SLO LIFE Jun/Jly 2018

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LIFE

SLOmagazine

LOCAL

EVENTS

NEWS

BRIEFS

BY THE

NUMBE

HEALTH

LIFESTYLE

CAN YOU

HANDLE IT

MUSIC

ENE

JUN/JLY 2018

SLOLIFEMAGAZINE.COM

MEET

PANCHO HERRERA

BUILDING COMMUNITY

& SHARING THE ROAD

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Wit h SLO Tran sit I can

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ily commute

and save up on

t o wor k

eas

gas money.

1 Find your route 2 Enjoy the ride 3 Reach your destination

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SLO LIFE

magazine

CONTENTS

Volume

9

Number 3

Jun/Jly 2018

38

PANCHO HERRERA

A combined passion for cycling

and community inform his

unique perspective.

12

14

16

18

Publisher’s Message

Info

On the Cover

In Box

8 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018

24

26

30

Briefs

Check out the latest news highlight reel.

Timeline

We take a look at local events from the past two months.

View

When an abandoned fishing boat caught his eye,

NASH MORENO was quick to capture the anomaly at sea.


JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 9


| CONTENTS

32

34

36

48

52

Q&A

With 40 years under her belt at CAP SLO,

BIZ STEINBERG shares her perspective

on the growth of the organization and the

opening of the new homeless shelter in

San Luis Obispo known as 40 Prado.

Now Hear This

A recent win as the best band at the

High Sierra Music Festival has WORDSAUCE

preparing to make their next big move.

On the Rise

Actress, musician, and SLO High

graduating senior DASHA NOVOTNY is

ready to shine into the future.

Insight

Publisher TOM FRANCISKOVICH digs into

recent developments connected to the

2,400-acre woodland, Wild Cherry Canyon.

Family

In search of a destination geared toward

fun for the whole gang, PADEN HUGHES

reaches high at The Pad Climbing.

64

72

78

Real Estate

Look no further for insight into the local housing market

as we share the year-to-date statistics of home sales

for both the City and the County of San Luis Obispo.

Health

Just in time for summer, we here at SLO LIFE check out

the latest news in health trends covering everything from

electromagnetic rays to nutrition.

.

Taste

Biting into one of her most loved sandwiches—fried

chicken—JAIME LEWIS explores not just its flavor, but

also its cultural origins.

54

Dwelling

Unique both in its architecture and design,

this San Luis Obispo home is constructed of

traditional, yet rarely seen, rammed earth.

86

88

92

96

Kitchen

While the summer sun might remind most people of

fresh fruit and lighter fare, for CHEF JESSIE RIVAS it’s a

family recipe of albondigas soup that reigns supreme.

Wine Notes

With camping trips, beach adventures, and poolside

fun on the horizon, ANDRIA MCGHEE cracks open an

unexpected surprise—wine in a can.

Brew

Pairing beer doesn’t apply only to food. BRANT MYERS

makes a convincing case for taking your mood into

consideration the next time you pop the top.

Happenings

Looking for something to do? We’ve got you covered.

Check out the calendar to discover the best events

around the Central Coast in June and July.

10 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


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JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 11


| PUBLISHER’S MESSAGE

Helen

I was in line at a gas station the other day behind an old, raspy-sounding woman who ordered a pack of

cigarettes—Pall Malls—and I was instantly transported to 1992.

Graduating from high school that year, it was customary to go away on a “senior trip” with your classmates.

For us, it was scheduled to be a week in Mazatlán on the Pacific Coast of Mexico. After talking it over with

my cotton-farming cousin, Scottie, who was also graduating on the other side of town where all the country

kids went to school, we decided that Mazatlán just wasn’t our cup of tea. Nothing against it, but for us San

Joaquin Valley boys, life was slow; we went to bed early and got up that way, too. Truthfully, you could not

have paid us to go to the never-ending party in Mazatlán. But, we needed to do something. We had to go out

in the world and sow our wild oats. We had to commemorate our graduation with a senior trip.

Fortunately for us, our Aunt Carol Ann—we called her ACA for short—owned a little vacation house, a

casita, in Mexico. The two of us came up with a plan. We sold ACA on the idea of letting us stay in her place

for a week, and we convinced my parents to loan us the family car, a 1985 Volkswagen Vanagon, to get us

there and back. As we prepped for the excursion, we sat down with ACA at her kitchen table. She handed

over the keys, gave us a checklist of little maintenance items to do while we were there, and wrote out a list of “fun things to do.” At the top of the

canary yellow sheet of paper, it read, “Go see Helen.” Naturally, we asked her, “Who’s Helen?”

Aside from the first time I rode a bike without training wheels, I had never felt freedom quite the same way I did when I pushed down on the clutch,

dropped it into fourth gear, and merged onto Highway 198 West; the valley heat poured through every wide-open window. We made it as far as San

Diego that day. While we were wide-awake and could have pressed on, the VW was tired, and needed oil, and antifreeze. Behind the gas station, we

snapped the curtains into place, wedged ourselves into the folded-down bed between surfboards and suitcases, and drifted off to a fitful sleep. The next

morning, we both admitted that Helen made appearances in our dreams. We wondered what she would be like. “A stunning Mexican beauty,” according

to ACA, “absolutely drop-dead gorgeous.” Scottie and I were both in agreement. Since there were two of us, but just one of her, we would let Helen

decide who she liked best.

The next day the van rolled onto Main Street, Ensenada, “Avenida de Cabezas” as we christened it, which featured the massive sculptured bronze heads

of various historical Mexican, uh, figureheads. After a feast of curbside fish tacos, we putt-putted our way to the casita, neatly tucked into an ex-pat

shantytown near Estero Beach. Except for a couple of toothbrushes, and one stick of Right Guard, the VW remained packed. At least our breath

would be passable, and our B.O., according to our own judgment, mostly undetected. Practically running to Helen’s house—The Promised Land—we

followed ACA’s map. “Turn izquierda at Juárez, derecho on Bahia, and keep an eye out for the casita with white rock and plastic pink flamingos out

front.” Drawing a deep breath, my cousin knocked on the misshapen screen door held on by a single rusty hinge. “Hi, Helen—you there? It’s Scottie and

Tommy. Your neighbor, Carol Ann, told you we’d come by.” Through the doorway, we could make out a faint silhouette, a mound shape crumpled into a

La-Z-Boy recliner. An ancient Magnavox with a partially tuned-in telenovela blared Spanish histrionics in the background. Helen’s grandma. Through

vocal chords marinated by many happy hours in the local cantinas, she summoned, “Come in.”

Stepping over piles of TV Guides and boxes of Tab cola, we wedged our way into the rabbit hole of a living room. From the lips of the old woman hung

a half-inhaled cigarette. On her chair’s armrest, next to the remote, was an empty package of Pall Malls. Struggling to rise, we reflexively supported

her arms as she reached for her walker; sliced-open tennis balls adhered to the four legs. With the complexion of a catcher’s mitt, and the vitality of

Kingsford charcoal, the old lady, pausing for a long swig from her iced glass of apricot Schnapps, had days that were clearly numbered. With one foot in

the grave and the other on a banana peel, the grandma was in bad shape. After she finally wobbled into a reasonably stable upright position, I asked, “Is

Helen home?” Careful to suck in every last carcinogen remaining in her glowing, unfiltered cigarette, the half-living woman exhaled a billowing cloud

that rivaled the Volkswagen’s frequent backfires, and declared, “I’m Helen.”

This issue marks the eight-year anniversary of SLO LIFE Magazine, and the only reason we are here is because of you. Thank you for your support,

it means everything. And a special thanks to my team members who have worked so hard along the way to make it happen, and most of all, to our

advertisers and subscribers—we couldn’t do it without you.

Live the SLO Life!

Tom Franciskovich

tom@slolifemagazine.com

12 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

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Dawn Janke

Jaime Lewis

Andria McGhee

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Makers & Allies

CONTRIBUTIONS

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NOTE

The opinions expressed within these pages do not necessarily reflect those of

SLO LIFE Magazine. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole

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CIRCULATION, COVERAGE AND ADVERTISING RATES

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Letters chosen for publication may be edited for clarity and space limitations.


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make all the difference. At Sierra Vista Regional Medical Center, our local interventional

neurology team is on call around the clock to provide the only endovascular approach to

treating ischemic stroke patients in San Luis Obispo County. That means you’re treated quickly

and within your own community to help minimize brain damage and improve outcomes.

What is Advanced Stroke Care? Learn more at:

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JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 15


| ON THE COVER

A SNEAK PEEK

BEHIND the scenes

WITH PANCHO HERRERA

BY VANESSA PLAKIAS

I showed up at Pancho’s

house right before sunset;

the light was gorgeous. He

had just ridden his bike

home from work. Just a

beautiful, quintessential

SLO evening. Before we

even started talking, I said,

“Don’t move, Pancho!” and

started shooting.

Pancho also has a soft spot for vintage motorcycles. He

was talking about looking at the world at a different

angle, turning things upside down, and as he was saying

that he jokingly flipped the manual upside down.

We took a look at some of his favorite bikes, his

most favorite being the single speed. He said,

“Keep life, and riding, simple.”

Pancho shared that he

doesn’t want to be seen as

a pillar of the community,

but hopes that his attitude

can be contagious and

inspiring to others. He

talked about how we all

have many different facets,

good and bad, and that

we should applaud each

other’s positives and find

things that are inspiring

in everyone, instead of

focusing on the negative.

That’s why we all love

Pancho! SLO LIFE

16 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 17


| IN BOX

Take us with you!

Hey, SLO LIFE readers: Send us your photos the next time you’re relaxing in town or traveling

far and away with your copy of the magazine. Email us at info@slolifemagazine.com

PETRA, JORDAN

HAVANA, CUBA

DOUG and NANCY BECKETT

DAVE and MARY STORNETTA

S’HERTOGENBOSCH, NETHERLANDS

Look what the members of SLO and Estero Bay

Newcomers Travel Group found in Havana, a street

called “Obispo.” We took a moment to enjoy it and

share SLO LIFE with the Cuban people!

KA’ANAPALI, MAUI

JÜRGEN, MAREIKE,

AND LINA MATHWICH

ALLYSON BOLTON

18 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


LA FORTUNA DE SAN CARLOS, COSTA RICA

PARIS, FRANCE

ROBERT DEL CAMPO

and CAROL RAMIREZ

FREIXO DE NUMAO, PORTUGAL

CONSTANCE PRADINES

LAKE POWELL

KIM MARTIN and DAVID NORTON in the village

of Freixo de Numao, Portugal, where we just had

watched how to make sugared almonds. Yum!

AUBURN, ALABAMA

CAROL and SAUL GOLDBERG

SUPERTREE GROVE, SINGAPORE

KAREN FEENEY traveled to Auburn, Alabama with

her copy of SLO Life. Here she is in front of Auburn

University. Go Tigers!

IAN and MAGGIE MCKAY

JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 19


| IN BOX

You showed us...

RIVER KWAI, THAILAND

SAN PEDRO, BELIZE

SEAN and DANA OBRIEN just got back from their

30th Anniversary trip to Thailand! MARYANN and

BILL STANSFIELD traveled with us celebrating

their 15th Anniversary. Also pictured is our guide

YO and our new friend, also named SEAN. We

took SLO LIFE with us to the Elephant World

Refuge where we got these amazing pictures with

the elephants. We gave them a mud bath then

afterwards walked them over to the River Kwai

and bathed them.

COMPOSTELA, NAYARIT, MEXICO

FLOR and HEIDI LEAL

VENICE, ITALY

The San Luis Obispo Rotary Club visiting their sister

Rotary club in Compostela Mexico, conducting a

service project planting trees in the Rotary Exercise

Park, a facility previously built through a joint

collaboration of the two clubs.

SHERIDAN GOVERS

and JUDY MAY

20 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


TOWER BRIDGE, LONDON

NEW ZEALAND

JUDY GRANTHAM

BOSTON MARATHON

NARA, JAPAN

TONI and

CRAIG KINCAID

LIZ BYRNES, AMY PARKINSON,

SUSAN MCADOO, SUZI JIANUZZI,

and ALISON BORGSMILLER after

completing the Boston Marathon.

OSAKA, JAPAN

SHEILA TEDONE

HUNTINGTON LAKE

KYE and LITS

BRENNEN

JET, DONOVAN, KILI, GENEVA,

HARRISON, CARTER, and LANDER

JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 21


| IN BOX

SLO LIFE travels!

STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN

PUERTO VALLARTA, MEXICO

AUSTIN, TYLER, and NATALIE

LUCERNE, SWITZERLAND

NORRIS-MENDELSOHN FAMILY

ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI

CHRIS and MICHAEL RITTER

ROB ISAACS, VICKI JANSSEN, JIM and GINA FISHER

visiting St. Louis for the National Collegiate Club

Volleyball Championships to watch Cal Poly’s Men’s

and Women’s teams compete.

22 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


NETHERLANDS

AMSTERDAM

SCOTT BRADFIELD

LAKE LOUISE, CANADA

JI LI

TUSCANY, ITALY

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TOM and RENEE DOBYNS

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CA License # 405800545

Letters may be edited for content and clarity. To be considered for publication your letter should

include your name, city, state, phone number or email address (for authentication purposes).

JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 23


| BRIEFS

“It’s our

responsibility

as people

to help one

another. It’s

as simple as

that.”

Former Los Angeles Laker, Kobe Bryant,

who made a surprise appearance on

ABC’s “The View” to congratulate the

Thompson family of San Luis Obispo

for their fund-raising efforts for local

non-profit Jack’s Helping Hand. The

youngest Thompson, six-year-old Bryson,

has epilepsy and together with his

older brother, Brock, the two have been

collecting sports memorabilia through

their Helmets4Helmets program to be

auctioned online for charity.

#884

San Luis Obispo High School gets a nod

from U.S. News & World Report when their

recent survey ranked it among the best in

the nation—884 out of more than 20,500

schools nationwide, and 149 out of 700

California high schools.

“We’re going to

call her Justice.”

The name 15-year-old Zoe Rosenberg

of San Luis Obispo gave to the cow she

attempted to save from the slaughterhouse.

The cow was being raised on Cal Poly’s

campus as part of a meat science class. A

video documented the ordeal in which

the activist chained herself to a gate and

declared, “For all I care, they can kill

me instead of this cow,” before she was

arrested for trespassing and resisting arrest.

“I don’t know if you

can possibly die

from second-hand

sand. But, if that’s

a thing, that’s how I

choose to go.”

Hanford resident and off-road riding

enthusiast Mike Gomes speaking in

opposition to the dust mitigation efforts

at the Oceano Dunes during a public

comments session in April. He continued,

“I will die on that beach with a cigar in one

hand, a vodka in the other, and a smile on

my face, because I spend enough time at that

beach with my wife and kids to have that

much sand in my lungs.”

(820)

$21,625

The amount the County of San Luis

Obispo paid a PR firm to handle

the fallout stemming from a video

documenting Andrew Holland’s death

at the County Jail. Critics claimed the

expenditure ran afoul of campaign

finance laws and should have been paid

for by Sheriff Ian Parkinson’s re-election

campaign, and not the taxpayers.

“I only want the Jews

in this special area,

OK? I want them

concentrated here.”

Audience laughter and applause met the

comment made by Milo Yiannopoulos at a

“fake news” forum hosted by the Cal Poly

College Republican Club. It was the second

time in a year the club had invited him to

speak. The cost of the security provided at

the two events by the university and SLOPD

was in the range of $150,000.

24 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018

“…someone

I have fallen

in love with.”

Deputy District Attorney Chase Martin,

describing popular Cal Poly student

Kennedy Love who was killed by a drunk

driver while riding his bike home on

Foothill Boulevard last August. Martin,

who prosecuted the case, obtained a

seven-year prison sentence for Los Osos

resident Gianna Catherine Brencola.

4th worst

According to a ranking by RewardExpert,

the Central Coast is the fourth worst place

in the country to start a business. Thanks

to the high cost of living, expensive office

space, and extensive regulatory burden, the

region had a poor showing and rounded out

the bottom of the list, which put Denver,

Colorado at the top.

No longer will “The 805” be just “The 805,”

it’s now also “The 820.” Phone numbers

issued from now on will have the new 820

area code and callers in the existing 805 zone,

an area that stretches from Thousand Oaks to

north of Paso Robles, will have to dial the full

ten digit numbers to make local calls.

“The genome of the

Octopus shows a

staggering level of

complexity with 33,000

protein-coding genes

more than is present in

Homo sapiens.”

A recent report published by Progress

in Biophysics and Molecular Biology

suggests that the exceptionally intelligent

octopus may actually be an ancient alien

from outer space. This may explain why

last month the owner of Giovanni’s

Fish Market in Morro Bay, Giovanni

DeGarimore, bought a 70-pound octopus

that had been tangled up in a fisherman’s

net, so that he could rehabilitate it and

release it back to the ocean. SLO LIFE


JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 25


| TIMELINE

Around the County

APRIL ’18

4/2

A body found in Prefumo Canyon is identified as Kristen Marti

of Morro Bay, who had been reported missing on January 18th

by family and friends. She was last seen on January 9th sitting

with an adult male in a red Chevy S-10 Blazer on the 1800

block of Prefumo Canyon Road. Six weeks later, SLOPD Chief

Deanna Cantrell held a press conference announcing that they

had arrested a suspect by working together with authorities in

Minneapolis, Minnesota where Arroyo Grande resident, 36-yearold

Robert Koehler, was apprehended and charged with murder.

Although the two did not have a prior relationship, Cantrell

declined to share the details as to why they were together. Koehler

had been the primary suspect for a month and SLOPD appealed

to the public for information about his activities at the time of

Marti’s disappearance. SLOPD monitored his whereabouts until

they were able to build a case and obtain a warrant for his arrest.

4/4

The City of San Luis Obispo spent $19,638 on a 19-page report

written by the law firm Best, Best & Krieger outlining an effort

at cooperation with Cal Poly as it relates to its impact on quality

of life for its permanent residents. While Cal Poly has paid lip

service to the idea of holding its enrollment at 25,000 students

(this year it is at 22,188) and housing 65 percent of them on

campus, there is no mandate requiring them to do so. The city,

in January, citing concerns about the university’s Master Plan, a

document outlining its intentions for the next twenty years, stated

in a 140-page letter, “a number of troubling environmental issues

which [the current draft of the Master Plan] does not properly

evaluate.” Those issues are impacts to the city’s housing stock,

water, traffic, and public safety resources.

4/4

Earlier this year, Cal Poly President Jeff Armstrong unveiled the

university’s plans to increase its diversity with a new grant program to

attract low-income students. Speaking about the Cal Poly Opportunity

Grant, Armstrong said, “Qualified students from every demographic

deserve exposure to our world-renowned Learn by Doing education.” He

continued, “This transformational new grant would improve access for firstgeneration

and low-income California students.” An official press release

that accompanied his comments that day stated that the grant “would

provide financial assistance for high-achieving, low-income California

students who meet Cal Poly’s rigorous academic admission requirements

but can’t afford to attend the university.” Two months later, Armstrong sent

an email explaining that the grant was cancelled, citing objections from

out-of-state students who would be required to pay an additional fee to

fund the program.

4/10

Cal Poly made national news when a photograph surfaced showing one of

its students posing in blackface at a fraternity event. A week later, another

photo circulated showing a different fraternity party where attendees were

pictured mocking Mexican-Americans as they dressed as gangsters. Those

incidents were followed by yet another blackface occurrence on campus.

As racial tensions flared at the university—by far, the whitest, least racially

diverse public institution in California—petty incidents of hate and

intolerance involving vandalism and graffiti cropped up around campus.

The events continue to indicate a pattern at Cal Poly and are preceded by

a photo last year of a fraternity posing with a Trump sign wearing various

racially insensitive costumes including Native American headdresses, fake

dreadlocks, sombreros, and some while holding guns. In another national

news-making incident, in 2013, Cal Poly administrators investigated a

fraternity party called “Colonial Bros and Nava-Hos” where attendees wore

racially insensitive costumes, which resulted in deeming it “offensive” but

no punishment was handed out.

4/30

By a 4-1 vote, an Air Pollution Control District hearing committee

approved a settlement with State Parks over dust mitigation at the Oceano

Dunes. As part of the agreement, dust emissions at the off-road vehicle

park must be reduced by 50% over five years. Had the committee rejected

the compromise, a public nuisance hearing before the state would have

continued, something many Nipomo residents advocated for, and it could

have resulted in the permanent closing of the dunes to vehicles. At various

times during the year, the air quality on the Nipomo Mesa continues to be

among the worst in the nation.

26 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


5/2

The San Luis Obispo City Council voted to make its city the first one

in the county to allow recreational marijuana stores after approving

its new cannabis ordinance. While the framework has been put in

place, the rules will not go into effect until November when the voters

weigh in on how to tax the new businesses. Provisions for the new

law include: prohibiting consumption at events or businesses; limiting

residents to a total of six cannabis plants each; retailers must remain

300 feet from residential neighborhoods and 1,000 feet from schools

and parks; and commercial cultivation can be done indoors only and is

limited to an aggregated total of 70,000 square feet. As part of the new

web of regulations, the city will limit cannabis operations to one of six

designated zones.

MAY ’18

5/7

The Fitzhugh family, owners of the 1,779-acre Hill Ranch north

of Cayucos, signed an agreement with the Land Conservancy

of San Luis Obispo essentially selling their development rights,

which effectively preserves the open space in perpetuity. Offering

sweeping views of the Estero Bay, the property along Highway

46 West is noted for its roaming cows and abundant wildlife.

The conservation easement will allow the family, who has owned

the land since the 1800s, to continue ranching while, other than

allowing two homes, forever preventing its subdivision. Funds

for the conservation easement were provided by a $2 million

grant from the Strategic Growth Council, $750,000 from the

California State Coast Conservancy, and a $1 million charitable

contribution from the owners.

5/15

The California Department of Transportation, or Cal Trans,

put out a notice asking Central Coast locals for their input

regarding the bottleneck on Highway 101 South between San

Luis Obispo and Pismo Beach. And, it seems that everyone

has a theory for the perplexing back-ups, ranging from “it’s the

first time you can see the ocean since the Bay Area, so everyone

slows down to get a good look,” to “it goes from two lanes to

three lanes to two lanes again, so that messes up the flow.” With

the passage of SB 1, the new $.12 gasoline tax which took effect

in November, and a $261 million allocation for San Luis Obispo

County roads, it does appear that help may be on the way,

and according to South County commuters, it cannot come a

moment too soon.

5/3

More records surfaced, again calling into question Sheriff Ian

Parkinson’s honesty related to the death of Atascadero resident Andrew 5/25

Holland. Although Parkinson claimed that Holland had been placed

Although Cal Poly President Jeff Armstrong claimed the

in a restraint chair for 46 hours because the inmate was “having a

blackface incident a month earlier was an exercise in free speech,

psychotic episode” and could not let him out of the chair because he

as were Milo Yiannopoulos’ multiple visits, the university decided

was combative, medical logs note that he was administered anti-anxiety to investigate several of its students who protested Raytheon,

and anti-psychotic drugs and a nurse wrote, “responds appropriately

a defense contractor which manufactures weapons such as the

when asked questions” and “sitting in chair, calm.” Additional entries

Tomahawk missile, at an on-campus career fair. The students,

in the journal found him to be “calm; quiet;” and “cooperative, minimal

members of the SLO Peace Coalition, stood in front of the

signs of aggression, minimal spitting,” eventually drinking water and

company’s booth for 18 minutes holding a sign that read, “Divest

eating lunch. While District Attorney Dan Dow continued to decline

from war, stop the war machine,” and sang. Former Raytheon

calls to investigate the matter, a sheriff in Oklahoma involved in a

CEO, William H. Swanson, who retired to the Central Coast,

similar situation with a restraint chair death is on trial facing firstdegree

manslaughter charges. serves as chairman of the Cal Poly Foundation. SLO

has donated $10 million to Cal Poly’s golf program, and currently

LIFE

JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 27


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28 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


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JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 29


| VIEW

SHIPWRECK

PHOTOGRAPHY BY NASH MORENO

The thing about being from somewhere—anywhere—is that it can be really difficult to

know what you’ve got until you have some other place to compare it to. At least that

was the case for Nash Moreno, a kid from Santa Maria who went off to the big city to

work as a software engineer. Practically every vantage point from San Francisco’s many

hilltops blew his mind—it was photographic eye candy.

Although he loved messing around with his parents’ Canon AE-1, burning through

35-millimeter film, the camera obsession did not take over completely until he

bought a GoPro video recorder. Since he had just nailed the motorcycle exam, and

had his new license in-hand, he thought it would be interesting to record his rides.

Before long, he found himself untethering the GoPro from its helmet mount to snap

landscape shots, sunsets, and moonrises. Video was not doing much for him; it was

still photography that got the juices flowing. As his career continued to expand in the

go-go Bay Area tech world, Moreno was being recruited to join a new start-up. “I

told them I’d do it,” he recounts the story, “if I could do their marketing photography.”

Upper management was thrilled with the work; the product brochures and flyers were

stunning. Instagram was also giving him positive feedback; the shots he was posting

were getting rave reviews. Then, he started hearing a little voice that was coming from

somewhere deep inside—his head, his heart, he wasn’t sure.

“Go home,” the voice said. At first it was no more than a faint whisper, but after a while

it became a pulsing drumbeat reverberating in his bones. “Go home, Nash—it’s time.”

Reconnecting with his hometown, reacquainting with the giant natural playground

known as California’s Central Coast, was a transformative experience for Moreno,

because when he returned, he returned as a photographer. Everything he saw now,

he saw through the lens of his camera; everything a subject, a scene, a landscape.

Immediately, he began racking up miles on his ’96 Toyota 4Runner in search of the

best backdrops for his burgeoning photography business. One day, while he and a

buddy headed north, to nowhere in particular, the pair stumbled upon a most unusual

sight. Heading up Highway 1, just past Cayucos, in an effort to track down an epic

Morro Rock shot from the sea cliffs at Estero Bluffs State Park, the photographer

spotted what appeared to be a shipwreck. Knowing that he had stumbled onto

something most unusual, he did what any good techie would do. He “pinned” his

location on Google Maps, then he opened his trunk and prepared his whirly bird for

flight. The drone, a DJI Phantom 4 Pro, pierced the windless sky climbing directly

over the ship’s wheelhouse and began snapping away.

Nine months earlier, the Point Estero shoved off from her mooring in Morro Bay en

route to fertile slime eel fishing territory. Somewhere on the return trip, due to some

unfortunate combination of operator error and unexpected weather, the Point Estero

ran aground atop a shallow rock formation 200 feet or so from shore where it rests

today. But, that is not the end of this story. The owner of the boat, who has managed

to remain unidentified, at least publicly through the ordeal, and has walked away

from the vessel, essentially relinquishing ownership and also the estimated $175,000

fee it would require to tow it back to Morro Bay. The question becomes then, if the

eel fisherman is not going to foot the bill, who will? Since the ship has been cleared

of all its fuel, oil, and other hazardous materials by the Coast Guard, the answer is

very likely: no one. Although tangled up in a gaggle of various bureaucratic entities,

it appears most likely that the State Lands Commission would be the one to step

forward. The only problem is that the legislature is not in a spending mood, and

funding for these shipwrecks where safety and environmental health are not at risk,

just does not happen these days. Instead, over the years, as with shipwrecks of old, the

Point Estero will break up and return to sea, one piece at a time. SLO LIFE

30 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 31


| Q&A

FAMILY BIZ

This year, BIZ STEINBERG, the Chief Executive Officer of the Community Action

Partnership of San Luis Obispo, Inc., known locally as CAP SLO, celebrates her 40-year

anniversary with the organization. Since she was promoted to head up the then tiny

non-profit in 1984, it has grown to a sprawling juggernaut with 1,200 employees, an

$84 million annual budget, and operations in ten counties serving more than 36,000

people each year. Later this summer, CAP SLO is poised to open the doors to the new

homeless shelter in San Luis Obispo known as 40 Prado, a state-of-the-art facility

Steinberg says, “Embodies the spirit of hope.”

Thanks for stopping by, Biz. Let’s talk a bit about how

you got your start. Where are you from originally?

I’m from a town nobody will know, Pigeon Falls,

Wisconsin. It’s a very little town in West-Central

Wisconsin. I grew up with all my cousins, and aunts,

and uncles, and grandparents. I got my name, Biz,

from my cousin who is three months younger than me.

He couldn’t say, Elizabeth, it came out Biz. I tried to

get rid of it when I went off to college, but somebody

always knows you. It was a very supportive community.

Somebody would always know if you did something

that maybe you shouldn’t, but it was in care and love

for you. They just wanted the best for you.

Sounds like a great place. It was just a wonderful,

caring, giving community. The population was 207

people at the time. We’re up to about 400 now. As

kids, we were out on our bikes constantly. Played a

lot of games. Softball down at the baseball diamond.

We recently went back for my uncle’s 100th birthday

party at the Lion’s Club. He owned the general store.

My dad ran the creamery. My Uncle Thurmond had

the insurance business. My dad’s oldest sister, my aunt,

who I was named after, Dorothea Elizabeth—there’s

a theme with the name Elizabeth that runs through

our family—she was the principal of the elementary

school. My other aunt ran the post office. My mom

commuted for work seven miles to a bigger town of

1,500 people. We all had working moms back in the

‘50s and ‘60s, and the goal of all our parents was that

our generation of kids was going to college. And, you

knew that. You worked for it. You saved for it, which,

when it comes to our organization, explains why I am

such a tightwad with the budget.

What do you remember about your parents? My

mom and dad worked so hard. My dad could help take

care of my younger sister because he would get two

days off during the week, which allowed my mom to

go back to work. So, I can identify with this with the

families we are serving now. We didn’t have childcare

centers back them. Families would get together and

work out how they could help each other. My mom

was the register of probate for our county judge and

my grandmother, her mother, was that position for his

dad. That’s the way it is in a little place. Then I went

off to the University of Wisconsin in Madison and my

eyes were really opened. All of the different cultures

coming together was such a rich experience, the music,

and all the courses you had the opportunity to take.

But, these were troubling times. I did demonstrate

against Vietnam and Cambodia. Nine students were

shot at Kent State that year when I went off to college.

We had the National Guard doing security at our

classrooms, so we didn’t dare go to class during that

time. I learned there that I would become some

kind of advocate, because I found myself speaking

up for the needs of people.

Walk us through your career path, if you would.

I thought I would become a doctor, but I ended up

switching from pre-med to human development,

child development specifically, because I was sick of

doing organic chemistry at 3 o’clock in the morning.

So, that led me to doing my practicum in kindergarten

and then Head Start. It was that experience with

Head Start that taught me so much. I was working

with young, low-income children and their parents. I

would try to help in all sorts of ways, drive families to

the doctor’s office, whatever I could do. Head Start is

very comprehensive in its approach. So, I graduated

from college, met my future husband, and we came

out here. He taught at Cal Poly and I got a job at

Southwood Preschool working with young children.

I was there two years, then it was two years working

with developmentally-disabled children in Oceano.

That work experience was so enriching. From there,

I went to a child development center housed at St.

Stephen’s Church in San Luis Obispo, with infants

and toddlers and helping teen moms. After that, I

went to the Economic Opportunity Commission, or

EOC. In 2009 we changed our name to Community

Action Partnership of San Luis Obispo, but most

people know us as CAP SLO.

Take us back 40 years to those early days at CAP SLO.

It changed my life. We had six classrooms at that

time totaling 120 children. My job was to oversee this

program. It was scary because I’m going from what

I am comfortable doing, which was working with

children in the classroom, to being a supervisor and

a mentor and I have to deal with federal regulations,

write grants, work on budgets. Our agency was small,

but we had a great staff, and we were meeting the

needs of people in poverty. Since that time, the need

has not gone away. The need is pretty much the same

things that you and I need. We need a home, a place

to live, we need to feed our family; we want to support

our family. I have not met any guest at the shelter,

anyone in Head Start, any veteran, who doesn’t want

to take care of their family. Sometimes, they just need

help to get there. SLO LIFE

32 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


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JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 33


| NOW HEAR THIS

WORDSAUCE

Local seven-piece hip hop/funk band Wordsauce advanced from the minors to the majors

recently when they won the High Sierra Music Festival band contest. “It’s like we left the little-kid

basketball court and now will be playing with three Michael Jordans and two Larry Birds,” says

guitarist Kevin Strong. Without a doubt, the band sees the opportunity as a stepping stone, and

they are determined to deliver the best set of their lives on that stage.

BY DAWN JANKE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY XANDER BISSELL

High Sierra Music Festival . Quincy . July 5-8

Album Release Party . The Siren . Morro Bay . August 11

34 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


ordsauce first formed in 2009 when

drummer and Michigan native Bill

Gerhardt moved to San Luis Obispo

and met bassist Wes Price through a

mutual friend. Across twists and turns

of fate, the two became four when

Strong and San Luis Obispo native

WSam Franklin joined the band. Then

four became seven with guitarist Shawn Warnke, turntablist/producer

Eric Mattson, and emcee/vocalist/producer Rick “Risko” Loughman.

Loughman met Price in a business management class at Cuesta College

and the two became fast friends after Price introduced himself as

someone who liked to rap and play bass. At that point, Loughman had

been rapping independently for about two years. He explains, “The whole

concept of doing what I was doing with a full band was something I

aspired to down the line. It was intimidating to play with the others at

first, because I didn’t have the musical training they had.” “But when Rick

joined the band,” adds saxophonist Franklin, “we started to take it more

seriously—he was the front man, and he was committed.”

After only three hours of rehearsal, the band’s first live performance

was in spring of 2010 at the Clubhouse, and their eight-year trajectory

since is testament to their collective commitment to music-making.

Loughman even sold avocados on the side of the road for gas money to

get back to San Luis Obispo to perform with Wordsauce when, for a

period, he had relocated to his hometown of Ojai to finish college.

In fact, for several years three of the seven band members lived out of

the area: Loughman worked toward his degree in digital media arts

with a focus on audio recording at Cal State Dominguez Hills, Mattson

attended Chico State and earned a degree in audio engineering,

and Franklin concentrated on a degree in jazz performance at Cal

State Northridge. Meanwhile, Gerhardt, Warnke, Strong, and Price

remained in SLO County and continued to rehearse. They also formed

Wordsauce LLC and started SaucePot 1, a warehouse they transformed

into six rehearsal studio spaces to rent to local bands.

Despite the distances among the seven bandmates during that time,

each member was confident that their reunion would be worth the wait.

As Franklin describes it, “We all knew we wanted to keep doing this.”

By summer 2014, all Wordsauce members were back in SLO working

on their first full-length album, “The Flow,” which they recorded at

Speak Studios, and while touring the state, and offering local charity

performances for the Woods Humane Society, Project Surf Camp, and

the Susan G. Komen Foundation.

Yet, as they geared up to record a second album, their music-making

again took a back seat when, in summer of 2016, the band purchased

additional warehouse space and broke ground on their own recording

studio. As Loughman put it, “When the space became available, there

was no question—we had the skillset and decent gear, we were just

missing the space, so why not build a couple of rehearsal rooms and

create a highly functional studio where we could record quality albums?”

Matteson adds, “The universe gave us one shot: the space became available

and everyone put as much time as they could into it.”

The Sauce Pot is Wordsauce’s full recording studio where the vibe is most

important. Matteson explains, “The studio is meant to be a vessel to create

our music, and we want to help facilitate that goal for other bands, too.”

Loughman adds, “It feels good in The Sauce Pot, and it’s refreshing to hear

bands describe it as space where they can just chill and make their music.”

Matteson continues, “We do everything here—it’s one studio where every

musical genre is welcome. There are so many talented bands in this area, and

we’re really trying to help grow the Central Coast music scene.”

With the studio underway, Wordsauce has had time over the past two

years to refocus on the music. Strong says, “We still have songs to record

from when we did our first tour; we just haven’t had time to release a lot

of music.” The band did release a single last year, “Big Skies Silent Valleys,”

a song they wrote in support of Big Surreal, an annual music festival in

Cachagua put on by Luke and Mike Handy of LuvLab Productions.

Wordsauce submitted the single to the New Times Music Awards and won

best song in the hip-hop/reggae/world beat category.

As the band moves forward, they plan to embrace the variety of their early

sound and hone in on their strengths. Warnke says, “One of the things we

learned early on is that dynamics are key, and a lot of times less is more.”

Strong explains that it’s difficult for guitar players to leave space, but they’ve

matured as a band and, “It will be exciting to see how the new album comes

together stylistically.”

Gerhardt explains, “The band’s sound is still changing.” Franklin points

out that because of the studio, Wordsauce will have instrument additions

on the new album, like a keyboard for Franklin. Loughman agrees that the

studio has helped them to develop their sounds and says their main goal

with the new album is to “button up and be decisive” with the songs they

select to track.

As if the band doesn’t have enough to focus on with the High Sierra Music

Festival and the release of their upcoming second album, Wordsauce is

expanding with another studio space next door to

The Sauce Pot. They also are heavily promoting

their new lifestyle website: inthestu.com. Price

explains, “We have a lot of stuff in the works,”

and Mattson adds, “We’re looking forward to

sharing our vibe with people who will enjoy it.”

The band sees their name, Wordsauce, as a

positive affirmation, and as Warnke says, “It’s

time for us to spread the sauce in and out of

town.” Loughman concludes, “We’re taking

advantage of this point in time to control our

own destiny—we’ve set a course for the future,

and what happens between now and then is the

middle moment. Being in that middle moment is

what we’re most excited about.” SLO LIFE

DAWN JANKE, Director,

University Writing & Rhetoric

Center Cal Poly, keeps her

pulse on the Central Coast

music scene.

JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 35


| ON THE RISE

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

Dasha Novotny

Eighteen-year-old San Luis Obispo High School

graduating senior DASHA NOVOTNY prepares to

head off to Nashville to perfect her craft.

What sort of extracurricular activities are you involved in? I’ve been involved

in leadership since 8th grade and have played volleyball for six years. On

campus, I’m a member of ASB, Improv Troupe, and the drama department.

I’ve performed in musical theatre productions since kindergarten, including

school productions and in shows with professional theatre companies. I also

write and record original music and perform my songs at wineries and local

venues, as I’m pursuing a career in the entertainment industry.

What recognition have you received? The first award I remember

receiving was the countywide poetry contest in third grade. Since

then, I’ve been awarded Golden Tigers, principal’s honor awards

every trimester of my high school career, and many theatre awards

including best actress in a play, best actress in a musical, and best

Sophomore at SLOHS.

What has influenced you the most ? Taylor Swift was my first

musical influence as a seven-year-old rocking out to “Our Song,” but on a

personal level, the most influential person in my life thus far is my brother,

Bardo. I admire how he knows exactly what he wants and will work tirelessly

until he accomplishes his goals. Bardo possesses charisma, intelligence, and

talent, but most importantly pushes me to maintain my ambitions more than

anyone, in ways he doesn’t even know.

What is important to you outside of high school? Outside of school, my

family comes first and foremost. Especially in these past few months, the reality

that in August I’m moving 1,890 miles away from my parents, siblings, and

friends has terrified, yet excited me, and has made me appreciate the presence

of my loved ones even more.

What is your favorite memory of all time? We’ve had a tradition in our

household since I can remember at Christmastime, where we all help bake and

decorate a homemade gingerbread house, and then on Christmas night, we

take the gingerbread house out onto the driveway and smash it with a hammer!

Where do you see yourself in ten years? I see myself in a bigger city: maybe

New York, Los Angeles, or even Nashville. I know I’ll still be following my

passions, but whether it’s acting, singing, dancing, theatre, songwriting, or

something else, is up to fate.

What else should we know about you? I’m 5’11,” pescatarian, am absolutely

fascinated with the theory of aliens and all extraterrestrial life including ghosts

and afterlives, and although lactose-intolerant, I love chocolate ice cream.

What’s on the horizon for you? The only college I applied to was Belmont

University in Nashville and that is where I’m headed in the fall. SLO LIFE

Know a student On the Rise?

Introduce us at slolifemagazine.com/share

36 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


CUESTA COLLEGE REGISTRATION

IS OPEN FOR BOTH

SUMMER & FALL

2018 CLASSES

Summer session starts June 18

Fall semester starts August 13

Cuesta College offers recent San Luis Obispo County high

school graduates fee-free fall and spring semesters. Deadline

to apply for the Promise scholarship is August 1st.

Enroll today at cuesta.edu.

Check out the printed

Schedule At-A-Glance booklet

available for FREE at your local library,

chamber of commerce, and other community

locations, or find your class today at

bit.ly/cuestaclasses.

(805) 546-3100

JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 37


| MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR

THE

SPOKESMAN

PHOTOGRAPHY BY VANESSA PLAKIAS

Following a busy day, in which he makes a living trying to “break things” at

San Luis Obispo-based bicycle components manufacturer, SRAM, product

tester PANCHO HERRERA stopped by on his bike to see us before pedaling

off to the grocery store and then heading home. After extolling the benefits of

installing proper bicycle parking at the front of our building, which we do not

have, he sat down for a wide-ranging interview that touched on everything

from the genesis of his unlikely name to pranking gullible European tourists

in Bolivia. Although he would vehemently deny it, there is probably no better

representative, no better spokesman, for the tight-knit cycling community on

the Central Coast. Here is his story…

38 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 39


40 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


kay, Pancho, let’s start from the

beginning. Where are you from?

I was born in Los Angeles, but I

came up here when I was around

three years old. My dad had Hispanic

roots; his parents emigrated from

Mexico. He was born in Colorado.

I have a couple of brothers younger

Othan me. So, you know, raising three boys in inner-city Los Angeles where

he had been going to school and where he had taken his first job was not

something he wanted to do. He was a teacher; the neighborhood was a

little rough for him, I think. He and my mom contemplated raising kids

there, but ultimately, they decided that they wanted something different.

They wanted to escape. So, they packed up and headed north. Dad got a

job teaching in Lompoc.

How long were you there? We were there only for a few years before we

moved to Mexico so my dad could get his master’s degree. He went to the

Universidad de las Américas in Puebla, central Mexico, which is east of

Mexico City by 50, 60 miles; so you’re still on that high plateau. Puebla

is the capital city of the state. It’s super metropolitan, very European

colonial-era Mexico. If you’ve been there, you can see the architecture

and the history of it. The university itself is outside of the city of Puebla.

It’s sort of famous for doing these exchange programs with Americans

and Europeans; people from all over, I suppose. We lived in a town called

Cholula, maybe ten miles away. And Cholula, at least at that time, was a

little burg, a village, really.

What did you take away from that experience? I think it formed some

of my values. I’m confident it did. One is the language skill. I got Spanish

dialed up pretty quick. But probably, the biggest and most formative thing,

if I’m looking back, is the recognition that not everybody lives like we did

in our little suburban Lompoc life; and that, you know, there are a lot of

different cultures. My father was super influential in that one. He put his

master’s degree together around illustrating Mexican culture, a broad array

of Mexican culture when we were there. I think that, at least at that time,

Americans sort of viewed Mexican culture as drinking tequila under a

cactus in your sombrero taking a siesta. And my father was pretty adamant

about disproving those stereotypes, and so I had this great opportunity

to tag along while he did research for his master’s thesis. We drove all

over in our Volkswagen van, family of five, my mama in tow, as well,

interviewing Mexicans of different walks of life: bankers, and teachers,

and artists, and fishermen. I forget how many people he interviewed, but

it was a lot. He wrote a terrific paper sharing peoples’ stories, illustrating

diversity. I thought it was super cool, and it was very influential, very

formative for me.

What about school? How did that go? Well, sure. I actually struggled

with school there, public school. Kind of jumped right into the middle

of the school session because of our schedule coming into town, living

in a small village, with a pretty—how do I want to say this?—a pretty

undereducated Mexican population there in a rural setting outside of the

big city. I was the only white kid with red hair. It was traumatic to be so

different, to not be able to integrate because it’s a totally new language,

totally new culture, blah, blah, blah. I definitely struggled with it, but

it also was really rewarding to kind of break through that and develop

friendships, long-lasting friendships. Learning the culture, not a lot of

video games available like now, but a lot more of everything else. I think

more of a work ethic in that kind of impoverished small community, you

know, dirt streets, no sidewalks, stray dogs; it’s what you would picture

in rural Mexico, especially in the ‘70s. And these people, they’d huddle

around the one TV in the village in the evening to watch a show or catch

the news. So it was a very different experience from where I came from,

you know, watching cartoons on Saturday morning.

Any stories stand out from your time in Mexico? Actually, yes. My real

name is Michael. But, when I was there, they would read my documents

and pronounce my name Michelle. I didn’t want to be called Michelle. I

was a nine-year-old boy and that’s a girl’s name. So, I came home from

school one day and I was pretty upset. I said, “Mom, I don’t want to be

Michelle.” She said, “Okay, well, pick a name.” We had recently visited

a museum dedicated to Pancho Villa. One of his ex-wives was there

curating this little podunk museum in the town where he was killed. It

actually had the car he was assassinated in, riddled with bullet holes.

I was just floored by the whole experience—the old black and white

pictures with the big mustache and the guns—it just sunk in. I was

captivated by the whole thing. So, when my mom told me to pick a

name, I said, “I want to be Pancho.” She gave me the green light and

that has been my name ever since. I’ve never bothered to legally change

it. It still says Michael on my driver’s license, bank records, but that is

how I came to be named Pancho.

How was it coming back to the States? There were some interesting

transitions to come back to this culture. It felt wildly, I don’t know if

opulent is the right word, but it felt much different than what we had left

in rural Mexico. We didn’t have hot water in the house back there; we had

to make a wood fire to heat it. There were no paved roads, no sidewalks,

chickens and farm animals were all over the place. Although Nipomo was

still pretty rural at the time, it had things like sidewalks and pavement

and grocery stores. I mean, you could buy anything there. It was a crazy

concept at the time. The transition back probably had less of an effect on

me than my brothers, who are younger than me. I remember one of them

not being able to figure out how to open a door because he had never seen

a doorknob before; stuff like that. It was good though, to see that there is

not just one way, one way to live, a right and a wrong way. There are good

elements in everything. The downside, I suppose, when we came back is

that I saw a lot more bullying here and a sort of spoiled kid mentality.

In Mexico, kids worked really hard doing chores and attending to family

businesses, things that would be unimaginable here. You know, here, kids

don’t go down to dad’s shoe repair store after school to cobble shoes.

Okay, Pancho, let’s switch gears—pardon the pun—and talk about bicycles.

Sure, okay. Let’s see, it was high school when I got my first road bike

and I started riding that thing. I was hooked immediately. Cycling was

blossoming at that time. When I graduated, I got a job at a bike shop

in A.G. There used to be one on Grand Avenue. It was called Grand

Schwinn. I took a job there assembling bikes. I started learning the trade.

So, that would have been in the early ‘80s, actually ‘82 or ‘83. Cycling was

starting to take off; bikes were being developed. The technology was going

places at that time, and I got into road racing. There’s so much to cycling,

I don’t know how much time we have to talk here. There are all kinds of

levels to the bicycle that make it cool. If you live in this area, you know

that it’s a great cycling culture that we have here. There’s a natural element

to it—you’re powering yourself. There’s the athletic element of it. I love the

competition, to go out and compete. It’s an awesome feeling to win races,

or try; it’s pretty amazing. There’s the technology of it. I’m a nut-andbolt

guy, so to see how things work, take them apart, reassemble them is

fascinating to me. >>

JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 41


And you spent time abroad on a bike, correct? I lived in Bolivia for about

four years and I did some bicycle tours down there and got to know the

people of that country, and the terrain. They’re intimate with the bicycle,

you know, that was kind of a cool interlude. That was in the early 2000s. I

had been working at the time for Cambria Bike Outfitters. Back then they

were in Cambria only, and doing international mail order. We had a lot of

Spanish-speaking clients from South America and Mexico. But mostly, I

was building bikes for this tour operation down there. The owner became

kind of a famous guy in the area as he grew his business, a Kiwi guy living

in Bolivia. He built his tour business and was buying more bikes and parts

and things. We got to know each other over the phone. One day he says,

“Why don’t you come for a visit?” So, I bought a three-month round trip

ticket and stayed for four years. I worked on bikes and ended up leading

tourists, mostly Europeans, on mountain biking tours. They would be

instructed to “go meet your guide named Pancho at such and such street

corner.” I’d laugh to myself as I watched them wander around walking

past me, assuming that I was another tourist, looking for “Pancho the

mountain bike guide.” I could always find the humor in that, and it made

for a good icebreaker when I finally introduced myself.

You don’t hesitate to advocate for more bicycle infrastructure locally.

Why? Because, I know that when I commute to work on my bike >>

42 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


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JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 43


virtually every day, the footprint I take up is this big [holds up hands

about two-feet apart]. The pollution that I make is this many [fingers

forming a zero]. And that, to me, justifies infrastructure planning and

parking; those kinds of things. You know, we want big bike lanes. It feels

very backwards to me when somebody says, “You’re taking away my car

parking.” That one car parking spot is ten bike parking spots. Who’s more

justified here? And I understand that there’s an elderly crowd that maybe

physically can’t do it. There are people that live far away and can’t do it. I

there are other ways to do it, you know; we’re kind of a spoiled culture

here. Again, it’s that sort of opulence and the belief that we all have to

own our own car so we can all go on our own schedule and listen to our

own music. But, the reality is that there are a lot of people out there, and

we’re going to have to find a way to share. And, for me, to share is pretty

easy because I’m only taking up a very small space on my bicycle. And, I

feel there should be some respect given to that fact. And I think there is.

San Luis is awesome for bike infrastructure. For the size of our city, we’re

...we’re exceptional both in our transportation

infrastructure and in our recreation infrastructure. All this

green space, all these trails we have. It’s magical. I mean, you

don’t hear about that in a town our size anywhere.

understand those things; but if you build infrastructure the right way, they

could be encouraged to do that. I mean, I’d also love to see more people

take the bus. I work right across from the airport and I see the traffic pile

up on 227 every day.

Since you ride that route daily, what is your take on Broad Street at the

south end of town, Highway 227? So, I have watched that 227 corridor

become a traffic jam, and that astounds me. And it is that way because we

don’t really have transportation infrastructure to tolerate the number of

commuters that we have. And having lived in Latin America, I see that

exceptional both in our transportation infrastructure and in our recreation

infrastructure. All this green space, all these trails we have. It’s magical.

I mean, you don’t hear about that in a town our size anywhere. There are

a lot of reasons for that. We have a really active cycling community. The

athletes in this area put a lot into it; they participate, they’re active, they’re

engaged. So, you asked me my opinion and there it is. I just find it to be

astounding that somebody can be so selfish as to say, “Well, you know,

you’re slowing me down in my car.” [laughter]

Speaking of cars, have you ever been tangled up with one? Touch wood.

>>

44 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


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JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 45


I’ve been cycling since the early ‘80s a lot, and I’ve never been hit by a car.

I’ve seen a lot of accidents and I try to be heads-up when I’m riding,

anticipating, defensive. Even with that, I experienced a really major

trauma last year with one of my workmates. We were riding See Canyon

and coming down the other side into Prefumo Canyon. We had just

started down the switchbacks near the peak and were going really fast.

It was aggressive riding. For some reason, going into the switchback, I

tapped my brakes and let him take the lead. We take turns letting each

other go ahead as we had on this particular route at least a hundred

times before. It was just bad timing, and the worst possible situation. A

16-year-old driver was coming up the other direction in the middle of

the road on a blind corner and my buddy smacked into her Toyota Rav4.

I watched him take it head-on, fly across the road, glass shattered, his

bike broke apart into several pieces. I mean, bodies are not supposed to

bend the way his did that day. He was in bad, bad shape. Unconscious.

I thought he was dead. Just a really, really traumatic experience. I had

cell coverage, thankfully, and was able to get a 911 call out. Super

performance from Cal Fire and San Luis Ambulance, both of those

entities came through for us and saved his life.

Wow, that’s intense. Super intense. Yeah. I mean, those are not the events

you want to remember in your cycling career. Fortunately, there have been

a ton of bright moments. I mean, my goodness, I’ve had so many amazing

bicycle experiences, racing and guiding, and even culturally, the SLO

Little 500, the Bike Happening downtown; I’ve been a part of that 15

years since its inception way back when. So I couldn’t really, as a bike geek,

I really couldn’t ask for a better lay of the land in terms of where I live, my

job; I mean, I got to ride two hours today on the clock at work as I tested

bikes. And, you know, the Central Coast has such great weather. I can ride

year-round. But, truly, the thing that really gets me going is sharing it with

others. I’m part of this charity, which is under the SRAM umbrella, called

World Bike Relief. We send out bikes to Africa for transportation and

infrastructure. It’s a super cool organization. The way you can change a life

with a bicycle in these developing countries is astounding. Walk six miles

to school, which takes three hours, or ride the bike there in 25 minutes.

That changes lives in a very significant way.

Okay, Pancho, what do you do when you’re not on a bike? I play music,

punk rock since the ‘80s when punk rock was invented. I’m a bass player

these days, but mostly a drummer. I did a mini-tour over the weekend, we

played in Ventura, we played in Los Angeles, and we’ll play places locally.

So, I’ll do that on a Saturday night then get up on Sunday morning and

race road bikes. I actually haven’t done that back-to-back in a while, but

I have always been proud to lead this sort of secret double life, especially

around these training athletes, these cyclists, because they’re nutty for

the sport. You know, their diets and sleep and training routines are so

paramount. It’s all become so technical with GPS, and scientific nutrition,

number crunching, and amazing bicycle technology. It wasn’t like that

when I was growing up so much. There was doping at the professional

level, but everybody had more or less the same equipment. It was much

less technical. Now, you know, your rides are analyzed by software and

data plots. But, no matter how advanced it gets, at the end of the day,

bikes, just like music, really, are still about community, and connection—

it’s got social meaning.

SLO LIFE

46 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


䘀 甀 氀 氀 匀 攀 爀 瘀 椀 挀 攀 Ⰰ 䌀 甀 猀 琀 漀 洀 Ⰰ 一 攀 眀 Ⰰ ☀ 䔀 猀 琀 愀 琀 攀 䨀 攀 眀 攀 氀 爀 礀

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JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 47


| INSIGHT

LEASE TO OWN

The future of Wild Cherry Canyon may be subject to interpretation. How a new look at an old

document could upend everything we thought we knew about the decades-old conservation effort.

BY TOM FRANCISKOVICH

In the age of the Internet, word travels

fast. Here on the Central Coast, it was

a few months back when locals woke

up to shockwaves emanating from

somewhere near the Diablo Canyon

nuclear power plant. Only, this shake

did not register on the Richter scale,

and there would be no Fukishima-style

radiation left in its wake. Instead, the rumbling

was the result of a humble email with a subject line

reading, “Please call me when you can.”

The Tribune’s headline blared in oversized letters:

“Plans for massive 15,000-home city on Diablo

Canyon lands uncovered in a private email.” That

missive, obtained by the paper through a public

records request, outlined the vision for what would

effectively become San Luis Obispo County’s newest

city rising up from 2,400 acres of pristine hillside oak

woodlands. The first line of the message, written by

developer Denis Sullivan, said, “I think we can get a

deal with PG&E to get the fee.”

The fee in this case is not what you think. It’s not

something you get in exchange for services, as in “the

lawyer’s fee is $75 per hour.” Fee, as it relates to Wild

Cherry Canyon, means ownership. And, ownership

means millions, perhaps as much as a billion dollars

in potential development profits.

At some point during the 1960s, the Marre family

ran into some tough times. They had owned most of

the 12,000 acres of land that spans from Montaña

de Oro to the north and Port San Luis to the

south. “Land rich, cash poor” is how some put it.

With money tight, the development rights to the

2,400 acres known as Wild Cherry Canyon went to

auction. An ownership group was formed to make

the purchase, calling themselves “Pecho Limited

Partnership” in a nod to the area where the land sits,

on the Pecho Coast. However, when a clerk down at

the County Recorder’s office typed up the documents,

the name was misspelled. Regardless, the company

born from a typo, Pacho Limited Partnership, took

possession of a very valuable asset: a 99-year lease

with an option to renew for another 99-year term.

But, it did not hold the fee, or fee title, which is

ownership. Did the Pacho group have control? Yes.

The right to develop? Yes. Ownership? No. Although,

it does not possess the development rights, PG&E,

to this day, ultimately holds the cards when it comes

to Wild Cherry Canyon. There will not be a 15,000-home city on the hill—conservatively estimating

three occupants per household, that's 45,000 people—unless Pacific Gas & Electric says so. And,

since it is beginning the process of closing up shop with its nuclear facility, there is reason to worry

that “maximizing shareholder value” could dictate the decision making at its high-rise San Francisco

headquarters. Selling the fee title to the entity that owns the lease today, the deep-pocketed developer,

Carlsbad-based HomeFed, which is owned by a bigger fish—a whale in Wall Street parlance—

Leucadia National Corporation of Manhattan, sure would look slick on a quarterly earnings report.

Three years ago, locals nearly lost their minds when HomeFed announced its plan to develop a

1,500-home neighborhood in Wild Cherry Canyon. Hapless company representatives wandered

into a buzz saw as they described a village of Italiante mini-mansions adorning the nearby hillsides

at a special Avila Valley Advisory Council (AVAC) meeting. The executives’ sales pitch, which

focused on solving a vexing problem—the lack of affordable housing—with multi-million dollar

estates, was tone deaf at best, and offensive at worst. Had the plan gone to a vote that night, the

decision would have been a unanimous “No”—not just “No,” but “Hell no.”

On any given day, especially when the sun is shining, which is almost always, the one road going into

and out of Avila Beach is a mess. The idea of adding 1,500-homes, each one with two or three cars,

would mean 3,000 to 4,500 more vehicles. Multiply that number times the number of commutes to

and from work and to soccer practice each day, and you start to get the idea. And, because these are

very high-end properties we are talking about, that figure does not begin to account for the house

cleaners, the pool guys, the landscapers, plus, for the kids, math tutors and piano teachers.

But, now, with the recent revelation that HomeFed is eyeing a development ten times the size they

did in 2015—that's 15,000 homes—those same people who attended the AVAC meeting are not

just concerned—they have gone, well, nuclear. Three years ago, the worry was over tripling the

size of Avila Beach. With the developer’s recent email, the issue is not the development of a new

neighborhood, but the creation of an entirely new city—to put it in perspective, the city of San Luis

Obispo has approximately 12,500 single-family homes—on the backbone of an already overburdened

infrastructure, increasingly creaking under the weight of its popularity as a tourist destination.

The various efforts to preserve Wild Cherry Canyon have been as ferocious as the swells lapping

its ocean cliffs during a winter’s squall. Twice, local preservationists came tantalizingly close to

realizing their dream of acquiring the property and then donating it to the state—forever protecting

the land by connecting it with Montaña de Oro for one massive, contiguous state park allowing

hikers to hear onshore winds rustling Coast Live Oaks as they walk from sea to shining sea. In

2000, county voters overwhelmingly approved the DREAM Initiative, formally known as the

Diablo Resources Advisory Measure, a non-binding action, in essence a proclamation stating, “At

such time when the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant closes, the land should be acquired for

public use and recreation.” In the aftermath, it was not difficult to read the writing on the wall,

and Denis Sullivan, the same guy who sent the recent email, picked up the phone and called San

Luis Obispo resident Sam Blakeslee, the initiative’s author, to talk. For the right price, he said,

HomeFed was willing to sell the land into conservation. Immediately after hanging up, Blakeslee

dialed his then wife Kara Woodruff, who was working as a land conservation advocate at the

Nature Conservancy. One thing led to another, and before long a contract was drafted and the two

parties were in escrow; but by 2003, for a variety of reasons, the deal fell apart.

A couple of years later, in 2005, HomeFed was anxious to monetize the land they continued to carry

on their books. It was dead weight at this point, an asset that was not generating any profit for its

shareholders. By now, Woodruff was with the American Land Conservancy (ALC) when Sullivan

reached out with a different offer. This time the path was less certain because the state informed

the ALC that, in order to receive any California government grant funds, it would, in addition to >>

48 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


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| INSIGHT

purchasing the lease held by HomeFed, also have to acquire the underlying fee title held by PG&E.

Control wasn’t enough; it needed full ownership. In other words, the deal just got doubly complicated.

The land at that time was appraised at $24 million. This was before the Great Recession knocked down

real estate values everywhere. When the property was reappraised during the economic slowdown,

it came back at $21 million—miraculously, exactly what the ALC had raised, both money in-hand

and pledged. The deal was on. All that needed to happen was to get the purchase on the agenda at an

upcoming Public Works Board hearing in Sacramento where the formality of allocating $6.5 million

of State Park funds toward the purchase would be finalized and the transaction would be completed.

Not so fast. Governor Schwarzenegger—still fuming over a fellow Republican, Sam Blakeslee, a

state senator at the time who voted against his budget—worked behind the scenes to prevent Wild

Cherry Canyon from showing up on the agenda. It was as if a cyborg teleported in from the future

to terminate the deal. When Governor Jerry Brown took over, still more attempts were made. But,

coming out of the economic malaise, Brown was not in a spending mood and massive deficits

stretching out as far as the eye could see were not doing anything to help matters.

Developing 15,000 homes is no small feat. Aside from the truckloads of money it will require,

the biggest hurdle, perhaps, will be in securing the go-ahead from the County Board of

Supervisors. But, right now, the board may be as development-friendly as it has been in years,

particularly with the state pushing it to add to its existing housing stock, hoping that upping

supply will lower prices. Judging from the optimistic tone of Sullivan’s email, it appears that

HomeFed may be feeling good about its prospects on this front. “I can push with the Board

of Supervisors that are in our favor at the moment to progress a deal to move to create a new

community on the Ranch,” Sullivan’s email reads. So, assuming that it can clear the Board of

Supervisors, there now appears to be another obstacle standing between Wild Cherry Canyon

and HomeFed’s bulldozers—the courts.

With the developer’s latest salvo has come greater scrutiny, and a sharp-eyed San Luis Obispo

lawyer may have upended the calculus when he dusted off and re-read the old Pacho lease

recently. Up to this point, no one else has noticed—or, if they did, they kept it to themselves,

hoping no one else would—a problem that could be spotted by a first-year law student: the rule

against perpetuities. Each state has their own take on this legal principle. In California, leases are

not allowed to exceed 95 years; a statute that was in place at the time the contract was signed.

Remember, the original Pacho deal back in the ‘60s was for two back-to-back 99-year leases,

which appears to be unlawful, or least cloudy. It has always been understood that HomeFed had

the property tied up for 198 years, which is a whole lot different than 95 years when it comes

to real estate development, particularly knowing they are fifty-some-odd years into the lease

already. If the statute holds up, and HomeFed is in fact limited to 95 years total, it could be that

there are only forty or so years of control remaining, which makes developing right now a highly

risky proposition. Who in their right mind would buy a home on land which the developer,

and therefore the homeowner, doesn't actually own? It may not matter so much if it were tied up

with a controlling interest for 150 years or so, but 40 years changes the equation, a lot. The math is

suddenly much less favorable, which means so, too, is the value of the asset, the lease.

Could it be that HomeFed has been bluffing all along? Have we been played by a bunch of slick

New Yorkers messing with the lives of nearby Avila residents, who have been going about their

days, minding their own business? Maybe. Maybe not. It is interesting to note, however, that in

2015 when executives were testing the waters locally with their smaller 1,500-home development

idea, the word “fee” never came up. Something changed in the past three years; perhaps their

lawyers started scrutinizing the documents a little more closely, too. In a recent Form 10-K

Securities and Exchange Commission filing under the heading “Pacho Project (Wild Cherry

Canyon)” HomeFed states, “If we are unable to obtain fee title to the property in a reasonable

period of time, we may not develop the property and an impairment of the asset may be taken.”

This language stands in stark contrast to its website, which strikes a more optimistic tone under a

heading labeled “Numerous Options Under Consideration.”

Regardless of intent—who knew what when—ultimately, if the lease were challenged in

court, no one knows for sure what may happen. A judge may decide it’s all good, “Other than

misspelling ‘Pecho’ it looks A-Okay to me.” But, with this new revelation, HomeFed’s interest is

suddenly murky, and does not appear as rock-solid as once presumed. If that is the case, then it

would be logical that the lease and the development rights that go along with it are not worth as

much as we all believed either, particularly if the California statute prohibiting agreements with

terms longer than 95 years holds up. Then, assuming that PG&E and HomeFed do not strike a

deal for the fee title, it’s just a matter of running out the clock. Four decades from now, the lease,

and HomeFed go away; that is, also assuming PG&E does not renew it. However, there are a lot of

if ’s, and’s and but’s to this story. Why not strike now while the economy is strong? Sacramento is

flush with cash, and the new revelation concerning

the old lease has upended bargaining positions.

Local preservationists have been watching Moby

Dick frolic in the Pecho Coast waters for years,

agonizingly close to shore, but just out of reach. It may

be now that the elusive whale has dropped its guard

and allowed the tide to pull it into range of Captain

Ahab’s harpoon. As is usually the case, it's a slip up

borne of hubris that hastens the end. A moment of

overconfident carelessness. The massive jackpot, a school

of shimmering fish beckoning within earshot of the

siren’s song—“I think we can get a deal with PG&E to

get the fee.” Still, with the newfound revelation, and the

crown jewel—the elusive whale—finally wandering into

the kill zone, now is not the time to flinch. The greatest

danger, according to advocates pressing to preserve the

old Spanish land grant territory, is that locals blink.

Become complacent. With the revelation that the lease

may not be ironclad as once thought, it could be that

everyone relaxes their guard just a bit, enough for the

whale to slip away, once again. Now, with the tides

shifting, and the winds favorable, this may very well be

the one and only moment in history where preserving

Wild Cherry Canyon in perpetuity is within reach,

never to be discussed in the board room of a multinational

corporation ever again—no matter how much

money is in the bank.

With the cloud hanging over the lease, its value

is likely less than once calculated. The math has

changed, and the question to ask the HomeFed boys

is, “How long do you all want to wait?” And, if there

is one thing that Wall Streeters understand, it's that

a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. There

may be no greater time than today to do a deal with

a spotlight now shining on the lease. That same

spotlight also shines brightly on PG&E. How will

they respond? How will the 50-year guest handle

its exit from the Central Coast? Will they act in

the best interests of the people who have supported

them all this time, or will they look to make a quick

buck? Why not donate the land to State Parks? At

least on the surface, PG&E appears to be genuinely

concerned about local input, as evidenced with the

formation of its Decommissioning Engagement

Panel, which is comprised of eleven community

members, each with refreshingly diverse backgrounds.

It would seem then, the whale is finally in range.

But, complacency looms. Without public action,

without agitation, without all available hands on

deck pulling the sails taut, nothing happens—

Moby Dick swims away, again. The scene is all too

familiar to Woodruff, who has been chasing down

a preservation deal for Wild Cherry Canyon over

the past 20 years. On her desk, during the good

days and bad, she keeps a reminder, an old Calvin

Coolidge quote. “Nothing in this world can take

the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is

more common than unsuccessful men with talent.

Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a

proverb. Education will not; the world is full of

educated derelicts. Persistence and determination

alone are omnipotent.” SLO LIFE

50 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


LOS VERDES 1 SAN LUIS OBISPO

4 bedroom, 2 bath home with 2 car garage includes numerous upgrades:

vaulted ceilings, tile floors, Corian kitchen counters, new stainless steel

appliances, new plumbing, new lighting fixtures, newer windows, and

solar panels. Stay comfortable with a heat pump, air conditioning, and

2 fireplaces. This beautiful single level home is located at the end of a

cul-de-sac with close proximity to shopping such as Trader Joes and

Starbucks. Priced at $595,000.00.

Get

your

season

tickets

now!

OCTOBER 6, 2018

Brahms’ Third Symphony

NOVEMBER 10, 2018

The American Masters

FEBRUARY 2, 2019

Spanish Guitar

MARCH 9, 2019

Big Sur Inspirations

MAY 4, 2019

Beethoven “Eroica”

CONCERTS IN THE COHAN

Performing Arts Center, SLO

Call 805-543-3533

to reserve your seats.

Jason Vork

DRE 01031282

805-440-4593

slosymphony.org

JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 51


| FAMILY

CLIMBING

HIGHER

BY PADEN HUGHES

Most parents I know talk about

sports or activities they cannot

wait for their child to be old

enough to try. Sometimes it’s

going to Disneyland, other

times it’s playing soccer, but it is always a

cherished pasttime we remember fondly and

want to share. Believe it or not, one of the

experiences I have really been excited for my

daughter to explore is rock climbing.

While studying in college, I developed a love for

the sport. It was exciting, challenging, strategic,

exhausting, and rewarding. I remember the bestkept

secret in town was SLO Op, a storage shed

off Suburban Road with a lock box only members

had a code to access. We could go 24/7, unlock the

storage unit and find a “box gym” for bouldering.

It provided me with endless hours of competition,

friendships, and a sense of accomplishment as I

built my climbing strength and skills.

That was probably a decade ago and many

things have changed. I’m a busy mom now

trying to balance running a business with my

husband. And that storage shed is no more—it

has evolved into an amazing climbing facility, at

a new location, owned by climbing friends who

fell in love, and have been building their dream

ever since.

I still harbor a love for climbing and was thrilled

to read that The Pad Climbing had expanded

their facility and services so much that they

have something for all ages. They even have a

section for infants and toddlers. To say I was

thrilled when I heard the news would be an

understatement.

That Saturday when my husband, our daughter,

and I checked out the renovated building a

wave of nostalgia swept over me as I walked

through the doors and saw the familiar

bouldering walls by the front desk. We

received a tour of the facility and then

headed up the stairs to the toddlers’ section.

They have dedicated a play area with stuffed

animals, toys, play mats, and even a little

bouldering area.

My daughter squealed with delight as she

bounced over to meet new little friends

sitting on a large stuffed tiger. We let her

explore, and eventually she headed to the

wall and started to grab the handholds, and

with some verbal encouragement from Dad,

she began to climb up. It was exciting to

witness. We spent about an hour letting her

build her confidence, try new things, and

make friends in a new, safe environment.

It is certainly a place we will return to as a

family. It’s rare to find a single location that

can accommodate the various interests and

capabilities of your brood, and this is one

worth checking out.

The Pad Climbing

offers many

programs, especially

over the summer, for

kids ranging in ages

and interest levels.

Kids under three are

free with a guardian

day pass and kids

under seven are free

with a guardian

membership. They

have two locations,

Santa Maria and

their new SLO

location. SLO LIFE

PADEN HUGHES is

co-owner of Gymnazo

and enjoys exploring

the Central Coast.

52 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


Elder Placements realizes the

IMPORTANCE of listening to the

client, in order to find the appropriate:

Independent Living

Assisted Living

Alzheimer’s & Dementia Care Homes

Let their experienced Certified Senior

Advisors take you on a tour to find the

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fits your loved ones Medical, Financial

and Social needs, at NO Cost to you.

Nicole Pazdan, CSA,

Contact us today for FREE placement assistance.

(805) 546-8777

elderplacementprofessionals.com

JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 53


| DWELLING

EVERYTHING OLD

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ELLIOTT JOHNSON

54 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


IS NEW AGAIN

JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 55


As far back as historians can reach, it has been

determined that human beings have been

compacting soil and using it to construct

homes. The earliest documented samples of the

construction technique known as rammed earth

were found at archeological excavations in the

Yellow River Valley area of China. The Yangshao

and Longshan peoples there were using the

same building techniques we use today back in

5,000 B.C. Everything old is new again.

Rammed earth is hot, and getting hotter. The

technique is praised for its sustainability and

energy efficiency; and, if done correctly, its

structural integrity. Fundamentally, rammed

earth, or as the French, call it, “pisé de terre,”

is quite simple and is very much as its name

implies: soil is mixed with a stabilizer—in

ancient times it was often lime or, sometimes,

animal blood—and rammed, or hardpacked,

into the shape of walls and floors and

foundations. That’s it.

Many of those buildings went on to stand

for hundreds, even thousands of years. The

largest of them is the Great Mosque of Djenne

in Mali, Africa, which was built in 1907. In

Berlin, the Chapel of Reconciliation, built as >>

56 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 57


a symbol of Germany’s unification following World

War II, is a prime example of a modern-day rammed

earth structure. But, they are everywhere, including

the whimsical whitewashed cob cottages dotting the

English countryside, some of them dating back to the

16th century; The Taos Pueblo in New Mexico, built

between 1,000 and 1,450 A.D.; and, right here on the

Central Coast, on a ranch outside of Cambria.

Ten years ago, Atascadero-based Semmes & Co.

Builders, Inc., was asked to construct what is arguably

the most unique home in the area. Together, with

architect Ben Korman, the project melded all the

best of old and new. While rammed earth has been

providing much-needed shelter to our forbearers for

many millennia, the primary downside is that those

primitive structures were not seismically sound. Any

decent-sized earthquake can easily level an early version

of one of those homes. Today, as shakes are an everyday

reality in modern day California, that would not fly. So,

in addition to those ancient building techniques, steel

rebar is added. And, a 5% cement mixture is combined

with the soil because, as it turns out, concrete has more

tensile strength than goat’s blood.

With walls up to 24” thick, rammed earth structures

are essentially massive, primitive thermal batteries.

During the day, while the sun is beating down, the

building absorbs heat, then overnight it releases it.

The phenomenon is incredibly efficient and eliminates

the need for HVAC, although the building code does

require an auxiliary heating system, at least locally.

The Cambria home uses radiant floor heating, as

is common in modern-day rammed earth homes, >>

58 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 59


ecause it, too, is also a very efficient way to maintain

a consistent indoor temperature year-round. The same

principle applies to radiant floor heating as it does to

rammed earth homes in general: a mass, in this case

the concrete slab, is heated by a web of plastic hot

water tubes. The slab retains heat, much the same way

a battery stores electricity, and emits, or radiates, the

warmth a little bit at a time, providing a very slow,

consistent heat. This contrasts with most homes that

are moderated internally by forced air heating and

cooling. When it gets cold, hot air is blown in. When

it gets hot, cold air is blown in. Forced air responds

to the ambient temperature of the room, kicking on

and off according to the thermostat. Radiant floor

heating, instead, reacts to a thermostat embedded

in the concrete. Therefore, it is much less responsive,

but it doesn’t matter because the dramatic swings in

temperature that characterize traditional stick-framed

structures are not found in rammed earth homes.

As far back as the early 1800s, rammed earth

construction has enjoyed the support of those

advocating for a sustainable, affordable alternative to

cutting down trees for lumber. Soil is abundant, trees

are not, the argument went. S.W. Johnson popularized

the concept in his book Rural Economy in which he

made the case for the proliferation of such housing on

farms throughout the United States. It took a while

for the idea to catch on, but in the 1920s, ‘30s, and >>

60 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


ARCHITECTURE

LANDSCAPE

INTERIORS

TO LEAVE THE WORLD

BETTER THAN WE FOUND IT

Our mission is simple:

“To leave the world better than we found it.”

To this end, we made the commitment to use our

business as a force for good.

In 2017, TEN OVER became the third Certified

B Corp in California and only the seventh design firm

in the U.S. to go through the certification process.

Why you ask? Because business, as usual, doesn’t

align with our mission. Because we can do better.

Because we love our families, our friends, and wild

places with clean air & clear water. We love vibrant

built spaces where people come together to live, work

and play. Because we love the positive power of a

passionate community working for the common good.

Joel & Julia enjoying some old school sketching on a pro-bono project

for the Nature Conservancy, Santa Cruz Island.

TENOVERSTUDIO.COM

JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 61


‘40s, several scholarly research projects concluded that

rammed earth construction would be a boon to lowincome

farm families. Despite the findings, widespread

adoption never took hold domestically. However,

the U.S. Agency for International Development has

continued to promote rammed earth housing for

developing nations and has financed the authorship of

the Handbook of Rammed Earth, now considered the

go-to publication on the subject internationally.

While basic rammed earth structures are about

the cheapest way to build a home, constructing a

modern-day house—one that is subject to all of

the current codes and regulations—is anything but

affordable. Unfortunately, rammed earth homes are

actually about the most expensive way to build in the

United States today. Yet, as San Luis Obispo, like

much of California and beyond, struggles with issues

around housing, like affordability and availability,

perhaps it is time to take cues from our past. Maybe

there is a happy medium that exists somewhere

between the little clay huts on the savannah, and

the multi-million dollar Cambria compound. There

is no reason that rammed earth could not become

a DIY phenomenon. Imagine little neighborhoods

sprouting up, including homes that are built by

the homeowners themselves, neighbors helping

neighbors. And, with self-driving cars on the horizon,

it is not difficult to imagine that population centers

will shift to places like the California Valley east of

San Luis Obispo. Why not? If land is cheap, clay

is plentiful, and with primitive building techniques

precluding the need for HVAC, what’s stopping us?

Don’t be surprised if it happens—again. SLO LIFE

62 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


FINN PLUMBING Inc.

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Creators of bench

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by local artisans.

The jewelry for

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DUUS

BLACKSMITH INC

2976 INDUSTRIAL PARKWAY . SANTA MARIA

805-570-0019 . HANSDUUS@GMAIL.COM

HANSDUUSBLACKSMITH.COM

JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 63


| SLO CITY

REAL ESTATE

BY THE NUMBERS

laguna

lake

tank

farm

cal poly

area

country

club

down

town

foothill

blvd

johnson

ave

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

2017

26

$661,512

$653,335

98.76%

24

2017

Total Homes Sold

7

Average Asking Price

$719,684

Average Selling Price

$712,843

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price 99.05%

Average # of Days on the Market 31

2017

Total Homes Sold

13

Average Asking Price

$834,154

Average Selling Price

$812,077

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price 97.35%

Average # of Days on the Market 38

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

2017

5

$959,580

$937,890

97.74%

59

2017

37

$697,478

$690,247

98.96%

52

2017

19

$763,453

$752,023

98.50%

32

2017

24

$790,950

$788,021

99.63%

47

2018

21

$808,124

$797,541

98.69%

22

2018

4

$909,500

$889,054

97.75%

25

2018

9

$914,111

$900,036

98.46%

15

2018

9

$1,331,164

$1,275,442

95.81%

46

2018

22

$976,286

$976,045

99.98%

86

2018

18

$924,011

$925,438

100.15%

20

2018

17

$760,580

$779,059

102.43%

42

+/-

-19.23%

22.16%

22.07%

-0.07%

-8.33%

+/-

-42.86%

26.37%

24.72%

-1.30%

-19.35%

+/-

-30.77%

9.59%

10.83%

1.11%

-60.53%

+/-

80.00%

38.72%

35.99%

-1.93%

-22.03%

+/-

-40.54%

39.97%

41.41%

1.02%

65.38%

+/-

-5.26%

21.03%

23.06%

1.65%

-37.50%

+/-

-29.17%

-3.84%

-1.14%

2.80%

-10.64%

*Comparing 01/01/17 - 05/22/17 to 01/01/18 - 05/22/18

SOURCE: San Luis Obispo Association of REALTORS ®

SLO LIFE

64 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


Help Us End Hunger In

San Luis Obispo County

Please join in helping RPM Mortgage and the Food Bank Coalition of San Luis

Obispo County in their efforts to end hunger. RPM will donate $100 for every

loan closed beginning Hunger Awareness Day, June 1st, 2018 through June 1st

2019 with a goal of raising $25,000.

Donna Lewis

Branch Manager/Senior Loan Advisor

NMLS #245945

805.235.0463

donnalewis@rpm-mtg.com

www.rpm-mtg.com/dlewis

Dylan Morrow

Loan Advisor

NMLS #1461481

805.550.9742

dmorrow@rpm-mtg.com

www.rpm-mtg.com/dmorrow

Brandi Warren

Senior Loan Advisor

NMLS# 290534

661.332.2074

bwarren@rpm-mtg.com

www.rpm-mtg.com/bwarren

Kim Gabriele

Senior Loan Advisor

NMLS# 263247

805.471.6186

kgabriele@rpm-mtg.com

www.rpm-mtg.com/kgabriele

Ken Neate

Loan Advisor

NMLS# 373607

925.963.1015

kneate@rpm-mtg.com

www.rpm-mtg.com/kneate

Valerie Gonzales

Loan Advisor

NMLS# 1082998

805.550.4325

vgonzales@rpm-mtg.com

www.rpm-mtg.com/vgonzales

1065 Higuera Street, Suite 100, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

LendUS, LLC dba RPM Mortgage NMLS #1938 - Licensed by the Department of Business Oversight under the CA Residential Mortgage

Lending Act. | 11310 | Equal Housing Opportunity.

JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 65


Be confident

in your

mortgage

decision.

| SLO COUNTY

REAL ESTATE

REGION

BY THE NUMBERS

NUMBER OF

HOMES SOLD

AVERAGE DAYS

ON MARKET

MEDIAN SELLING

PRICE

2017

2018

2017

2018

2017

2018

Arroyo Grande

105

112

69

55

$799,551

$760,106

Atascadero

155

130

69

38

$539,413

$566,528

Avila Beach

7

4

118

90

$1,079,668 $1,176,273

Cambria/San Simeon

52

56

86

83

$690,106

$748,052

Cayucos

18

21

118

90

$1,122,667

$957,952

Creston

6

2

73

138

$635,667

$587,500

Grover Beach

77

45

46

57

$516,921

$534,954

Los Osos

51

69

34

37

$597,453

$644,185

Morro Bay

53

42

62

75

$679,840

$708,536

Nipomo

83

112

56

51

$602,229

$667,389

Oceano

19

17

65

49

$439,416

$486,059

Pismo Beach

39

62

47

77

$1,104,985

$990,145

Paso (Inside City Limits)

175

154

51

34

$471,496

$495,162

Paso (North 46 - East 101)

17

29

51

54

$471,609

$508,531

Paso (North 46 - West 101)

41

47

122

86

$489,482

$646,486

Ben Lerner

Mortgage Advisor

NMLS 395723

805.441.9486

blerner@opesadvisors.com

1212 Marsh St., Suite 1

San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

Paso (South 46 - East 101)

San Luis Obispo

Santa Margarita

Templeton

18

146

10

45

24

119

5

47

99

40

46

74

72

44

161

80

$823,025

$743,544

$390,700

$706,748

$739,646

$952,994

$463,800

$780,764

opesadvisors.com

© 2017 Opes Advisors, A Division of Flagstar Bank

66 | SLO Member LIFE FDIC MAGAZINE | Equal Housing | JUN/JLY Lender2018

Countywide

1,100 1,046

*Comparing 01/01/17 - 05/22/17 to 01/01/18 - 05/22/18

61 54 $628,585 $688,447

SOURCE: San Luis Obispo Association of REALTORS ®

SLO LIFE


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San Luis Obispo 805.242.8336 Santa Maria 805.316.0154

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JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 67


SPONSORED

LINNAEA’S CAFE

Marianne Orme, who co-owns Linnaea’s Café with

her husband David Arndt, never thought she would

be the owner of a café. In fact, after graduating from

the Culinary Institute of America and working in

several restaurants, the last thing she wanted was

to be a restaurant owner!

When Marianne started working for Linnaea back

in 1995, first as a cook, then a baker, and then

as a manager, she never expected to be buying

the café 13 years later. Being a single Mom and

recently relocated to San Luis Obispo, Marianne

was very happy to have a job that gave her the time

to be with her young son and to live in a town that

welcomed them both with open arms. She cried the

first time she was able to pick up Chris after school,

and it was thanks to Linnaea - and her willingness

to be flexible - that Marianne could do that.

It came as a big surprise when Linnaea, out of the

blue, decided to ‘retire’ and offered to sell the café

to Marianne.

During this time Marianne had fallen in love and

had married David, her young son Chris had

grown and was working at the café as a barista,

and purchasing the café fell into place. It seemed

to be a natural progression for both the café and

for Marianne. The iconic gathering spot would not

disappear as many long-time residents feared.

It was a bit of a struggle at first. The town

freaked out that Linnaea’s was being sold,

but everyone soon realized the spirit and feel

of Linnaea’s was not changing with the new

ownership. Marianne and David continue to

retain the café’s hominess, warmth and the

tradition of acceptance and equality.

Marianne and David really do not have anything different to offer the

community except themselves. They are avid volunteers at many local

events, and regular volunteers with SLOfolks concerts and at the Live Oak

Music Festival.

You can get a good cup of coffee in a hundred places in San Luis Obispo

but you can only find these two on Garden Street at the original, iconic

Linnaea’s Cafe. They love what they do, they love cooking and baking for

you, and they love having the space to share with you.

The People of Garden Street

LUCIANO

OWNER, LA LOCANDA

The greatest musician of all time: Mozart

Dream car: Maserati Quattroporte

Who would you cast in the movie of your life? Al Pacino

If you could invite one person from history to dinner, it

would be: Leonardo da Vinci

When I was little I wanted to grow to be: a professional

soccer player

Comfort food: Spaghetti Bolognese

GARDEN STREET - The Heart of Downtown San Luis Obispo

68 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


SPONSORED

YOU’LL BE HOOKED

San Luis Traditions has

multiple area rugs in custom

and standard sizes. Hooked by

skilled artisans of 100% wool,

this collection boasts bold colors

with impossible-to-miss patterns

for a decidedly statementmaking

series of rugs.

Starting at $329

San Luis Traditions

748 Marsh Street

San Luis Obispo

(805) 541-8500

sanluistraditions.com

MAKE AN ENTRANCE

Spectacular earrings by Eddie

Sakamoto! They move, they swing,

they will catch everyone’s eye as

you enter a room. Diamonds and

gold like you’ve never seen them.

See this spectacular collection at

Marshalls Jewelers, right here in the

heart of downtown San Luis Obispo.

Contact for Pricing

Marshalls Jewelers

751 Higuera Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 543-3431 // marshalls1889.com

LOVE YOUR CURLS

The easiest thing you can do to get gorgeous curls is to

ditch your shampoo. Without the harsh chemicals found

in most traditional formulas, your hair is transformed. No

more dryness. No more frizz. All you’re left with is beautiful,

healthy curls that can handle any style you feel like trying.

Pick up DevaCurl No Poo 12-ounce bottle today.

$22 // Salon62 // 1112 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 543-2060 // salon62.com

DOUBLE HAPPINESS

A beautiful blend of modern and classic design elements

intersect within our new Double Halo Engagement Ring.

Fifty-eight small brilliant Canadian diamonds trace a

0.62 carat round center diamond forming two concentric

cushion shape halos, all set in lush matte finished 18K

Rose Gold. Modern classic jewelry. Made fresh daily.

$5,865 // Baxter Moerman

1128 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 801-9117 // baxtermoerman.com

COFFEE & GIFTS

Scout is known for its beautifully curated gift

section, and pretty ceramics are always in the

mix. There is currently a wide assortment of lovely

handmade mugs ready to become your favorite.

Come in, sip your favorite drink and browse the

ever-changing selection. And, for updates be sure

to check them out on Instagram.

$12 to $32 // Scout Coffee Co.

1130 Garden Street and 880 E. Foothill Boulevard

San Luis Obispo

(805) 439-2253 // ScoutCoffeeCo.com

RESPONSIBLE LUXURY

With Responsible Luxury being a

vital brand pillar for Hotel Serra,

demonstrating environmental

accountability is paramount. Utilizing

green products and practices assist

in achieving this goal. All Hotel Serra

guests will receive a complimentary,

reusable, BPA-free water bottle upon

check-in. Filtered water stations

will be strategically positioned

throughout the hotel.

Hotel Serra Coming Soon

1125 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

hotelserra.com

GARDEN STREET - The Heart of Downtown San Luis Obispo

JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 69


SPONSORED

GHEMME A NEBBIOLO

It preceded the Barbaresco and Barolo in

consumption back in its home country, Italy.

This beautiful, bold red has inspired the poets

and painters who have in turned inspired us.

It plays well with almost any meal. A vintage

2011 has your name on it and is ready to be

uncorked at your table tonight.

$93 // La Locanda

1137 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 548-1750 // lalocandaslo.com

THE DEVIL’S IN THE DETAILS

Soon to be reincarnated as Brasserie SLO, the

1924 Union Hardware building will shine as

a lively, bustling eatery. We’ve commissioned

this series of colorful dishes for breakfast and

lunch service that take inspiration from French

brasseries of the same period. Stay tuned

because this limited-run, fun 1920’s Series custom

chinaware will also soon be available for sale.

Prices will vary // Brasserie SLO

1119 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

hotelserra.com

FOR THE LOVE OF SUMMER

Known as “The Gem of Gems”

sapphires come in a rainbow of colors.

Perfect to represent your love of

summer, this delicate 14K dragonfly

pendant shows those vivid tones while

holding the delicateness of nature in

the hand-finished wings. Appraised

at $970. Available at Garden Street

Goldsmiths, your trusted expert since

1974.

$649 // Garden Street Goldsmiths

1114 & 1118 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 543-8186

GardenStreetGoldsmiths.com

CHEESE CAKE

Check out the cheese wheel cakes

at Fromagerie Sophie. They are

the perfect way to say cheese for a

wedding, graduation party, anniversary

or any event where a cake just won’t

cut it. It’s a great option for something

that’s deliciously different and sure to be

a crowd pleaser. Stop by the shop today

to find your favorite fromage.

Contact for Pricing // Fromagerie Sophie

1129 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 503-0805 // fromageriesophie.com

HERE COMES THE CAKE

Did you know Linnaea’s Cafe will

create your dream wedding cake?

They specialize in vegan, gluten-free,

and classic buttercream cakes and

cupcakes—the flavor choices are

endless. Be sure to contact Marianne

at linnaeascafeslo@gmail.com to

discuss your celebration.

Prices vary // Linnaea’s Cafe

1110 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 541-5888 // linnaeas.com

FEELING TROPICAL

In beautiful embroidery, the Rosario

handwoven straw and raffia bag by Aranaz is

fun, practical and elegantly modern. Each bag

is hand-woven by local artisans in Manila, each

design a treasured, entirely handmade piece

that will not leave your side all summer long.

$126

Finders Keepers Consignment Boutique

1124 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 545-9879 // slofinderskeepers@gmail.com

GARDEN STREET - The Heart of Downtown San Luis Obispo

70 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


SPONSORED

and style, Kim has chosen to embrace the past, and

focus on personal connections, not unlike what they

probably provided back in 1935.

HAIR TODAY, HAIR YESTERDAY

THE OLDEST RUNNING HAIR SALON IN SAN LUIS OBISPO

The idea that a storefront in heart of Garden Street in downtown San Luis

Obispo has been operating as a hair salon since 1935 is hard to believe. So

many things change with time; upgrades, modernization, and even moving

on to a new location—but not Salon62.

As Kim Boege reaches her third anniversary on Garden Street she

continues to research the history of the “Barrett Block” and the salon space

she calls home. As salons become very high tech and very modern in look

Kim and her husband Eric have been in business

together for over thirty years. With their two Preschools

they have educated thousands of children over the

years. However, fifteen years ago Kim decided to

embrace her new calling-the world of beauty-and

open their first salon in Atascadero. Although the north

county is where Kim and Eric raised their family, San

Luis Obispo was where they found they needed to be.

Eric’s family, the Graggs, were some of the earliest

ranchers in the SLO and Shell Beach area. Eric’s

grandmother was a teacher at the old school in Avila,

where she met his grandfather surveying then Highway

1 back in the 1920’s. With this combination of history

and this perfect connection, they found themselves on

Barrett Block with the owner Nancy Megli reiterating

they are exactly where they are supposed to be.

Kim’s passion for the care of her own curly hair

has created some very special outgrowths. (no pun

intended) Not only has Kim embraced the education

of Aveda and DevaCurl, but she has created a

soon to be non-profit called “The Curly Cure” which

provides complimentary services for cancer patients

dealing with the new growth of their curly hair after

chemotherapy.

Kim and all the incredible stylists at Salon62 look

forward to serving the community for many years to

come. Our stylists are committed to providing the

personal touch that may have been lost in our fast

paced lives.

The Dogs of Garden Street

PROGRESS REPORT

As we approach the final stages of the Garden

Street Improvement program, Hotel Serra would

like to thank all of our neighbors for their gracious

support and patience. The end result will be well

worth it. The next focus on Garden Street will

be the revitalization of two historically important

buildings. The previous Christian Science reading

room and SLO Brew buildings have had many

lives over the years providing downtown San Luis

Obispo with a variety of goods and services.

In their next life they will become, Hotel Serra

entrance with a beautifully designed lobby lounge

and Brasserie SLO, café, restaurant and bar in the

style of European Brasseries.

Penny // Chihuahua-Dachshund // 3 1/2 Years

Adopted from Woods Humane Society, Penny loves

lounging in the sun, long walks, and a warm lap to

snooze upon. Most days you can find her in front

of Baxter Moerman with her buddy, Indi. Check out

woodshumanesociety.org to find your own Penny.

GARDEN STREET - The Heart of Downtown San Luis Obispo

JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 71


sum

mer

time

| HEALTH

health trends

The sun is sticking around the Central Coast sky much

longer before dipping into the ocean for the night, and

our bodies are acting differently. That ancient hardwiring,

which scientists call biorhythms, is busy at work, pushing

combinations of hormones into our veins that are different

than at any other point during the year. Summertime is

not just about being swimsuit-ready, it is also an ideal time

to achieve optimal health. To help, we did a quick, highly

unscientific survey here at SLO LIFE Magazine to find

everyone’s favorite tips. Here is a list of the top five. >

72 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 73


#1

GET HIGH ON ENERGY

While its cousin, marijuana, seems to get all of the attention these

days, people are starting to tune into the benefits of hemp hearts.

Essentially making up the center, or heart of the Cannabis Sativa

plant, these little seeds are a super food powerhouse that you

probably have not heard of yet. It won’t be long before you do.

Hemp, unlike marijuana, has only trace amounts of psychoactive

properties. It also is a much hardier plant and can grow just about

anywhere. Unfortunately, hemp was collateral damage when it

was unintentionally outlawed when President Nixon declared his

“War on Drugs” in 1970. Snacking on these little seeds will not

get you high, but they will provide a list of nutrients too long to

include here, and will give you a sustained burst of energy to keep

you going on the trails or at the beach this summer.

#2

SERIOUSLY, GUYS,

EYE MASKS?

Don’t laugh! These bad boys really work. Think

about it: for thousands of years, since the first

Homo sapiens walked the earth, we have

slept when it was dark, awakened when it was

light. This diurnal pattern has always been the

norm, that is until Thomas Edison had his “aha

moment” with the light bulb. Now, if we’re not

bingewatching Neflix late into the night, we’re

catching up on emails, or texting our friends.

Our brains are freaking out, people! And that

means that our bodies get confused about

whether it is day or night. And, any bit of light

finding its way into your bedroom, whether

from the street lamp outside, or your bed

partner’s Stephen King novel on the Kindle, will

negatively affect your sleep. Do yourself a favor

and give an eye mask a try this summer. After

a week, we bet your energy will be so improved

that you will never climb under the sheets

without one of these light blockers again.

#3

SOMETHING’S A LITTLE FISHY

The word “sardine” originates from the early 15th century, when

fishermen in Sardinia, the island near the shin bone of Italy’s boot, were

hauling these little guys up by the ton. There is no particular species of

fish called a “sardine,” the designation goes to pretty much any small,

oily herring or, if you are a marine biologist, Clupeidae. While we keep

hearing mixed reports on the wisdom of eating fish—on the one hand,

most of them are jam-packed with important nutrients, but on the other,

we are learning more and more about their high levels of mercury. The

sad news is that our fish populations are susceptible to the same pollution

we are, and the bigger they are, the harder they fall. Larger species of

fish, such as tuna and halibut, often contain the most mercury. The

ocean’s pipsqueaks, sardines, have the least, and are full of brain and body

boosting nutrients. Don’t judge—give ‘em a try! >

74 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


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JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 75


#4

BLOCK THAT KICK

ELECTROMAGNETIC RAY!

ATTENTION

ATHLETES

Just like light, we modern day humans are also inundated daily with

electromagnetic waves. From the cell phone in our pocket to the iPad in our

backpack, there is a constant onslaught of unnatural energy beams pointing at

us for most of our waking hours. And, for those of us that sleep next to our cell

phones, it’s more like 24/7. Consider this: radio waves, now ubiquitous, would

have been experienced by our ancestors only during a lightning strike, and more

faintly emanating from the distant stars. Now, its true that everything, including

our own bodies, emit electromagnetic radiation, but, many alternative health

practitioners, particularly those who identify as energy healers, argue that our

cell phones are messing with our auras and, therefore, making us sick. Many

traditional white coats pooh-pooh the claim, noting that science has yet to make

a definitive link. Why not hedge your bets? Airestech, the leader in the field of

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76 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018

#5

EAT YOUR WEED-IES

In cities all over the world, more and more people can be found at parks eating, you’re not

going to believe this—weeds. Called “urban foragers,” these current day hunter-gatherers see

sustenance where you and I see nuisance. That stinging nettle in your backyard, it’s loaded

with vitamins, amino acids, and antioxidants. The wild amaranth, common this time of the

year, it’s a protein powerhouse. For those of us with less time and imagination, there are

weed sellers everywhere (no, not that kind of weed!), so look no further than top-selling

website SeedsNow.com for guidance. Become a weed farmer this summer. There is plenty of

instruction available for sprouting these guys in a mason jar; it’s not difficult stuff. Dandelions

are our favorite, so far, but there are so many that we are excited to sample. Grow, eat, repeat.

Sprinkle on salads, eat them raw, make a tea. Get excited about weeds. SLO LIFE


Live the SLO Life!

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JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 77


| TASTE

FRIED

CHICKEN

SANDWICH

not from nowhere

These delectable concoctions are popping up around SLO.

But do you know the background?

BY JAIME LEWIS

>

IT’S time to talk about one of my all-time favorite

dishes: the fried chicken sandwich. But first, I think

we need a quick detour into the subject of cultural

appropriation. Stay with me here, San Luis Obispo.

Cultural appropriation refers to when a dominant

culture wields its power to siphon cultural capital from

a minority culture for its own benefit. Alternatively,

multiculturalism refers to when a society respects,

celebrates, and footnotes its myriad cultures for their

contribution to the whole.

Confused? Here’s a good test. If you benefit from a

culture without engaging in it directly (say, oh I don’t

know, dressing up in blackface for a laugh), it’s probably

cultural appropriation. If, on the other hand, you

appreciate a culture from a place of humility and shared

humanity (like dancing to West African drumming—I

defy anyone not to at least tap a toe), it’s probably a case

of multiculturalism.

Food might seem an innocuous subject in this regard but,

like so many facets of American life, can be a cultural

appropriation minefield. Think of yuppies ordering sushi

in the ‘80s, or bun-headed hipsters debating the minutiae

of burritos. (Sigh: guilty.) Are we acknowledging the

origins of our food, or are we ignoring them in an

exhausting game of culinary one-upsman-ship?

Now to the subject of this column. On their website, the

company Chick-fil-A claims that founder S. Truett Cathy

invented the fried chicken sandwich outside Atlanta in

the 1960s. But guess what? Fried chicken sandwiches

contain fried chicken, a dish born of African people,

enslaved in the American south and denied access to

more expensive proteins like beef.

So the next time you bite into a fried chicken sandwich

like the outrageously tasty

ones I profile here, get real

with what you’re eating.

Touch down on the truth

of why it exists and who

brought it to your plate,

across the centuries and

across the world. Because,

ultimately, food isn’t

really about ingredients,

technique, or presentation;

it is, and will always and

forever be, about people. >>

JAIME LEWIS is a world

traveler, and food writer, who

lives in San Luis Obispo.

78 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


First Presbyterian Church is committed

to expressing our love of God through

inspirational worship.

Summer Worship time: 10am

childcare available

981 Marsh Street

(corner of Marsh and Morro)

fpcslo.org

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JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 79


At Spirit of San Luis at the SLO County Regional

Airport, new owners Mike and Ellen Stanton have

given the stalwart restaurant a new, crisp interior to

frame panoramic views of the runway. They’ve also

freshened up the menu, which includes a lofty fried

chicken sandwich on brioche. I order mine with

house-made chips. “Why fried chicken?” I ask Ellen

between bites.

“It’s just a nice contrast in textures,” she says, humbly.

“A classic combo.”

Veteran restaurateurs, Ellen and Mike owned Gus’s

Grocery for 28 years, over which time they perfected

the seasoning and crispiness of fried chicken tenders.

When they sold Gus’s and purchased Spirit of San

Luis in August of 2017, the Stantons brought that

recipe and know-how along, opting to put a fat wedge

of tomato, pickles, fluffy greenleaf lettuce, and an

Edna’s Bakery bun on top. The result is a long slab of

fried chicken, barely contained by the brioche, with a

rich crunch that positively begs for a beer alongside.

Pair that with plane-watching on a warm day and you

have a slice of Central Coast heaven. >>

80 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


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JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 81


When I meet Chef Thomas Fundaro on the cozy,

creek-facing patio at SLO Brew downtown, he

describes his dilemma with chicken sandwiches.

“You gotta have a chicken sandwich,” he says,

rubbing a calloused hand over his head. “Usually

that’s a grilled chicken sandwich with avocado on

herbed focaccia or something. Kind of anemic.”

Instead, when he developed SLO Brew’s menu, he

chose to make use of the restaurant’s new pressure

fryer and offer something better for a brewpub.

“One of my favorite dishes is Nashville Hot

Chicken,” he says, referring to the spicy, sweet

fried chicken made famous in Music City by

Prince’s Hot Chicken Shack. To riff on that style,

he dredged chicken thighs in brown sugar, flour,

and a happy helping of spices before frying them

in oil. Then, he toasted a brioche bun and layered

Kewpie Mayonnaise (a creamy Japanese mayo),

house-made pickles and lemon-kale slaw on top of

the chicken for a symphony of crunch, acid, sweet,

and spice. The name? Nasty Nashville Hot Thighs

Chicken Sandwich. >>

82 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


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JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 83


Small plates and share-able gastropub fare are the modus

operandi at Sidecar Cocktail Co., where Chef Kyle Rucker

offers a plate of fried chicken sliders made from just a

handful of ingredients. “All my food is simple and easy

to execute,” he says. “Not hoity-toity-crazy. People can’t

connect with that.”

To that end, he batters chicken in buttermilk and breads

it in flour, cayenne, paprika and garlic before frying. Two

sets of halved buns get a schmear of aioli and sear on

the flat-top (resulting in what Rucker calls “one of my

top five favorite smells in the kitchen;” others on the list

include that of fresh mint and bacon) before being loaded

with house-made pickles, rings of red onion, and another

swath of aioli.

When Rucker delivers my impossibly cute sliders on a small

wooden board, I take it all in: the warm slate walls, the

‘70s punk coming over the speakers, the vintage lamps, the

glass-backed bar—and the aromas of a toasty fried chicken

sandwich under my nose. “I make this food because this is

the food I want to eat,” Rucker says. I decide I want to eat

it, too. And with that, I dig in. SLO LIFE

84 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


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JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 85


| KITCHEN

TÍA’S ALBONDIGAS SOUP

For some reason my aunt—mi tía—thought albondigas soup was

my most favorite meal, so she would make it for my birthday

every year. I grew up in Bakersfield and my birthday is in July—we

all know how hot it is that time of year in the valley. Still, every

summer she would make this warm, hearty soup and the whole

family would gather outside sitting in and around the swimming

pool eating albondigas soup. I have kept the tradition and still love

making and eating the soup soaked in summer sunshine.

BY CHEF JESSIE RIVAS

86 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


TÍA’S ALBONDIGAS SOUP

Meatballs:

1 lb ground beef

1 cup long grain white rice (uncooked)

1 egg

½ yellow onion, minced

3-4 cloves garlic

2 tsp oregano

½ bunch or 3 Tbsp chopped mint leaves

½ tsp ground cumin

salt and pepper to taste

Broth:

2 quarts chicken or beef broth

1 cup water

1 whole yellow onion peeled, cut in quarters

2 tsp cumin

1 cup tomato sauce

salt and pepper to taste

Vegetables:

2 carrots

2 stalks celery

1 zucchini

2 red new potatoes

1 jalapeño

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To make the meatballs, sautée the onions and garlic

and let cool. In a large mixing bowl mix ground

beef, uncooked rice, sautéed onions, garlic, egg,

oregano, mint, cumin, and season with salt and

pepper. Chill in the refrigerator for 15 minutes.

Prepare soup in an 8-quart stock pot. Add stock,

water, onion, cumin, tomato sauce, and bring to a boil.

While the soup is coming to a boil, roll meatballs

into 1-ounce sized portions.

JESSIE RIVAS is the owner

and chef of The Pairing Knife

food truck which serves the

Central Coast.

When broth is at a boil,

add chopped vegetables

and let the broth come

back to a boil. Add

meatballs one at a time,

slowly so the broth stays

hot. Once all meatballs

are added, lower soup

to a simmer and let

cook until meatballs

are cooked through,

about 15 – 20 minutes.

Garnish with fresh

cilantro and serve. SLO LIFE

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JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 87


| WINE NOTES

Can You Handle It?

Surprises are popping up with this new trend of wine in a can. So much of wine

hype is surrounded by a luxurious lifestyle, though wine is part of our everyday

lives. Cans are challenging our previous packaging ideas as convenience,

freshness, sustainability, and quality are very important to many consumers and

is the reason for the up-and-coming canned wine trend.

BY ANDRIA MCGHEE

Similar to cans, when screw caps on bottles

were first introduced, they were seen only

on low quality wines, but winemakers began

noticing the benefit of no corks. Cork was

expensive to import and caused a lot of wine

to turn bad. Better screw caps were made.

Winemakers changed their process to use them more. Now,

the screw cap is mainstream and easily opens us to amazing

wine. We are currently at a similar early stage with canned

wine, though untraditional and so convenient, when done

right, still commands excellence.

Still, why cans? They’ve been around for 60 years, stack and

fit well into each other, are lightweight, and have helped us

easily store food and drink. Wine cans pull the same utility

because they can go almost anywhere. Throw that can into

your backpack and take it on a hike, or throw it in the cooler

for the beach, or tailgating. Pick one up when rushing over to

a friend’s house for a barbecue. Cans work when glass is not

invited to the party, whether it’s a pool, a raft, a concert, or a

fishing trip. Aluminum has introduced wine to places where

other drinks were exclusive. Plus, no wine opener needed. >>

88 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


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JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 89


Cans equal freshness; as with the screwcap, you will never get

a corked (spoiled) wine. If corks are temperamental, another

enemy of wine is oxygen. You open a bottle for dinner one

night and it tastes totally different the following. Cracking

open a can will give you smaller servings and freshness every

time. Everyone can pick something different to drink without

a lineup of half-finished bottles at the end of the evening.

What about recycling? Fully 25% of bottles arrive to the

recycling center and take large amounts of energy to process;

compare that to cans which come in at 80%. “It takes three

months from a can in your hand to the shelf again,” says

sustainability nerd Jordan Kivelstadt, CEO of Free Flow

Wines. Paradoxically, new glass is cheaper than recycled.

Some argue that this is the weakness of the recycling system,

which could be changed if market prices dictate.

What about the big question—how does it taste? I love it.

As with wine in bottles, I prefer some varieties to others. I

am surprised at the quality and the lack of aluminum taste.

High quality wine does not always need to be aged, so quick

drinking is great in the can. The people at Field Recordings

in Paso Robles’ Tin City are making some of my favorites.

Hans Gruner is a light white wine with crisp, green fruit. I

found this at The Spoon Trade in Grover Beach where Brook

and Jacob Town stock many canned wines in their restaurant

because of quality and convenience. Try it with the fried

chicken and you have a good thing going. Another favorite is

the Alloy Works Antipasto, which is as charming in its design

as it is a wine. This Italian variety Sangiovese is awesome

alongside edibles from the grill, or with pasta. Cans are now

seen in grocery stores, delis, and liquor stores. Grab one and

try it. It won’t break the bank. You’ll see Porch Pounder,

Underwood, and Essentially Geared, as well; all focused on

getting quality wine to people, the best way possible.

So, are there any downfalls to aluminum? The can is

working well, but still has room to improve. Right now, it

is recommended that you drink wine from the can within

three months of its “born date” for freshness. Most wine is

consumed within about 24 hours of purchase anyway, so

these cans have a place in the wine world. One concern is

wine’s exposure to oxygen in canning, as the top is open and

filled with wine until it is sealed with a lid. So, though it is

a slight amount, the wine may get some exposure to oxygen

on the production belt before it

is sealed. The great thing about a

growing trend, like screw caps, is

that the aluminum can will drive

innovation.

There is still a place for corks and

bottles. Some wines need aging.

Every wine package option serves a

purpose. We innovate here on the

Central Coast and tend to have a

non-traditional outlook compared

to other places in the world. People

like wine in all aspects of their life.

There is no need for a super special

occasion. So, bust open a can and

break down those barriers. SLO LIFE

ANDRIA MCGHEE received

her advanced degree on

wines and spirits from

WSET in London and enjoys

travel, food, wine, and

exercise as a means to enjoy

those around her.

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JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 91


| BREW

PAIRING BEER WITH

MOOD

At this point in the craft beer game, many of us know that beer pairs well with most any food. Some go

better than others such as pilsners with hot wings, lagers with sushi, saisons with cheese, stouts with

chocolates, and on and on. If you want to know any of these, all you need is a quick online search and you’ll

get about a million articles and blogs talking about the subject, so answering that question is easy. However,

when asked what my favorite beer is, I’m not thinking about what I’m pairing it with, but how I’m enjoying it.

For the most important pairing of all is with mood.

BY BRANT MYERS

As camping season descends upon us

and the barbecue grill covers come off,

it’s important to remember how you’re

enjoying your beer. The days of buying

a thirty pack of grain-flavored water

are over. People want an experience

when they drink a craft beer and part

of that comes down to proper use of

the beverage. After all, beer is living so shouldn’t we be

doing the same?

Most of us love to have a few while camping and I feel it’s

the perfect example of how you can pair emotions, activities,

friendships, and experiences while complementing the day,

from start to finish, with the perfect beer. The morning is tricky,

and much like a Choose Your Own Adventure book, you can

go one of two ways. Coffee drinkers should opt for the lightly

caffeinated and bold flavors of a robust coffee porter such as

the “Cafe Noir” from Tap It. This imperial porter was barrel-aged in pinot noir barrels

then infused with cold brewed coffee. It’s sure to take the edge off the late night you

just spent around the campfire the night before and give you a jolt of coffee to knock

the cobwebs loose. If you want to maintain some sobriety for that hike you’re about to

embark on, you should go the route of a cold glass of juice. No commute to work and

no responsibilities means that you can pop the top and pull the cork off of Libertine

Brewing’s “It’s Cobblering Time.” At half the ABV (alcohol by volume) of the porter,

this wild ale is blended with fresh peaches, cinnamon sticks, and Madagascar vanilla

beans. So now you can have your pastry and drink it, too.

As the day grows warmer and you find yourself on the beach or atop a mountain,

it’s time to get into the bolder flavors. That’s right, it’s time for some hops. Luckily,

we have a plethora of options here, so let’s talk about two thirst-quenching and very

popular fruited IPAs. I hope you stopped in the Barrelhouse Speakeasy to grab a sixpack

of “Mango IPA” because this brew is wildly popular for good reason. Just enough

sweetness from the mango commingles with the aromatics and bitterness of the hops

to create a real thirst quencher that will give you a buzz for the hike back to camp or

the brass to run into the cold ocean waters. Another option is the brand new release >>

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hailing from Figueroa Mountain with their “Painted Cave,” a

guava purée infused IPA with bold aromas complementing the

sweetness coming from liberal use of Citra, El Dorado, and

Simcoe hops. Guava is such a delicate flavor that it really is the

perfect brunch beer. Not quite sweet enough for breakfast, not

quite hearty enough for lunch, but that perfect intersection of

your day and your palette.

There’s still a fire to be built, dinner to cook, and sand to

knock off your blanket, so let’s talk about the best part of the

camping day—dusk. Once back at your site, it’s time to start

surviving in earnest. There’s wood to chop, a picnic table to

reset to eating mode, and maybe even a sunset to catch while

the foil is nestled in the coals. This is the time for lagers. In

San Luis Obispo there is one true powerhouse when it comes

to this style and the title goes to Central Coast Brewing. You

can’t go wrong with a few crowlers (32-ounce cans filled on

the spot) of any fresh offering they have, but I would go with

their “Terrifico.” This Munich Helles lager has been brewed

with lime zest and sea salt for a well-deserved quencher

after a long day and as a reminder that even though it can be

work, you’re still on vacation. Its drinkability and low alcohol

content lets you keep one in your hand and still man the grill

without falling into the flames.

As the sun sets, appetites are satiated, those damn pesky

raccoons keep trying to steal your bag of marshmallows, so

it’s time to get into the dark stuff. What beer pairs well with

camaraderie and regaling friends with tales of antics past? My

go-to would be a campfire classic—whiskey. Passing around the

bottle will surely make you “those people” at the campground,

so why not treat yourself to something a little more mellow

and refined? Don’t worry though, you’ll soon be snoring in

your tent regardless. My go-to could be nearly any limited

release or anniversary beer since they tend to be bourbon or

whiskey barrel aged, boozy, and the perfect thing to drink

while entranced in the flames of a campfire. Although mainly

released in winter, these bold brews can get tucked away for

such an occasion. As a matter of fact, this is the perfect time

to drink SLO Brew’s 30th Anniversary beer “Winter Braun.”

A take on their traditional winter warmer, this beer has come

full circle with the mash going to

RE:Find Distillery in Paso Robles

to create whiskey, then sending the

whiskey barrels back to SLO Brew to

age their core beer, before becoming

whiskey barrel aged Winter Braun.

What a special beer to pair with the

ones you consider special in your life.

Get out the enamel mugs and pour a

dram for everyone.

So no matter where this summer

takes you, or who you spend it with,

remember that beer is more than a

beverage, it’s an experience, so go out

there and drink it in. SLO LIFE

BRANT MYERS is owner

of Hop On Beer Tours, a

concierge service for craft

beer enthusiasts along the

Central Coast.

94 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


No matter what your fortunes are,

Dr. Daniel will give you the smile you need

to make your dreams come true!

Specializing in Smiles

Dr. Daniel Orthodontics

1356 Marsh Street . San Luis Obispo

(805) 543-3105 . drdanielortho.com

JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 95


| HAPPENINGS

ANNIE

Leapin’ Lizards! The world’s best-loved

musical will be the fabulous finale for the

inaugural season. Based on the comic strip

by Harold Gray, Annie was the winner of

seven Tony Awards, including Best Musical.

The beloved book and score features some of

the greatest musical theatre hits ever written,

including “Easy Street,” “It’s a Hard Knock

Life,” “I Don’t Need Anything But You,” and

the eternal anthem of optimism: “Tomorrow!”

June 8 - July 1 // slorep.org

JUNE

CONCERTS IN THE PLAZA

Concerts in the Plaza features

musical genres across the spectrum

from reggae to rock, blues to

jamgrass, soul, California roots

rock and more at Mission Plaza

in Downtown San Luis Obispo

every Friday June 8th through

September 14th from 5:00-8:00

p.m. Local vendors sell snacks and

food for hungry concertgoers while

Firestone Walker Brewing Company

and Chamisal Vineyards supply beer

and wine for purchase. Be sure to bring

your own reusable cup or purchase a

commemorative Concerts in the Plaza

tumbler. Non-alcoholic beverages are

provided as well. No outside alcoholic

beverages or pets are allowed and this is

a non-smoking event. All concerts are

free to the public.

SYMPHONY AT SUNSET

Enjoy estate wines under the stars

during an intimate live performance

at the Vina Robles Amphitheatre.

Take in an Evening of Pops Under

the Stars with the Opera San Luis

Obispo Grand Orchestra. Conducted

by Artistic Director Brian Asher

Alhadeff, this family-friendly program

will star soprano Alba Franco-Cancél

as well as pianist Matthew Harikian

and include familiar classics, Broadway

hits and popular music ranging from

Star Wars to the Beatles.

June 10 // vinaroblesamphitheatre.com

JERSEY BOYS

“Too good to be true!” raves the New York Post for

Jersey Boys, the 2006 Tony, Grammy and Olivier

Award-winning Best Musical about Rock and

Roll Hall of Famers, Frankie Valli & The Four

Seasons. This is the true story of how four bluecollar

kids became one of the greatest successes

in pop music history. They wrote their own songs,

invented their own sounds and sold 175 million

records worldwide—all before they were 30. Jersey

Boys features a compelling script and an absolute

treasure-trove of their hit songs, including “Sherry,”

“Walk Like a Man,” “Big Girls Don’t Cry,” “Rag

Doll,” “Oh What a Night,” “Can’t Take My Eyes

Off You,” and so many more.

June 19 - 20 // pacslo.org

LINEUP

June 8 . The Molly Ringwald Project

June 15 . Fialta

June 22 . Young Dubliners

June 29 . Truxton Mile

July 6 . Stellar

July 13 . Resination

July 20 . The Tipsy Gypsies

July 27 . The Kicks

August 3 . Damon Castillo Band

August 10 . Bear Market Riot

August 17 . Truth About Seafood

August 24 . Diego’s Umbrella

August 31 . The JD Project

September 7 . The Mother Corn Shuckers

September 14 | Moonshiner Collective

June 8 - September 14 // downtownslo.com

96 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018


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5K BEER RUN

Enjoy a celebration of local craft brewing,

an active lifestyle, and the surrounding

community hosted at BarrelHouse

Brewing Company. Food will be available

for purchase on-site from Shave N Flav

and the band Bad Obsession will be

providing live entertainment.

June 30 // templetonrecfoundation.com

#IMOMSOHARD

Enjoy estate wines under the stars

during an intimate live performance

at the Vina Robles Amphitheatre.

Come join an entertaining evening

with comedy duo Jen Smedley and

Kristin Hensley, creators and stars of

#IMOMSOHARD.

June 16 // vinaroblesamphitheatre.com

ROLL OUT THE BARRELS

Kick off the summer in San Luis Obispo’s Wine Country at the 28th Annual

Roll Out the Barrels Weekend. Your getaway to our coastal wine mecca begins

Thursday, June 21st at Barrels in the Plaza, with over 50 wineries and local chefs

dishing out delicious food and wine. Then on Friday and Saturday, sip your way

through San Luis Obispo tasting rooms with our Passport to Wine Country.

Walk the vineyards, barrel sample the new vintage, and enjoy open houses, wine

tastings, and festivities all day Friday and Saturday.

June 21 - 22 // slowine.com

JUNE 8–JULY 1

Wed-Sun@7 pm

Sat-Sun@2 pm

Bring the whole family to enjoy this

delightful Tony Award winning musical!

Tickets: $20-$38 • slorep.org • (805) 786-2440

Dr. Arnie Horwitz

HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS

Are you feeling overwhelmed

and confused? I can help.

Specializing in

- Relationship Conflicts - Parenting & Self-Esteem

- Separation and Divorce - Personal Life Planning

- Grief and Loss - Career Uncertainty

Therapy/Counseling/Coaching

Dr. Arnie Horwitz • 30 yrs. Experience

805-541-2752

www.doctorarnie.com

JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 97


| HAPPENINGS

JULY

LAVENDER FESTIVAL

Enjoy a day in Paso Robles with

the tastes of lavender cuisine,

sampling of oils, dipping sauces,

ice cream, education, growing,

and sustainable farming practices

throughout the county.

July 7 // cclavenderfestival.com

BLUES BASEBALL

FIREWORKS

Since 1946, Blue’s Baseball

has been a San Luis Obispo

tradition. This family-friendly

setting offers plenty of games and

activities for the kids, as well as a

concession stand and beer truck.

The fireworks show will begin

immediately following the game.

July 3 // bluesbaseball.com

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ROCK TO PIER FUN RUN

2018 marks the 49th year of the

Brian Waterbury Memorial Rock

to Pier Fun Run. This six-mile

event is held entirely on the beach

from Morro Rock to the Cayucos

Pier and is open to participants of

all ages and abilities.

July 14 // morrobay.org

FESTIVAL MOZAIC

The annual Summer Music Festival

features orchestra, chamber music,

fringe concerts, notable encounters,

family activities and other musical

and social events for you to enjoy.

July 17 – 29 // festivalmozaic.com

98 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018

SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL

The Filipponi Ranch is once again hosting

the Central Coast Shakespeare Festival

with live music performed before each

Friday night production. Pack a picnic or

purchase delicious fare on site and bring

low-back chairs. Wine will be available for

sale by the glass and bottle.

July 13 – August 4 // centralcoastshakespeare.org

MID STATE FAIR

The California Mid-State Fair is

held annually and runs for twelve

days at the end of July. The Fair has

hosted some of the biggest names in

the music industry.

July 18 - 29 // midstatefair.com


JUN/JLY 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 99


HAVEN

PROPERTIES

To learn more about our Distinctive Collection listings

visit www.havenslo.com/distinctive

100 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | JUN/JLY 2018

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