MAINSAIL ISSUE 8_LOW3

bdarmanin

MAINSAIL

>> COVER STORY: World Oceans Day: A Plastic Planet’s Lilly Barclay on how to live a low-plastic life - An interview with Lily Barclay on World Oceans Day p.06

>> EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW: Q&A: Sir Ben Ainslie on his enduring bid to win the America’s Cup - Interview with Sir Ben Ainslie about his road to Auckland 2021 p.08

>> FEATURES: Eradicating the Ocean Plastic Plague - Dr Mae Wan Ho, Dr. Lucy Woodall and Melinda Watson discuss the perils of the plastic problem p.22

>> REPORT: Anchorages, Marinas and Boatyards in Malta - Mario Borg Mario and Lillian Borg’s useful guide for cruising around Malta p.30

issuE 8

MALTA’S PREMIER BOATS & YACHTING MAGAZINE

www.mbrpublications.net

Newspaper Post


‘…a super-efficient, less time-consuming & ultimately more cost-effective

alternative to owning a luxury vessel’

Issue 7 >> 02


Lightness

of Spirit

IT’S WHAT MALTA’S MOST INNOVATIVE YACHT

SHARE PROGRAMME IS ALL ABOUT

As many Azure Ultra clients are fond of

saying, there’s only one thing better than

owning a luxury yacht in the Mediterranean.

And that’s owning part of a luxury yacht in

the Mediterranean.

Most high-end yacht owners will reel off a list

of disadvantages about ownership, from cost

of maintenance and crewing to berthing in

suitable and convenient marinas.

What Azure Ultra’s fractional ownership

programme offers is truly liberating. To arrive

in Malta, get driven to the marina and cruise

off into the sunset with your Mediterranean

itinerary already pre-planned is what freedom

is all about. What’s more, once your charter is

over, you just step off the yacht with a

lightness of spirit, a feel-good buoyancy

which comes from not being burdened with

the emotional baggage of ownership.

While the perception of yacht owners is one

of intrepid adventurers out on their boats

enjoying tropical cocktails and exotic islands

365 days of the year, the reality is that most

yachts spend the majority of their time in

the marina. A reality that is unavoidable and

astronomically costly; a proverbial albatross

around the neck.

With all the advantages of yacht ownership

and none of the drawbacks, it’s no wonder

Azure Ultra’s yacht ownership programme has

been hailed as innovative and revolutionary.

Piers Brown of Fractional Life (International

Hospitality Media Limited) named Azure

Ultra ‘Europe’s leading fractional yacht

ownership programme’.

Why not try an Azure Ultra taster package?

Give the team a call on 2778 2500, email

charters@azureultra.com or visit

www.azureultra.com

www.mbrpublications.net >> 03


MAINSAIL

issuE 8

Contents

06

Cover Story

World Oceans Day: A Plastic Planet’s Lilly Barclay on how to

live a low-plastic life

An interview with Lily Barclay on World Oceans Day, and the global initiative to educate the

public about the crisis facing our oceans

Exclusive Interview

Q&A: Sir Ben Ainslie on his enduring bid to win the

America’s Cup

We caught up with former Olympian Sir Ben Ainslie to learn more about the 36th

America’s Cup road to Auckland 2021

08

10

History Stories

6 Ancient Naval Battles

Evan Andrews takes us on a journey where ancient navies often clashed in spectacular and

most brutal naval battles

Features

Sunset sanctuary: Finding exclusivity on land in Santorini

The world-renowned view out from Santorini’s coastline is where Elizabeth Finney drops

anchor and goes in search of the perfect uninterrupted sunset

16

22

Eradicating the Ocean Plastic Plague

Dr Mae Wan Ho, is joined by ocean plastics specialist, Dr. Lucy Woodall and Raw Foundation

anti-plastic activist, Melinda Watson, as they discuss the perils of the plastic problem

26

The Grimaldi Group orders Six Hybrid Ro/Ro Vessel

We follow the expansion and modernisation programme of the Grimaldi

Group, the world’s leading company in the ro-ro sector

Issue 7 >> 04


Americas Cup Special

28 Ben Ainslie strikes $153m deal to

fund second America's Cup bid

An exclusive story by Danielle Rossingh on how Ben

Ainslie landed $153m America's Cup sponsorship

with INEOS

Report

30 Anchorages, Marinas and Boatyards

in Malta

Mario Borg Mario and Lillian Borg detailed report is a

very useful guide for anyone considering cruising Malta

News Features

36 Inside the superyacht interiors book

launch at Salone Del Mobile 2018

MAINSAIL attends launch of the inaugural Superyacht

Interiors book by Boat International Media,

marked with a sparkling cocktail party held in Milan

during the Salone del Mobile design fair

38 ABB's Azipod propulsion passes

100 cruise ship milestone with

PONANT order

Behind the propulsion system of choice for cruise

vessels around the world

40 Frank Coles wins inaugural

SMART4SEA Leadership Award

Frank Coles, Chief Executive Officer of Transas, has won

the prestigious inaugural SMART4SEA Leadership Award

Quote of the Month

“What she really loved was to hang over the edge

and watch the bow of the ship slice through the

waves. She loved it especially when the waves

were high and the ship rose and fell, or when it was

snowing and the flakes stung her face.”

Kristin Cashore, Graceling

MAINSAIL is distributed to all major banks, car hire, port authorities, maritime agencies,

financial and maritime law companies, foreign diplomatic representations, transport and

logistics agencies, shipping agents, ship and yacht registration, ship repair and suppliers,

including Creek Developments Ltd, Grand Harbour Marina, Harbour Marina, Kalkara Boat

Yard, La Valletta Club, Malta Maritime Authority, Malta International Airport, Manoel Island,

Mgarr Marina Gozo, Msida & Ta’ Xbiex Waterfront, Passenger Terminals, Portomaso, Valetta

Waterfront, and four/five star hotels.

Disclaimer

All rights reserved. No part of this work covered by copyright may be reproduced or copied

and reproduction in whole or part is strictly prohibited without written permission of the

publisher. All content material available on this publication is duly protected by Maltese and

International Law. No person, organisation, other publisher or online web content manager

should rely, or on any way act upon any part of the contents of this publication, whether that

information is sourced from the website, magazine or related product without first obtaining

the publisher’s consent. The opinions expressed in Mainsail are those of the authors or

contributors, and are not necessarily those of the editor or publisher.

Editor’s Note

MAINSAIL has had its finger on the pulse of

sailing for over two years, though some of

us joined a little more recently. We reckon

we are the most enthusiastic sailing fans

in the world: we love boats of all kinds,

modern and classic, we like racing and

cruising, are fascinated by innovation yet

revere tradition, and nothing that floats is

too big or too small for our tastes.

Every three months, both in print and

also electronic version we bring you the

choicest cuts in sailing, and we pride ourselves on our independent

tests, in-depth reports and top-quality photo journalism, who

contribute towards the success of such a publication.

I am very excited about the future of MAINSAIL. The magazine’s

network will be substantially strengthened as we add on our database

and distribution run, as well as finally launching its own website.

Therefore, its regional reach will grow in 2018 and also beyond.

With popular influential exclusive interviews, stories and features,

supported by the annual prestigious Malta International Boats &

Yachting Awards, MAINSAIL has quickly become Malta’s classy large

format leading boats and yachting publication, also reaching across

the region looking for authoritative, accurate and practical information

about acquiring a boat or a yacht- and then making use of it.

Over the past year, with a lot of tenacity, dedication and passion,

we fought off naysayers, as MAINSAIL’s brand and trademark has

established itself also in the luxury yachting and lifestyle media

market and industry, and is already trusted by the most discerning

and sophisticated reader, boats and yachting owners and maritime

aficionados. We will be going to offer additional geographical

distribution, integrated and tailored solutions for our clients in the

print, digital and events environment.

MAINSAIL is already a trusted editorial and advertising platform for

yachting and boat manufacturers, agents, suppliers, and marine

companies including marina and waterfront developers, and well

established luxury brands (Rolex, Maserati, Macallan, etc).

Martin Vella

Publisher - MBR Publications Limited

Editor - Martin Vella

Front Cover Photo - Susannah Hart/ Selden

Sales Department - Margaret Brincat - Sales Director

Art & Design - MBR Design

Advertising - 9940 6743 / 9926 0163

Email: margaret@mbrpublications.net; sales@mbrpublications.net;

Contributors - Evan Andrews; Mario Borg; Lillian Borg; Zoe Dickens; Elizabeth Finney;

Chris Jefferies; Danielle Rossingh; Melinda Watson

Special Thanks - Boats International; Eqiuom Group; Media Pro International; World

Sailing; Yachting & Boating World; Yachting Monthly; Ugo Boss/VF Group

Print Production - Printit

Offices - Highland Apartment - Level 1, Naxxar Road, Birkirkara, BKR 9042

Telephone - +356 2149 7814

www.mbrpublications.net >> 05


Cover Story

Swaps rather than recycling are the solution to tackling the plastic crisis. Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

World Oceans Day: A

Plastic Planet’s Lilly

Barclay on how to live a

low-plastic life

BY ZOE DICKENS

June 8 marked the annual World Oceans Day,

a global initiative to educate the public about

the crisis facing our oceans and raise funds

to help the organisations tackling it. One

such organisation is A Plastic Planet, which

was co-founded by Lilly Barclay and Sian

Sutherland after the pair met while working on

the influential documentary A Plastic Ocean.

A Plastic Planet is currently campaigning for

supermarkets to offer plastic free aisles and,

on June 5, 2018, organised the first One Plastic

Free Day encouraging the public to give up all

products packaged in plastic for 24 hours.

Read on for her insight into the plastic pollution

crisis and tips for how to transform your habits

and live a low plastic life. To hear more from

Lilly Barclay, I registered to attend the Ocean

Talks on June 13, where she spoke alongside

environmental experts and superyacht industry

insiders including Blue Planet II’s James

Honeyborne, designer Espen Øino and REV

project manager George Gill.

Issue 7 >> 06


Cover Story > 07


Exclusive Interview

Q&A: Sir Ben Ainslie on his enduring bid to win the America’s Cup

With the format of the 36 th America’s Cup

taking shape, there are still a few details up

in the air. One thing is for certain though,

Sir Ben Ainslie will be there, his desire

to bring the cup home undiminished.

Mainsail caught up with the former

Olympian to learn more about the road to

Auckland 2021…

By Chris Jefferies

The 36 th America's Cup

MS:Are you disappointed to see multihulls disappear from the America’s Cup?

BA:We are comfortable with the transition. The key people in our sailing,

design, engineering and support teams all have a great deal of relevant experience.

Although I feel that stability and staying with the multihull ACC for the next

America’s Cup would have been the best decision, this new boat could be just

as exciting.

AS A NEW TEAM, WE WERE PLAYING A GAME

OF CATCH UP ALL THE WAY THROUGH THE

35TH AMERICA’S CUP AND THAT PUT A LOT OF

PRESSURE ON US, BUT WHILE WE DID MAKE

MISTAKES IN STRATEGY WE HAVE IDENTIFIED

THEM AND LEARNED FROM THEM.

MS: Do you see any potential problems with the new nationality quotas?

BA: Land Rover BAR has always had a British identity, so a nationality rule

suits us well with strong homegrown talent in our sailing team. We are yet to

see which teams will continue from the last America’s Cup, but a couple of

them were very multi-national and they will have to reconfigure their sailing

teams to meet the new residency requirements, which will be expensive.

MS: Will the new protocol make the America’s Cup more attractive for

new teams?

BA: I think we have to see the class rule for the boat before we can answer that

question. The America’s Cup will always be a sporting and design race and there

is a need for the best talent. The top end of sport is expensive.

MS: How many of your financial backers have committed to the 2021

campaign so far?

BA: We have a huge amount of support, not only from Land Rover but also

from our main partners, 11th Hour Racing, Aberdeen Standard Investments,

CMC, BT and Coutts, alongside our team chairman Sir Charles Dunstone and

the Land Rover BAR Board — who have continued supporting the team. Their

support really allows us to go forward with confidence and continue our goal to

bring the cup home.

MS: How many of your team members will be retained?

BA: We have been looking back at the last campaign and learning from the

mistakes, we have retained a core team through the period until the class rule is

released and are restructuring and examining where our specific focus should be

to create a winning formula.

MS: How will your experience in Bermuda shape your Auckland strategy?

BA: As a new team, we were playing a game of catch up all the way through the

35th America’s Cup and that put a lot of pressure on us, but while we did make

mistakes in strategy we have identified them and learned from them. If I had to

pick one thing out for the next campaign, it’s to do a better job of matching our

racing strategy to the available resources. MS

Creditline: Boat International; America’s Cup

All rights reserved- Copyright 2018

Issue 7 >> 08


While

you’re

doing

this...

…we’re doing this...

When you’re out on the water, you shouldn’t have to worry about what’s going on

underneath it. That’s why we’ve been out in the field, designing, testing and optimising

our coatings to safeguard your boat from fouling. Our results? A streamlined new

range of antifoulings, featuring Micron® 350 – the ultimate fusion of performance,

convenience and superior colour.

Below the waterline? We’ve got it covered.

international-yachtpaint.com

Use antifouling paints safely. Always read the label and product information before use.

All trademarks mentioned in this publication are owned by, or licensed to, the AkzoNobel group of companies. © AkzoNobel 2018.

9055/0218

For trade enquiries please contact Med Tek Ltd on telephone

number 21661982/3 or email info@medtek.com.mt


History Stories

6 Ancient Naval Battles

By Evan Andrews

Long before the invention of cannons and other modern weaponry, ancient navies often clashed in spectacular sea battles

involving hundreds of vessels and thousands of sailors. These engagements typically devolved into hand-to-hand combat on

the decks of ships, but they also included highly sophisticated tactics that ranged from using wooden boarding ramps and

grappling hooks to marine archers and even giant bronze rams. Below, find out more about six of the ancient world’s largest

and most brutal naval battles.

The Battle of Salamis

In 480 B.C., Ancient Greece was fighting for its life. The Persian conqueror Xerxes

had defeated a coalition of Hellenic defenders at the Battle of Thermopylae, and

his forces had sacked Athens and torched the Acropolis. Total defeat seemed on

the horizon, but the beleaguered Athenians managed to regroup with their allies

on the nearby island of Salamis. There, the admiral Themistocles hatched a plan

to strike a last-ditch blow against Xerxes’ 800-ship armada. After using a slave to

feed Xerxes false information, the Greeks lured the Persian navy into the narrow

channels near Salamis.

Arriving in the straits, the Persians were surprised by a fleet of some 370 Greek

Triremes, which sliced through the water single file and began ramming and

boarding their vessels. The Persian armada was so large that it had trouble

maneuvering in the cramped waterway, and it soon fell victim to panic. From

a specially constructed throne on the mainland, Xerxes could only watch as the

numerically inferior Greek force sank more than 300 of his ships and butchered

thousands of his sailors. With his fleet in shambles, he was forced to put his

invasion on hold and withdraw. Xerxes never managed to establish a firm foothold

in Greece again, leaving many historians to cite Salamis as the battle that saved

Hellenic culture from annihilation.

Issue 7 >> 10

The Battle of Actium

In 31 B.C., opposing armadas under Octavian and Marc Antony clashed near

the Greek peninsula at Actium. At stake was control of the Roman Republic,

which had hung in the balance since the assassination of Julius Caesar some

13 years earlier. Antony and his lover Cleopatra commanded several hundred

ships, many of them well-armored war galleys equipped with wooden towers

for archers, massive rams and heavy grappling irons. Octavian’s vessels were

mostly smaller Liburnian craft capable of greater speed and maneuverability and

manned by more experienced crews.

According to the ancient historian Plutarch, the ensuing engagement quickly

took on the character of a land battle, with the two sides firing flaming arrows and

heaving pots of red-hot pitch and heavy stones at one another’s decks. Antony’s

war galleys proved slow and clumsy in the heat of combat, and Octavian’s more

nimble Liburnians found success by swarming around the enemy vessels and

attacking in numbers. As the battle turned in Octavian’s favor, Cleopatra lost

her nerve and ordered her 60 vessels to abandon the fight. A love-struck Marc

Antony followed with a few ships of his own, leaving the majority of his forces

to be overwhelmed by Octavian’s fleet. The defeat at Actium was the beginning

Continued on page 12


...more than just an insurance!

FREE ASSISTANCE INCLUDED

IN HULL INSURANCE

24h HELP LINE

What can we offer?

Hull and machinery insurance Accident insurance

Third party liability insurance Cargo insurance

help line number: +356 7903 7902

info@yacht-pool.com.mt


History Stories

Continued from page 10

of the end for Antony and Cleopatra, both of whom later committed suicide

when Octavian’s forces moved on Egypt. With his main rival defeated,

Octavian tightened his grip on Rome, took the honorific name “Augustus”

and ruled for more than 40 years as its first emperor.

The Battle of the Delta

The walls of the Egyptian Pharaoh Ramses III’s mortuary temple at Medinet

Habu include several drawings depicting one of the earliest known naval

battles in human history. The engagement took place around 1176 B.C.,

during a period when the Mediterranean was plagued by a mysterious

maritime culture known as the Sea Peoples. These fearsome nomads had

already made an attack on Egypt during the reign of Ramses II, and they were

likely responsible for toppling the mighty Hittite Empire.

The Sea Peoples launched a renewed offensive against Egypt during the eighth

year of Ramses III’s reign. The pharaoh led the Egyptians in a spirited defense

that blocked the invaders’ land forces, and he also devised a scheme to trap their

navy. After allowing the Sea Peoples to sail into the Nile Delta unopposed, an

Egyptian fleet launched a surprise attack and used grappling hooks to seize and

destroy their ships. Ramses III also lined the banks of the Nile with archers,

who pelted the enemy with a punishing hail of arrows. The ensuing massacre

brought a brutal end to the Sea Peoples’ attempts to conquer Egypt. “As for

those who reached my boundary,” an inscription at Ramses III’s temple reads,

“their seed is not. Their hearts and their souls are finished unto all eternity.”

The Battle of the Aegates Islands

In 241 B.C., the navies of the Roman Republic and the North African citystate

of Carthage were both feeling the strain of more than 20 years of bitter

conflict in the First Punic War. Carthage had struggled to staff its ships with

properly trained sailors, and Rome was only able to build a fresh fleet of 200

quinqueremes after wealthy citizens donated vast sums of money to the public

treasury.

Upon putting its new armada to sea, the Romans used it to besiege the land

forces of Hamilcar Barca near Sicily. When the Carthaginians sent their navy

to relieve the pressure, the two sides met in a ferocious ship-to-ship battle near

the Egadi Islands. Before the fight, the Roman commander Catulus cut his

ships’ weight by stripping them of everything except the bare necessities of

combat. The move proved advantageous, and the Roman vessels were able to

outmaneuver the Carthaginians’ heavier ships and use their bronze rams and

wooden boarding ramps to devastating effect. Half of Carthage’s fleet was

soon destroyed or captured, leaving its generals no choice but to agree to harsh

terms of surrender to end the war.

The Battle of Arginusae

One of the most legendary naval clashes in Greek history, the Battle of Arginusae

came in 406 B.C. during the Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta.

At the time, Athens’ once-proud navy was in shambles after the Spartan leader

Callicratidas sunk 30 of its vessels and besieged the rest near the city of Mytilene.

The Athenian commander Conon sent word of his dilemma to Athens, which

quickly marshaled an emergency armada of some 150 ships.

When he learned of the relief fleet’s approach, Callicratidas set sail with 120

ships to intercept it near the Arginusae Islands. He was so confident of victory

that he refused to withdraw even in the face of the Athenians’ superior numbers,

a decision that proved disastrous. The Spartans were overwhelmed during a

long and heated battle, and Callicratidas was thrown overboard and killed after

his ship tried to ram an enemy vessel. While the Athenians won the day, they

later executed six of their own naval commanders for failing to rescue several

thousand sailors whose ships had been sunk during the fight. The decision left

them with a critical lack of experienced leaders and hindered their efforts in later

campaigns. Despite having scored a spectacular win at Arginusae, Athens and its

allies went on to lose the Peloponnesian War in 404 B.C.

The Battle of the Red Cliffs

During the dying days of the Han Dynasty, ancient China fractured into three

states ruled by a trio of warlords known as Cao Cao, Liu Bei and Sun Quan.

These would-be royals made repeated attempts to seize power for themselves,

and their struggles eventually came to a head in A.D. 208, when Cao Cao

invaded the territory surrounding the Yangtze River. In response, Liu Bei and

Sun Quan banded together and raised a combined force of some 50,000 troops.

This coalition army soon converged on Cao Cao as he sailed down the Yangtze

with a massive armada and a complement of roughly 230,000 men.

Though severely outnumbered, Liu Bei and Sun Quan gained an advantage

thanks to a now-legendary ruse. While pretending to surrender part of their

forces near an area known as the Red Cliffs, their generals floated several

dozen ships filled with oil and straw up to Cao Cao’s fleet and set them ablaze.

Cao Cao had unwisely chained his entire armada together, and the fire soon

spread to hundreds of vessels. As Cao Cao’s men panicked and tried to escape,

alliance forces launched a withering barrage of arrows from the banks of the

Yangtze. Cao Cao fled the battle, leaving many of his forces to be intercepted

and slaughtered as they retreated. China’s tumultuous “Three Kingdoms”

period would continue for several more decades, but following the debacle at

the Red Cliffs, Cao Cao’s hopes of reunifying China under his own banner were

permanently thwarted. MS

Creditline: Evan Andrews

Issue 7 >> 12


40M Yacht Launch

Columbus 40M Sport

A “unique green” yacht that offers a completely

new way of cruising.

- Vertical bow and automotive-inspired lines together with high volume and

impressive interior heights (2.3 of headroom)

- All-aluminum semi-displacement unit is powered with an advanced hybrid

propulsion for a performance range between 3 and 20 knots

- The integrated I-Bridge system from Team Italia creates a helm station exclusive

to each and every captain

- Classified with the additional class notation “Hybrid Propulsion (Y)” and AUT

CCS (Y)

- All interior woods are FSC certified and the leather is treated with a special

non-toxic water painting process

- Winner of the World Superyacht Awards 2016 – category Semi-Displacement

& Three Deck Motor Yacht 30m - 40.9m - Sport Hybrid model actually records

five between ShowBoats Design and World Superyacht Awards.

Aligned with the green approach to yacht building pioneered by Columbus

Yachts, a brand of Palumbo Group S.p.A., the innovative M/Y Divine – second

model of the 40 M Sport Hybrid awards winning series – will be on display at

Monaco Yacht Show 2016 from 28th of September – to 1st October along the

Quai des Etats-Unis.

“Sport” indicates the high performance of this superyachts equipped with two

diesel engines which will give a top speed of 20 knots, with the ability to easily

cruise and with very low consumption at 16 knots. “Hybrid” is because of her

“green credentials”. She is able to offer a completely new way of yachting, more

conscious and respectful of the environment. Three-decked aluminum M/Y

Divine hosts ten guests in five staterooms with the owner's suite and study on

the main deck, and she can accommodates eight crew members.

While naval architecture and exterior designer - in cooperation with the shipyard

- is Hydrotec Srl, interior design has been conceived by Hot Lab. With its neat

vertical bow and automotive-inspired lines, the architectural point of view M/Y

Divine can certainly be considered a sport yacht although characterized by high

volume and impressive heights, unusual for a yacht of this size.

To reduce the mass of the hull structure from the side profile and offer

uninterrupted views from the main salon, the bulwarks feature glass cut-outs

that also serve as fold-down balconies. These are complemented by full-height

glass doors, which were engineered by the Shipyard to either slide or hinge open.

With the doors open and the balconies lowered, the salon becomes a floating

terrace with unparalleled sea views.

Columbus Yachts - a brand of Palumbo Group S.p.A - produces its own range

of awards winning superyacht combining the best technical expertise with the

excellence of Italian style.

The collections of innovative design yachts - full custom oriented - merge a solid

50 years heritage of shipbuilding with an extremely technologically addicted

production thanks to the strong in-house engineering team and the collaboration

of top international design partnerships forward thinking and well knowledge

project management organization. The actual range is available in four steel

and aluminium distinct collections: Sport Hybrid (40/45/50 meters), Classic

Oceanic (55/60/70/80 meters), Explorer (55/60/70/80 meters) and Custom.

Columbus

With four yachts on water so far - one 40m-year 2013 Sport Hybrid M/Y

ELEONORA III and one 54m-year 2011 M/Y PRIMA - Columbus Yachts

launched two new units in the 2015. The 40m Sport Hybrid – M/Y DIVINE

and a 57m Classic – M/Y TAIBA.

The forward-thinking Columbus Sport Hybrid collection is powered with the

famous hybrid propulsion system – the first system in the luxury motor yachts

industry in the world to obtain the “Hybrid Propulsion (Electric Motor & Shaft

Generator)” Rina Class Certificate in 2014. With three 2013 Showboats Design

Awards with M/Y Eleonora III and actually with M/Y Divine, Columbus Sport

Hybrid 40M it's definitely an award winning model. Divine was awarded with

a special commendation for her Naval Architecture at 2016 Showboats Design

Awards and she is the winner of World Superyacht Awards 2016 – category

Semi-Displacement & Three Deck Motor Yacht 30m – 40.9m.

Columbus is building a 70 metres custom megayacht, with construction to

begin on speculation. Columbus Yachts production facility is actually located in

Columbus

Naples, headquarter of the Group. The yard has 840m (2,755') of quayside for

commissioning and completion works served by two berth-side cranes (7T and

12T) and six telescopic cranes (20T to 700T). The berths are equipped with all

the necessary shore services.

The yard has been certified ISO 9001 since 1998, ISO 14000 since 2005 and

conforms to the organizational and management model under the OHSAS

18001 standard. All activities are carried in compliance with existing laws and

regulations concerning environmental protection.

Columbus Yachts in-house workers and long-term subcontractors appreciate the

level of detail required in modern yachting. Drawing on our experience in ship

construction with our team of welders, metalworkers, carpenters, electricians

and painters, they are able to offer a level of service unparalleled in the area. MS

Creditline: Palumbo Malta Superyachts

Available at:

Palumbo Malta Superyachts Ltd., 31st of March Street, Senglea ISL1041, Malta | Tel: (+356) 2399 6008 / Fax: (+356) 2399 5292 |

Email: info@palumbosy.it | Website: http://www.palumbomsy.com

Issue 7 >> 14


www.mbrpublications.net >> 15


Cruising Destination

Sunset sanctuary:

Finding exclusivity on land in Santorini

By Elizabeth Finney

The world-renowned view out from

Santorini’s coastline peppered with white

sugar cube houses may be one of the most

beautiful in the Med – meaning it’s also one

of the most crowded. Elizabeth Finney drops

anchor and goes in search of the perfect

uninterrupted sunset.

The coastal village of Oia, Santorini.

As it’s difficult to drop anchor and watch the sunset from on board, I escape

the busy port to Erosantorini, a private retreat perched on a cliff overlooking

the caldera. It’s the ultimate hideaway, boasting classical and contemporary

Santorini style, perfect for when the hustle and bustle on the rest of the island is

too much. “People come here for the privacy. The problem with Santorini is that

you go somewhere, and there are people all around you – you cannot be alone,”

explains executive host, Takis Skolarikis. “Many people do not see Greece – they

go to places in Greece but they do not see it.” His passion for Greek culture is

infectious, and it is infused in every aspect of the Erosantorini experience. The

five whitewashed suites are simple yet luxurious, each offering a cool refuge from

the Mediterranean sun.

Takis is an effortlessly expert host and regularly appears with treats and snacks –

one evening, he appears on the pool terrace with a glass of Champagne, hoping

it might add to my sunset experience. The familiar kaleidoscope of colour

engulfs the caldera, visible over the edge of the glassy infinity pool – I sip bubbles

enjoying one of the best views on the island. All I can hear is the sound of the

distant waves far below and as the last sliver of gold disappears over the horizon,

rich magentas and indigos sweep the sky, revealing a web of stars. This is an

experience best shared with family, close friends or partners, with nobody else

to interrupt the peace.

Hiking to Oia over the mountains in Santorini, with a

view of the Caldera

According to Greek myth, Santorini, formerly known as Thera, was created

when Euphemus, son of Poseidon, threw a clod of earth from nearby Anafi into

the sea, because of a dream he’d had about making love to a nymph. Throughout

recent history, the island has been dubbed a haven for couples and creatives –

especially Oia. While still charming, the blue-roofed cliff side town is no longer

Santorini’s best kept secret, though if you know where to look, you can still enjoy

a snapshot of its Bohemian heyday.

The trick is to forgo the famous sunset – even in low season I’m buffeted by

swathes of tourists at the old fort ruins, so I retreat to Meteor Café, a tiny, domeceilinged

spot tucked away from the masses, littered with Greek and Turkish nicknacks.

Sipping a crisp glass of local white, I watch the sun descend uninterrupted

from the minuscule balcony, nibbling at peanuts with a cool breeze bouncing

off the patterned tiles. The locals appear at Marykay’s – one of the best bars

in the Mediterranean – after 11pm, long after tourists have boarded coaches

to make their dinner reservations. Here, you can drink until the small hours,

sharing stories, listening to music and meeting the characters of Oia. One such

individual is local musician Yannis Pantazis, who makes and plays traditional

instruments, using them all – with the help of his audience – to tell stories from

Greek mythology. The quiet night came alive with his singing, lyre and an array

of drums and bells while he tunefully retold the tale of how the Apollo came to

be the god of music.

The coastal village of Oia, Santorini. Picture courtesy of

Shutterstock.com / fokke baarssen

The sunset at Erosantorini

Breakfast at Erosantorini can be anything guests desire, though I am committed

to the Cyclades Islands way of life. Settled al fresco at a sheltered wooden table,

I’m presented a bowl of delicious Greek yoghurt, peppered with pollen from the

Erosantorini bees, their honey to one side. The estate also has it’s own kitchen

garden, baked goods, olive oil and a gorgeous wine cellar, which is concealed

beneath a sliding trap door a stones throw away from the on-site chapel.

Additionally, there is a spa, one of the best in the Mediterranean, where you can

request any treatment, perfect for after a private Pilates class on the patio or a

stint in the steam room.

Issue 7 >> 16


Cruising Destination > 17


International Insurances

YACHT-POOL INTERNATIONAL

Insurances provides full insurance service for over

40 years - and now also available in Malta!

Since 1976, YACHT-POOL INTERNATIONAL has been and an

independent specialist in developing own insurance-solutions for the special

requirements of the yachting industry.

The service between the seamanly experienced YACHT-POOL-crew and yachtowners

lead to inspiration, mutual benefit and a high customer loyalty in over ten

European countries. This way we could develop an inimitable international network

with acceptance as a specialist for solutions for all companies and in all countries.

Yacht-pool international

Since 1976, YACHT-POOL INTERNATIONAL has been and an independent

specialist in developing own insurance-solutions for the special requirements of

the yachting industry.

The service between the seamanly experienced YACHT-POOL-crew and yachtowners

lead to inspiration, mutual benefit and a high customer loyalty in over

ten European countries. This way we could develop an inimitable international

network with acceptance as a specialist for solutions for all companies and in all

countries.

The history

As a member of a well-known yacht-building family Dr. Schöchl – founder and

CEO of YACHT-POOL INTERNATIONAL – has a very profound experience

of the real risks and needs of the yacht-owners. He speaks their language – which

is not always very common for general insurers.

Together with the clients of the family ship-yard he has learnt that a single

insured yacht-owner often stands alone when it comes to settle a claim. Thus the

idea of a “pool of the yacht-insured” was born to counter the strong insurance

companies with an equal power.

YACHT-POOL INTERNATIONAL was created as a “union” of the insured

and the practical results convinced and attracted more and more clients and

made YACHT-POOL INTERNATIONAL with more than 50.000 insured

soon one of the big yacht-insurers in Europe.

Now available in Malta

With the new established office in Malta, YACHT-POOL INTERNATIONAL

is moving forward to cover all markets in the Mediterranean. As a matter of

fact, it has been agreed to cover the needs for each and every specific market

and country in the Mediterranean region. Our new department YACHT-

POOL MALTA is now part of this development and the YACHT-POOL

MEDITERRANEAN strategy. The manager in charge is Mr. Marijan Dželalija,

specialist with the postgraduate diploma in Marina Insurance at Lloyd’s and with

already 8 years of working experience in the field.

YACHT-POOL MALTA is offering a whole range of products for all kinds of

client requirements such as:

- Hull, comprehensive and machinery insurance for yachts

- Third party liability insurance for yachts

- Other different specialized coverage for crew and yachts

- Cargo insurance (all kinds of coverage)

- Special liability insurances

- Assistance at sea (Yacht-Pool Assistance)

- 24 hour help-line for clients MS

Creditline: Yacht-Pool International

For all requests and more information please contact us

via our e-mail address info@yacht-pool.com.mt

YACHT-POOL …. More than just an insurance!

Yacht-pool international

Issue 7 >> 18

Yacht-pool international


Marine Insurance

Your most reliable companion when out at sea

* Free add-ons on comprehensive policies

motor yachts • motor sailing

* Terms & conditions apply

Floriana | 2557 9000 - Freephone | 800 72322

info@citadelplc.com

citadelplc.com

Citadel Insurance p.l.c. • Casa Borgo • 26 Market Street • Floriana FRN 1082 • Malta

Branches: Ħaż-Żebbuġ 21464873 • Il-Gżira 21332151 • Il-Mosta 21438880 • In-Naxxar 21419198 • Iż-Żejtun 21807779 • Paola 21806247 • San Ġwann 27330044

Victoria, Gozo 21566660 - Tied Insurance Intermediaries: Malta • Gozo

Citadel Insurance p.l.c. is a company authorised under the Insurance Business Act, Cap. 403, to carry on general and long term business of insurance and is regulated by the MFSA.


Marine Pollution

Eradicating

the Ocean Plastic Plague

By Melinda Watson

Dr Mae Wan Ho , is joined by two very special guests, ocean plastics specialist, Dr. Lucy

Woodall and Raw Foundation anti-plastic activist, Melinda Watson. They discuss the perils of

the plastic problem. A special feature gives some tops tips for the everyday things you can do

to fight the plastic plague.

O

n current trends the world will contain 33 billion

tonnes of plastic by 20150, writes Mae Wan Ho, and

much of it will litter the oceans, concentrating toxins

and damaging marine life throughout the food chain. The

alternative is to classify the most toxic plastics as 'hazardous

waste', and for all plastics to be reused and recycled in 'closed

loop' systems.

Pesticides and organic pollutants are consistently found on plastic wastes at

harmful concentrations 100 times higher than in sediments, and 1 million

times higher than in sea water.

Over five trillion pieces of waste plastic are floating in our oceans, weighing

268,940 tonnes and causing damage throughout the marine food chain,

according to data collected by a team of scientists from the United States, France,

Chile, Australia and New Zealand.

The team went on 24 expeditions between 2007 and 2013 that surveyed all five

sub-tropical gyres: North Pacific, North Atlantic, South Pacific, South Atlantic

and Indian Ocean, and extensive coastal regions and enclosed seas including the

Bay of Bengal, Australian coasts and the Mediterranean Sea.

Their work included both surface net tows and visual transects for large plastic

debris at 1,571 locations in all oceans. This is the most comprehensive survey

to-dat - yet it is most likely a gross under-estimate of the scale of oceanic plastic

pollution. In 2012, the world produced 280 tonnes of plastic. Less than half has

been consigned to landfill or recycled, and much of the remaining 150 million

tonnes not still in use litters continental shelves and oceans. Global trends suggest

that waste plastics are accumulating exponentially in parallel with trends in

plastic production - which has increased 560-fold in just over 60 years.

These by-products of the oil industry are icons of the industrial economy built

on the over-exploitation of oil and other fossil fuels that's turning the planet

literally into a terminal wasteland (see Redemption from the Plastics Wasteland).

Waste plastic an escalating environmental hazard

The estimate from the global survey of plastic pollution on the sea surface for all

fragment size classes combined is only 0.1% of the world annual production.

The estimates are "highly conservative", the team acknowledged: they do not

account for the potentially massive amounts of plastic washed up on shorelines,

submerged on the seabed, suspended in the water column, and inside organisms.

Also, the survey only collected particles larger than 0.33 mm, due to the size

of the netting used. Sequestration in the sediment is the likely fate of plastic

pollutants after perpetrating numerous impacts on organisms along the way.

Waste plastic in the open ocean is degraded into smaller and smaller fragments

through UV radiation, mechanical abrasion, biological degradation, and

disintegration. The fragments disperse in the ocean, converging in the subtropical

gyres. Generation and accumulation of plastic pollution also occur in closed

bays, gulfs and seas surrounded by densely populated coastlines and watersheds.

The impacts through ingestion and entanglement of marine organisms ranging

from zooplankton to whales, seabirds and reptiles are well documented, and new

studies are showing up harmful effects of nano-size plastic particles that have

escaped inventories so far (see Plastic Poisons in the Food Chain).

The data from the global survey showed that during fragmentation plastics are

lost from the sea surface [2]. There is a 100-fold discrepancy between the expected

microplastics (particles < 4.75 mm) weight and abundance and the actual

amounts observed, indicating a tremendous loss of microplastics. This suggests

removal processes are operating, including UV degradation, biodegradation (by

microorganisms), ingestion / absorption by organisms, decreased buoyancy due

to fouling organisms, entrapment in settled detritus, and beaching.

GLOBAL TRENDS SUGGEST THAT WASTE

PLASTICS ARE ACCUMULATING EXPONENTIALLY

IN PARALLEL WITH TRENDS IN PLASTIC

PRODUCTION - WHICH HAS INCREASED 560-FOLD

IN JUST OVER 60 YEARS.

Fragmentation rates of already brittle microplastics may be very high, breaking

them down into ever smaller submicron or nanoparticles, and unrecoverable by

the nets. Numerous studies demonstrate that many more organisms ingest small

plastic particles than previously thought, either directly or indirectly via their

prey organisms. These are then packaged into faecal pellets which sink to the

bottom. Further, there is evidence that some microbes can degrade microplastics.

Plastics at sea the cause of ecological havoc

A team of scientists led by Chelsea Rochman at University of California Davis

and Mark Anthony Browne at University of California Santa Barbara in the

United States wrote a Commentary in the journal Nature in 2013 calling for the

need to classify plastics hazardous waste.

They point out that plastic debris can physically harm wildlife. Many plastics

may be chemically harmful either because they are themselves potentially toxic

or because they absorb other pollutants. Waste plastics can kill or damage

ecologically and commercially important species including mussels, sea-marsh

grasses and corals. Mammals, reptiles and birds can be harmed through ingesting

plastic or becoming entangled in it.

Continued on page 24

Issue 7 >> 22


MARINE ELECTRICAL PRODUCTS

BUILT TO LAST

Fabian Enterprises Ltd

18-20 Msida Road, Gzira GZR1401.

Tel: 2131 3283/2132 0845 | E-mail sales@fabian.com.mt

WWW.FABIAN.COM.MT


Marine Pollution

Continued from page 22

In 2012, the secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity in Montreal

Canada reported that all sea turtle species, 45% of marine mammal species

and 21% of seabird species can be harmed in that way. Yet in the US, Europe,

Australia and Japan, plastics are classified as regular 'solid waste' and treated like

food scraps or grass clippings. Policies for managing plastic debris are outdated

and severely threaten the health of wildlife.

As plastic breaks into smaller pieces, it is more likely to infiltrate food webs. In

lab and field studies, fish, invertebrates and microorganisms ingest micrometre

sized or smaller particles, which also come from synthetic (polyester or acrylic)

clothing and cleaning products containing plastics. Studies in humans and

mussels have found that ingested and inhaled microplastics get into cells and

tissues where they can cause harm. In patients who have had their knee or hip

joints replaced with plastic implants, such particles can disrupt cellular processes

and degrade tissues.

SEABIRDS THAT HAVE INGESTED PLASTIC WASTE

HAVE POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS IN THEIR

TISSUES AT 300% GREATER THAN THOSE THAT

HAVE NOT EATEN THE PLASTIC.

Toxicities of plastics

Plastics are made up of repeating units or monomers that join up to form long

chains or polymers. These chains are thought to be generally inert - yet unreacted

monomers and other harmful ingredients can be found in plastics.

According to United Nations' Globally Harmonized System of Classification and

Labelling of Chemicals, the chemical ingredients of more than 50% of plastics

are hazardous. Studies investigating the transfer of additives in polyvinylchloride

(PVC) from medical supplies to humans indicate that these chemicals can

accumulate in the blood. In lab tests, monomers and other ingredients of PVC

polystyrene, polyurethane and polycarbonate can be carcinogenic and can affect

organisms in similar way to the hormone oestrogen.

The monomers making up some plastics such as polyethylene (used for carrier

bags) was thought to be more benign. Yet these materials can still become

toxic by picking up other pollutants. Pesticides and organic pollutants such as

polychlorinated biphenyls are consistently found on plastic wastes at harmful

concentrations 100 times higher than those found in sediments, and 1 million

times those occurring in sea water.

Many of these are 'priority pollutants' - chemicals regulated by government

agencies, including US Environment Protection Agency (EPA) because of their

toxicity or persistence in organisms and food webs. These chemicals can disrupt

processes such as cell division and immunity, causing disease or reducing the

organisms' ability to escape from predators or reproduce. In an unpublished

analysis, the authors found that at least 78% of priority pollutants listed by the

EPA and 61% listed by the EU are associated with plastic debris. Seabirds that

have ingested plastic waste have polychlorinated biphenyls in their tissues at

300% greater than those that have not eaten the plastic.

Classify the most harmful plastics as hazardous!

Governments have struggled for decades to reduce plastic debris. The

International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL)

was signed in 1973, although a complete ban on the disposal of plastics at sea

was not enacted until the end of 1988. Despite 134 nations agreeing to eliminate

plastics disposal at sea, ocean sampling suggests that the problem has persisted or

worsened since MARPOL was signed.

The scientists wrote: "We feel that the physical dangers of plastic debris are well

enough established, and the suggestions of the chemical dangers sufficiently

worrying, that the biggest producers of plastic waste - the United States, Europe

and China - must act now. "These countries should agree to classify as hazardous

the most harmful plastics, including those that cannot be reused or recycled because

they lack durability or contain mixtures of materials that cannot be separated."

Plastic waste on the 'Mayan Riviera', Quintana Roo, Mexico.

Photo: John Schneider via Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0).

Focusing on the most hazardous plastics is a realistic first step. Currently, just

four plastics - PVC, polystyrene, polyurethane and polycarbonate - make up

roughly 30% of production. These are made of potentially toxic materials

and difficult to recycle. PVC is used in construction, such as pipes that

carry drinking water. Polystyrene is used for food packaging; polyurethane

in furniture; and polycarbonate in electronics. Health-care and technology

industries are already replacing PVC components in intravenous-drip bags

and in computers with materials that are safer, more durable and recyclable,

such as polypropylene and aluminium.

With the proposed change in plastics classification, many affected habitats

could immediately be cleaned up under national legislation with government

funds. In the United States, for instance, the Comprehensive Environmental

Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 would enable the EPA to

clear the vast accumulations of plastics that litter the terrestrial, freshwater and

marine habitats under US jurisdiction.

Ultimately, the scientists want changes in regulation to drive the development

of a closed-loop system in which all plastics are reused and recycled, instead of

ending up in landfills where chemicals leach from the plastic into surrounding

habitats. "If current consumption rates continue, the planet will hold another

33 billion tonnes of plastic by 2050. This would fill 2.75 billion refusecollection

trucks, which would wrap around the planet roughly 800 times if

placed end to end", the scientists wrote.

"We estimate that this could be reduced to just 4 billion tonnes if the most

problematic plastics are classified as hazardous immediately and replaced with

safer, reusable materials in the next decade."

Dr Mae Wan Ho is the director of the Institute of Science in Society (ISIS),

which campaigns against unethical uses of biotechnology.

This article was originally published by ISIS. A fully referenced version of this

article is posted on ISIS members website.

Author's note: Please circulate widely and repost, but you must give the URL

of the original and preserve all the links back to articles on our website. If you

find this report useful, please support ISIS by subscribing to our magazine

Science in Society, and encourage your friends to do so. Or have a look at

the ISIS bookstore for other publications. Meanwhile, a solution to cleaning

up existing waste and a route of recycling may be turning Waste Plastics into

Fuel Oil? MS

Creditline: the Ecologist/Virgin

Issue 7 >> 24


Image: X4 9

Pure X

Aimed at the discerning sailor, the pure X range is designed

to meet the demands of sailors who want to enjoy sailing

in a wide verity of conditions as well as have all the luxury

you would expect from the clean, timeless Danish style,

synonymous with X-Yachts.

Pure X

X4 3 • X4 6 • X4 9 • X6 5

Xcruising

Xc 35 • Xc 38 • Xc 42 • Xc 45 • Xc 50

Xperformance

Xp 38 • Xp 44 • Xp 50 • Xp 55

NEW: X4 6 - Launch in August 2018

X-Yachts have built almost 6000 yachts, offering Superb Sailing Pleasure. X-Yachts are fast, strong and safe whilst providing luxury, quality and comfort at

sea. X-Yachts provide a world class experience that comes with nearly 40 years of passion for yachting. X-Yachts, World Class since 1979.

X-Yachts Malta • +356 7949 4500 / 9936 0901 • x-yachts.com.mt


RO/RO

THE GRIMALDI GROUP ORDERS

Six Hybrid Ro/Ro Vessels

The design of the new buildings, called “Grimaldi Green 5th Generation”

(GG5G), was developed by the Technical and Energy Saving Department of

the Grimaldi Group together with the Nordic Engineering Design house Knud

E. Hansen and it incorporates innovative elements partly already patented and

protected by copyright.

These are the first examples of a new series of hybrid ro/ro vessels, which will use

fossil fuel during navigation and electricity while in port, thus guaranteeing “zero

emissions in port”. The vessels will, in fact, be equipped with mega lithium batteries

which will allow them to satisfy the energy requirements while at berth. These

batteries will be recharged during navigation, through shaft generators adding the

so-called peak shaving system, and with the aid of 600 m2 of solar panels.

Grimaldi Group

Grimaldi Group Hybrid RoRo

In the framework of the expansion and modernisation programme of its owned

fleet, as anticipated in the last months, the Grimaldi Group has signed an

agreement for the construction of six ro/ro vessels, for a total investment worth

over USD 400 million. The order has been awarded to the Chinese shipyard

Jinling, thus consolidating an important partnership with the Neapolitan

Group, the world’s leading company in the ro-ro sector.

The new vessels, whose delivery is expected as from 2020, will have a length of

238 metres, a beam of 34 metres and will have a gross tonnage of 64,000 tonnes.

They will be able to transport over 7,800 linear meters of rolling units, equivalent

to about 500 trailers. Their loading capacity will be double compared to the

one of the largest ships currently operated by the Neapolitan group and triple

compared to the previous generation of ro/ro ships. At the same speed they will

consume the same quantity of fuel, meaning a 100% increase in efficiency when

measured in terms of consumption/ton of freight transported.

THE VESSELS’ HULL WILL ALSO BE COVERED WITH

SPECIAL NO-TOXIC SILICON PAINTS CHARACTERISED

BY LOW SURFACE ROUGHNESS WHICH WILL REDUCE

FRICTION WITH THE SEA AND DOES NOT RELEASE

ANY SUBSTANCES INTO THE WATER.

The other main technical innovation of these ships is the air lubrication

system under the keel creating bubble layers which will reduce friction and

hydrodynamic resistance and consequently the emissions deriving from fuel

consumption. The vessels’ hull will also be covered with special no-toxic silicon

paints characterised by low surface roughness which will reduce friction with the

sea and does not release any substances into the water. As far as sulphur emissions

are concerned, special on-board devices will combine the sulphur released by the

propulsive cylinders with the salt contained in sea water, exploiting its natural

chemical reaction, producing gypsum, which can be reused on the ground or

disposed of in nature.

Three of the ships will be operated by Grimaldi Lines in the Mediterranean while

the remaining three, which will be ice-class, will be purchased by the Group’s

sister company Finnlines and deployed in the Baltic Sea.

“Reducing fuel consumption and, consequently, cutting harmful emissions

are categorical imperatives for our Group”, proudly said President Gianluca

Grimaldi, at the helm of the Group together with the Managing Directors

Emanuele Grimaldi and Diego Pacella. “It is the first time in the world that such

powerful batteries, equivalent to those equipping 90 Tesla cars, will be installed

on ships”, continues Diego Pacella. “We are proud that these exceptional

technologies on board will make the GG5G hybrid ro/ro the most innovative

and efficient vessels in the world”, concludes Emanuele Grimaldi. MS

The Grimaldi Group, Naples is represented in Malta by Sullivan Maritime

Limited. Should you wish to require any further information, please visit www.

sullivanmaritime.com or call +356 2299 5110.

Credit: Sullivan Maritime

Grimaldi Group Hybrid RoRo

Issue 7 >> 26


Palumbo Event > 27


America’s Cup Special

Ben Ainslie strikes $153m deal

By Danielle Rossingh

Story highlights

• Ben Ainslie lands $153m America's Cup sponsorship with INEOS

• Team ends four-year partnership with Land Rover

• New boat class has driven up costs, Ainslie tells CNN

Ben Ainslie didn't become Britain's most successful sailor by ducking tough decisions.

Toward end April, the four-time Olympic sailing gold medalist announced a

shock £110 million ($153m) shakeup of his former Land Rover BAR America's

Cup team. The 41-year-old unveiled the record title sponsorship from INEOS, a

petrochemicals company owned by Britain's second-richest man James Ratcliffe.

The new look INEOS TEAM GB ends a four-year collaboration with British

car brand Jaguar Land Rover, as Ainslie accelerates his second attempt to win the

America's Cup for Britain. In a joint statement with INEOS, Ainslie called the

deal "an amazing boost for British sport."

The life of windsurfing legend Robby Naish

Ben Ainslie ends Land Rover deal with £153m America's Cup

sponsorship from Jim Ratcliffe's INEOS

'Auld Mug'

Although the America's Cup, sailing's most prestigious event, was first held in

Britain in 1851, no team from the British Isles has ever lifted the "Auld Mug."

Last year, Ainslie's rookie Land Rover BAR team were knocked out by eventual

winners New Zealand in the semi-finals of the challenger series in Bermuda.

The decision by Ainslie, who was part of Oracle Team USA's Cup-winning team

in 2013, did not go down well with Land Rover. "We are extremely disappointed

having worked tirelessly to support Ben and the entire team," Land Rover said

in an emailed statement on Thursday, adding that they were told INEOS had

bought the team and that its contract was terminated on April 20."It is a great

blow to us all that our partnership will not continue."

Cost increase

THE DECISION BY AINSLIE, WHO WAS PART OF

ORACLE TEAM USA'S CUP-WINNING TEAM IN 2013,

DID NOT GO DOWN WELL WITH LAND ROVER

Speaking by phone to CNN from London, Ainslie said the increased cost

of the 2021 America's Cup campaign had played an important part in his

decision. As defender of the longest continuous international competition in

sport, Team New Zealand has decided the next America's Cup will be staged

in a new class of boat. Instead of the twin-hulled foiling catamarans used in

Bermuda, Grimaldi the Group 2021 Cup Hybrid finals RoRo in Auckland will be held in 75-feet foiling

monohull yachts.

Land Rover BAR skippered by Ben Ainslie competes on the second day

of the America's Cup on May 28, 2017 on Bermuda's Great Sound.

Land Rover BAR skippered by Ben Ainslie competes on the second day of the

America's Cup on May 28, 2017 on Bermuda's Great Sound.

"There is a completely new concept of boat, two 75-feet foiling monohulls, and

the costs have gone up significantly and it requires a different approach," Ainslie

said, after thanking Land Rover and his other backers for their support in his

previous Cup bid.

"It was approximately a 30 percent increase in budget and we looked very long

and hard at how we could fund the team. "It became clear that the proposal from

INEOS -- although it's a completely new team and structure -- also gives us that

commitment level of funding to be able to build the right strategy, a winning

strategy, to take on this technical and sailing challenge."

Although Ainslie acknowledged his previous investors and partners "are all

disappointed that they're unable to remain involved with the team," he said

"this was ultimately the team's decision and my decision to move forward

Issue 7 >> 28


America’s Cup Special


Berths & Marinas

Anchorages, Marinas and Boatyards in Malta

By Mario Borg

http://www.maritimedirectory.com.mt/cruising.asp

Courtesy: Boatcare Reservations

Marinas

Grand Harbour Marina

Mario and Lillian Borg are both Maltese. They emigrated to Canada 40 years

ago but frequently visit family in Malta. They have been cruising on their boat,

SY Maltese Falcon, since 1999 and have crossed the Atlantic 3 times, visiting

many countries along the way. Their report below is a very useful guide for

anyone considering cruising Malta.

For anyone contemplating sailing to Malta, as most have already heard, the

Maltese marinas are most of the time fully booked and beyond most cruisers'

budgets. There is plausible reasons for this and that is that demand exceeds the

supply, everyone knows the end result. Having said all that, there are places during

the summer where you can anchor safely and with very nice surroundings. If you

keep an eye on the weather one can move around fairly easyily as the Maltese

archipelago is small, just 17nm by 14nm in total.

Anchorages

Malta, West coast: All anchorages are good from May until September, but even

until the end of November it is possible - with good weather forecasts - to linger

around this beautiful archipelago. The worst months are December through to

the end of February.

Mellieha Bay: Consisting of a very deep bay with sand and weed bottom

very good holding. There is a nice beach at the head of the bay, and very nice

surroundings.

St Paul’s Bay: This is also a large bay and anchoring is possible in several places:

south of St Paul’s Island; further west below the cliffs; across the bay at Bugibba

and also just before the west mooring field. Provisioning here is excellent with

supermarkets, small grocery shops, two fishmongers, hardware stores all within a

short walking distance. There is also many seafront bars and restaurants. There is

a bus service to most of the island including the airport. You can land the dinghy

behind the southern breakwater and tie up to the low wall, it is secure and you

can go and explore the island from here.

Marsamxett Harbour: Anchoring is possible in front of the Royal Malta Yacht

Club in 30 ft over mud. This is a very spectacular place to be and also very close

to all the chandleries and marine services. There are an abundance of restaurants

and bars a short distance away.

Marsaxlok Fishing Harbour: There are several places to anchor in this

picturesque fishing village with adequate spots to tie up your dinghy. Some repair

services are available and to the south west of the large bay is a yard where you can

haul out for storage or short term with very reasonable prices. Provisioning is very

good here and public transportation also available to most parts of the island.

These spots above are the most popular on the main island, There are many small

bays and coves that in good weather are great anchorages with good holding,

follow the link below, it is excellent and once you start browsing through it you

will be amazed at how much is there to offer.

Issue 7 >> 30

Manoel Island Marina: This is the best one and the most reasonable we found.

It is part of Manoel Island Yard. The marina is located on the south coast of

Manoel Island in Marsamxett Harbour. We paid €450.00 excluding Vat of 18%

for one month, and you should be able to get a slip here during the summer

months for a short period, showers and toilets as you enter through the gates.

Utilities are extra; security 24/7, no WiFi at the moment. It is conveniently

located near most of the service centers and chandleries all are within a short

walk, as are many restaurants and groceries. Public transportation is available

close by to most parts of the island. Contact Pierre Aquilina - Marina Manager

at +356-21342618 or visit the website : http://www.miym.com.mt/

Courtesy: Boatcare Reservations

Grand Harbour Marina (Camper and Nicolson operation). This is a high

end Marina with all the facilities but a month here for a 12 metre yacht will

run around €945.00/month. There is a couple of chandleries with limited

supplies but they can get you items from their other location the same day. There

are very nice restaurants along the way out of the marina and 24/7 security,

utilities are extra. This marina is located in a historical area of Grand Harbour

and has spectacular surroundings of fortresses that date back to the 15thcentury.

Provisioning is available close by within walking distance. Public transportation

is not as frequent from here but there are water taxies that will take you to Valletta

the Capital across the harbour. For more info visit their website: http://www.

cnmarinas.com/en/marinas/grand-harbour-marina

Kalkara Boat Yard and Marina: This marina is located in the second creek to

your port side as you enter the Grand Harbour. They have a couple of pontoons

and charge €30.00/day for 12 meters, no discounts for long term stays, showers

are included. It is a small village but not much else, some restaurants around the

creek and non frequent public transportation. Call for rates: +356- 21661306.

Website: http://www.kalkaraboatyard.com.mt/home.php

Msida Creek Marina: In 2012 it was being renovated i.e. pontoons being

replaced and the marina was closed for visiting boats. The marina was paying

their contract clients to go stay at other marinas around the island. From the

progress I have seen, it is not likely that it will be ready to accept visitors for the

summer of 2013.

Sandy Yacht Marina: At the moment this is an organized mooring field with

fore and aft moorings. The company has applied for a proper marina with Med

moor pontoons, but as of this writing nothing has happened. They have free

pickup and delivery back to your boat so you do not have to keep your dinghy

in the water. More details and prices at this link: http://www.sym-malta.com/

Portomaso Marina: This is a small marina located in an upscale area of Malta

surrounded by high end condominiums and restaurants. There is a small

chandlery with limited stock catering for the small marina and the fishing fleet

nearby in Spinola Bay. This is near the heart of the entertainment district and

Continued on page 32


Millenium Cup


Berths & Marinas

Continued from page 30

Mario and Lillian Borg are both Maltese. They emigrated to Canada 40 years

ago but frequently visit family in Malta. They have been cruising on their boat,

SY Maltese Falcon, since 1999 and have crossed the Atlantic 3 times, visiting

many countries along the way. Their report below is a very useful guide for

anyone considering cruising Malta.

For anyone contemplating sailing to Malta, as most have already heard, the

Maltese marinas are most of the time fully booked and beyond most cruisers'

budgets. There is plausible reasons for this and that is that demand exceeds the

supply, everyone knows the end result. Having said all that, there are places during

around this beautiful archipelago. The worst months are December through to

the end of February.

Mellieha Bay: Consisting of a very deep bay with sand and weed bottom

very good holding. There is a nice beach at the head of the bay, and very nice

surroundings.

St Paul’s Bay: This is also a large bay and anchoring is possible in several places:

south of St Paul’s Island; further west below the cliffs; across the bay at Bugibba

and also just before the west mooring field. Provisioning here is excellent with

supermarkets, small grocery shops, two fishmongers, hardware stores all within a

short walking distance. There is also many seafront bars and restaurants. There is

a bus service to most of the island including the airport. You can land the dinghy

behind the southern breakwater and tie up to the low wall, it is secure and you

can go and explore the island from here.

Marsamxett Harbour: Anchoring is possible in front of the Royal Malta Yacht

Club in 30 ft over mud. This is a very spectacular place to be and also very close

to all the chandleries and marine services. There are an abundance of restaurants

and bars a short distance away.

St Paul's Bay - Pinterest

the summer where you can anchor safely and with very nice surroundings. If you

keep an eye on the weather one can move around fairly easyily as the Maltese

archipelago is small, just 17nm by 14nm in total.

Anchorages

Malta, West coast: All anchorages are good from May until September, but even

until the end of November it is possible - with good weather forecasts - to linger

Marsaxlok Fishing Harbour: There are several places to anchor in this

picturesque fishing village with adequate spots to tie up your dinghy. Some repair

services are available and to the south west of the large bay is a yard where you can

haul out for storage or short term with very reasonable prices. Provisioning is very

good here and public transportation also available to most parts of the island.

These spots above are the most popular on the main island, There are many small

bays and coves that in good weather are great anchorages with good holding,

follow the link below, it is excellent and once you start browsing through it you

will be amazed at how much is there to offer. MS

http://www.maritimedirectory.com.mt/cruising.asp

Courtesy: Boatcare Reservations

Marsamxett Harbour - Oren Rozen

Issue 7 >> 32


Yacht Design


Marine Software

Transas A-Suite brings AI to maritime to reduce human error

Transas has launched its first package of applications built on THESIS, a unified

cloud-based platform for managing operations across the full breadth of the maritime

ecosystem. The advanced ‘A-Suite’ package also sets a new precedent by utilising the

latest in machine learning techniques to reduce the potential for human errors on the

bridge or poor decisions elsewhere in the vessel operational chain.

In addition to the officers and crew working on board ships, the benefits of

A-Suite will be available to personnel managing VTS systems and those running

shore-based fleet operational centres or even training facilities, allowing them to

participate in real-time decision support and post-voyage analysis.

"Technology shouldn't be an end in itself – but a tool to achieve an end,” said

Transas CEO Frank Coles. “We want to help the industry improve by enabling

it to make better decisions and boost competitive advantage, using machine

intelligence to augment the human in the loop.

"TECHNOLOGY SHOULDN'T BE AN END IN

ITSELF – BUT A TOOL TO ACHIEVE AN END”

“We are especially proud to go beyond the hype by bringing to market a set of

revolutionary AI-powered e-navigation tools apposite to the needs of modern

ships operating in an increasingly automated and digital world.”The Transas

A-Suite employs machine learning techniques to de-risk vessel operation on

the bridge, at fleet operation centres and in VTS centres. Algorithms detect

anomalies in the behaviour of the human operator wherever they are in the

operational chain and raise the alarm before the consequences of a course of

action or momentary lapse in attention become irreversible. The first version of

the package comprising three core modules – Advanced Intelligent Manoeuvring

(AIM), Advanced Intelligent Diagnostics (AID), and Advanced Intelligent

Routing (AIR) – is now available to end-users and the services will become fully

operational over the coming months.

AIM is a track prediction system and anti-collision support tool designed to improve

situational awareness and reduce the probability of officer inattention or poor

judgement leading to an incident. Using data previously collected on the actions and

behaviour of personnel sailing in the same location, together with a sophisticated

hydrodynamic model of the vessel and a programmatic abstraction of the anticollision

regulations, the system provides advanced decision support.

AID is primarily intended to detect anomalies and provide decision support both

in real-time or during a more methodical post-voyage analysis. This module detects

excessive or unusual manoeuvring patterns, keeping an eye on parameters such

as speed and rate of turn, as well as unexpected deviations in fuel consumption.

By taking data both from conventional equipment and environmental sensors

and recording how and when operators interact with vessel controls, AID marks

a major step forward in real time operational monitoring. AIR creates a platform

for voyage planning and optimisation based on an extensive set of parameters. The

application absorbs real time metocean data, hazards and a vessel’s hydrodynamic

performance, as well as taking account of the impact of known and anticipated

vessel traffic along the route and at bottlenecks.

These are supported by Advanced Data Delivery (ADD) and Advanced

Remote Maintenance (ARM). ADD frees deck officers from the laborious task

of updating of special electronic charts (SENCs), weather data, and other

navigational safety notices. It also creates an audit trail for shore-based offices

ensuring that managers are fully informed of a vessel’s navigational status for

compliance purposes. ARM provides remote diagnostics and performance

analytics for bridge and satellite communication equipment. It backs up key

software together with its configuration data and parameters to the Transas

Cloud allowing rapid restoration of service in the event of a system failure.

In addition, A-Suite features a sophisticated e-learning solution, Advanced

Remote Training for Seafarers (ARTS), with online access to manufacturerapproved,

type-specific training courses for Transas ECDIS. This is fully

compliant with SOLAS, ISM, and STCW requirements.

In this way, A-Suite establishes the critical links between vessels and shore-based

offices, vessel traffic control centres and training institutions and embodies the

core principles of THESIS, Transas’ vision of a harmonised ecosystem, meeting

the needs of multiple operational stakeholders simultaneously.

Resilience, security and deep data integration are fundamental to the THESIS

concept and, by extension, A-Suite. As a cloud-based technology, the applications

can be accessed from ship or shore. However, recognizing the reality that outages

in connectivity do happen at sea, the ship-based installation contains an onboard

pre-processing data management server, so that the applications and decision

support can continue to operate without a live connection to the cloud.

“When we first started to envisage how ships would be operated in the future, we

realised there would be much greater collaboration between ships, back-offices,

traffic control centres, etc. With A-Suite we set out to build a set of intelligent

decision support tools for working in this shared environment,” explained Coles.

“In contrast to many standalone solutions on the market today, A-Suite pulls

together a wider selection of data from a broader range of input sources.

Combined with machine learning techniques, this results in a deeper level of

insight and guidance that is more reflective of a vessel’s actual situation.” The

three-day Transas Global Conference 2018, which takes place in Vancouver in

March, will provide greater insight into and demonstrations of the A-Suite and

one day will be dedicated to the examination of the tools and their capabilities

in the eco system. MS

Creditline: JLA Media Ltd

Issue 7 >> 34


THE Diving, Boating, Watersports

And Marine Magazine For Malta And Gozo

SALES

EXECUTIVES

WANTED

Issue nine now available

from dive centres

MTA offices, yacht clubs

marinas & other outlets

in Malta & Gozo

DON’T DELAY!

DIVE INTO

AZURE TODAY!

Telephone: 99873920

azure@runbox.com

www.iscenemalta.com

www.mbrpublications.net >> 35


SY Book Launch

Inside the superyacht interiors book launch

at Salone Del Mobile 2018

The Party

April 18, 2018 saw the launch of the inaugural Superyacht Interiors book by Boat

International Media. Marked with a sparkling cocktail party held in Milan during

the Salone del Mobile design fair, leading figures from the worlds of interiors, luxury

and superyacht design gathered at the Montenapoleone VIP lounge to celebrate

the book's publication and network with the influential superyacht interior design

brands it showcases. Our Editor was invited as VIP guest, had the time of his life

and also won accolades for his writing talent during the show.

Courtesy Boats International; Salone del Mobile 2018

MS

Stefano Cetoloni and Riccardo di Bene of Luce5 with Laura

Pomponi, founder of Luxury Projects, and guests

Selina McCabe and Helen Rolfs-Melleney of Winch Design

MAINSAIL Editor Martin Vella withdrawing his award

Issue 7 >> 36


SY Book Launch


Hybrid Cruise

Azipod® propulsion, the ABB technology that has become the industry standard

in the cruise segment since its launch in 1990, has secured its 100th cruise ship

order, winning a contract for powering the world’s first electric hybrid icebreaker.

The luxury polar expedition cruise ship, due delivery for the French cruise

company PONANT in 2021, will feature two Azipod® VI propulsion units

fit for the most challenging ice conditions. Upon delivery from Norway’s

Vard Søviknes, a Fincantieri Company, the cruise ship will take passengers to

unexplored destinations in Arctic and Antarctic waters. In the harsh conditions

of ice-covered seas, Azipod units with 6-meter propellers and combined power

of 34 MW will help the vessel achieve greater maneuverability and efficiency, as

well as lower the environmental impact. Due to minimal noise and vibration,

Azipod propulsion will also improve passenger and crew comfort.

Ponant icebreaker

ABB's Azipod propulsion passes

100 cruise ship milestone with

PONANT order

“We are delighted that PONANT chose to rely on ABB’s leading expertise both

in cruise and ice-going vessel propulsion for their pioneering vessel,” said Juha

Koskela, Managing Director, ABB Marine & Ports. “Azipod units already power

more than 80 vessels navigating in icy seas, and reaching the 100th cruise ship

order highlights ABB’s commitment to a technology with superior performance,

reliability, safety and environmental profile.” MS

Propulsion system of choice for

cruise vessels around the world

The first Azipod order from a cruise ship customer in 1995 led to installations

on board the Carnival Cruise Lines Fantasy-class newbuildings Elation and

Paradise. An order from Royal Caribbean Cruises came in 1997, with three

Azipod units installed on the biggest cruise ship of its time – Voyager of the

Seas. Other large cruise lines followed, selecting Azipod propulsion for their

vessels. “At the beginning of the 1990s, we entered the cruise market with a

technology offering a 10-15% efficiency gain over conventional shaftline systems

and a gearless construction that reduces environmental impact,” said Marcus

Högblom, Head of the Passenger, Ice & Dry Cargo segment, ABB Marine &

Ports. “Since then, the cruise market has been increasingly choosing Azipod

propulsion. We estimate that energy savings equivalent to 700,000 tons of fuel

have been made in the cruise sector due to the selection of Azipod.”

from natural resources to finished products. As title partner of Formula E, the fully electric

international FIA motorsport class, ABB is pushing the boundaries of e-mobility to contribute to

a sustainable future. ABB operates in more than 100 countries with about 135,000 employees.

www.abb.com MS

Creditline: JLA Media Ltd

WE ESTIMATE THAT ENERGY SAVINGS

EQUIVALENT TO 700,000 TONS OF FUEL HAVE

BEEN MADE IN THE CRUISE SECTOR DUE TO THE

SELECTION OF AZIPOD

Options for Azipod propulsion now span 1.5MW to 22MW, and the technology

has played a key role in developing ABB Marine & Ports’ strong position for

environmentally-friendly electric propulsion.

Utilizing the ABB Ability Collaborative Operation Center infrastructure, ABB

experts are able to monitor the operational parameters of the Azipod cruise

fleet and coordinate remote equipment analysis, diagnostics, and predictive

maintenance services.

ABB (ABBN: SIX Swiss Ex) is a pioneering technology leader in electrification products, robotics

and motion, industrial automation and power grids, serving customers in utilities, industry and

transport & infrastructure globally. Continuing a history of innovation spanning more than

130 years, ABB today is writing the future of industrial digitalization with two clear value

propositions: bringing electricity from any power plant to any plug and automating industries

Azipod

Issue 7 >> 38


New Alfa Laval PureSOx connectivity solution simplifies SOx compliance

Alfa Laval PureSOx - Olaf van Heerikhuizen, Manager Service, Gas Systems at Alfa Laval.

C

onnectivity is a catchphrase in today’s marine

industry, but Alfa Laval is taking concrete steps

to make it a reality. With a new connectivity

programme for Alfa Laval PureSOx scrubbers, the

company is adding value for exhaust gas cleaning customers. The

solution promises both simplicity and even greater reliability in

SOx compliance.

SOx > 39


SMART4SEA Leadership Award

Frank Coles

wins inaugural

SMART4SEA

Leadership Award

Frank Coles accepting the

SMART4SEA Leadership Award

Frank Coles, Chief Executive

Officer of Transas, has won

the prestigious inaugural

SMART4SEA Leadership Award,

recognising his outstanding

contribution to transformative

thinking in the maritime industry.

The 2018 SMART4SEA awards, held on January the 30th on the eve of the

SMART4SEA Conference in Athens, focus exclusively on the initiatives and

individuals who foster ‘Smart Excellence & Sustainable Shipping’. The first ever

Leadership Award is a special celebration of the individual whose entire career is

considered as demonstrating leadership towards smarter shipping.

In a 40-year career starting as a ship’s cadet, Coles has championed the beneficial

change in ship management available through new communication technologies,

but he continues to highlight that shipping’s resistance to innovation is based on

attitudes and culture, not technology.

Frank Coles

“WE NEED WELL-TRAINED MARITIME

PROFESSIONALS WORKING IN A MODERN

ENVIRONMENT

“Essentially leadership in innovation and change is a continuous campaign

against the archaic cultural attitudes fighting modernization and the benefits of

efficiency brought about by technology,” said Coles, accepting the Award. “In

the last 20 years of pushing for safer, more efficient ships, the biggest challenge

has not been technology; it’s been pushing against the bastions of the old club

and networks.”

Coles’ career highlights include: Rydex becoming the first company to develop

a ship-to-shore email software system over satellite; developing the first version

of synchronized software – Infobridge - for Sperry Marine; transforming Globe

Wireless into a market leader for crew voice services via high frequency and

satellite communications; and boosting turnover at Inmarsat Maritime from

$450 million to $680 million in under two years as President.

He identified his ‘light bulb moment’ as occurring in the mid-1990s when, as

CEO of Pacific Basin, he wrote a business plan envisaging ships connected into

land-based management decisions, using data and analysis brought ashore. “Yet

here we are 20 years on, and it is just beginning,” he observed.

Today, Coles is maintaining the momentum for change through THESIS

(Transas Harmonised Eco System of Integrated Solutions), the ground-breaking

ship-shore communications platform for sharing of administration and decisionmaking

between sea- and land-based staff. By automating much of the onerous

paperwork and changing the roles of captains, crew and land-based staff,

THESIS is creating new efficiencies, improving safety at sea and reducing vessel

operating costs.

In typically forthright style, a presentation during a panel session opening the

SMART4SEA Conference on January 31st saw the Transas CEO describe the

maritime constituency as ‘Citizens Against Virtually Everything’ (CAVE) when

it came to connectivity advances. He castigated shipping for an intransigence

he attributed to its ‘ASS’ (Archaic Spaghetti Structure) and summed up its

operational dynamism in the acronym FOSSIL (Fleet Operations Services Stuck

in Limbo).

However, Coles believes more change will be achieved in the next 10 years than

has been possible in the preceding 40, as “the cultural roadblocks and attitude

dinosaurs” are removed.

“We need well-trained maritime professionals working in a modern environment.

Fortunately, as time has passed, the combination of a new generation and

technology will remove those who refuse to see, cannot see or don’t care enough

to see. Change is coming from within but also from outside. We must keep

talking about it, so we can see the sea,” said Coles.

The Transas CEO also emphasised that smarter shipping is safer. “We have for

so long spoken in platitudes about the seafarer and ship safety, while all the time

seeking ways around the rules. You cannot achieve an efficient or safe ship by

loading technology on top of paper and old systems. You cannot have a cyber

secure ship if you simply add technology to old fashioned processes. The regulatory

process that desires to please everyone ends up with a camel as a race horse.” MS

Creditine: JLA Media Ltd

Issue 7 >> 40


www.mbrpublications.net >> 41


Outboard Motor Focus

New outboard launch by Suzuki

Another revolution in innovation - Suzuki launches new DF325A outboard.

Suzuki recently held a press conference at the Düsseldorf Boat Show to

proudly introduce the NEW DF325A – an outboard that perfectly balances

awesome power and thrust, with outstanding fuel-efficiency and trusted

reliability all within a lightweight and stylish design.

Built with everyday use of larger boats in mind, this market-leading new

outboard has been engineered to run on 91 RON fuel and in doing so,

is the first four stroke outboard over 300 horsepower in the world to

achieve this. The high-tech and innovative DF325A has been designed to

be robust, easy to use and versatile, making it the ideal outboard for large

boats and any task. Whether you are using your boat for work or play,

wherever you are in the world, this latest addition to the Suzuki range is

the ultimate choice as it shares the same revolutionary technologies as the

recently launched DF350A.

Suzuki combines huge power and maximum efficiency

Suzuki’s engineers set out to build a compact, lightweight outboard that delivers the

high power required, whilst also maximising operating efficiencies. Additionally,

they set the goal of making the DF325A run on low octane, 91 RON fuel, which

combined with legendary Suzuki reliability makes the outboard ideally suited for

a wide variety of large boats around the world. The traditional single propeller

design not only creates forward thrust, but also produces a significant amount of

rotational energy. Suzuki’s engineers have captured this wasted energy and turned

it into productive power by utilising a revolutionary dual-propeller technology.

Dual Prop System – a true revolution in propellers

Suzuki’s engineers know that the lower unit shape and propeller design have a

critical impact on performance. The innovative contra-rotating propeller design

provides more grip underwater and also helps to achieve a smaller, and far more

hydrodynamic gear case. It does this by distributing the engine’s torque evenly

over two propellers, so that the torque per propeller is decreased enabling the gear

diameter to be reduced.

A new three-blade/three-blade propeller set up has been developed to provide

incredible acceleration and high performance. In testing, this configuration

recorded high speeds even under heavy load and at high rotation speeds.

The propeller blade geometry has also been optimised to work in the new

configuration resulting in incredible grip and acceleration across the rev range.

One of the most remarkable benefits is exceptional directional and transverse

stability which is achieved by each propeller rotating in different directions, to

balance the turning.

Dual injectors for both cooling and power

Injecting fuel achieves two things: it atomises the fuel and it cools the cylinder.

To provide the power and cooling needed, the fuel must be completely injected

at precisely the right time and angle. The all-new Dual Injector System uses two

smaller injectors giving immense precision, improved atomisation and increased

fuel efficiency.

Attention to detail - technologically advanced pistons

With a high compression ratio (10.5:1), more advanced technology is required

for the pistons than ever before. Not only does the surface have to withstand

greater forces, but the connecting rod and hardware do too. To help the piston

withstand the added lateral pressure, a switch has been made from the standard

surface texture treatment to shot peening. Shot peening creates fine dimples on

the surface that evenly distribute the pressure created during combustion. It’s a

more expensive, and a far more involved manufacturing process, but this is what

makes it possible to create a piston worthy of the ‘ultimate’ title.

Direct intake system and dual louver system for cool and dry air

Achieving a flow of cooler, dry air directly into the engine is made possible by the

unique combination of the Direct Intake System and the Dual Louver System.

This revolutionary approach ensures a direct flow of air whilst eliminating water

intake, even in the face of the most severe on-water testing.

The Dual Louver System incorporates a double shield of blades. The outer row of

blades removes the spray from the boat and the inner louvers capture and drain

the remaining mist. As a result, intake air is free of moisture and is kept close to

ambient temperature. The development of this new outboard has been driven

by Suzuki’s belief that it is important to provide boaters with more than just

horsepower. While power and speed are critical factors, the added dimensions

of efficiency, reliability and stability at this top-end level make the DF325A a

welcome addition to Suzuki’s range of ultimate four stroke outboards.

Yasuharu Osawa, Executive General Manager, Global Marine &

Power Products Operation, Suzuki Motor Corporation,

said, “The latest high-spec, high-output outboards

all require high-octane fuel. As far as we know,

there is no other outboard over 300 horsepower

that runs on RON 91, which is regular fuel in

some key markets. This also makes the DF325A

a very attractive outboard for the commercial

sector. It is packed with the very latest outboard

technologies which will deliver the ultimate

boating experience.” MS

For further details, please contact:

Strand Marine & Autosystems Ltd. Qormi

Tel: 21472336; Fax: 21472338; Mob: 99209690

Email: info@strandmarinemalta.com

Credit: MMD

Issue 7 >> 42


Presents

MALTA’S BEST

ENTREPRENEUR

OF THE YEAR

AWARDS 2018 ®

Leading the way, going the way and

showing the way

Castello Dei Baroni, Wardija

Friday 27 th July, 2018

SIMON

ESTATES

MALTA’S AWARD WINNING

FAMILY WINEMAKER


Issue 7 >> 44

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines