SLO LIFE Magazine Apr/May 2018

slolife

LIFE

SLOmagazine

HEALTH

TRENDS

LOCAL

FLAVOR

TIMELINE

NOW

HE

T

APR/MAY 2018

SLOLIFEMAGAZINE.COM MEET

CENTRAL

COAST

EVENTS

BY THE

UMBERS

ON THE

RISE

KATHY CALLAHAN

MOTHER, SURVIVOR

& ENTREPRENEUR

APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 1


2 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 3


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SLO LIFE

magazine

CONTENTS

Volume

9

Number 2

Apr/May 2018

40

KATHY CALLAHAN

Bringing joy is as important as

turning a profit for this mom

turned entrepreneur.

12

14

16

20

Publisher’s Message

Info

On the Cover

In Box

8 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018

26

28

32

Briefs

Check out the latest news highlight reel.

Timeline

We take a look at local events from the past two months.

View

It was an annual meteor shower which led BRADY CABE

to capture the magic of the night sky.


APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 9


| CONTENTS

34

36

38

54

Q&A

SLO CAL’s chief executive, CHUCK DAVISON,

shares his perspective on promoting

growth and opportunity while still

protecting the small town feel that

embodies the Central Coast lifestyle.

Now Hear This

It’s their jazz-infused style that keeps

THE TIPSY GYPSIES growing in popularity

as one of the Central Coast’s favorite bands.

On the Rise

Basketball phenom and Mission Prep senior

SEAN SCARRY looks to the future focused

on athletic and personal growth.

Family

With a toddler in tow, PADEN HUGHES

enjoys an afternoon exploring the Avila

Valley Barn, a local favorite produce and

sweet shop.

74

Health

Always interested in the latest health news, we here

at SLO LIFE began digging into the current research

on sulforaphane—a compound found in cruciferous

vegetables, and in broccoli sprouts in particular.

56

Dwelling

Born and raised in San Luis Obispo, local

LEIGH CRONIN sought to revamp her

family’s Pismo Heights home with tasteful

updates while maintaining its charm.

80

Taste

Eager to stay in the know on all things culinary related,

JAIME LEWIS ventures into three of the Central Coast’s

teaching kitchens, where education meets palate

pleasing experiences.

66

Real Estate

Look no further for insight into the local

housing market as we share the year-todate

statistics of home sales for both the

City and the County of San Luis Obispo.

10 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018

88

90

92

94

Kitchen

If the recent sunshine and warmer weather have left

you searching for the fresh crispness of a spring salad,

take a peek at this latest Asian-inspired recipe from

CHEF JESSIE RIVAS.

Wine Notes

With an extensive education and passion for winemaking,

ANDRIA MCGHEE offers her insight and expertise into

the journey that precedes every single glass.

Brew

The vegan movement doesn’t apply to food alone, and

BRANT MYERS has the surprising answers to what goes

into producing a socially conscious beer.

Happenings

Looking for something to do? We’ve got you covered.

Check out the calendar to discover the best events

around the Central Coast in April and May.


APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 11


| PUBLISHER’S MESSAGE

Small World

Last month, my youngest, Harrison, turned nine years old. And he took the opportunity to remind my wife

and me, again, that unlike his big brother and sister, he had never been to Disneyland.

He had a point, and if we were ever going to do it, now was the time. Another year, and he would likely lose

interest. So, that night we studied our calendars searching for a window between dance rehearsal, water polo,

and baseball practice. As it turned out, the only available date for the foreseeable future was the very next day.

With five tickets in the shopping cart, and my pointer hovering over “Purchase,” I swallowed hard reviewing

the total when I heard the “click.”

It had been at least ten years since my last trip to the Magic Kingdom. But, the place never really changes.

Sure, there were new attractions, new rides, but mostly it was just as I remembered it. In our effort to

squeeze as much family fun into one day as was humanly possible, we obediently stood in one line after

another as we careened from Adventureland to Toontown with expert precision. First, it was Pirates of the

Caribbean, then Thunder Mountain, next the Matterhorn, after that was Space Mountain. But, there was

one ride that stuck with me.

As we waited our turn to set sail into the Small World, I told my kids about one of my roommates in college who claimed to have suffered PTSD

from the ride. When he was a little kid, I shared in the same hushed tone and pacing of a spooky campfire ghost story, the ride broke down and he was

shipwrecked for seven-and-a-half hours. The repetitive animatronic refrain It’s a small world after all drove him to the brink of madness, requiring years

of counseling and medication. While kernels of the story were true, they did not buy my embellishment. But, I did get some laughs when I told them

about my high school buddy who landed himself in Disney Jail after disembarking the ship and moonwalking around the Japanese area of the exhibit.

It was Grad Nite, two-thirty in the morning with 100,000 other 17-year-olds. Who would have thought that security was watching? They were.

Maybe I’m getting old, or perhaps delirious from the long day at the park; it could have been the overcooked burger I ate in Tomorrowland for lunch,

but something got to me. As we cruised around the world, serenaded over, and over, and over again by a variety of Disneyfied ethnic groups, my mind

bounced between two thoughts: One, those robots will someday kill us—technological singularity, the theory postulating that our machines will

eventually become smarter than people and ultimately take us out, is probably right. And, two, I think I finally get it.

Without question, there is some crazier-than-usual stuff going on lately—the first thing I do each morning these days is log on to the “Failing”

New York Times website to find out if we have launched our nukes—and for the first time I recognize the problem: adults. We are born into this life

prewired to learn, and grow, and love, but for so many of us that gets lost along the way like a pair of oversized mouse ears on Splash Mountain. Our

natural childhood curiosity and wonderment is replaced too often with suspicion and fear. A tendency to connect, to cooperate, to collaborate, for a lot

of us, is trumped by a life of isolation and xenophobia. It’s a world of hopes and a world of fears. Abundance becomes scarcity. Why?

Okay, I realize that I may have lost you by now. You’re probably thinking, “This guy drank some weird Kool-Aid down there in Anaheim.” Stick with

me, hear me out: If it weren’t for us adults modeling for our kids otherwise, the wedges between people would probably melt away within a generation.

Let’s be honest, Small World is probably the worst ride at Disneyland. Still, as corny as it is, there is that message that cannot be ignored: There’s so much

that we share that it’s time we’re aware. But, perhaps we adults are too far gone and need some other thing to unite us. As the saying goes, “The enemy of

my enemy is my friend,” like when the United States and Russia buddied up to fight back Hitler. Maybe we do need technological singularity—where

our electronics attempt to enslave us—maybe going to war with the Small World Animatronic Army would be the thing to bring us together. And, after

a full day at Disneyland, you can count me in.

I would like to take this opportunity to say “thank you” to everyone who has had a hand in producing this issue of SLO LIFE Magazine and, most of all,

to our advertisers and subscribers—we couldn’t do it without you.

Live the SLO Life!

Tom Franciskovich

tom@slolifemagazine.com

12 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


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SLO LIFE

magazine

4251 S. HIGUERA STREET, SUITE 800, SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIFORNIA

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info@slolifemagazine.com

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PUBLISHER

Tom Franciskovich

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Sheryl Disher

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Paden Hughes

Dawn Janke

Jaime Lewis

Andria McGhee

Brant Myers

Jessie Rivas

Beautiful Design

with Inclusivity in Mind

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Brady Cabe

Gina Cinardo

Vanessa Plakias

Melody Shirazi

CONTRIBUTIONS

Have some comments or feedback about something you’ve read here?

Or, do you have something on your mind that you think everyone should

know about? Submit your story ideas, events, recipes, and announcements

by visiting us online at slolifemagazine.com and clicking “Share Your Story” or

emailing us at info@slolifemagazine.com. Be sure to include your full name

and city for verification purposes. Contributions chosen for publication may

be edited for clarity and space limitations.

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media kit along with testimonials from happy advertisers.

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NOTE

The opinions expressed within these pages do not necessarily reflect those of

SLO LIFE Magazine. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole

or in part without the express written permission of the publisher.

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CIRCULATION, COVERAGE AND ADVERTISING RATES

Complete details regarding circulation, coverage and advertising rates,

space, sizes and similar information are available to prospective

advertisers. Please call or email for a media kit. Closing date is 30 days

before date of issue.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

info@slolifemagazine.com

4251 S. Higuera Street, Suite 800

San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

Letters chosen for publication may be edited for clarity and space limitations.


APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 15


| ON THE COVER

A SNEAK PEEK

BEHIND the scenes

WITH KATHY CALLAHAN

BY VANESSA PLAKIAS

When I got to her house,

Kathy was putting on

her signature red lipstick,

which goes with her red

shoes. I noticed throughout

her home that red was

her signature accent color.

There was always a splash

of red somewhere. In her

kitchen it was her red

Kitchen Aid mixer.

Her sons Jude and Noah were there; such nice boys.

I was able to get some shots of Jude shooting the

basketball. He’s a really a good player. I’ll be able to say

someday, “Hey, I knew him way back when.”

When we were done, I

asked her to change back

into her normal street

clothes and we did a few

more shots, just to capture

her in her everyday mode.

Real Kathy. SLO LIFE

I met Dobby—the kids named him, it comes

from Harry Potter—who they had just adopted.

The other dog is Indie from Indiana Jones.

16 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


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Meet local birth & baby professionals who can help you navigate the journeys of

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APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 17


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MONTEREY STREET COUR T STREET DOWNTOWN CENTRE

18 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


H&M Kids is decked out in all the colors of spring.

APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 19


| IN BOX

Take us with you!

Hey, SLO LIFE readers: Send us your photos the next time you’re relaxing in town or traveling

far and away with your copy of the magazine. Email us at info@slolifemagazine.com

KOH SAMUI, THAILAND

FRENCH POLYNESIA

PAUL and MELISSA WHITE

APRIL and JACOB DEAN

TERRY and STEPHANIE CONNER traveled to

French Polynesia (Tahiti) to celebrate our Golden

Wedding Anniversary. We took the wonderful

SLO Life Magazine along with us!

RAJASTHAN, INDIA

KRUGER NATIONAL PARK, SOUTH AFRICA

Celebrating wedding anniversaries at the Ngala Safari

Lodge, BOB and LAURIE NEUMANN (46 years) with

CHRIS and ANN SLATE (25 years).

JAN MARX at Ranthombore wild tiger

nature preserve.

20 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


SAN FRANCISCO

Members of the SLO Newcomers Shop Till You Drop

and Boomin Bloomers group took on San Francisco for

“Galentine’s Day” but did not forget to take a moment

at Filoli Gardens with SLO Life Magazine.

INDIAN OCEAN

TOM and SHARON RIPPNER aboard a dive liveaboard in the

Indian Ocean among the Maldives.

APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 21


| IN BOX

You showed us...

GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS

VENICE, ITALY

JULIE and BILL KALENIAN enjoying a chilly day

in Venice.

ERICA, SHELLY, and MIKE LOPEMAN

enjoying the Warriors’ Win!

SAYULITO, MEXICO

PANAMA CANAL

JEFF and ALMA MCCLINTOCK

The weather was perfect, the people warm and

friendly and Panama exceeded our expectations.

The Panama Canal is an engineering wonder.

NONI SMYTH, SUSAN SAVAGE, KINDLE SMYTH,

CHARLENE IRWIN, KAREN WOOD and CINDY MCCOY

took SLO Life Magazine to Sayulito, Mexico as we

feasted on fish tacos and sipped margaritas—ole!

22 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


HAVE A SLO SUMMER.

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APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 23


| IN BOX

We heard you...

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Truthfully…

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Oscar, our Activities Director,

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I can always depend on the

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Activities Professional

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SLOm a g a z i n e

LOCAL

TASTE

CENTRA

COAST

REAL

E

slolifemagazine.com

FEB/MAR 2 018

LIFE

BEHIND THE

SCENES

SEASONAL

BREWING

BRIEFS

HEALTH

TRENDS

NOW

HEAR

THIS

MEET

RUSHDI CADER

ALTRUISM, ADVOCACY

& PROMOTING PEACE

For the past 13 years, I have

been fortunate and honored

to work with one of the great

humanitarians of our time,

Dr. Rushdi Abdul-Cader.

SLO Life Magazine has had

many interesting cover

subjects since its inception,

but none more worthy.

— RON YUKELSON

Correction:

| LEGACY

NORTH

STAR

This academic school year marks the end of an era at

Cuesta College as GIL STORK, an institution within the

institution, after 51 years, calls it a career.

In the article, North Star, from

the last issue we incorrectly

noted that Gil Stork, the

outgoing president of Cuesta

College, had previously retired

as president. Actually, he was a

vice president when he stepped

down from administration

before returning as president.

BY TOM FRANCISKOVICH

When Gil Stork woke up on the runway

he rubbed his tongue across his teeth to

discover some of them were broken. His

first thought was, “My mom is going to

kill me!” She had always warned him

that he would get his teeth knocked out

playing football. Turned out she was

right, in a way. With his legs and back

throbbing in pain, consciousness slowly returning, he could begin to see

what appeared to be flames flickering through the dense fog. The next thing

he remembers was someone running up, standing over him and shouting,

“There’s another one over here!”

Forever tied to San Luis Obispo’s most tragic event, the Cal Poly Football

team airplane crash of October 29, 1960, it took Stork many years to reconcile

the events of that night, just outside of Toledo, Ohio, which claimed the lives

of 22 of the 48 aboard. Why did they over-pack the plane? Why did they

attempt a takeoff in that soupy fog? What caused the left engine to fail? Why

did I switch seats? Why did I survive? It should have been me.

Guilt, confusion, and anger followed—years of processing. Constantly

replaying the events of that night, bargaining in prayer with a higher power

for a somehow different result. The question, “Why am I here, but he’s not?”

played in an endless loop, over and over again in the mind of the young

offensive lineman.

Rising out of mourning is a gradual process, and sometimes it never

happens. Once in a while a good day comes along, sometimes followed by

another. When a string of them link up into a long chain, it can be said

that someone has finally “turned the corner.” For Stork, the up and down

struggle to return to normal took hold six years later when his first child

was born. Going through that experience—“witnessing the miracle of

life”—shifted his perspective in an instant and changed his thinking from

questioning why the crash had happened to pondering the significance

of it. As he settled in with his wife and their baby, a new question arose: >>

44 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | FEB/MAR 2018

Discover for Yourself!

Free 1-Month Stay

Call 805.225.9360

475 March Street, San Luis Obispo

www.TheManse.Net

CA License #405800545

Please send your photos and comments to info@slolifemagazine.com

Follow SLO LIFE on Facebook: Visit facebook.com/slolifemagazine

Visit us online at slolifemagazine.com

Letters may be edited for content and clarity. To be considered for publication your letter should

include your name, city, state, phone number or email address (for authentication purposes).

24 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 25


| BRIEFS

$551,000

The current budget deficit at Cuesta

College, which comes as a result of

declining enrollment and mandated

spending. The shortfall may grow as the

faculty union there is in the process of

negotiating a 4% pay increase over the

next two years.

“People

Died, Ian

Lied”

Multiple signs spotted at a protest

following The Tribune’s release of chilling

video footage documenting the final

hours of local inmate Andrew Holland’s

life, in which Sheriff Ian Parkinson,

who is currently running for re-election,

had falsely claimed Holland was “found

unconscious and unresponsive” and was

“under the continual care of a physician.”

We’re

Number

50!

U.S. News & World Report published a study

completed by McKinsey & Company that

ranked California dead last in quality of life.

In a survey completed by more than 30,000

people, the state fared poorly in categories

such as voter participation, community

engagement, and social support. Coming in

first place was North Dakota followed by

Minnesota, Wisconsin, New Hampshire, and

South Dakota.

26 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018

“Lots of eyes on

them, which keeps

them safer.”

San Luis Obispo City Councilmember

Carlyn Christianson expressing her

opinion that potential recreational

marijuana retailers in town should be

placed in visible locations near crossroads.

“Thanks but no thanks

for your stupid letter.”

Supervisor Adam Hill in a Facebook

message to a Pismo Beach constituent that

continued, “Now? F--- off. All talk, no

balls.” Following the incident, Hill took

a brief leave of absence citing his lifelong

struggle with depression and the need to

get himself in better shape “emotionally

and physically.”

“Oh, my

God—it’s

Vanna

White!”

Atascadero resident and Cal Poly graduate,

Kelly Wilson, gushed before appearing on

the game show Wheel of Fortune after

applying “six or seven times” since she was

a student at Cal Poly. It was a big week for

SLO County, as Paso Robles retiree Barbara

McGregor also took her turn at the wheel.

“Well, guess what?

Merry Christmas.”

Jamila Haseeb, arguing in favor of later

hours for a proposed adventure-themed

“escape room” on Marsh Street, observing

during the public comments segment of a

San Luis Obispo City Council meeting that

people always say there are “too many bars in

the downtown, too many restaurants.”

“It is the

long-standing

legal policy for every

jail death to be

investigated by Sheriff

Coroner detectives,

not the District

Attorney’s office.”

District Attorney Dan Dow penned a memo

rationalizing why he is not investigating

the death of Andrew Holland, explaining

further that it would be “inappropriate for

me to comment on the details of the case” as

the FBI is investigating the matter.

$3.23

The cost of a pack of ten tampons that the

SLO County Jail charges its female inmates

in a clear violation of their civil rights, a new

lawsuit against the sheriff ’s office alleges.

Mismanagement was also uncovered at

the SLO County Jail last year by a Grand

Jury, which found several infractions

that followed a 2016 inspection that also

uncovered seven violations.

“I just got off the

phone with your

mom and she

wants you to have

fun and be safe

this weekend!”

San Luis Obispo Mayor Heidi Harmon

posted on her Facebook page on the eve of

St. Patrick’s Day where she shared a flyer

created by the city with the title “Selfies Not

Mugshots” encouraging young people to be

smart while celebrating. SLO LIFE


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APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 27


| TIMELINE

Around the County

2/4

The San Luis Obispo City Council whiplashed back-andforth

on a series of decisions concerning the controversial

bike boulevard proposed for Broad and Chorro Streets in the

Anholm District. After an intense four-hour discussion involving

energetic pushback from some residents in the area, the council

unanimously agreed (Councilmember Carlyn Christianson was

absent) to a compromise, which would involve a scaled down

version of the plan while keeping parking spaces in place. Twoand-a-half

weeks later, Councilman Dan Rivoire stated that after

further consideration, the traffic-calming measures did not go far

enough. The council then voted again, this time 4-1, with Andy

Pease opposing, to reconsider a proposal from an earlier plan that

would reroute cars with traffic diverters on Broad Street between

Meinecke and Lincoln streets. Some residents cried foul and

accused the council of moving forward without proper public

notification and transparency.

FEBRUARY ’18

2/6

Twice, Supervisor Bruce Gibson proposed the SLO County

Board of Supervisors write a resolution as a public comment

to the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management to signify its

opposition to the Trump administration’s plan to open up 90%

of the nation’s offshore oil and gas reserves—including right here

on the Central Coast—to oil and gas exploration. Both times,

Gibson failed to secure a second vote, as Adam Hill was out sick,

John Peschong had recused himself because his firm had accepted

money from oil companies, and Debbie Arnold and Lynn

Compton failed to support the motion.

2/17

Andy Mangano, the developer behind the 720-home project near the SLO

Airport known as Avila Ranch, settled a lawsuit with two local groups—an

advocacy group called Preserve the SLO Life and a nearby neighborhood

association, Los Verdes I and II—for $678,000. The funds were earmarked

for a variety of projects intended to mitigate the groups’ concerns about

traffic, noise, and flooding impacts. The city of San Luis Obispo, which

was named in the suit, had no financial obligations in the settlement,

but will play a monitoring role going forward. Engineering for the new

neighborhood is currently underway and construction is expected to begin

next year with the first phase of homes forecasted to be available for movein

between 2020 and 2022.

2/8

After two photographs emerged showing that a member of the

SLO High School boys soccer team was concurrently playing in

a Paso Robles men’s league, the team—one of the top-ranked in

the state—was forced to forfeit ten of its wins, which removed

them from playoff contention. Although it was later determined

that three other teammates also played in the men’s league, SLO

High Principal Leslie O’Connor argued unsuccessfully that

had the photos been turned over immediately by the Arroyo

Grande High School athletic director, rather than waiting for

what appeared to be a competitive advantage a week later, then

the school would have suspended the players, but kept two

additional wins allowing the team to enter the playoffs. The

league denied the appeal.

2/23

Shockwaves were felt throughout the Central Coast when news surfaced

that a local developer was planning a massive 15,000-home city in an area

near the Diablo Canyon Power Plant known as Wild Cherry Canyon.

The development, on untouched pristine oak-studded hillside land, would

be accessible only through Avila Beach, an already heavily trafficked area,

and would sprout a city one-and-a-half times the size of Grover Beach. In

an email to Tom Blessant, a manager with HomeFed Corp. of Carlsbad,

developer Denis Sullivan said, “Think we can get a deal with PG&E to

get the fee (title). Think we should push forward a (sic) soon as possible.”

For years, environmental groups have been working to protect the 2,400-

acre area, at times coming close to achieving state park status, but the

issue is expected to heat up as the nuclear power facility begins winding

down its operations.

28 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


3/3

It was revealed that San Luis Obispo’s City Hall is considering asking

its residents to approve a 1% sales tax increase to raise approximately

$400 million over the next twenty years to pay for a variety of projects,

including: redesigning and refurbishing Mission Plaza with a remodeled

amphitheater, restroom, and new café; adding and expanding cross-town

bicycle corridors; and building a new police station. It is estimated that

the new tax would generate about $15 million per year initially, and city

officials point to a 2014 study they commissioned showing that 70% of

the tax is paid for by visitors. San Luis Obispo’s budget is forecasted

to veer heavily into the red—there is an $8.9 million annual shortfall

expected over the next few years—as the city grapples with an unfunded

pension liability of about $148 million.

3/6

In an unexpected development, a plea deal was reached with John

Wallace, 73, on the second day of his preliminary hearing for two

felony conflict-of-interest charges and four misdemeanor counts of

public official interference, related to his tenure as the head of the

South County Sanitation District and the Avila Beach Community

Service District, where he was accused of unlawfully funneling millions

of dollars of contracts to his company, The Wallace Group. Under

the terms of the agreement, Wallace was required to pay $59,724

in restitution in exchange for pleading guilty to a pair of lesser

misdemeanor charges with the stipulation that his conviction does not

admit to fraud, deceit, or recklessness, which would have affected his

professional licenses.

MARCH ’18

3/14

High school students around the Central Coast joined a national walkout

protest, advocating for gun control on the one-month anniversary of the

shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida where

17 people were killed and 15 others were injured. While most students

locally were allowed 17 minutes to demonstrate, students at Paso Robles

High School initially were prohibited from joining the walkout that day,

but later administrators opted for changing the schedule to allow for a

longer morning break. Meanwhile, schools in Atascadero were locked

down during the 17-minute protest because one of its students had

threatened to “shoot up” the high school on social media.

3/16

San Luis Obispo County received national media attention

after The Tribune published a bombshell investigative report

indicating that Sheriff Ian Parkinson had lied about the

County Jail’s treatment of a local inmate, Andrew Holland,

who died of a pulmonary embolism when a blood clot

formed in his leg and traveled to his lung. The newspaper

simultaneously released a surveillance video showing Holland

struggling to breathe after finally being released from his

restraint chair where he sat in his own waste for 46 hours.

While medics attempted to resuscitate Holland, a couple of

guards appeared to be smiling and laughing. As seen in the

video, contrary to Parkinson’s claims, Holland was not “found

unconscious and unresponsive” and was not “under the

continual care of a physician.” Despite calls for the San Luis

Obispo District Attorney to investigate, Dan Dow declined.

Since 2012, deaths at the SLO County Jail are three times

the national average. Last month, a sheriff in Oklahoma was

charged with first-degree manslaughter for a similar incident

involving a restraint chair.

3/21

Following the announcement that the San Luis Obispo Air

Pollution Control District (APCD) and State Parks had

proposed a settlement agreement to reduce dust emissions

from the Oceano Dunes by 30% over five years, a hearing

board nixed the plan. After an extensive public comments

session, board member William Johnson summarized the

majority opinion when he said that the agreement was

“vague in a number of areas and not as fully protective of

public health as it needs to be.” The hearing board then

ordered State Parks, the agency that oversees the off-road

riding area in the Oceano Dunes, and APCD to come back

by April 30th with a settlement agreement that reduces

emissions by 50%. If a settlement is not reached, then a

nuisance trial will proceed where State Parks will have to

defend itself against accusations that ATVs are causing a

public nuisance, potentially closing the park to off-road vehicles.

The air quality on the Nipomo Mesa is often the worst in the

country, and air monitors showed that it was in violation of

California health standards 98 days last year. SLO LIFE

APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 29


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APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 31


| VIEW

INTO THE

UNKNOWN

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRADY CABE

As a young father, Brady Cabe knows a thing or two about sleepless

nights. But, it is an all-nighter in August that he looks forward to

year-round. After tucking his kids into bed, and kissing his wife

goodnight, he hops into the car and heads north, then east, until the

only thing heard is the whisper of the owl’s flight overhead.

The Perseids meteor shower is a big-time event. The Super Bowl for

stargazers. And there is no better place to take in the show locally

than from some oak-studded field a few paces off of Shell Creek

Road, an offshoot of Highway 58, nowhere in particular outside of

Santa Margarita. Almost completely without urban light pollution,

the skies are deep dark, bringing the cosmos within reach.

Photographic inspiration hit Cabe in the most unusual way: surfing.

More specifically, it crept up on him during the days when the swells

failed to appear. As he would sit on his board, waiting for a set to

roll in, not far from his Grover Beach home, he started to notice

something during those early mornings. The light. Each day it was

a little bit different, but always trying to tell a story. He started to

tune in, listen with his eyes. It was not long before he became more

interested in the flat days with dramatic light than he was when south

swells were pounding the beach break. “It finally occurred to me,” is

how he remembers it, “that I ought to try to take a few pictures with

my phone.” And, so it began.

One thing led to another, which is how Cabe found himself all alone,

at 3 o’clock in the morning in one of the most uninhabited corners of

San Luis Obispo County. As he tromped around the uneven terrain,

he searched for a foreground subject—something immovable, and

timeless, something that deserved to share the stage with the heavens

above. In the distance, he saw the silhouette and knew he found it.

Carefully, he mounted his Canon 6D to the tripod below the elderly

oak, and began capturing the light. Every 30 seconds curious creatures

of the night could hear the sound of the shutter with its clunky click.

The composition you see here, called a star trail, is actually an

amalgamation of approximately 60 photos taken over the course of a

half-hour or so. Initially, Cabe was disappointed with the result. He

had hoped to shoot a meteor, which would have been represented

in the print as a thin, white streak across the canvas, but they were

not cooperating. By training his focus on the North Star, the one

stationary point in the sky, the kaleidoscope effect is created by the

Earth’s rotation. It’s not really the stars that move—it’s us. And Cabe

was there that night as an intergalactic translator of sorts, attempting

to discern the story of their ancient light, while the little blue-green

marble he found himself standing on continued to hurtle through

space, into the unknown. SLO LIFE

32 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 33


| Q&A

BOARDROOM TO BOARDWALK

The San Luis Obispo County Visitors & Conference Bureau is on the move after

rebranding itself with a new name—SLO CAL—and a new $4 million annual

budget, which comes as a result of its recently created marketing assessment that

charges guests at local hotels a 1% fee designated for promoting the county to

tourists. And, if one thing is for certain, CHUCK DAVISON, the organization’s chief

executive, practices what he preaches, as six years ago he walked away from a

lucrative corporate life to move his family to Pismo Beach. Recently, he stopped by

to talk about his transition from boardroom to boardwalk, his views on diversity, his

faith, and what to do about Diablo Canyon. Here is some of what he had to say...

Tell us, Chuck, where are you from? I was born

and raised in Las Vegas. My family has been there

about 85 years. My great-grandfather moved out

there to be a foreman at Boulder Dam, which

became Hoover Dam. I spent the first half of my

career working in the gaming industry, casinos.

Then I ran four properties for Carl Icahn. Loved

Vegas, still do; lived there a long time. Spent the

last five years there in corporate America as the

General Manager of North America for Expedia.

I was traveling 28 days per month.

So, how did you end up here? In 2006, my wife

and I came to Pismo Beach for the first time for

a vacation. I remember sitting on the patio with

a glass of wine looking at the ocean and saying,

“Who are these people that get to live here?

Because this is the best of California—no people,

no smog, no traffic.” So, six years ago, when I was

40, I said to my wife, “What if we just moved to

Pismo Beach?” We didn’t know one person, didn’t

have a job. Had no idea how we were going to

do it. We decided we’d figure it out. It was the

hardest two years of my life. Trying to become

relevant in this county when you’re not third

generation, didn’t go to Cal Poly, didn’t move

here for a job, is a tough thing. We drained tons

of savings. I had plenty of opportunities to do

consulting, which would have meant traveling

again, but the idea was that I wanted to spend

time with my family—be a dad.

Tell us about your family. I’m married and have

four girls. We’re born again Christians. We always

grew up going to church. My wife’s father was a

pastor. In a world today that seems so challenged,

it’s what drives us and helps us get through. We

love the fact that we live in a community where

not everybody thinks the same way as us. That’s

awesome. I think that the ability to be able to sit

down with somebody, across the table, even when

you think about things differently, and have a

conversation like you and I are doing now; rather

than what is taking place in the world today

where, because your faith doesn’t line up with

mine or your political viewpoint doesn’t line up

with mine, we can’t even be friends? We’re trying

to raise our kids in an environment where, hey,

not everybody thinks the same, but we should

love everybody the exact same way as God loves

us. So, yes, it’s a big part of our life. And trying to

be better tomorrow than we were today is a big

thing for us.

Let’s talk business. What challenges do we

face? Looking ahead with all of the things we

need to do to be successful, particularly with the

closure of Diablo Canyon, we just cannot produce

enough homegrown talent in this market. We

have to import people, there’s no way around

it. Our county does a really good job of being

friendly on the surface, but the ability to go

deeper in a relationship can be challenging if you

are not in that circle already. We’ve got to do a

better job as a community of embracing those

people, embracing diversity. And, the people that

we need to move into this county don’t necessarily

look like us. Quite frankly, one of the hardest

things for us, when we took our daughters to

Shell Beach Elementary for their first day of

school after we moved here from Las Vegas was

finding that 99.9% of the kids there were white.

We said, “What in the world is this? Where’s

everybody else? Where’s the rest of the world?”

What does tourism mean to us locally? It’s

the number one economic driver in the county

outside of agriculture. And, I would argue that if

you removed wine from ag and put it in tourism,

ag wouldn’t even be a close second. Overall,

tourism was worth $1.59 billion last year. It’s huge.

Over 18,000 jobs here are tied to tourism and

hospitality—that’s one out of every eight jobs. In a

county with less than 300,000 people, we wouldn’t

have so many of our great restaurants, and wineries,

and activities without tourists. We just don’t have

the population to support it. But, we get to enjoy

all of these amazing assets because we have a

tourism community that helps carry the weight.

But, for me, ultimately it’s about protecting and

improving the quality of life for people who live in

San Luis Obispo County. So, how do we make sure

that we continue to create opportunity, and growth,

and financial responsibility in the market; and, how

do we do it in a way that protects the culture, and

the history, and the environment, and the quality

of life that all of us have come to love and is the

reason we call this place home. SLO LIFE

34 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


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APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 35


| NOW HEAR THIS

THE TIPSY GYPSIES

It’s sometimes surprising to hear our favorite artists reveal that they don’t watch their movies or

listen to their albums once they’re released. For The Tipsy Gypsies’ vocalist Hilary Langdon, it isn’t

that she doesn’t like the songs she’s sung; it’s difficult for her to listen to the early albums she

recorded with guitarist Forrestt Williams and the rest of their Central Coast ensemble because her

voice has changed so much over the past ten years.

BY DAWN JANKE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MELODY SHIRAZI

To check out The Tipsy Gypsies and learn about their

upcoming performances, go to thetipsygypsies.com

36 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


angdon’s voice isn’t the

only thing that has

changed for The Tipsy

Gypsies. Originally

as a quintet, the band

performed in a gypsyjazz

style with acoustic

string instruments and

La sound influenced by

French guitar virtuoso Django Reinhardt. With its

evolution from gypsy-jazz to soul rock, The Tipsy

Gypsies’ style has changed drastically, and Langdon

and Williams are excited to explore where this new

sound will take them.

Performing together since 2007, Langdon and

Williams have shared the stage with a number

of “top-notch musicians,” as Williams says, and

while the musical line-up has evolved, Langdon

and Williams remain The Tipsy Gypsies’ primary

songwriters. Langdon, a Sacramento native and

Cal Poly graduate, explains, “Forrestt and I get

a foundation together, and then everyone else

does their own voicing for their part in the song.”

Williams adds, “It’s worked for so long because we

all listen to each other, and we welcome each other’s

feedback.” Langdon continues,“We have mutual

respect and admiration for one another,”

It’s clear that Langdon and Williams value

the sound each musician brings to the group.

Williams says, for example, that he’s a big fan of

Daryl VanDruff ’s drumming and wants to hear

him perform whenever he can. Williams also is

quick to point out that bassist Brian Lanzone

and saxophonist/clarinetist Laura Foxx have

musical degrees and “bring that talent to each

composition.” Langdon shares, “They know

when to play and when to leave space—a lot of

musicians try to fill space, and they’re helping us

reign that in. Everyone is really talented.” And

vocalist Reese Galido agrees, “The mutual respect

for each member’s expertise lends itself to some

seriously great musical expression.”

In terms of musical expression, Langdon credits

the band’s newest member, Foxx, with imparting

a totally different vibe to the group. “It’s very new,

and it’s really good,” she says. “We definitely like

where it’s going,” Williams adds. “We’re getting

funkier, with more R&B and soul coming through.”

Foxx says everyone has been really supportive as she’s learned the songs:

“They encourage me to add some of my own style through sax/clarinet lines

and solos and equally to develop lines for the new songs that we’re currently

working on.”

With the addition of Foxx, “It’s now three women and three men, so

the dynamic has changed, too,” says Langdon. “And, of course, all the

musicians in the group influence the sound,” adds Williams. One key

shift in that sound is from violin to horns. “The violin was keeping us

tied to our gypsy jazz roots, and now we’re able to embrace the tonalities

that we’re currently into,” says Williams, a Morro Bay native and multiinstrumentalist,

who explains that the change in the band’s sound has

been a natural evolution.

Langdon and Williams celebrate the band’s evolution as they muse about

the recording process of each album and agree that, even if it’s hard for

Langdon to listen to songs from the past, they’re both really proud of their

work. And it’s their most recent release, “Waiting,” to which they clink

glasses and toast to success. “‘Waiting’ definitely speaks to our sound and is

the most polished of our three albums, many thanks to Damon Castillo,”

says Williams. Langdon chimes in, “Damon took his time with each track,”

and Williams continues: “We came to him with all the recorded tracks, and

he mixed the album, but he was almost like a co-producer because of the

level of work he put into it. He sprinkled that album with his magic.”

Listeners agreed that “Waiting” was magical. At last year’s New Times

Music Awards, The Tipsy Gypsies took home four wins. Their single,

“Drought,” won in the best songwriter category; their single, “Waiting,” won

in the best R&B/Blues category; and the band won best album and best

live performance. “It was a fun event, and it was especially cool to win the

best songwriter category because Forrestt’s wife [Sharaya Olmeda] wrote

the lyrics to that one,” says Langdon. “She gave me a poem to write music

to; it was “Drought,” and it won.” Williams says the award is a testament to

Olmeda’s writing, “She is an amazing poet.”

As a result of their awards, The Tipsy Gypsies have some recording time at

The Sauce Pot Studios and reveal that something

is in the works. Langdon says, “Making music

as the Tipsy Gypsies continues to be a fun,

collaborative process.” Williams adds, “We have

a couple of new original songs that we are really

excited about.”

They’re also excited to continue sharing their

music with fans in SLO County. Whether it’s

the ocean or the mountains, both Langdon and

Williams agree that there is a something about

this place. “It’s like we’ve all just converged,” says

Williams, “and there’s a disproportionately high

level of musical talent in our community that

we’re thrilled to be a part of.” SLO LIFE

DAWN JANKE, Director,

University Writing & Rhetoric

Center Cal Poly, keeps her

pulse on the Central Coast

music scene.

APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 37


| ON THE RISE

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

Sean Scarry

Standing at six feet seven inches,

seventeen-year-old Mission College Preparatory

Catholic High School senior SEAN SCARRY

charges through life with the same tenacity he

dedicates to the basketball court.

What sort of extracurricular activities are you involved in? I play basketball,

and have been class president and vice president the past two years. I fundraise for

two orphanages in Livingstone, Zambia; one for girls who were sexually abused

by family, and one for kids whose parents have been arrested or have passed away.

We built a basketball court when we were there because their hoop had been

destroyed. We started a karate program to teach discipline, provide a strong role

model, and give the kids a sense of pride in competing for their orphanage in

tournaments across the country.

What is important to you outside of high school? I enjoy helping my community

and my family and friends are extremely important to me.

Aside from playing basketball, what do you like to do for fun? I like to

wakeboard and scuba dive.

What has influenced you the most ? My parents have shown me that when

you focus and work hard, you can accomplish anything. They also taught me to

be accepting of all people and treat everyone with respect. My travels have also

influenced me tremendously. Seeing different cultures and meeting different

people has enabled me to have a better understanding of the world.

If you could go back in history and meet anyone, who would it be? I would meet

my mom’s dad. Unfortunately, my grandpa died before I was born and I have

always been sad that I never got to grow up with him in my life, so I would take

advantage of the opportunity to get to know my grandpa first-hand.

What is your favorite memory of all time? Beating St. Bernard in CIF this year.

If you won $1 million, what would you do with it? I would use it to rebuild

Lubasi and Dani’s home, the two orphanages we have been working with and

make it a safer, more comfortable environment.

What career do you see yourself in someday? Construction and real estate

development.

What are you looking forward to most? I am extremely excited for the next part

of my life. I am looking forward to bettering myself and my athletic performance

this coming year then continuing my education, starting a construction company,

and starting a family.

What’s on the horizon for you? I will be attending IMG Academy, a preparatory

boarding school and sport training facility, next year. SLO LIFE

Know a student On the Rise?

Introduce us at slolifemagazine.com/share

38 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


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| MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR

MINUTE

OF JOY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY VANESSA PLAKIAS

As the days grow longer and warmer around the Central Coast, San Luis Obispo resident

KATHY CALLAHAN is beginning to swing into action with her retro ice cream business

she calls SLO Mama Sweets. While the goal of spreading joy shares equal weight with

turning a profit, the iconic 1954 Chevy freezer truck is doing both. From the outside looking

in, it would be impossible to fully grasp the depth of her resilience. Here is her story…

40 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 41


42 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


et’s start from the beginning, Kathy.

Where are you from? I’m originally

from Southern California, from the

Los Angeles area. And so, I went

to Cal Poly, like a million years ago.

And I met my husband, actually we

met right before I came up here,

Land then we went to school together. He is from the Bay Area, and we

graduated, and I said, “I don’t want to go back to L.A.” And he didn’t

want to go to the Bay Area, so we did like most people at the time,

because there was no industry here; we just tried to find anything we

could do to stay in town because it’s such a great place. So, that’s kind

of how it was. I was a political science major. My plan was originally to

go to law school, but we said, “Let’s get married—let’s live in San Luis

Obispo!” So, I ended up managing a swimwear company that was based

in Los Angeles, but the manufacturer was here. And so I did that, and

then I started my own business.

What was the business? I started a children’s apparel manufacturing

company with my sister. We went into production, I had sales reps

around the country, and traveled all over the place. Back then, we didn’t

have computers, you know. We ran everything on the phone, and used

a Rolodex, landlines, and payphones. And so we had to travel around to

see the showrooms. You had to actually physically go there because you

couldn’t get much work done over the phone. My husband and I really

wanted to start a family at this point. We had been married about a year,

and I had this business started, it was getting going, which is when I was

diagnosed with stage 4 Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

Wow. I grew up in Glendale, and I played softball from the time I was in

third grade through high school. And it turns out that the field sat on a

toxic landfill. Shortly after I was diagnosed, I got a call from a guy I went

to high school with. I was only 25, newly married. And he was like, “Did

you know that there’s like 30 of us?” We were all diagnosed around the

same time with Hodgkin’s. And there are only something like 8,000 cases of

Hodgkin’s a year. The numbers for my school were just off the charts. So, the

CDC [Center for Disease Control] came in and did a study and identified

it as a cancer cluster—you know, the whole Erin Brokovich story—and they

closed down the park. I cannot really pinpoint the toxins we were exposed

to, but I’ve lost some of my friends who had the same thing that I did. I’m

52 now and we are starting to see other cancers develop as we get older. You

see different age groups go through each decade and something seems to

crop up with the group of people that went through this. But when I was

diagnosed, I mean, we were like babies, so young.

What was the prognosis? I was end stage. It was everywhere but my brain

and my bone marrow. It was completely systemic. So, yeah, it was a crazy

situation. And when I look back, I think, “Oh, my gosh, how did I not see

these symptoms?” But they don’t come on, like, you don’t have something

growing from the top of your head. It comes on slowly. I just thought I

had the flu. I thought I was catching every cold in the office, every flu. You

know, when you’re 25, your brain doesn’t go there. So you think, I’ll tough

it out. I just got married, and figured that I was just coming down from

that experience, all the planning. I’m just stressed, whatever. Then things

started getting worse. I had massive night sweats. Different things that

were not normal, so I finally broke down and went to the doctor. I had a

chronic cough, you know, and I was drinking bottles of cough syrup, and

trying to help myself, and nothing would quell the cough. The doctor said,

“Let’s do a chest X-ray to see if you have pneumonia. Let’s do a blood

test.” So, the blood test came back that there was something wrong with

my liver, so I’m thinking, “Oh, man, what could that be?” And she rattled

off a long list of things that could be causing it, and sandwiched in there

was, “malignant C-word.”

Oh, man… So, I went home and then I get a phone call. They said, “You

need to come in and see the doctor within the hour, and please bring your

husband.” It was pretty alarming. The doctor sat us down and said, “You

have a grapefruit-sized tumor in your heart. We have you scheduled for

open heart surgery right now.”

Seriously, that day? I think she thought I was going to kick the bucket,

like, right then and there. And, of course I did not go to the hospital, I

went home and called everyone I knew, my family, and told them what

was going on. Then I heard that there was an experimental program up

at Stanford and they wanted me right away because I was young and end

stage. So, I went into treatment there, lived up there. I had some major

complications and ended up going into an emergency room, up in the Bay

Area, because I couldn’t make it to Stanford. I spent a week in intensive

care where the doctor came in, and said, “This is it. There’s nothing more

that can be done. I’m sorry. We need to call your family.”

So, what did you do? I kind of fired that doctor. I very inappropriately

kicked him out of the room, and called my doctors at Stanford. They said,

“We’re breaking you out of that place.” They sent an ambulance for me

to transport me back to Stanford. I spent a month in their ICU, their

cancer ICU, which is like an isolation unit. And I got well. Well, sort of.

And, then I finished the treatment. So, it was crazy. It was like, you know,

just a really amazing journey that I even made it there. And with my

business at the time, my manufacturing business, I went back into that

once I recovered. We started making little girls hats so we would go up

to Stanford to give them to the little girls who didn’t have hair because

of their treatments. So, just part of that was keeping my hand in all of

that, trying to, I don’t know, keep connected with the cancer community

to some extent. So, we closed the business and we tried to have kids. And

we knew that was going to be a huge, monumental hill to climb, because

of all the chemo, and radiation, and surgeries, and things like that. So, we

embarked on having kids anyway, which was a pretty interesting journey.

Our three kids came to us very miraculously, each in different ways

through different forms of adoption.

Alright, what came next for you? So, I had quit my business, because my

main focus was to stay at home with my kids, but I thought about what

I could do out of my home. I began baking, and found I had a penchant

for wedding cakes and baked goods. It just came naturally. So, I baked

out of my home and did that for as many years as I could. But it became

very taxing. You do your baking in the middle of the night, and I just, I

couldn’t, my body couldn’t handle that anymore. So, I really was trying

to wrap my brain around what I could do to contribute to our family.

You know, we have three kids and college was looming for our oldest,

and I needed to contribute. But, at the same time, I didn’t want to leave

the kids because there was a huge motivation for me to be at home with

them. You know, life changes, and you realize what the things are that are

important. And, spending every second we can with the kids is important.

So, I wracked my brain, asking myself, “What can I do that incorporates

our kids?” Nothing was coming to me. Then we went on a family trip to

D.C., and we marched those kids through every one of those museums >>

APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 43


and, I think it was like the seventh one, the American History Museum,

I see this vintage Good Humor ice cream truck. It was on display as part

of the museum. I saw it and immediately said, “This is what I’m doing!”

You know, it was like being struck by lightning. I had never experienced

anything like it in my life—it was just so clear, I could see it all. I could see

the old uniforms—we were going to bring back something that was gone.

So cool. That night at the hotel I started researching. Learning everything

I could about Good Humor. My husband, Matt, thought I was nuts.

For four months I looked into trucks, talked to everyone I could. I dove

into the details of ice cream; put together a plan for doing a business.

Finally, one day, Matt walked in and said, “This is it—this is the business

for you!” It took him a little while to come around, but we were both on

the same page. So, we started working together to find a truck, which is

very hard to do. They are either rusted out and beyond repair, or they are

family heirlooms that people do not want to part with. So, we ended up

buying a 1954 Chevy. That is the year you want because of the grille; it’s

all about the grille. It’s spectacular, so curvy, and gorgeous, and shiny. But,

it wasn’t that way at first. It was a mess. We spent a couple of years doing

restoration. It was a nightmare.

Did you do the restoration yourselves? We did some ourselves, and we >>

44 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


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Graham worked with us on the purchase of our first home. Graham was patient and always available to walk us through the

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we look at it right away. This became our home and we are so thankful that Graham was on the lookout and made that call!

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graham @ ccreslo.com

805.459.1865 | CalBRE #01873454

www.ccreslo.com

3196 South Higuera Suite D, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401


APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 45


farmed different things out. There were about five different shops involved.

And a couple of times, we almost gave up. We said, “What are we doing?

Let’s just drive this thing off a cliff.” But we stuck with it. There were some

really big high highs, and really low lows. Probably the lowest point, this

was about five years ago now, was when we had a shop down in Southern

California install a completely new brake system. We got it on the freeway

and I had a complete brake failure. I exited at 126 and came to the first

stoplight—nothing. The light was red, people were stopped, and I was

pumping the brakes—absolutely nothing. I honked the horn—no sound. I

pulled the emergency brake—not a thing. So, I’m scanning around trying

to figure out what to do when I see a brand new road under construction

off to the right. It’s blocked off, but there is a small opening through the

orange cones. I crank the wheel and veer off onto it and just coast on it.

Fortunately, it went slightly uphill so it slowed me down to the point

where the truck finally came to a stop. Matt, who was following me, said,

“What are you doing?” My head is spinning and all I can say is, “No

brakes, no nothing.”

But, everything turned out alright? Yes, luckily, everyone was okay; it’s a

miracle that I didn’t hit anyone, and we were able to get the brakes fixed, but

we missed our whole first season. Instead, we launched during the summer

of the following year. We ended up having a wonderful first year. My kids

and I do the business, and my husband moonlights when he is not working.

Our vision was really to bring back something of the past that doesn’t exist

anymore. We’re not curing cancer, but wherever we go, we bring so much joy.

I love that. That’s what keeps me going. Driving around the neighborhoods,

going to the soccer fields, or baseball fields, going downtown whenever I

can. I have the permits for that. I try to go in front of the schools if I can.

We’re doing a lot more vending opportunities at events, so we will reach

out to people and say, “Hey, can we come to your event and just sell?” We

also do corporate events, weddings, things that are pre-scheduled. We have

incorporated some charity things that are important to us. In the first year,

kind of across the board, just answering the call to whatever we could, and

giving a portion of what we make to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.

They helped us out when we were poor, and destitute, and dying, literally. So,

we just said, “That’s how it’s going to be.”

Let’s talk about your kids and their involvement. So, yes, that’s kind

of been our journey; teaching our kids how to start a business, how to

run the business. They get paid, but they’ve got to work. That’s the deal.

They’ve been with us through everything. Through rebuilding the truck

to forming an LLC. They had to come to that meeting, and see the

paperwork. They were bored out of their minds. But, it’s important; it was

a teaching process. So, they work the truck. Sometimes they are excited,

sometimes they’re not. When I set the whole thing up, I said, “Okay, we’ve

got to wear these uniforms.” So, the guys wear the white hats and the

black bow ties, and come in the fifties uniform. At first, I thought that my

kids were going to hate me. And then we did our first event. People went

crazy. People were coming up with tears in their eyes, and it is usually a

person of that era and they’ll say, “This was in my neighborhood as a kid.”

You know, I think that has been the most surprising thing for me. I was

trying to start a business with the kids, and be home with them, but what

I’ve gotten back is huge, so much more than I anticipated. For just a few

minutes that people come by, it’s like they’re transported to something.

The kids don’t know that era, but they recognize that this is not typical.

We play big band music, early 50’s music, and just try to fully live the

experience right at the moment.

What advice would you give to a young entrepreneur? Take a long hard

look to see if it’s truly in your heart. Keep fighting, because when you hit >>

46 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


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APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 47


a wall, you will have to really examine, is this really what I want to do?

And you have to be tenacious, and be able to keep fighting. I think that’s

been the theme in my life anyway. We had to fight in life, just to be alive. I

think you have to search your heart. Ask yourself if it is really in your heart

to do this, and know that whatever obstacles pop up, you have to overcome

them; and if it’s really deeply in your heart, you’ll find a way. And keep

pushing forward because, I think the reward, in the end, is more on a

personal level than a financial situation. And, for us, that has definitely

been the case. You know, financially it’s been great. We’ve been able to

make a business out of it. But, really, the goal was more than that. I think

business?” You sort of reexamine things. Then, right about that time, you

get a shred of something, some light, some feedback. Like recently, there

was a guy who came up to the truck, and he had three little boys with him.

He was just super into the truck, like, “Oh, wow, this is the greatest truck

dah, dah, dah.” I asked him, “Would you guys like some ice cream?” He

declined, mentioning that he was kind of having a hard time. I just said,

“Here, what do you guys want?” I gave them ice cream and sat and talked

with the guy. Then I received a letter. It was unbelievable, the guy went on

and on about how much that meant to him, which was nothing. I mean,

we gave them some free ice cream. What the heck; it was nothing. But he

...because life is so much about connecting, and

bringing just a minute of joy to somebody is huge.

that if it’s something that is truly in your heart, and you’re pursuing it,

you’ll be able to fight those fights, and you will be able to overcome those

pitfalls to get where you want to be.

Expand on that idea, if you would. There have been a few times when

you think, “What are we doing? Why are we working so hard on this

said, “I’ve been so down on my luck, and not being able to buy my kids an

ice cream that day, and just bringing us into that experience, and talking to

us, and, you know, what it did for my boys. You gave me a lift.” That’s what

I treasure, and I always share those sorts of things with my kids. I want

them to see it because life is so much about connecting, and bringing just

a minute of joy to somebody is huge.

SLO LIFE

48 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 49


50 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 51


52 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


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APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 53


| FAMILY

AVILA VALLEY

BARN

BY PADEN HUGHES

Just a couple years ago, before parenthood,

I used to think I was a hipster when I

drove up to a red light, my windows down,

blasting a trendy radio play. Times have

changed. Now, I slow roll up to a red light,

keeping my windows closed to spare the drivers

next to me from hearing an awkward soundtrack

of cows mooing, horses neighing, pigs oinking,

and roosters crowing, as my toddler learns to

associate animals with the sounds they make.

My husband and I are obsessed with farm animal

noises now, because just hearing our daughter try

to imitate a frog or cow is the cutest thing in the

world. We are shameless. Everything seems to be

geared to farm life and its sounds these days.

So, it should be no surprise that our favorite

family outing is feeding the animals at Avila

Valley Barn. In fact, it’s a weekly excursion. Our

daughter is walking and leads us around by our

hands, pointing things out and muttering to

herself about whatever she sees, but we have

difficulty translating.

Back in college, I occasionally visited Avila

Valley Barn for an annual pilgrimage, picking out

a pumpkin for Halloween and trying to make it

through the hay bale maze. Now that I’m a mom,

I’ve learned that Avila Valley Barn is not just for

the holidays. Outside of the couple of weeks it

closes down each year to renovate, its activities

evolve with the seasons and there is always

something new and exciting to see. Between the

seasonal fruit stands and holiday fanfare, there

always seems to be a new baby goat to watch

grow up.

We have developed a ritual. After a visit to the

chicken coop, counting the eggs and trying to

inspire the roosters to crow for our amusement,

we head into the farm stand to buy fruit and

a bag of reject veggies to feed the animals.

My daughter loves to pull out a nice piece of

lettuce and hold it like a prize for the next hour,

unaware that she’s taunting the poor goats with

it. The goats are her favorite. Somehow these

creatures manage to con every visitor into

believing they are starving, bleating like

they have endured unimaginable conditions

before your timely arrival. We buy into it

like suckers every time. Once we’ve satisfied

the goats (or so they lead us to believe), we

circle the property pointing out the turkeys’

feathers, watching the squirrels sneak food,

admiring the cows’ kind eyes, avoiding the

emus, and wishing we could ride the cute

little ponies. We repeat this circle two or

three more times before heading home.

All in all, it’s an entertaining afternoon

that inevitably becomes the best part of our

day. The store, established in 1985, began

as an impermanent fruit stand for those on

their way to Avila Beach. Today, it is a local

favorite to buy seasonal produce, experience

U-Pick opportunities in summer and

fall, enjoy a petting zoo for farm animals,

and stop off to grab an ice cream or deli

sandwich in a peaceful environment, and,

of course, buy a fresh baked pie, cobbler,

or turnover. You can also stumble upon

seasonal tractor and pony rides. It’s a great

place for a family picnic, birthday party,

or just a nice spot to meet up with other

families in a place

your kids can

safely run free and

enjoy a glimpse of

farm life.

I always check

out their website

to confirm their

seasonal open

hours. For the time

being, it’s Thursday

to Monday, 9 a.m.

to 5 p. m. and is

closed Tuesday and

Wednesday. SLO LIFE

PADEN HUGHES is

co-owner of Gymnazo

and enjoys exploring

the Central Coast.

54 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


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APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 55


| DWELLING

ALL IN THE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GINA CINARDO

56 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


FAMILY

APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 57


The year was 1965 when a father and his son

decided to open a store. They called it San

Luis Paints. For Leigh Cronin, she cannot

recall a time when she was not down at the

paint shop working alongside her dad and

her grandpa, carefully hanging brushes on

the pegboard display after school.

“I loved working with my dad, and instead

of running away when I was 18 like I

should have,” Cronin chuckles at the

thought, “I got involved in the family

business.” The years passed by, faster

than they should, and soon Cronin was

teaching her own son how to display

the merchandise in a way that would be

most tempting to customers. Together,

the mother and son duo ran the chain

of family-owned paint stores up until

2013 when they finally closed. Times had

changed. It wasn’t as fun as it used to be,

the business, now dominated by national

heavyweights, was different. But, the

entrepreneurial roots were planted. >>

58 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


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All those years dealing with colors had an effect

on Cronin, and allowed her to develop her own

eye, nurture her taste. Friends started asking for

tips with interior decorating and clothing. One

thing led to another, and she found herself hanging

out a shingle declaring she was now officially

what is known as an image consultant. With her

help, clients are able to break out of a funk and

express themselves through their home décor and

wardrobes to, as he puts it, “reflect who they are.”

This focus on style and elegance is contrasted

sharply by her son, Sandy, who started a junk

hauling business. Yet, he, too, exhibits an eye for

design and branding as his distinctive green, white,

and black logo emblazoned on the San Luis Movers

& Junk Removal trucks run laps back and forth to

the landfill.

Through it all, the family businesses have put

the emphasis on family. When Cronin’s parents

bequeathed their Pismo Heights home to their

daughters, the choices were difficult. At first, it

became a rental. Then, after nine years they finally

decided it was time. Cronin and her son did a

walk-through before the home was to go on the

market. “It just reminds me of the holidays—it

reminds me of Christmas, Mom,” was how Sandy

put it. “I really think you should buy it.” The wheels

started turning and then things began to fall in

place. Cronin bought out her sister’s interest and >>

60 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


ARCHITECTURE

LANDSCAPE

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Why you ask? Because business, as usual, doesn’t

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Because we love our families, our friends, and wild

places with clean air & clear water. We love vibrant

built spaces where people come together to live, work

and play. Because we love the positive power of a

passionate community working for the common good.

Joel & Julia enjoying some old school sketching on a pro-bono project

for the Nature Conservancy, Santa Cruz Island.

TENOVERSTUDIO.COM

APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 61


now looked at the old house with different eyes.

Originally built in 1959, it was dark and a bit closed

in with a busy floor plan, but it had potential. More

importantly, it had history. It had memories.

If Cronin was certain about one thing, it’s that

she was “intent on keeping a lot of the original

elements,” while updating and modernizing it

tastefully. Where to start? The kitchen was closed

off from the spectacular view of the water and

Pismo Pier—that had to change. So, she called

Seelos Design & Construction of Arroyo Grande

and immediately bonded with the husband and

wife team. The co-owners, Scott and Nina Seelos

shared the vision and could see how to make it

a reality. During the four-month remodel in late

2015, early 2016, all of the boxes were checked.

More light, sweeping views, open and inviting

space, but, and this was a very important “but,” it

also needed to maintain many elements from the

past, while also enhancing them. The pine tongue

and groove ceilings are a prime example, as are the >>

62 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 63


kitchen skylights. Originally there were two, but

two more were added. Although the same brand and

style were no longer available, the new pair were

painstakingly selected and placed to nearly match

the originals, all while doubling the amount of

natural light overhead.

The second stage of the remodel was done over

another four-month period in the middle of 2017

when the bathrooms were updated and the bedrooms

and closets divided-up. An awkward staircase that

greeted visitors at the front door was removed, and

the entire first floor was converted into a separate

apartment of sorts, with its own entry, bedroom,

living area, and kitchen. The main floor, a threebedroom,

two-bath, provides ocean views from just

about every corner.

Much of the décor is a result of Cronin’s love

for San Luis Obispo-based SLO Consignment

Furniture, where she spends time regularly

visiting with the proprietor, Jennifer Alderman,

and inspecting her ever-turning inventory to find

“treasures that tell interesting stories.” And, it’s

those stories—old and new—that make a house a

home, make it warm and welcoming, give it life,

family, love. Just like Christmas. SLO LIFE

64 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


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APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 65


| SLO CITY

REAL ESTATE

BY THE NUMBERS

laguna

lake

tank

farm

cal poly

area

country

club

down

town

foothill

blvd

johnson

ave

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

2017

12

$596,450

$589,175

98.78%

30

2017

1

$819,900

$810,000

98.79%

29

2017

3

$722,333

$693,333

95.99%

103

2017

3

$956,333

$932,817

97.54%

83

2017

21

$675,181

$664,131

98.36%

66

2017

Total Homes Sold

8

Average Asking Price

$871,475

Average Selling Price

$846,188

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price 97.10%

Average # of Days on the Market 53

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

2017

9

$785,211

$769,611

98.01%

55

2018

12

$709,825

$704,100

99.19%

29

2018

1

$729,000

$650,000

89.16%

88

2018

1

$1,050,000

$1,050,000

100.00%

31

2018

3

$1,065,992

$1,057,992

99.25%

17

2018

14

$1,119,207

$1,117,391

99.84%

117

2018

7

$817,786

$813,933

99.53%

20

2018

5

$760,580

$752,000

98.87%

22

+/-

0.00%

19.01%

19.51%

0.41%

-3.33%

+/-

0.00%

-11.09%

-19.75%

-9.63%

203.45%

+/-

-66.67%

45.36%

51.44%

4.01%

-69.90%

+/-

0.00%

11.47%

13.42%

1.71%

-79.52%

+/-

-33.33%

65.76%

68.25%

1.48%

77.27%

+/-

-12.50%

-6.16%

-3.81%

2.43%

-62.26%

+/-

-44.44%

-3.14%

-2.29%

0.86%

-60.00%

*Comparing 01/01/17 - 03/20/17 to 01/01/18 - 03/20/18

SOURCE: San Luis Obispo Association of REALTORS ®

SLO LIFE

66 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


Not All Lenders

are Created Equal

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personalized service and outstanding reputation work for you

Start a conversation with us today

Donna Lewis

Branch Manager/Senior Loan Advisor

NMLS #245945

805.235.0463

donnalewis@rpm-mtg.com

www.rpm-mtg.com/dlewis

Dylan Morrow

Loan Advisor

NMLS #1461481

805.550.9742

dmorrow@rpm-mtg.com

www.rpm-mtg.com/dmorrow

Brandi Warren

Senior Loan Advisor

NMLS# 290534

661.332.2074

bwarren@rpm-mtg.com

www.rpm-mtg.com/bwarren

Kim Gabriele

Senior Loan Advisor

NMLS# 263247

805.471.6186

kgabriele@rpm-mtg.com

www.rpm-mtg.com/kgabriele

Ken Neate

Loan Advisor

NMLS# 373607

925.963.1015

kneate@rpm-mtg.com

www.rpm-mtg.com/kneate

Valerie Gonzales

Loan Advisor

NMLS# 1082998

805.550.4325

vgonzales@rpm-mtg.com

www.rpm-mtg.com/vgonzales

1065 Higuera Street, Suite 100, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

LendUS, LLC dba RPM Mortgage NMLS #1938 - Licensed by the Department of Business Oversight under the CA Residential Mortgage

Lending Act. | 9158 | Equal Housing Opportunity. APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 67


Be confident

in your

mortgage

decision.

| SLO COUNTY

REAL ESTATE

REGION

BY THE NUMBERS

NUMBER OF

HOMES SOLD

AVERAGE DAYS

ON MARKET

MEDIAN SELLING

PRICE

2017

2018

2017

2018

2017

2018

Arroyo Grande

53

51

72

64

$778,765

$796,096

Atascadero

78

68

72

38

$566,919

$574,996

Avila Beach

3

3

16

113

$904,334

$1,160,931

Cambria/San Simeon

23

22

80

48

$634,261

$702,064

Cayucos

6

8

74

114

$1,110,500 $1,001,000

Creston

4

0

73

0

$645,750

$0

Grover Beach

36

22

53

54

$520,311

$484,268

Los Osos

24

24

49

40

$575,088

$606,004

Morro Bay

26

18

58

83

$658,708

$683,028

Nipomo

41

55

67

54

$537,449

$679,045

Oceano

9

10

89

52

$397,833

$475,900

Pismo Beach

20

26

40

54

$1,225,979 $1,002,279

Paso (Inside City Limits)

85

62

57

34

$454,871

$519,638

Paso (North 46 - East 101)

10

15

62

73

$463,135

$485,433

Paso (North 46 - West 101)

29

16

118

100

$491,716

$611,408

Ben Lerner

Mortgage Advisor

NMLS 395723

805.441.9486

blerner@opesadvisors.com

1212 Marsh St., Suite 1

San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

Paso (South 46 - East 101)

San Luis Obispo

Santa Margarita

Templeton

10

60

6

21

15

49

3

19

117

53

70

81

70

56

177

91

$1,041,310

$714,052

$396,667

$697,257

$725,367

$927,198

$463,333

$765,793

opesadvisors.com

© 2017 Opes Advisors, A Division of Flagstar Bank

68 | SLO Member LIFE FDIC MAGAZINE | Equal Housing | APR/MAY Lender 2018

Countywide

536 471

*Comparing 01/01/17 - 03/20/17 to 01/01/18 - 03/20/18

66 57 $623,066 $684,129

SOURCE: San Luis Obispo Association of REALTORS ®

SLO LIFE


smart, eclectic, art to live on

1599 Monterey Street | 805.544.5900 | sloconsignment.com

(at the corner of Grove Street, across from Pepe Delgados)

Open Monday - Saturday 10-6pm

Home &

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APPLE PIE CONTEST

SUNDAY, MAY 6 th @ 12pm

APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 69


SPONSORED

TIMELESS TREASURES

Timeless, Très Chic Style on “Rue de Jardin”

Few streets in San Luis Obispo are as European as Garden Street—in

its newly renovated iteration, spotted with café tables, we might rename

it Rue de Jardin—and few shops in SLO are equally as European as

Finders Keepers. A highly selective consignment boutique selling lightly

used designer women’s clothing and accessories, Finders Keepers

offers shoppers a timeless stylishness, not subject to the whims and

environmental costs of fast fashion. According to owner Debra Fogg, for

the women who shop in her store, “it’s the thrill of the hunt—to not only

find a treasure at an amazing price, but to collect great designer finds not

otherwise offered in our town.”

For the conscientious shopper, Finders Keepers reminds us that the

best, most treasured items in our own closets may well have belonged

to a friend, family member, or a woman we’ve yet to meet, for whom the

item was just not right. It’s that spirit of camaraderie that Finders Keepers

nurtures, not only among its loyal locals, but among the diverse women

traveling through, who happen to discover the boutique while wandering

the eclectic shops and cafés of Garden Street.

Debra, who opened the doors of Finders Keepers in 1998 to “a very

welcoming community,” credits the boutique’s success to the “amazing,

beautiful women of SLO, who are not only women of impeccable style,

but extremely savvy shoppers. I love the environmentally conscious

women of SLO; my store is successful because they really do care

and choose to shop recycle.” The store’s success, she adds, is also “a

tribute, of course, to the incredible consignors who bring in their lovely

items.” The shop always has at least a month’s wait for a consignment

appointment and, thus, never experiences a shortage of seasonal,

curated items in stock.

Debra, who grew up in Pasadena and relocated to the Central Coast in

1970 to raise her two children, is one of the reasons to pop into Finders

Keepers. Embodying sophistication and elegance, remembering names

and preferences, if you’re lucky enough to have her help with your

purchase, you’re destined to leave the shop with an iconic addition to

your wardrobe. Her secret, perhaps, is that she “was born loving fashion.”

“When I was two,” she says, “my mother said I would change

my little dresses at least three times a day.”

Finders Keepers attracts women of all ages. It’s not

uncommon to see mothers and daughters shopping side

by side, each finding something to love, with the help of

the friendly, never overbearing staff. Whether searching for

a cocktail dress for a spring wedding, a perfectly French

“little black dress,” fall boots, or simply a quick trip to see if

anything calls your name, Finders Keepers is the place to

shop for très chic style. But it’s more than just a boutique.

As Debra notes, “The laughs, the tears, the stories shared in

this ‘chicks club’ are why so many women come back.”

The People of Garden Street

MATT BAXTER

CO-OWNER, BAXTER MOERMAN

On my playlist: Alabama Shakes, Dr. Dog, Heartless

Bastards, Plants & Animals, Fruit Bats, and The Growlers

Comfort food: Totchos from Libertine

Favorite activities: Surfing & Mountain Biking

I secretly want to: Shoot BB guns all day

If you could invite one person from history to dinner:

My Norwegian Great Grandmother, Mattie Lien

GARDEN STREET - The Heart of Downtown San Luis Obispo

70 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


SPONSORED

HEALTH IS IN THE AIR

Capturing the health and wellness at the heart of living on the Central Coast. Spa Serra will

provide an oasis of relaxation, restoration and rejuvenation. Artfully designed and ecologically

conscious, the full variety of treatments will be enhanced by our signature fig-scented, organic

skin products crafted from pure essential oils. Spa Serra refillable hair, cleanse and moisture

preparations will be featured in all Hotel Serra guest rooms.

Hotel Serra // 1125 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo // hotelserra.com

ALEXANDRITE DONE RIGHT

Keep ‘em guessing with a color change Alexandrite.

Alexandrite is the highly regarded color changing

variety of Chrysoberyl. The color of Alexandrite

changes under different lighting conditions. This is

one of our in-house custom fabricated work for a

very lucky client. Bring us your ideas or just your

dreams and let us create something for you.

Contact for Pricing // Marshalls Jewelers

751 Higuera Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 543-3431 // marshalls1889.com

LIGHT THE WAY

A candle with an earthy fragrance

and dash of lemon will create a

sanctuary in your home, blending

together the grounding, calming,

and stabilizing power of organic

vetiver from Haiti. 100% of the

proceeds benefit global clean

water projects through Global

Green Grants Fund.

$28 // Salon62

1112 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 543-2060 // salon62.com

HAND-CRAFTED VERSATILITY

This vibrant conversation piece from San Luis Traditions provides generous

storage. It is hand-crafted from solid wood, and can be used in many rooms,

from a media cabinet for your television, in the entryway, or bedroom for storage.

It’s hand-finished and distressed and adds great texture to any space. This piece

measures: 76” wide x 18” deep x 35” tall. Other styles available.

Contact for Pricing // San Luis Traditions // 748 Marsh Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 541-8500 // sanluistraditions.com

PEACHES ARE ALWAYS

IN SEASON

We absolutely love making engagement

rings like this beautiful piece featuring a trio

of matched color natural peach sapphires set

in recycled 18K rose gold. A sweet halo of

Canadian diamonds traces the perimeter of the

sapphires, creating a unique look that’s equal

parts feminine and classic.

Modern classic jewelry. Made fresh daily.

$4,225 // Baxter Moerman

1128 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 801-9117 // baxtermoerman.com

GARDEN STREET - The Heart of Downtown San Luis Obispo

APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 71


SPONSORED

THE PERFECT ADDICTION

Try the newest addition to our cookie

line and everyone’s favorite, Linnaea’s

Rosemary Shortbread Cookie with Sea

Salt. A buttery and sweet shortbread

cookie with just a hint of savor—the

perfect addiction.

$6 // Linnaea’s Cafe

1110 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 541-5888 // linnaeas.com

EXPERIENCE TASTE

Simple Italian cooking is anything

but simple when done with the

secret ingredient: Love. The Cod

all’acqua Pazza is a favorite of

Mediterranean fisherman and

a specialty of our cuisine. Wild

Atlantic cod, red onion, garlic,

cherry tomatoes, capers, olive oil,

white wine, parsley. The side is

asparagus and butter. You have to

taste to experience it.

$29 // La Locanda

1137 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 548-1750 // lalocandaslo.com

OLD AND NEW

Whether it be your heirloom stones in

a new, custom tailored mounting or a

top-to-bottom restoration of that special

antique piece. GSG has the experience

and expertise to breathe new life into

your most sentimental pieces. Work

done in-house. Trust and experience

since 1974.

Contact for Pricing

Garden Street Goldsmiths

1114 & 1118 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 543-8186

GardenStreetGoldsmiths.com

SPRING OBSESSION STARTS HERE

Add this Kate Spade fable blue cross-body to your

collection of accessories—it’s anything but basic.

Utilitarian and timeless—a bag that goes with

everything from jeans to a sexy summer dress.

$96 // Finders Keepers Consignment Boutique

1124 Garden Street,

San Luis Obispo

(805) 545-9879 slofinderskeepers@gmail.com

SAY CHEESE

Spring has sprung and now is the perfect time to welcome

it in with a custom platter. Together we will come up with a

stunning selection for Easter celebrations, Mother’s Day or

just a fun night with friends. All platters are created based

on budget, event size, cheese selection and accoutrement

availability. Check out our website for more information.

Contact for Pricing // Fromagerie Sophie

1129 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 503-0805 // fromageriesophie.com

GARDEN STREET - The Heart of Downtown San Luis Obispo

72 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


SPONSORED

DOWNTOWN TRADITIONS

Anyone who has walked down Garden Street has likely visited Traditions.

The business has been in San Luis Obispo since 1989, and its owners have

design and furniture roots that go back several generations.

The new owner, Allegra Marquardt, is proud to be growing the family

business in Downtown SLO. Allegra’s parents, Mary and Bill Marquardt,

opened Traditions after moving to San Luis Obispo from Northern

California. Now, it is one of the most well established furniture and interior

design businesses in the region.

Growing up in a Victorian house near the corner of Broad and Buchon,

Allegra spent much of her childhood downtown. The memories of playing

in the creek, eating Country Culture yogurt, losing her first tooth at Foster

Freeze, and being in the La Fiesta parade - have helped solidify her love for

SLO. During her countless afternoons spent downtown, she would come by

Traditions and help with odd jobs. She remembers licking stamps for direct

mail campaigns and pricing merchandise.

Growing up with hardworking enterprising parents, she benefited from

hands-on learning about the business and interior design industry. She saw

the value in having a good attitude, being involved in the community, and

enjoyed continuous exposure to the world of design.

Since taking over San Luis Traditions in 2017, Allegra has established

herself as both a successful businesswoman and a tasteful collaborator.

Her projects are distinct to the individual, completely functional, and

timeless in design. Her portfolio of work includes countless residential

projects, collaborative efforts on commercial undertakings, and hotel,

restaurant, and bar projects. This skillset and the fantastic range of product

offerings available at the business enable Traditions to offer the best of

product and design services to the region.

Ask around. Allegra is one of friendliest faces on Garden

Street. She is always stopping to say hello to fellow

merchants, customers, and friends. When she is not in

the showroom, she is out enjoying the many amazing

restaurants and special events on the Central Coast. Her

love for the community she grew up in runs deep, and

she is glad to always give back. She is a proud member

of the Rotary of SLO de Tolosa, and is involved with other

regional non-profits. Allegra is excited to keep expanding

the family business and continue being a staple in the

downtown business community.

The furniture showroom is open everyday except Sunday.

Traditions specializes in leather furniture, draperies and

roman shades, motorized window treatments, and highend

custom upholstery. Always local. Tried and true.

The Dogs of Garden Street

PROGRESS REPORT

As we approach the final stages of the Garden

Street Improvement program, Hotel Serra would

like to thank all of our neighbors for their gracious

support and patience. The end result will be well

worth it. The next focus on Garden Street will

be the revitalization of two historically important

buildings. The previous Christian Science reading

room and SLO Brew buildings have had many

lives over the years providing downtown San Luis

Obispo with a variety of goods and services.

In their next life they will become, Hotel Serra

entrance with a beautifully designed lobby lounge

and Brasserie SLO, café, restaurant and bar in the

style of European Brasseries.

Billy // Dachshund // 7 weeks old

The newest dog on Garden Street…

Billy is Garden Street’s only full-time canine resident,

living upstairs from Baxter Moerman. He loves

playing with his friend Indi Moerman, chewing on

shoelaces, and melting hearts.

GARDEN STREET - The Heart of Downtown San Luis Obispo

APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 73


| HEALTH

Broccoli Sprouts

Moms everywhere have long known the truth about broccoli. How many times have we heard, “Eat

your broccoli!” at the dinner table? The stuff is good for you. Just how good? We’re only starting

to learn the truth now. While its fellow green plant, kale, has been getting all the buzz over the past

few years, it may be time to give broccoli, and especially broccoli sprouts, a second look.

Recently popularized by a book that has been getting a lot of

attention lately, “The Elimination Diet: Discover the Foods that

are Making You Sick and Tired—and Feel Better Fast,” broccoli

spouts are rocketing their way to the top of the most cutting edge

health trends.

Broccoli sprouts, and its cousins, the cruciferous vegetables, like cauliflower, bok choi,

cabbage, brussel sprouts, and kale, belong to the Brassicaceae family of plants. Their name

derives from the Latin word “cruciferae,” which means “cross bearing,” attributed to the

cross-like shape of their flowers.

As we started digging into the broccoli sprout craze, we learned that it all came down to

one thing: sulforaphane. And, in its sprouted form, sulforaphane is found in concentrations

from 10 to 100 times greater than detected in mature plants.

If you have to have twelve

and-a-half minutes to spare,

we recommend watching

Tom Malterre’s TED Talk.

You can find it on YouTube

by searching for “Broccoli –

the DNA whisperer.”

Here are the top six benefits of adding more sulforaphane into your diet: >

74 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 75


No. 3

LOWERS CHOLESTEROL

A study completed in 2015 demonstrated a significant reduction of

LDL cholesterol, the stuff often called “bad cholesterol,” in those

participants eating 100 grams per day of broccoli sprouts. At the same

time, a marked improvement of oxidative stress markers was found.

No. 4

IMMUNE BOOST

The presence of sulforaphane in mice was shown to increase the

activity of natural killer cells as well as enhancing overall immune

function. While the mice were reluctant to add broccoli sprouts to

their cheese, there is a good case to be made that we ought to reach

for the green stuff more often than we do.

No. 1

DETOXIFICATION

Through a complex pathway, broccoli sprouts boost the

antioxidant capacity of our cells by acting as a potent inducer of

what is known as Phase 2 enzymes. In layman’s terms, it helps

our body rid itself of waste build-up. Also, it acts to increase

cellular glutathione levels, which is produced and consumed

by every cell in our bodies and is sometimes referred to as “the

mother of all antioxidants.”

No. 5

PROTECTS THE SKIN

In one study, sulforaphane extracts from three-day-old broccoli

sprouts were applied to the skin and compared to a control group

where it was found to reduce overall oxidative stress and erythema

(skin redness) when exposed to UVA radiation.

No. 2

COMBATS CANCER

Joseph Cohen, writing for his popular health blog selfhacked.com,

makes the bold statement: “Of all the molecules I’ve studied,

sulforaphane and broccoli sprouts are the most promising at

preventing and killing cancer.” He goes on to point to research

indicating that diets rich in sulforaphane, three-to-five servings

per week, decrease the risk of cancer by 30 to 40%.

No. 6

IMPROVES COGNITIVE

FUNCTION

Fascinating results were documented in a study completed last

year that found sulforaphane increase neuronal BDNF in mice,

which is a factor that supports the survival of existing neurons and

encourages the formation of new neurons and synapses. Research in

this area is in its infancy, but shows promise. >

76 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


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APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 77


INTRO SPECIAL

2 WEEKS FOR $30

Grow Your Own

The best, most potent, highest sulforaphane content serving of

broccoli sprouts can be found in the ones you grow yourself.

Here is how to do it in 10 easy steps:

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78 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018

1. Place 2 tablespoons of broccoli sprouting seeds in a wide-mouthed

quart jar. You can find the seeds online at sites such as seedsnow.com.

2. Cover seeds with a few inches of clean, filtered water and cap

with the sprouting lid.

3. Store in a warm, dark place overnight.

4. The next morning, drain the liquid off and rinse with fresh

water. Be sure to drain all the water off.

5. Repeat this process twice daily. Continue to store your seeds in

a warm, dark place. After a few days, the seeds will start to break

open and grow.

6. Eventually, the sprouts will be an inch or so long and have yellow

leaves. At this point you can move the sprouts out into the sunlight.

7. Continue to rinse them 2 times a day until the leaves are dark

green. Now they are ready to eat!

8. This whole process will take about a week. Be patient. It may

not seem like anything is happening, but they are growing.

9. Once they are ready, replace the sprouting lid with a standard

mason jar lid and store in the refrigerator.

10. Serve on top of salads, stirred into soups, or as garnish for

your meals. SLO LIFE


APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 79


| TASTE

>

BEFORE I became

fascinated by fine food

and drink many years

ago, my culinary tastes

ran more Bugles-and-

Bud-Light than boeuf

bourguignon. Foodie

fever set in slowly as

I took tea in Kyoto,

downed street tacos in

Mexico, hunted porcini

in Austria, and took a

sincere interest in the

local liquid gold of our

Edna Valley and Paso

Robles wineries. In those

days, every trip, morsel

and sip maintained the

fever pitch.

Today, food, wine, and

la dolce vita represent

much more than my

passion: they’re my

profession. But, to

paraphrase Albert

Einstein, the more I

learn, the more I realize

how much I don’t know.

As I visited three San

Luis Obispo County

establishments where

the line blurs between

dining and teaching, I

experienced new flavors,

methods, and cultures,

along with my fellow

participants, from the

comfort of a perch at

the kitchen counter. The

outcome? A full belly...

and a renewed hunger

for more. >>

EAT, DRINK, AND BE EDUCATED

Want to go deeper with your dining? Look no further than these three

establishments that deliver a side of a-ha! with each dish.

BY JAIME LEWIS

JAIME LEWIS is a world

traveler, and food writer, who

lives in San Luis Obispo.

80 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


HOME TO EDNA VALLEY’S MOST

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805-541-9463

TASTING ROOM OPEN 10AM-5PM DAILY

A Family Friendly Event benefiting United Way of San Luis Obispo County

Joan Gellert-Sargen

805-975-8180

APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 81


THE ROGUE CHEF

“We have fourteen courses tonight,” announces Chef

Ricky Odbert to the diners at Six Test Kitchen,

the haute cuisine six-seat teaching restaurant he

established in his parents’ Arroyo Grande garage.

(Yes, you read that right.) “We’ll explain each one as

it comes.”

A couple of local boys, Odbert and Chef de Cuisine,

Matt Corella, both cooked in cosmopolitan kitchens

and returned to proselytize tasting menus and modern

creative dining on the Central Coast. To afford such

ambitions, in 2015 Odbert made the most of what

he had: two supportive parents and the use of their

garage. Thus was Six Test Kitchen born.

Plated, each of Odbert’s dishes reads like a work of

architecture, constructed just inches from where my

husband and I sit with our fellow diners. In just one

or two bites, the balance of flavor, texture, and aroma

is transporting: arctic char, pickled turnips, sourdough,

and dill take me on a quick mental jaunt to Oslo,

while an onion tuile filled with artichoke mousse and

dehydrated olives calls up an autumnal walk through

an ancient forest.

Guests are encouraged to bring their own wine for

the meal, but around the eighth course, Odbert and

Corella crack open the good stuff: a 40-ounce bottle

of MGD High Life, poured equally between two

plastic kitchen containers with much ceremony. “It’s

tradition,” Odbert says.

$740 per party of six, wine and gratuity not included.

Reservation required. >>

82 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


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APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 83


THE MASTER OF WINE

Don’t get me wrong: I can still boogie with Bud Light and a bag

of Bugles. When matched with the right time, place and people, I

firmly believe any food can transcend the sum of its parts.

Sommeliers work hard on the restaurant floor, but I’d venture that

none works as hard as Ian Adamo of Somm’s Kitchen in Paso

Robles. Since opening in March 2017, he’s comprised almost a

one-man show responsible for the feeding, drinking, and curiositysating

of fourteen people per seating at his horseshoe bar.

While the theme at Six Test Kitchen might be boundary-pushing

reimagined cuisine, Somm’s Kitchen goes in for classic luxury of

an Old World persuasion. Adamo is the stuff that Michelin stars

and James Beard Awards were made for (quite literally: he earned

both for his work at Lampreia in Seattle and cut his teeth at Le

Cirque and Daniel in New York), but even as he pours me a flute

of Russian River Valley bubbles and slides a slab of pink foie gras

my way, his approach is as casual and easygoing as any bartender

worth his or her (Maldon flake) salt.

Throughout my six-course dinner with wine pairings—including

sous vide carrots with thyme, lamb with veal demiglaze and

raspberries, and flourless chocolate torte—Adamo mines his

extensive experience to provide a sense of place: how the vines are

grown, how the ingredients are harvested, what the culture is like.

But for all his expertise, Adamo’s approach remains simple. “When

you come here I want it to be like you come to my home,” he says.

“Good food, good wine, and good people.”

Bites and starters $5-18; Mains $14-28; International and local wines

available by the glass and bottle. Reservation required. >>

84 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


770 Capitolio Way . San Luis Obispo

805 549 0100

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APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 85


THE CULINARY REFUGE

At a “Mastering Meats” class at Refugio Kitchen in Paso Robles,

the aroma of beef hangs thick on the air. “Obviously you guys

are interested in meat,” says Brigit Binns, the proprietor and

prolific cookbook author with bylines on Williams-Sonoma and

Sunset Magazine publications, among others. “I am, too, so let’s

get started.”

The kitchen is bright, colorful, and contemporary, with a massive

island and cooktop where Binns demonstrates; behind her, a

small team of helpers tosses lettuces, slices standing rib roasts,

and collates a booklet of recipes for me and my fellow students

to take home. Amy Butler of Ranchero Cellars pours a vertical

flight of Carignan wine for each course while Binns describes

how to reverse-sear ribeyes, purchase a meat thermometer,

render beef fat, and time each dish for entertaining. Along

with the wine, her expertise augments each plate of roast beef,

tangerine and arugula salad, NY steak with board dressing, and

standing rib roast with pepper jelly-red wine reduction sauce

that we savor.

“Caramelization of meat is called the Maillard Reaction,” she

says, lifting a NY steak from the grill pan. Midway through

describing the process she pauses and smiles. “You didn’t know

you were going to get a science class with your steak, did you?”

Demonstration classes $115; hands-on classes $125. Both include

a welcome glass of local wine followed by several tastes of one wine

producer. Reservations required. SLO LIFE

86 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


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APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 87


| KITCHEN

SALMON SALAD

With its mild flavor and versatility in food pairing,

salmon is an easy ingredient to incorporate into this

health-conscious meal. The crisp crunch of fennel and

carrots refresh when combined with marinated baked

salmon all topped with an Asian-inspired vinaigrette.

BY CHEF JESSIE RIVAS

88 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


JESSIE’S TIP:

The cooked salmon can be served

hot or cold on the bed of greens

!depending on your preference.

SALMON SALAD

1 lb salmon fillet cut into 4 pieces

Marinade:

2 Tbs miso paste

1 Tbs olive oil

1 Tbs rice wine vinegar

1 tsp lime juice

½ tsp black pepper

Salad Mix:

6 oz mixed greens

1 oz shaved fennel

1 oz julienne carrots

¼ cup broccoli florets

½ oz pickled or raw red onion slices

2 oz chopped roasted peanuts

Salad Vinaigrette:

3 oz soy sauce

1 ½ oz canola oil

2 Tbs dijon mustard

2 Tbs lime juice

½ oz sesame seed oil

1 tsp minced garlic

1 tsp minced ginger

salt and pepper to taste

Local Harvest

Delivery

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To make vinaigrette, mix all ingredients in blender.

For the salmon fillet, mix all the ingredients for the

marinade in a mixing bowl. Let stand for at least

20 minutes. Once marinade has rested, whisk again

and pour over salmon and let marinate for up to

one hour. After salmon has been in the marinade,

set on a baking sheet

lined with parchment

paper. Bake in 400° oven

until golden brown,

about 15 minutes. Let

rest for 10 minutes.

JESSIE RIVAS is the owner

and chef of The Pairing Knife

food truck which serves the

Central Coast.

Toss salad with

vinaigrette and separate

into four salad bowls.

Top each salad with

baked salmon fillet.

Garnish with toasted

sesame seeds. SLO LIFE

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APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 89


| WINE NOTES

I first wanted to understand why bottles are labeled by the regions in

which they are grown. Only a few bottles had a grape varietal listed on

them. Little did I know that each region grows certain grape varieties in

a certain style. These regulations, called appellation d’origine contrôlée

or AOC in France, restrict what can or cannot be done in making wine;

other countries have similar restrictions. I was appalled! Those poor

countries were so limited! “You need to break free from this tyranny and

fight for freedom,” I wanted to say to them. “Revolt!”

The more I listened and had conversations with industry experts, the

more I realized that these rules were not merely restrictive, but actually

helpful. It’s like an ancient secret. Knowledge about the processes is

preserved. Medieval monks in Burgundy, for example, noticed after

many years of observation, that certain types of grapes flourished in

certain parts of the land. The variety of slopes, soil types, and pockets

of fog produced grapes and a wine that makes it taste Burgundian.

Some plots of land were more favorable for grapes than others and are

classified according to quality. For instance, Gran Cru and Primer Cru

basically mean best land. Watering restrictions reflect the rainfall of the

year. The grape’s life is unique to this year, time, and place. It is reared

by the vineyard managers, picked, and then passed to a winemaker. This

journey, the good and the bad that happen along the way, reflect a taste

that you would expect from this particular region of the world, with

subtle differences from year to year. This is the concept of terroir.

TER-WAH?

Growing up in California, my parents would take

me wine tasting. While not connoisseurs nor

experts, they had an appreciation for wine and

enjoyed the experience. By the ripe old age of 16,

I could identify a handful of wines and had an

idea of their basic characteristics.

BY ANDRIA MCGHEE

With my curiosity piqued for all things related

to viticulture and oenology, one of the aspects

that took me by surprise was the idea of terroir

(ter-wah). About ten years ago, I stood in

a wine shop in London while a shopkeeper

was amused by my lack of knowledge on

the subject. He must have enjoyed how green I was because instead

of rolling his eyes, we discussed terroir in that small, cramped room

surrounded by wine bottles cased on the walls and in crates on the floor.

So, what does this mean on the Central Coast? Grape growers and

winemakers have some regulations of their own, but overall have more

freedom to use techniques and technology to get the wine they desire.

With freedom comes risk. Sometimes it works, and sometimes it doesn’t.

Winemakers here are collaborative and ready to try new methods to

make a wine that is amazing. This is the American way. We question. We

try new things. We innovate and thrive when we learn from each others’

wisdom and experiences.

At the end of the process, it’s a small miracle the wine has made it to

our glass. The end product, when finally enjoyed, is a true reflection

of its journey, not so dissimilar to our own. Many factors influence its

life. Where it is raised, those with whom it comes in contact, its trials

through storms, and survival of sicknesses. As we understand this

about each other, we can understand this about a wine. These all shape

its future, as it does ours. The bottle is a reflection of many hands that

have nurtured it with hours of labor and love. The wine at its opening

is a true celebration of the life that it has

lived and the lives that it touches.

When you crack open your next bottle,

think of its local journey. The dust or mud

that you trekked through on a hike today

may share soil with vines nearby that gives

your Sangiovese its earthy taste. The same

sea spray from your day at the ocean may

have floated to a nearby vineyard to cool the

grapes to help your Sauvignon Blanc with

its crisp apple taste. The generous sun you’ve

enjoyed slowly warms Syrah grapes giving

it a nice blueberry flavor in your glass. This

wine reflects our wonderful life here on the

Central Coast. SLO LIFE

ANDRIA MCGHEE received

her advanced degree on

wines and spirits from

WSET in London and enjoys

travel, food, wine, and

exercise as a means to enjoy

those around her.

90 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


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APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 91


| BREW

SOCIALLY CONSCIOUS

SUDS

Beer is made with three basic ingredients, at least according to the Reinheitsgebot, the “German Beer Purity

Law” of 1516: water, hops, and barley. This law is so old they didn’t even know that yeast was the magic

doing all the work! I don’t see any mention of chicken wings or tri-tip on that list, so why do I keep seeing

vegan beers touted by the more socially conscious breweries? The answer may surprise you.

BY BRANT MYERS

Having just returned from a beer tourism conference

in Vermont, you can believe that the 300+

international attendees consumed a fair bit of beer

either purchased locally, driven in, or flown to our

hotels. I may be in the minority, but I had a beer

made with lobsters and one with oysters in the

same night (think lemony and salty). More commonly, you might find a

beer with maple syrup and bacon at your more adventurous bottle shops,

or even lactose (milk sugar) used to sweeten up a stout much like creamer

in your coffee, but a very common ingredient could be as seemingly

innocuous as honey. At this point, we are all at least vaguely familiar with

the general definition of veganism: the non-consumption of any foods

that are a product, or by-product, of animal origins. Even small amounts

of adjuncts used for subtle flavors, such as honey or milk, can deter vegans

from enjoying a beer. However, there is one animal by-product that can be

found in many beers, but you would never know it.

What do Skittles and parchment paper have in common? If I had a dollar

for every time someone has asked me this question, I could buy a bag of

Skittles. The answer is that they both utilize animal by-products during the

brewing process. Refining agents help in achieving clarity of your beer by

attaching themselves to flocculates and weighing them down to the bottom

of the fermenter, essentially leaving only clear beer left for consumption.

The most widely applied one being gelatin, which is used in many foods

and especially chewy candies. Gelatin is created from the bones of animals

and is definitely not vegan-friendly. A lesser utilized method is a product

of fish bladders called isinglass. Naturally a bit more difficult to process,

isinglass is traditionally used in British cask ales, so we don’t see much

stateside. Same goes for its use in parchment paper reconstruction and

repair. If I had a dollar for every ancient manuscript I’ve repaired…

So, what is the alternative and who is using it? Despite the eightfold

price increase over the aforementioned methods, many breweries are

opting for a synthetic product called BioFine Clear. 7Sisters Brewing in

San Luis Obispo, near Trader Joe’s, has recently partnered with SLO

Vegan Guide to showcase themselves as a completely vegan brewery,

ensuring that every beer they make is accessible to all visitors, regardless

of dietary restrictions. If vegan beer wasn’t enough of a draw, then check

out their food samplings that includes a grilled cheese sandwich made

with cashews, vegan chili, and my favorite—their house-made pickled

vegetables. Just the right amount of tang and salt to pair with any of

their beers. Fun fact: If you eat veggies while drinking, they pretty much

cancel each other out.

Although not advertising their vegan-friendly beers, you can head over

to Libertine Brewing on Broad Street where they also exclusively use

BioFine for their beer clarification and have tater tots to die for. Plus,

they use locally sourced fruit in many of their beers, so it’s practically

health food. Central Coast Brewing’s head brewer Brendan Gough

creates vegan beers during this part of the process, but you may also

see some lactose used in certain beers. Noelle DuBois of Bang the

Drum Brewing also confirmed that they use

BioFine in most of their beers, but use other

agents particularly to help remove gluten

from their gluten-free beers; and I’m pretty

sure I’ve seen some Milk Stouts on their

menu board. Check out their core beers,

King Mate, Das Weiss, and Draca to see how

good vegan can taste.

It’s very likely you’ve had a vegan beer

without even knowing it, so don’t let it

dissuade you in your choices. And if you still

want to get your carnivorous fix, we have good

intel that IPAs pair well with beef jerky. So,

grab a vegan friend and head to your local

brewery because you have a strong social

consciousness—and a stronger thirst. SLO LIFE

BRANT MYERS is owner

of Hop On Beer Tours, a

concierge service for craft

beer enthusiasts along the

Central Coast.

92 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


Not only is Dr. Daniel’s office located conveniently

close to San Luis Obispo High School,

there’s no better place to get your perfect smile!

Specializing in Smiles

Dr. Daniel Orthodontics

1356 Marsh Street . San Luis Obispo

(805) 543-3105 . drdanielortho.com

APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 93


| HAPPENINGS

ART AFTER DARK

Every first Friday, hundreds of visitors converge on downtown SLO to see new art exhibits

and add to their growing collections. With dozens of galleries and non-traditional exhibit

spaces, it’s SLO’s favorite night of the month to celebrate art.

April 6 // artsobispo.org

APRIL

EROICA CALIFORNIA

Eroica California offers a most

memorable cycling experience—a

weekend of cycling entertainment

including an ocean view ride with

various route lengths and a Concours

d’Elegance for vintage bicycles.

CONCOURS

Eroica California will organize a

Concours d’Elegance for vintage road

bicycles. Awards include Best in Show,

Best Bianchi, and many other special

categories.

MORRO BAY YARD SALE

Shop at over 300 different sale

locations and find treasures you didn’t

even know you needed. This is a fun

reason to come to Morro Bay and

spend time perusing the sales to find

nearly anything you can imagine.

April 6 - 8 // morrobay.org

KORESH DANCE COMPANY

Enjoy an evening of contemporary works that are

highly technical and deeply resonant. The troupe

is widely recognized for its superb technique and

emotionally-compelling appeal, promoting highspeed

attack and gestural diversity drawn from

Graham technique, Luigi jazz, classical ballet,

hip-hop, and Israeli folk dance.

April 14 // pacslo.org

WINE 4 PAWS

Join in on the fun to raise funds for

Woods Humane Society—choose from

over 80 local wineries, breweries, and

olive oil producers. Visit any of the

participating Wine 4 Paws tasting rooms

and enjoy the bounty of the Central Coast

while supporting a great cause.

April 7 - 8 // wine4paws.com

NOVO

Want to experience the most challenging

and spectacular gravel roads of the

Central Coast of California? Join

NOVA Eroica California. A group

ride event with fun, timed segments

open only to road and gravel bicycles.

Starting separately from the Eroica

classic event, NOVA Eroica takes a step

beyond vintage to celebrate the beauty of

fatigue and the thrill of conquest also on

modern bikes.

CAMPING

Tents and RVs are able to stay at the

Paso Robles Event Center during the

weekend of Eroica California, at the

center of the festivities. The entire

festival, Saturday night dinner, and the

ride start and finish will be held on site

at the Event Center for the first time

this year, making camping the perfect

option for those wanting to stay close to

the festival.

April 14 - 15 // eroicacalifornia.com

94 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018


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TERRANCE SIMIEN

& THE ZYDECO EXPERIENCE

For 35 years, two-time Grammy

Award-winning artist Terrance

Simien has been shattering the

myths of what his indigenous

Zydeco roots music is—and is

not. Leading his skilled Zydeco

Experience band, Simien has shared

studio and stage with the likes of

Dave Matthews Band, Los Lobos,

Robert Palmer, and Paul Simon to

name a few.

April 20 // pacslo.org

MIRACLE MILES FOR KIDS

The 15th Annual Miracle Miles

for Kids helps to meet critical

needs of over 1,800 children,

youth and families served by

Family Care Network annually.

This beautiful 10K (6.2 miles)

race course runs along the water’s

edge from Morro Rock to the

Cayucos Pier.

April 21 // mm4k.com

SHEN YUN

This epic production immerses you in stories

reaching back to the most distant past. You’ll

explore realms even beyond our visible world.

Featuring one of the world’s oldest art forms—

classical Chinese dance—along with patented

scenographical effects and all-original orchestral

works, Shen Yun opens a portal to a civilization

of enchanting beauty and enlightening wisdom.

April 17 – 18 // pacslo.org

The Perfect Gift

* *

Ethically-sourced,

Hand-crafted Chocolates

1445 Monterey Street, SLO

805.782.9868

www.mama-ganache.com

RODEO AND THE CRUCIBLE

Join the Civic Ballet of San Luis

Obispo for Drew Silvaggio’s

contemporary retelling of Agnes De

Mille’s celebrated ballet, Rodeo, a

love story set against the backdrop

of the trying times of the great

American Dust Bowl. Civic Ballet

will also present their bewitchingly

creative adaptation of Arthur Miller’s

award winning play, The Crucible.

The Crucible is made modern and

relevant through Silvaggio’s masterful

use of film, video, contemporary

music, and modern choreography.

April 21 -22 // pacslo.org

APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 95


| HAPPENINGS

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live

the

SLO

LIFE!

SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

slolifemagazine.com

96 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018

CRUISIN’ MORRO BAY CAR SHOW

Celebrate the 21st Anniversary beginning

Friday with Cruise Night as classic and

other rare cars cruise past. Continue the

party on Saturday and talk with the car

owners. The event wraps up on Sunday

morning with awards.

May 3 - 6 // morrobaycarshow.org

MAY

LOST IN YONKERS

Winner of the 1991 Pulitzer Prize for Drama,

this memory play by America’s great comic

playwright is set in Yonkers in 1942. Ne’erdo-well

Eddie deposits his two young sons

on his stern mother’s doorstep when he takes

to the road as a salesman. The boys are left to

contend with Grandma Kurnitz, their sweet

Aunt Bella (and her secret romance), and with

their Uncle Louie, a small-time hoodlum in a

strange new world called Yonkers.

May 4 -20 // slorep.org

WINE WAVES & BEYOND

Come celebrate the best that Classic

California has to offer. Enjoy three

days of unforgettable events that

embrace the love of California’s

traditional surfing lifestyle and

culture along with exceptional wine

and food. Experience Central Coast

wines, artisan brews, local California

farm-fresh and seaport-inspired

cuisine, as well as great music, art,

and the amiable coastal community.

Wine, Waves & Beyond events

take place at several scenic venues

throughout Pismo Beach and at the

Fremont Theater in San Luis Obispo.

May 4 - 6 // winewavesandbeyond.com

FLAVOR OF SLO

At this all-inclusive event, you’ll

enjoy sampling some of the best food,

wine, and beer the Central Coast has

to offer, at the beautiful and historic

Mission Plaza in San Luis Obispo.

Entertainment includes live music

from Rio Salinas featuring Louie

Ortega. Each year this event raises

thousands of dollars to benefit United

Way of San Luis Obispo County,

which seeks to create lasting change

in the community by focusing on

the building blocks for a good life:

education, health, and financial

stability.

May 5 // flavorofslo.org


APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 97


| HAPPENINGS

Dr. Arnie Horwitz

HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS

Are you feeling overwhelmed

and confused? I can help.

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- Relationship Conflicts - Parenting & Self-Esteem

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Therapy/Counseling/Coaching

Dr. Arnie Horwitz • 30 yrs. Experience

805-541-2752

www.doctorarnie.com

SENIOR DISCOUNT . Mon & Tues 10 to 2 . $15

INSIDE THE OLIVE

Taste like the pros and look behind

the scenes of this emerging California

specialty crop. Learn olive oil’s place in

history and explore why this ancient

food is gathering so much attention

today, from health benefits to fraudulent

products, farming methods to breadth of

use. Events include: a farm tour, making

your own body scrub with Life Elements

Founder Martha Van Inwegen, and

cooking advice from Chef Jacob Lovejoy

as he prepares brunch.

May 6 // farmsteaded.com

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MAY

OKLAHOMA!

One of the greatest musicals of all

time, Oklahoma! marks the first

collaboration between Rodgers and

Hammerstein and changed the

landscape of musical theatre as the

first fully integrated musical play

that blends song, character, plot,

and dance into one seamless work.

Considered by many to be the

single most influential American

musical work, when Oklahoma!

opened in 1943, it instantly

established the modern American

“book musical” formula and served

as the model for Broadway shows

for decades to follow.

May 12 - 13 // operaslo.org

1351 Monterey Street . San Luis Obispo

(805)783-2887 . clippersbarber.com

98 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018

ANTIQUE STREET FAIR

Enjoy springtime while seeking out

something old and something new. There

is something for everyone at this sale.

Downtown Cayucos becomes a pedestrian

zone while browsers and shoppers can

checkout the many goods and cuisine being

offered by local and visiting vendors. And

new this year, antique trailers will be parked

on the bluffs for viewing.

May 6 // cayucoschamber.com

PASO ROBLES WINE

FESTIVAL

Now in its 36th year, Wine Fest is a

Paso Robles tradition when wineries

bring the Paso Robles region to one

central location for two days of events

in the Downtown Park. Venture into

wine country for events at more than

100 wineries all weekend long. Enjoy

a Grand Tasting, Reserve Event,

Winemaker Seminar, Big Bottle

Dinner, and Winemaker Dinner.

May 17 - 20 // pasowine.com


APR/MAY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 99


HOMECOMING

starts with a home.

BHGREHaven.com

For generations, people have turned to Better Homes & Gardens for

guidance on how to live the lives of their dreams. From skyline to

shoreline and everything in between, Better Homes and Gardens Real

Estate Haven Properties is here to help you find the perfect home in

which to bring those dreams to life.

100 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2018

Expect Better. SM

805.592.2050

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