and I am really excited to walk in

the ceremony. But I am still asking myself

what am I going to do after graduation?

Some students decide to come back

home to enjoy the short break during the

spring, some students decide to transfer to

a four-year university and other students

get internship for a year.

Graduation means a lot to me. I feel

something different inside. It is not my

first time going to college but it will be my

first graduation ceremony. I have studied

at university for two years in my own

home country. But at university, there is no

graduation ceremony after finishing. Students

are notified from the school whether

they earned their degree or by checking

the transcript through the online system.

But here, once requirements are met, I can

participate in to the ceremony.

After graduation, I will have a big decision

to make. Should I work for a year or

transfer to a four-year university? Whatever

my decision, I still hope to always serve

my community with my skills and knowledge

at my future job.

I wish for this big day that my parents

could see me walk in to the ceremony, but

they are too far away. The next best thing I

can do is to show them the pictures of me

wearing a gown and cap.

After a few years of waiting for this big

day, I think I have been patient in the

process to get my associate of arts degree.

The most significant thing that graduation

means to me is what I learned in college.

I was able to meet more people, I got

involved in many kinds of volunteer and

Student Life activities, and know more on

Beatrix Cendana walks in this spring’s graduation

ceremony. She will receive her associate of arts

degree from Pierce in the fall.

what I am really passion about.

When I decided to study in the U.S., I

thought I would have a hard time studying

or speaking with other students at Pierce

because of my language barrier. That’s why

I never thought to look for ways to grow.

But I found I was wrong. I discovered

that from a small thing I can produce big

changes in my life.

During my time here at Pierce, I was

more than a student working towards getting

my degree in one year. By working in

various jobs on campus, I was able to gain

professional experience and made good

friends.

Marina Chetverikov/

Staff Photo Illustration

Another thing is the way education

system works in the United States. Here, I

never find that studying is a duty but it is

more like a passion to reach my goal.

In my country, education is a must-do

thing and it is a duty if we want to get a

better job. Also, ages are limited.

To get a bachelor’s degree, everyone has

to be under 21 years old to get accepted

into every university.

During my time spent in college, I

learned that a degree is not the only thing I

need to get a good job. I also need to know

who I am and what I want in the short

term and long term for my future.

Most cats only live to be

teenagers, but Garfield

will be celebrating his

40th birthday this month.

“Student life”

Jim Davis is the creator of

Garfield, and on June 19,

1978 Garfield appeared in

41 U.S. newspapers.

by Hannah Nguyen

Staff Illustrator

According to garfield.com,

Garfield is read today in

more than 2,100 newspapers

by 200 million people.

“Fathers”

Guinness World Records

named Garfield as the

world’s most widely syndicated

comic strip.

1. Last name said: “It is a wise father that knows his

own child.”

2. Who is the “Father of America”?

3. Who celebrates on the third Sunday of June?

4. From what scripture comes these words: “Fathers,

do not exasperate your children; instead, bring them

up in the training and instruction of the Lord.”

5. Who is known as the “Holy Father” according to the

Roman Catholic Church?

6. Finish quote “Any fool can be a father, but it takes a

real man to be a _ !!” by Philip Whitmore

Find answers for this crossword at PiercePioneerNews.com/category/ae/

Crossword by Marina

Chetverikov/ Staff

Illustration, Photo

Coffee Break

DON’T FORGET TO CELEBRATE

ON JUNE 17.

Photo courtesy of Pixabay

Read a student

commentary

on Father’s Day at

piercepioneernews.com

26 / piercepioneernews.com

June 4, 2018 / Vol. 51, Issue 9

June 4, 2018 / Vol. 51, Issue 9

piercepioneernews.com / 27


Look for the next issue in the fall quarter.

Until then...

visit PiercePioneerNews.com and enjoy your summer!

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