10,000 Hands - 2017-2018

acapsj

Community Environmental Outreach and Education in Saint John, New Brunswick, 2017-2018

20

10,000

17 Hands

Graeme Stewart-Robertson | Roxanne MacKinnon | Shauna Sands


Table of Contents

Acknowledgements ............................................................................................................................................................................. ii

Executive Summary ............................................................................................................................................................................ iii

Green Network ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

Methods ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

Results ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 2

Cleanup Events and Outcomes ........................................................................................................................................... 3

Riparian and Coastal Enhancement ............................................................................................................................................. 6

Methods ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 6

Results ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 6

Community Tree Planting Events ....................................................................................................................................... 7

Red Head Marsh ................................................................................................................................................................... 7

Patterson’s Brook ................................................................................................................................................................. 7

Crow Alley Urban Tree Nursery ...................................................................................................................................... 8

Seaside Park .......................................................................................................................................................................... 9

St. Rose Tree Nursery...................................................................................................................................................... 10

Caledonia Brook Stormwater Detention Pond...................................................................................................... 12

Spar Cove ............................................................................................................................................................................. 12

Environmental Outreach ................................................................................................................................................................ 14

Education ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 14

RNS Earth Day ......................................................................................................................................................................... 15

Girl Guides of Canada Rally ................................................................................................................................................ 15

Manchester Bird Sanctuary ................................................................................................................................................ 16

Harbour View High School Field Trip ............................................................................................................................. 17

Conclusion ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 19

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Acknowledgements

This project was made possible through the generous financial contribution of the New Brunswick

Environmental Trust Fund, and through the ongoing logistical support provided by the City of Saint

John Department of Municipal Operations. We would especially like to acknowledge the dedicated

services provided by Katherine Shannon for enabling the Saint John community to conduct cleanups

with the knowledge that city staff would collect and properly dispose of the litter and debris. We would

like to personally thank Doug Simpson from F. Andrew Simpson Contracting Ltd. for their land-use

contribution for the Crow Alley Tree Nursery, as well as St. Rose School for their land-use contribution

toward the St. Rose Tree Nursery.

The 10,000 Hands project is a true grassroots initiative that only exists through the selfless efforts of

thousands of community volunteers, and through the organizations, community groups, and businesses

that contribute to its success. We are proud to say that the list of dedicated contributors is large and

ever-growing, and we sincerely appreciate the contribution of every individual, in making Saint John a

more restorative environmental city.

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Executive Summary

ACAP Saint John’s signature Green Network program was established in 2006 as a means to improve

the effectiveness and efficiency of volunteer-based green space cleanups in Greater Saint John. In 2014,

the Green Network was re-launched as a larger 10,000 Hands initiative, incorporating cleanups,

awareness events, stakeholder education and volunteer-based community actions such as tree planting

and watercourse restoration. Over the course of the 2017-2018 project, 19 community cleanups took

place, allowing 578 volunteers to contribute to almost 1,500 volunteer hours for ACAP Saint John

cleanups. A total of 4,880 kg of waste was removed from the environment for an average of 8.4 kg per

volunteer. This project achieved exceptional results throughout 2017-2018, and through its innovative

delivery system, has been built from the ground-up to allow an on-going expansion of the available

resource pool for future volunteer enhanced initiatives.

The Riparian Enhancement portion of the 10,000 Hands project involved eight planting locations where

a total of 1,940 native trees and shrubs where planted in urban areas of Saint John during tree planting

events. Volunteers had the opportunity to be involved in, and learn about, habitat restoration while

experiencing nature first-hand and getting their hands dirty. A diversity of volunteers participated in

planting events including a wide range of ages, experience, and socio-economic and cultural

backgrounds.

ACAP Saint John and its community outreach initiatives have become an established vehicle by which

community stakeholders can participate in hands-on improvements to their local environment. The

efficiency of this program lies in its ability to maintain a strong partnership with the City of Saint John for

logistic support, the New Brunswick Environmental Trust Fund for financial support, and in ACAP Saint

John’s ability to maintain an established, growing and dedicated network of volunteers and experts.

Through direct engagement, in-field and in-class education programs, tree planting and outdoor

activities, citizens develop a sense of understanding and ownership of their environment and are more

likely to support other initiatives that promote good stewardship and restorative development.

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Green Network

The Green Network is a well-established volunteer engagement program whereby community

stakeholders participate in hands-on improvements to their local environment through cleanups, tree

planting, and education. The program’s effectiveness lies in its ability to maintain a strong partnership

with the City of Saint John for logistic support, the NB Environmental Trust Fund for financial support,

and in ACAP Saint John’s ability to maintain an established and dedicated network of volunteers.

ACAP Saint John has been engaging the regional community in volunteer-based cleanups since 1997.

Since that time, ACAP Saint John has proved successful in developing a volunteer base, educating the

public on the extent of littering and illegal dumping in the region, and establishing ACAP Saint John as a

credible and trusted environmental champion.

The Green Network model was developed to enhance the effectiveness of volunteer-based cleanups in

the Greater Saint John area, both logistically and in deliverability. This model places responsibility on

engaged individuals, community groups, and businesses interested in conducting hands-on projects to

contact ACAP Saint John for assistance. The Green Network, by way of ACAP Saint John, assists

interested groups in executing a successful cleanup by making available to them a coordinator who

provides necessary knowledge, materials, and resources. This coordinator supplies essential items, such

as gloves, garbage bags, safety tips, garbage disposal (via the City of Saint John), and a cleanup site if

necessary. This helps volunteers to be prepared and ensures they will have all the materials to complete

a successful cleanup.

The implementation of the Green Network and the services it offers were

promoted throughout the community through a wide array of media channels including: social media,

ACAP Saint John’s webpage, media, and community outreach.

Methods

The Green Network operates on a collaborative model for sustainability whereby multiple stakeholders

are directly involved in each event from planning though to completion. In 2017, the Green Network

coordinator acted as a facilitator and interested groups contacted the coordinator to setup their cleanup.

A date, time, and location were discussed and determined between the coordinator and interested

groups. Some volunteer groups already had a cleanup location chosen; if not, the coordinator chose a

cleanup site and determined an appropriate site for garbage pickup based on a list developed at the

beginning of the season. The coordinator then contacted the City of Saint John’s Transportation and

Environment Services Department to confirm the location and time for pickup from the city workers. The

appropriate number of garbage bags and gloves were prepared at the ACAP Saint John office for a

member of the volunteer group to pick up prior to the cleanup. Upon request, the coordinator brought

the supplies to the cleanup location and spoke with the group about the environmental issues of the area

they were helping to clean up. The Green Network Cleanup Sheet was included in the cleanup package

and a request was made for a member of the cleanup group to complete the form and return it to ACAP

Saint John along with pictures through our website, via email, or in person. The group was contacted just

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prior to the cleanup to confirm the details (date, time, number of volunteers, location garbage will be piled

after the cleanup, etc.) and to provide them with a few helpful cleanup and safety tips, such as:

• Dress for the weather (i.e. hats, sun block, raingear, etc.);

• Wear proper footwear (no open toe shoes or sandals);

• Do not pick up any dangerous items (sharp objects, containers with unknown fluids, etc.);

• Do not pick up needles, report any found needles to ACAP Saint John to dispose of properly

in a sharps container;

• Take photos (especially ‘before and after’ pictures); and,

• Keep the mood light! Take breaks, enjoy the scenery, and have fun.

Each cleanup was unique, and the coordinator’s duties depended on each group’s needs. Some groups

conducted cleanups on their own and only required supplies and garbage disposal, while other groups

needed the Green Network coordinator to oversee most of the necessary cleanup logistics. Each

cleanup crew, respectively, filled out the cleanup details on the Green Network Cleanup Sheet and the

specifics have been noted in the Results section of this report. The amount (number of bags, or weight,

and unusual items) of the garbage collected, number of volunteers, and the duration and location of the

cleanup were details the coordinator took note of. In the Results section, each garbage bag has been

assumed to weigh 6.8 kg for consistency in recording.

Results

This year, ACAP Saint John provided supplies for a total of 19 cleanups throughout the Greater Saint

John Area (Figure 1). A total of 578 volunteers helped with these cleanups for a total contribution of

1,459 volunteer hours; which equates to roughly $35,220 worth of time based on this year’s value of

volunteer time ($24.14/hour). During that time, 4,880 kg of waste or roughly 8 kg per volunteer was

removed and properly disposed of at the landfill.

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Figure 1: Location of the 2017 community or volunteer cleanups facilitated through ACAP Saint John’s

10,000 Hands project.

Cleanup Events and Outcomes

Social Enterprise Hub

Location: Chown Field and Prince Edward Street

Date: April 21, 2017

Duration: 1 hour

Participants: 8

Garbage Collected: 10 bags

Beaver Lake Fishing Club

Location: Beaver Lake and Old Black River Road

Date: April 22, 2017

Duration: 3 hours

Participants: 20

Garbage Collected: 35 bags

New Brunswick Community College:

Robertson Institute for Community Leadership

Location: Tin Can Beach and Little River Reservoir

Date: April 26, 2017

Duration: 3 hours

Participants: 31

Garbage Collected: 28 bags

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Harbour View High School

Location: Douglas Avenue

Date: May 10, 2017

Duration: 2 hours

Participants: 200 students

Garbage Collected: 100 bags

Canaport LNG Marsh Creek Cleanup

Location: Marsh Creek

Date: May 13, 2017

Duration: 3 hours

Participants: 86 volunteers

Garbage Collected: 2.5 tonnes

Sweep and Speak

Location: Seaside Park

Date: May 16, 2017

Duration: 3.5 hours

Participants: 20 Cleanup Volunteers and additional

community members voicing their ideas for the park.

Garbage Collected: 13 bags

Saint Malachy’s Memorial High School

Location: Courtenay Bay Causeway

Date: June 7, 2017

Duration: 25 minutes

Participants: 16 high school students

Garbage Collected: 12 bags

Crescent Valley Community Tenants Association

Location: Crescent Valley Neighbourhood

Date: June 10, 2017

Duration: 3 hours

Participants: 80 volunteers

Garbage Collected: 40 bags

Xerox Canada Inside Sales

Location: Red Head Marsh

Date: June 12, 2017

Duration: 7 hours

Participants: 13 volunteers

Garbage Collected: 25 bags plus tires, pallets, and

other large items

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Trees Planted: 280 White spruce seedlings

Saint John Learning Exchange (B.E.S.T. program)

Location: Prince Edward Street Neighbourhood

Date: June 14, 2017

Duration: 1 hour

Participants: 6 learners plus ACAP staff

Garbage Collected: 7 bags

The Great Fundy Coastal Cleanup

Location: Bayshore Beach and Fallsview Park

Date: July 15, 2017

Duration: 3 hours

Participants: 6 volunteers

Garbage Collected: 9 bags plus a pallet, rug, and old

metal pieces

Saint John High School Key Club/Scouts Canada

Location: Bayshore Beach and Duck Cove

Date: September 16, 2017

Duration: 3 hours

Participants: 20 Volunteers

Garbage Collected: 15 bags

New Brunswick Community College:

Robertson Institute for Community Leadership

Location: MacDonald Drive

Date: October 4, 2017

Duration: 2 hours

Participants: 27 students and instructors

Garbage Collected: 20 bags

Second Location: Tucker Park

Date: October 4, 2017

Duration: 2 hours

Participants: 22 students and instructors

Garbage Collected: 7 bags

Irving Nature Park

Location: Saint’s Rest Beach

Date: October 7, 2017

Duration: 3 hours

Participants: 20 volunteers

Garbage Collected: 25 bags plus woody materials

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Riparian and Coastal Enhancement

Riparian Enhancement is vital for improving watercourses and wildlife habitat in Saint John’s urban

environment and watersheds. ACAP Saint John’s Riparian Enhancement project is a recognized

component of urban sustainability whereby community stakeholders can participate in hands-on

improvements to their local environment that will provide immediate and long-term benefits to our urban

ecology. The project’s success lies in ACAP Saint John’s ability to maintain a strong partnership with

landowners and volunteers and the NB Environmental Trust Fund for financial support. Public support

of enhancement projects and ACAP Saint John’s ability to maintain an established and dedicated

network of volunteers have upheld Riparian Enhancement as a key environmental project for Greater

Saint John.

Methods

The Riparian and Coastal Enhancement project was carried out by spreading seeds, planting trees and

shrubs, and staking cuttings to enhance habitat and increase native vegetation in Saint John during the

2017 field season. Riparian Enhancement took place in seven locations over the season as detailed in

this report.

Plantings were completed with the help of volunteers who learned how to plant by digging holes and

using fertilizer and top soil to plant young potted plants and seedlings. Potted plants, seedlings, and seeds

were ordered from nurseries around the Maritimes and Quebec or were donated by J.D. Irving. The

planting sites were chosen by ACAP Saint John employees who targeted riparian and coastal areas within

the city. Native species for each site were also selected by employees and where determined based on

the site conditions and availability of desired species.

Staking was completed by ACAP Saint John employees to re-vegetate a project area after a culvert

removal was completed. For this staking, Red Osier dogwood stakes were cut from a site with a vast

number of Red Osier dogwood plants to ensure that the act of cutting would not damage the existing

shrubs. Once the cuttings were made, they were dipped in rooting hormone (Wilson Liquid Root

Stimulator) and placed in soil until they could be staked into the ground on site.

Results

This year, a total of eight community tree and shrub plantings were organized by ACAP Saint John at

seven different locations, as well as, Red Osier dogwood staking was completed by ACAP Saint John

staff after a culvert removal project. Through these eight events a total of 1,940 native trees and shrubs

were planted by 139 volunteers (Figure 2). Volunteers had the opportunity to be involved in, and learn

about, habitat restoration while experiencing nature first-hand and getting their hands dirty. A diversity

of volunteers participated in planting events including a wide range of ages, experience, and

backgrounds.

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Figure 2: Locations of community and volunteer tree plantings conducted by ACAP Saint John in the

2017 field season.

Community Tree Planting Events

Red Head Marsh

On June 12, 2017, 13 volunteers from Xerox Canada Inside Sales planted 280 White Spruce seedlings

donated by J.D. Irving in the upland portion of Red Head Marsh that had been disturbed in years past and

is now filling in with Speckled alder.

Patterson’s Brook

On September 17, 2017, 35 volunteers from TD Tree Days helped plant 305 native trees and shrubs

along Patterson’s Brook. This planting took place on City of Saint John property along Peacock’s Lane

where years of riparian encroachment had left the left bank riparian area lacking woody vegetation. The

planting itself took about two hours and the volunteers planted 10 Eastern White cedar, 10 Bur oak, 10

Red oak, 40 Winterberry, 20 Eastern hemlock, 5 Pussy willow, 5 Sandbar willow, 20 Shadblow

serviceberry, 10 White pine, 5 Red pine, 30 Yellow birch, 70 White spruce, and 70 Red spruce seedlings

to mimic the existing forest around this site.

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Figure 3: Volunteers from TD Insurance plant over 300 trees and shrubs along Patterson’s Brook on

September 17, 2017.

Crow Alley Urban Tree Nursery

The Crow Alley Nursery is located on the corner of Brunswick Street and Middle Street in the Waterloo

Village area of Saint John and was a vacant lot prior to the nursery being implemented. To prepare this

property, volunteers from the Social Enterprise Hub and Salesforce helped ACAP staff move four truck

loads of topsoil around the site in order to form rows to plant the trees in. White clover mix was then

spread over the soil to act as a living mulch to help hold the soil in place and reduce weeds and a strip of

Eastern Wildflower mix was spread next to the sidewalk to improve aesthetics of the site.

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Two volunteer tree planting events, averaging around an hour each, have taken place at this site since

the prep work was completed. On September 13, 2017, eight volunteers from McInnes Cooper planted

15 Sugar maple, 15 Red maple, 15 Bur oak, 15 Red oak, 15 American elm, 27 White spruce, 15 Red pine,

and 15 White pine seedlings and four 1.2 m apple trees as legacy trees for a grand total of 136 trees. An

additional planting was done on October 3, 2017, with volunteers from the Saint John Learning

Exchange’s Workplace Essential Skills (WES) program. These volunteers planted 40 Red spruce, 11 Bur

oak, 16 Red maple, 16 White pine, 17 Mountain maple, 17 Red pine, 17 Red oak, 17 Silver maple, and

17 White spruce seedlings for a total of 168 trees for this planting. At a later date, ACAP Saint John staff

planted an additional four 1.2 m trees (3 Bur oak and 1 Sugar maple) as legacy trees for a grand total of

300 trees for the nursery and eight legacy trees. These trees will be left to grow for two to five years

before being transplanted to riparian or coastal areas in need of woody vegetation.

(a)

(b)

(c)

Figure 4: (a) Vacant lot before it was transformed into the Crow Alley Urban Tree Nursery. (b)

Volunteers creating rows of soil. (c) Volunteers planting over 130 trees on September 13, 2017. (d)

Volunteers planting over 160 trees on October 3, 2017.

Seaside Park

Seaside Park is located on the West Side of Saint John and was damaged in the late Fall of 2016 by

vandals. On the morning of September 30, 2017, community volunteers helped plant 599 native trees

and shrubs over three hours through the upper (park-like area) and lower (coastal) portion of this park.

Within the upper section six 1.5 m Sugar maple, four 1.5 m Bur oak, and four 1.5 m Red oak were planted

to help define the park. An additional five American elm, 30 Red Maple, ten Red oak, two Balsam fir, and

(d)

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three White pine seedlings were planted. In the lower section, 135 Potentilla, 80 Red Osier dogwood, 50

Flowering raspberry, 50 Swamp rose and 220 White spruce seedlings were planted to help re-naturalize

the coastal area that is being overtaken by Speckled alder.

Figure 5. Community volunteers joined ACAP Saint John on the morning of September 30, 2017 to

plant over 550 trees and shrubs.

St. Rose Tree Nursery

The St. Rose Tree Nursery was ACAP Saint John’s second tree nursery to be implemented this year. It is

located behind and on St. Rose School property on the West Side of Saint John. This nursery was

implemented with support from Salesforce and volunteer time for both site prep and tree planting being

donated by Salesforce as well. The prep work involved cutting grass for the rows and hauling soil onto

the site to plant the trees and shrubs in and took a total of eight hours over two days. The planting was

done on October 16 th , where Salesforce volunteers planted over 200 trees in the St. Rose Tree Nursery.

The last two rows of the nursery were planted with the help of Salesforce volunteers and 22 students

from the school as part of the opening ceremony with the entire school. The volunteers planted a total of

250 trees and shrubs including: 8 Sugar maple, 12 Shadblow serviceberry, 41 Eastern White cedar, 14

Eastern hemlock, 12 Winterberry, 14 Red maple, 17 Black spruce, 32 Red Osier dogwood, 18 Mountain

maple, 17 Yellow birch, 20 Red spruce, 19 White pine, 18 Dwarf birch, and 8 Red oak seedlings; as well

as six legacy trees (four 1.8 m Yellow birch and two 1.2 m Bur oak). Similar to the Crow Alley nursery,

these trees and shrubs will be left for two to five years before being transplanted to their final sites.

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Figure 6. Above, volunteers from Salesforce helped prepare the site for an additional tree nursery at St.

Rose School. Below, students from St. Rose School plant remaining trees in the nursery during an open

ceremony with the entire school.

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Caledonia Brook Stormwater Detention Pond

A stormwater detention pond was constructed by the City of Saint John behind Boars Head Road in

Millidgeville in 2014 in which Caledonia Brook flows through. The pond was seeded with wetland

vegetation, however no upland woody vegetation was planted. ACAP Saint John staff plus one volunteer

planted 180 trees and shrubs throughout the pond on October 27, 2017. We planted 10 Bur oak, 10 Red

oak, 15 Yellow birch, 10 Sugar maple, 10 Red maple, 10 White spruce, 15 Red pine, 20 Eastern White

cedar, 20 Winterberry, 20 Shadblow serviceberry, 20 Chokeberry, and 20 Black elderberry seedlings

over a two hour period.

Figure 7. Stormwater detention pond located in Millidgeville, off Boras Head Road. Trees were planted

around the pond on October 27, 2017.

Spar Cove

A small area next to Spar Cove was planted on November 14, 2017 with the help of 15 youth from the

Celebrate Me! Program. This area is prone to illegal dumping and a cleanup of the site was done by ACAP

Saint John staff prior to the event. In total twelve 1.2 m Bur oak trees were planted, and straw was spread

around to help insulate the tree roots due to the late planting. This planting was hopefully the beginning

of a larger project in the area to help vegetate this riparian area.

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Figure 8. Youth volunteers from the Celebrate Me! Program planting native trees during a riparian

restoration project in Spar Cove.

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Environmental Outreach

Environmental outreach in 2017 was achieved through a variety of volunteer activities organized as part

of the 10,000 Hands: Environmental Engagement in Saint John project and targeted educational activities

towards children and youth, along with social media. Volunteer events facilitated outreach through

project participants and any volunteers directly engaged in environmental events and activities who then

circulated information through their contacts and networks. ACAP Saint John was also able to leverage

promotion of environmental information and events through regional stakeholders and various multimedia

channels. Local media remained an important outreach component for ACAP Saint John, the

organization and its activities were covered by eight local news stories in 2017.

Online resources were also leveraged for Environmental Outreach and have enabled ACAP Saint John

to reach a broad audience and publicized up to date environmental information, comments, event

announcements, cleanup contests, and cleanup and planting event pictures. Online resources also

enabled volunteers and stakeholders to promote ACAP Saint John projects and environmental

information, especially through social media where posts are easily and quickly distributed through wide

networks. By the end of 2017, ACAP Saint John had 4,138 followers on the organization’s Twitter

account, 301 followers on Instagram and 1,092 ‘likes’ on Facebook. ACAP Saint John’s webpage also

remains a vital component for sharing information. The website was visited by an audience of 5,700

visitors with over 13,500 page views during the first eleven months of the 2017-2018 10,000 Hands

project.

Since the move to the Social Enterprise Hub, ACAP Saint John has been more connected to the

community than ever. Other local non-profit organizations, such as The Saint John Community Loan

Fund, The Saint John Learning Exchange and the Saint John Human Development Council, are also in

this building, providing us with multiple volunteers right at our fingertips. Partnering with The Saint John

Learning Exchange has provided work training opportunities through volunteerism as a part of this

project, enabling new volunteer partnerships that will increase job training in New Brunswick.

This new hub has received a lot of attention and praise by the Saint John community and ACAP Saint

John has been involved in multiple media articles and building tours to talk about our work and how it fits

into the work others are doing in our community. The tours, as well as informal conversations in the

buildings common spaces, have already facilitated and enabled valuable discussions about sustainability

and restorative development in Saint John.

Education

Environmental Outreach also included several activities aimed at educating children and youth about the

region’s environment and environmental stewardship through school presentations and citizen science.

Presentations were made to seven schools in 2017 to interact with children about local environmental

stewardship where they learned about local environmental issues and environmental stewardship in

Saint John. In addition to school presentations, six different high school teachers were also given stream

assessment field packs and have been taught how to measure stream health parameters through our

Water Rangers Program. This has encouraged hands-on learning where youth have the opportunity to

get outdoors and experience nature as a part of their education.

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RNS Earth Day

On April 27, 2017, Rothesay Netherwood School held an Earth Day event where the students took the

afternoon to engage in different forms for nature related activities. ACAP staff facilitated four different

outings with the students, including water quality and fish monitoring, bird habitat walks, benthic

macroinvertebrate sampling and climate change mind-mapping.

Figure 9. Students from RNS conducting water quality assessments in Taylor Brook during the RNS

Earth Day event on April 27, 2017.

Girl Guides of Canada Rally

On May 13, 2017, 1,000 Girl Guides and their leaders gathered together for a province wide rally at

Rockwood Park. A staff member from ACAP Saint John facilitated a ‘critter dipping’ station in some of

the parks boggy areas. Girls had the opportunity to catch tadpoles, frogs and macroinvertebrates, while

also learning about aquatic habitat. The Girl Guides did not only learn about the surrounding species, but

were able to connect with their environment by allowing them to go outside and get dirty.

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Figure 10. Youth from Girl Guides Canada dipping for critters in Fisher Lake, Rockwood Park during a

Girl Guides Rally on May 13, 2017.

Manchester Bird Sanctuary

The Manchester Bird Sanctuary is a 4.65-hectare plot of land that was registered as a sanctuary in 1951.

In late April of 2017, ACAP Saint John educated the neighbours around the Sanctuary by passing out

pamphlets door-to-door. These pamphlets served to both raise awareness about the sanctuary and bird

habitat, and to invite neighbouring residents to a Bird Walk, hosted by local bird expert Jim Wilson.

On the morning of May 27, 2017, twenty-six participants joined the bird walk event. To avoid disturbing

the different habitats within the sanctuary, the bird walk was conducted along the perimeter of the area.

Over two hours, a variety of bird species were observed within the sanctuary, including Black-capped

chickadee, Red-breasted nuthatch, American goldfinch, Northern cardinal, and a collection of sparrows

and warblers.

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Figure 11. Above, Jim Wilson (local bird expert) talks to members of the Saint John Naturalists Club

about the variety of bird species that can be found within the Manchester Bird Sanctuary. Below, local

birders observe bird species along the perimeter of the Manchester Bird Sanctuary.

Harbour View High School Field Trip

ACAP Saint John and the students from the Harbour View High School, Marine Biology class met at Red

Head Marsh on the morning of October 19, 2017. European Green Crab traps were set out as soon as

the students arrived to bait for crabs as an invasive species demonstration. The students were then

broken up into two different learning groups, beach seining and water quality monitoring, where groups

rotated activities throughout the morning. The crab traps were retrieved later in the morning and the

students were able to gain hands-on experience with some local invasive species.

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Figure 12. HVHS students helping Graeme Stewart-Robertson, executive director, check the beach

seine nets for fish. One student getting hands-on experience holding a European Green Crab (Carcinus

maenas).

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Conclusion

Throughout the successful 10,000 Hands project, ACAP Saint John was able to connect with a large

number of community members through volunteer and outreach activities. Although, the total number

of cleanups conducted this year was down compared to previous years, ACAP Saint John still facilitated

a total of 19 cleanups removing close to 5,000 kg of waste from our environment. In addition, over 1,900

native tree and shrub species were planted throughout the City to restore our riparian and coastal areas

as well as to populate our two urban tree nurseries for future projects. Along these two direct volunteer

engagement avenues, ACAP Saint John was able to directly interact and dialogue with over 750

community members. Through our educational outreach activities, we were able to dialogue with an

additional 1,300 students; providing them with both environmental education opportunities and the

opportunity to learn in a hands-on setting out in nature.

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Address: Social Enterprise Hub

139 Prince Edward Street, Suite 323

Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada

phone: (506) 652-2227

email: office@acapsj.org

web: www.acapsj.org

www.facebook.com/acapsj

twitter.com/acapsaintjohn

www.instagram.com/acapsj

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