Dirt and Trail July 2018 issue 2

foleyg

JULY 2018

WORLD LAUNCH: 2019

KTM MOTOCROSS

www.dirtandtrailmag.com

Ride More Stress Less

EXTREME ENDURO:

2018 ERZBERG

PLUS:

// T-BOSS 550

// MUDDY FACE BOTS

// SIDI BOOTS WINNER

// KTM 4-STROKES

// MERZOUGA RALLYE

& LOADS MORE!

LOCAL LAUNCH:

2019 TRIUMPH’S

BIG TEST:

JUNIOR ADVENTURE

JULY 2018 RSA R35.00

9 771815 337001

18007

GS TROPHY 2019:

SA WORLD CHAMPS


Driven by a

Passion

for Safety

XTRACE

FULLFACE

R3650.00

R4495.00

FEATURES

Shell: polycarbonate

Double shell size

Double visor (clear + smoke)

Mircometric buckle

Internal air-circulation

Removable and washable liner

Rain protector rims

Removable wind stop

Removable Peak

Removable nose / sheild

TOURMAX

FLIP-UP/MODULAR

FEATURES

Shell: polycarbonate

Double visor (clear + smoke)

Quick release visor system

Double anti-turbulence neck roll

Antiscratch visor with Pinlock

Internal air-circulation

Removable and washable liner

Removable wind-stop

Rain Protection Rims

To find your nearest Caberg dealer - Tel: 011 792 7691 Web: www.dmd.co.za

Prices mentioned are at recommended reatail including VAT. E&OE

GAUTENG

ZEEMANS MOTORCYCLES 011

BIKING ACCESSORIES 012

FACTORY RACING 011

GAME MOTOR SERVICES 011

MOTO-MATE RIVONIA 011

MOTO-MATE STONERIDGE 011

JUST BIKING 016


Photo Credit: Doc Weedon

Blake Baggett

35 7177

42 7474

67 0092

49 7000

34 5275

09 0944

21 1153

SHAPED BUSHING TECHNOLOGY

GAUTENG

ZEEMANS MOTORCYCLES 011 435 7177

BIKING ACCESSORIES 012 342 7474

FACTORY RACING

011 867 0092

GAME MOTOR SERVICES 011 849 7000

MOTO-MATE RIVONIA

011 234 5275

MOTO-MATE STONERIDGE 011 609 0944

JUST BIKING

016 421 1153

KCR MOTORCYCLE FANATIX ATIX

011 975 5405

OFF-ROAD PBA CYCLES DEALER LISTING 012 333 6443

PRIMROSE MOTORCYCLES 011 828 9091

RANDBURG MOTORCYCLES 011 792 6829

WAYNE HEASMAN RACING

011 955 5960

NORTHWEST

BIKERS MPUMALANGA

PARADISE

INSANE BIKE CITY BIKERS

018 297 4700

014 013 594 244 2111 2143

MOTORS @ KLERKSDORP 018 468 1800

FREESTATE

WATER RITE MOTORCYCLES 018 771 5050

SALLEYS YAMAHA

051 430 3326

LIMPOPO

REGINA RX3 Chains, PBA Original DEALER Equipment LISTING

on KTM, HUSQVARNA, TM... feature the outstanding

SHAPED BUSHING technology which, together with chromized

NORTHWEST

alloy carbon steel pins BIKERS and PARADISE beveled plates, provides 018 297 4700 best

INSANE BIKERS 014 594 2111

performance, shock resistance and reduction in wear.

GAUTENG

ZEEMANS MOTORCYCLES 011 435 7177

BIKING ACCESSORIES 012 342 7474

FACTORY RACING 011 867 0092

GAME MOTOR SERVICES 011 849 7000

MOTO-MATE RIVONIA 011 234 5275

MOTO-MATE STONERIDGE 011 609 0944

JUST BIKING 016 421 1153

KCR MOTORCYCLE FANATIX 011 975 5405

OFF-ROAD PBA CYCLES DEALER LISTING 012 333 6443

PRIMROSE MOTORCYCLES 011 828 9091

RANDBURG MOTORCYCLES 011 792 6829

WAYNE HEASMAN RACING 011 955 5960

NORTHWEST

MPUMALANGA

BIKERS PARADISE

018 297 4700

BIKE INSANE CITY BIKERS 013 014 244 594 2143 2111

MOTORS @ KLERKSDORP 018 468 1800

FREESTATE

WATER RITE MOTORCYCLES 018 771 5050

SALLEYS YAMAHA 051 430 3326

LIMPOPO

K.R.MOTORCYCLES 015 297 3291

KZN

RIDE PERRY’S HIGH M/CYCLES WITH YAMAHA BALITO 035 084 789 353 1851 2713

PERRY’S ROCKET RACING M/CYCLES PINETOWN UMHLANGA 031 566 702 7411 2606

PERRY’S ROCKET RACING M/CYCLES MARITZBURG

HILLCREST 031 033 765 264 2560 3240

RBS YAMAHA

031 701 1311

CAPE PROVINCE

CRAIGS M/CYCLE FITMENT 021 939 8944

TRAC-MAC BELVILLE 021 945 3724

MOTORS @ KLERKSDORP 018 468 1800

WATER RITE MOTORCYCLES 018 771 5050

LIMPOPO

K.R.MOTORCYCLES 015 297 3291

KZN

PERRY’S RIDE HIGH M/CYCLES WITH YAMAHA

BALITO 084 035 353 789 2713 1851

ROCKET PERRY’S RACING M/CYCLES PINETOWN UMHLANGA 031 702 566 2606 7411

ROCKET PERRY’S RACING M/CYCLES MARITZBURG HILLCREST 033 031 264 765 3240 2560

RBS YAMAHA 031 701 1311

CAPE PROVINCE

CRAIGS M/CYCLE FITMENT 021 939 8944

TRAC-MAC BELVILLE

021 945 3724

TRAC-MAC PAARDEN-EILAND

021 510 2258

TRAC-MAC WYNBURG 021 761 4220

MIKE HOPKINS MOTORCYCLES 021 461 5167

NEVES MOTORCYCLE WORLD CC 021 930 5917

EASTERN CAPE

IMOLA MOTORSPORT 043 722 1157

RIDE HIG

PERRY’S

PERRY’S

CAPE PR

CRAIGS M

TRAC-MA

TRAC-MA

TRAC-MA

MIKE HOP

NEVES M

EASTERN

IMOLA MO


EDITOR: ROLEY FOLEY

The other night I was invited out for a boys

night. I told The Mrs that I would be home by

midnight, ‘I promise!’

Well, the hours passed and the beers went

down way too easily. Around 3 a.m, a bit

loaded, I headed for home. Just as I got in

the door, the cuckoo clock in the hallway

started up and cuckooed 3 times. Quickly,

realizing my Mrs would probably wake

up, I cuckooed another 9 times.

I was really proud of myself for coming up

with such a quick-witted solution, in order

to escape a possible confl ict. (Even when

totally smashed… 3 cuckoos plus 9

cuckoos totals = 12 cuckoos MIDNIGHT!)

The next morning my Mrs asked me what

time I got in, I told him ‘MIDNIGHT’… she

didn’t seem cross in the slightest...

Whew, I got away with that one!

Then she said ‘We need a new cuckoo

clock.’ When I asked him why, she said,

‘Well, last night our clock cuckooed three

times then said ‘oh sh*t.’ Cuckooed 4 more

times, cleared its throat, cuckooed another

three times, laughed, cuckooed twice more,

and then tripped over the coffee table and

backfi red.

Have a great month!

CONTENTS: JULY 2018

THE TEAM:

EDITOR:

Glenn Foley

foleyg@mweb.co.za

DESIGN:

Rob Portman

rob@ridefast.co.za

ADVERTISING:

Sinead Foley

foleyg@mweb.co.za

Kyle Lawrenson

lawrensonk@mweb.co.za

ACCOUNTS &

SUBSCRIPTIONS:

Anette

anette.acc@mweb.co.za

Office no (011) 979-5035

(011) 979-0053

CONTRIBUTORS:

Kurt Beine

Richard Sutherland

Zygmund Brodalka

Byron Rudman

Sean Hendley

Tristan Foley

Mike Wessels

12: WORLD LAUNCH: 2019 KTM MX BIKES 24: SA LAUNCH: 2019 TRIUMPH BIKES

40: HARD ENDURO: 2018 ERZBERG 50: BIG TEST: JUNIOR ADVENTURE BIKES

TO SUBSCRIBE

CALL 011 979 5035 OR EMAIL

anette.acc@mweb.co.za

Digital or hard copy.

72: GS TROPHY: SA WORLD CHAMPIONS 84: TESTED: KTM 4-STROKES

2 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


Piston and Gasket Sets

Cranks, Conrods and Camshafts

Cylinder Kits, Rebores, Main Bearings and Clutch Plates

VALVES,STEM SEALS AND SPRINGS

Email:G124@mweb.co.za

no 4 Fifth avenue

Northmead

Benoni

011 425 1081/4


Wow guys and gals, the response was amazing!!

Here are the last selected entries.

TURN TO INSIDE BACK COVER TO SEE THE WINNING PIC.

Hello Glenn Foley

I trust this mail finds you well.

I would like to enter my man’s image into this competition

and why: The image: I’m a pro photographer sins 2003,

Snapdragon Photography, KZN and this is the least I can

do for him. My passion for photography and this man has

created this amazing image.

When he kickstarts his bike I feel the pain in my stomach

with those skankie, dirty broken boots ! So here’s my

passion, combined with his passion and perseverance in

life! Troy Crawford

Got my bike, got my kit (well, most of it!), all that

is missing now are decent quality dirt bike boots!

Hey there.

I need a pair of boots so bad.

This is my first ride with my

son. No mx boots used my

road boots oh boy that didn’t

work out as planned.

Kick start got stuck in boot

lost balance end up with kick

start in my foot. Five stiches

later and still on crutches.

Right boot for the right ride.

Pieter Hamman

When varsity got you

to resort to drastic

measures - ‘braai-ing’

my beat up boots to

survive, the party must

go on and I got to keep

on sending it somehow,

in need of some new

boots to pick up chicks

please! P.S. Will braai

for motocross gear.


Cable-tying my soles back on in Swaziland!!! Regards Steve Lauter

Hi Guys.

I’m sitting here today

with tears in my eyes,

wondering where I’m

going to get a new pair

of boots. My only pair

boots had seen better

days, have no money,

and today it become

worse,

I’ve Started hearing

things, Then I realise

it’s my boots that are

talking to me.



Hello Dirt & Trail Magazine.

My name is Gerrit Olivier.

I love my boots and I want new ones because there is a hole inside one

boot and the clips are not working like they need to.

So my mom said I should get rid of them and then buy new ones.

So one day when I got back from school she said that she took my

boots and got a way to use them.

So she is now using one boot without a hole as a pot for a sunflower.

So I am saving up to by Sidi’s for myself.

It will be very nice if I could win the competition.

Thanks for the chance to enter.

Hi Sir, is this the end of our road together as you can see I lost

half of my body on the track. Remember the good old days with

you flying on the track, Please Remember me...................

I think it’s urgent time for a new pair of boots.

Kind Regards, Jaco Malan


New silicone Garmin

Etrex mounts

This new model of Garmin mounts system

was invented by Darryl Curtis. Silicone

GPS mounts that come in pairs – if you

only have 1 GPS, you can use the other

side to carry your wine gums. The mounts

boppa straight onto your handlebars.

Easy to install and they keep your GPS

snug and well secured.. we bought a set,

we’ll be checking them out soon.

banditsigns.co.za (011) 4625520

R&G Combos for the G310

GS available at Holeshot

Motorcycles

These Swingarm Protectors for BMW G310R /

GS ‘17- models, fit into the rear spindle, looking

great and protecting the swingarm. Held in place

by a stainless steel connecting bar design means

installation is simple.

They help protect the core, expensive components

found around the swingarm area, such as the brake

calliper, disc, sprocket and the swingarm itself.

Stainless Steel Radiator Guard for the BMW

G310R ‘17- and G310GS ‘17- models (SRG0054SS)

The R&G Stainless Steel Radiator Guard series is

a more rugged version of their aluminium radiator

guard. Constructed from 1mm stainless steel sheet

allows the guard to be strong and impervious to

rust – perfect for bikes and riders who want to tackle

demanding terrains and conditions.

The laser-cut grills are designed for maximum airflow

to the radiator so that cooling isn’t compromised; the

Radiator Guard is as good looking as it is purposeful.

The CNC finished guard attaches easily and quickly

to the front of the radiator, either by utilising the

existing mounting bolts or by cable tie.

No modifications need to be made to the bike to

install this radiator guard.

This R&G Stainless Steel Radiator Guard protects

both of the radiators on the BMW G310R ‘17- and

G310GS ‘17- models.

Bar End Sliders for the BMW G310R / GS ‘17-

(BE0112BK)

R&G Bar End protectors have been specially

designed and developed for the BMW G310R / GS

‘17- models.

Helping to protect expensive levers and clip ons from

damage in the event of a drop, crash or slide.

Easy to install they simply screw-in-place of the OE

bar ends taking only seconds.

A selected dealers like Holeshot 011 826 5163


New Riding shirts at DMD:

Oxford is at it again with constant additions to their

lineups. The introduction of the Oxford Kickback,

a reinforced shirt offering protection ideal for

motorcyclists. The Kickback shirt from the UK based,

Oxford design team is particularly noteworthy

for not just offering protection, but also stylish

option.

The durable, heavy weight cotton outer

has a water resistant coating applied, yet

remains flexible allowing for some stretch,

which, combined with soft edge cuffs

makes for a comfortable, relaxed fit.

The button down front closure hides a

tough YKK zipper ensuring the 100%

DuPont Kevlar lining remains in place

should it be needed. Hidden structure

stitching, nylon bonded coats thread

and hidden extra layers of material add

strength to the Kickback while secure

internal pocket and external pockets give

you somewhere safe to your valuables.

Available in sizes S-4XL, in Khaki/White,

Touratech finds a new

home at GPS 4 Africa:

The famous Touratech range of adventure products

has found a new home under the wing of GPS

4Africa’s Pauli Massyn.

“South Africa is one of the largest and most exciting

adventure motorcycle markets in the world with a very

active and passionate rider community. Therefore

we are very pleased to have GPS4Africa as our new

business partner. With their extensive experience in

the adventure motorcycle market, we are convinced

to bring the same service and quality standards to

the South African riders which Touratech is known for

in many countries all around the world.” says Martin

Wickert, Chief Marketing Officer of Touratech GmbH.

The official launch of the multi-channel distribution

business will be on September 1st 2018. There will be

a dedicated Touratech showroom in Pretoria, Gauteng

at the premises of GPS4Africa and also option for

online purchases.

Founded in 1990 in Germany, Touratech GmbH is

a leading manufacturer of adventure motorcycle

equipment. With an innovative and constantly

developed product portfolio that covers the entire

needs around adventure riding, Touratech products

are highly appreciated by adventure riders and world

travellers from all over the world.

After a fresh start in 2018 as part of the Pelzer

Swiss Holding AG, Touratech is well positioned to

continue as a trendsetter in the motorcycle and travel

scene and expand its market position, as well as its

Blue/White, Red/Black and Red/Blue.

www.dmd.co.za for your nearest retailer – or at good

Accessory stores.

worldwide distribution network.

For more information about Touratech GmbH and

their products please visit: www.touratech.com.

For more information about GPS4Africa please visit:

www.gps4africa.co.za | 012 665 2830.

8 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


www.husqvarna-motorcycles.com

BUI LT T O GO

A S FA R A S Y

DAR E T O TAK

ENDURO PROGRESSION

LIMITLESS ENDURO

The FE 350 is known for its versatility in all types of terrain.

With a lightweight chassis and ample performance, the FE

350 possesses a 450 rivalling power-to-weight ratio while

keeping the light and agile feel of a 250. Combined with WP

suspension, traction control and comfortable ergonomics, the

FE 350 is second to none when the going gets tough.

THE 2016 2-STROKE ENDURO MODEL RANGE.

The joy of the ride is often in nding routes that nobody else has used – reac

destinations that few others would dare to aim for. The 2016 Husqvarna Mot

2-stroke enduro bikes rely on exceptional agility, a broad powerband and lig

weight – letting you easily explore wherever you choose to go.

FE350

Please make no attempt to imitate the illustrated riding scenes, always wear protective clothing and observe the applicable provisions of the road traffic regulations!

The illustrated vehicles may vary in selected details from the production models and some illustrations feature optional equipment available at additional cost.

Photo: H. Mitterbauer

Coming soon to P.E

FREESTATE - Husqvarna Central, Bloemfontein – (051) 430 1237

Holeshot Motorcycles, Boksburg – (011) 823-5830

Belville (021) 945 8019

MPUMALANGA - Vans Husqvarna, Middleburg – (013) 282 0766


The Rumble and the

Grumble: Dirtbikers –

preserve your riding area.

Maybe it’s because we are getting new faces on dirtbikes

– or maybe it’s because people don’t actually care but

there have been two or three incidents where people

have cut fences, removed signboards, boxed with

landowners and all that in the recent past. This affects

business owners like Mamarok and Wild West… think of

their welfare. Once you are gone they have to fix the balls

up… and hopefully mend fences with the neighbours.

Another safety heads up – Stephen Spaans runs a 4x4

club and they have, over the past couple of months,

“discovered” the 3-Fences river bed at De Wildt. They

have an arrangement with Patrick from the 3-Fences

Shop (Menlyn) to run their vehicles in the river bed on

his land - they actually pay him a tidy bit of loot per

vehicle. Patrick, as you all know, is very dirt-bike friendly

and does not want confrontation. Stephen is also very

keen to maintain all civility between the 4x4s and the

dirt bikers.

• He has committed to join Moto101 so that he can post

the dates and times when 4x4’s will be in the river bed

during the week before their planned trip.

• He asks please, and not unreasonably, that if and when

you do encounter 4x4’s in the river bed that you do not

blast them with sand and stones.

• He also asks please, that when you have been given

a heads-up about when they will be there that you ride

with caution in the last sandy section before the shop.

You would look really ugly as a hood ornament on a 4x4!

Respect or ride areas, respect landowners don’t stuff

it up.

Please. That’s it have a great riding month.

Mahle filters

specifically for BMW

Mahle is the German based OEM manufacturer

for the likes of BMW and a number of other

European manufacturers.

The LX984-2 and LX984-5 are air filters for the

R1200 BMW series of bikes. The LX984-2 has

an RRP of R175 and LX984-5 has an RRP of

R229.

The KL145 fuel filter fits many BMW K-series,

R-series models and a number of Ducati

models with an RRP of R399.

The KL315 fuel filter fits many BMW F and G

models with an RRP of R539.

Available at dealers.

Lodewyk to Trax:

The talented Enduro racer Lodewyk Jansen van

Vuuren has joined the busy Trax KTM Family as

General Manager. (012) 1110190.

10 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


EXCLUSIVE WORLD LAUNCH

ANOTHER STEP

FORWARD

2019 KTM SX Launch - Malagrotta MX Track. Rome. Italy. This, incidentally is

Antonio Cairolli’s private track (Yup, he owns it…) and KTM’s test track in Italy.

Our full time team of Kyle and Glenn were doing really

lekker stuff like riding in Swaziland, so we roped in the

talents of our Mike Maverick to undertake this really

tough assignment. Head to Europe, rub shoulders with

the rich and famous – and test the latest and greatest

Motocross machines from this amazing orange brand

Enduro boys and girls – please read all of this and

take note… we are pretty certain that most of these

innovations will find their way onto your bikes too.

Leaner, meaner lighter…

12 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


50 million Euro’s - Don’t quote

me but I’m sure that I heard that

figure being bandied around as

the budget that KTM allocated

to upgrade their latest MX range

and although it sounds like an

insurmountable sum of money,

the upgrades are very evident

in the new lineup… I have to

wonder if other manufacturers

are that dedicated to dirtbike

development.

After a 10 hour flight from

JHB International, we touched

down in Rome. We had to

make our own way to the hotel

– KTM laid on a Fiat 500. Man

the drive to the hotel was an

experience all of its own – not

only do they drive on the wrong

side of the road, but they are

all related to Valentino Rossi. I

saw two accidents on the way

there – and was gobsmacked to

see how friendly everyone was.

“Ahhh itsa no problem – itsa

happening all the time…” hands

all over the place… Very funny.

If you think riding or racing

MX is exciting, just try driving in

this city – in peak hour traffic.

The hotel eventually appeared

– a sea of orange flags in the

midst of the city. Quick parking

and a wander through the doors

to the display of a spankin new

SX250 and lots of admirers

fondling her.

Quick shower, shave no time

to dawdle, KTM hosted a meet

and greet and introduced us to

the bikes. Even the cocktails

and swizzle sticks were orange

– branded KTM of course,

attention to detail – KTM City.

In the hall they popped a

movie up with Cairolli and

Dungey chatting about the

new bikes, the endless hours

of testing and feedback given

to the boffins on how to make

the bikes better. The lights

came on and – Ta daaaaaa. In

they walked, along with up and

coming superstar Jorge Prado.

The crowd went mad! Talk

about special effects.

For a guy who has always

looked up to these riders –

that was amazing. And guess

what? They all rode with us at

the track. Unusual, because

Dungey does not normally ride

at events like this.

Once the formalities were

over, the riders joined us for the

Buffet, along with all of KTMS

management and tech guys…

I sat with some of the press

guys – mostly from France, Italy,

Ukraine, Germany – a great

bunch – all mad about bikes –

and – interestingly, most from

print media...

Bright and Breezy the next

day we were collected from

the hotel and transferred to

the track.

Wow! We have cool tracks,

but man – unless you see it

yourself – you don’t understand.

The track is really technical –

built into the side of a mountain,

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018 13


with huge slopes, berms and rollers. It had

rained the evening before – so it was nice

and damp – and dust was not an issue.

4 KTM Rigs, WP suspension tent, A full

workshop rig, DJ’s spinning – Red Bull

bokkies with a PS4 setup… whoever got the

highest score on that for the day won signed

Cairolli Merch… and the highlight of the day,

30 gleaming 2019 MX Machines, all in their

own tents – 125, 150, 250, 350, 450 – and

then split into two and four stroke camps.

The only bikes missing were the junior

motocrossers.

If you were not there, you don’t

understand… riding Nirvana.

The track was open – after a short briefing,

we were pointed in the direction of the

bikes – choose your weapon –and six hours

of riding madness ensued. A very slick

operation, they radioed your number to the

photographers and they clicked away.

The ride:

I opted to start on the two strokes – 125, 150,

250, four or five laps on each bike, man it

was fun. I ride a KX 450, so on the 2-strokes

it’s flat out all the way, especially in the wet,

slippery conditions. One note – although it

was wet, the new KTM patented silicone ribs

in the bikes seat covers keep you firmly in

place. A great little touch… and immediately

noticeable. I started having a little dice with

a no 5 dude on a four stroke and I thought

I was doing pretty well… 3 corners later, Mr

Dungey gave me a nice Roost and opened

the throttle…

Initial thoughts on the two stroke lineup are

impressive but we’ll tell you more about each

bike at the end of this.

You can imagine all this hard work took

a bit of time… we broke for a light lunch –

Cairolli Pasta – Go Faster Eat Pasta was

the mantra for the rest of the day!!! Dessert

– orange (Of Course!) chocolate fountain…

And man we needed the energy. The rain

came down, turned the track into slush,

the journo’s were all being a bunch of wets

until Cairolli roared past the tent and it was

game on!

Mud, slush and four strokes… what a Jol!

So lekker to twist the throttle in such a cool

place. Naturally lots of Dices happened – two

of the lady riders were mixing it up with the

boys and their muddy faces at the session

said it all.

Sadly, the rain put an end to play, it was

wet, cold, and most had their fill for the day.

Very slick with more than enough time to ride

each bike.

AND it was time to try and crack the top

score on the PS4… Man some of those

nerds are good – I’ve got the game at home,

but didn’t stand a chance. One of the French

Jouno’s destroyed everyone – but we sure

had a good time trying.

14 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


GET MORE DIRT

IN YOUR LIFE

NOW AT PRIME LESS 2%*!

Photo: ZCMC

Maximize your time in the dirt! Finance a new KTM EXC 4-stroke model at prime

less 2%*! Now only available through KTM Finance, a product of WesBank.

* Promotion valid from 1 April 2018 to 30 June 2018 on all new, in-stock KTM EXC-F four-stroke 2018 models, while stocks last, at all participating KTM dealers. All information with

the proviso that mistakes, printing, setting and typing errors may occur. Please consult your local dealer for further details. Terms and Conditions apply. Finance is subject to approval.

Initiation fee and service fee may be applicable. KTM Finance is a product of WesBank - a division of First Rand Bank Ltd. Registered Bank. An Authorised Financial Services and

Registered Credit Provider. NCRCP20.


Bike Updates:

KTM does not just make changes in a “Willy

Nilly” fashion. For the aforementioned seat

cover, they took a cross section of all of

the leading cover manufacturers, sent out

surveys on what riders liked – and then they

manufactured to their own spec. When they

redesigned the plastics, they put cameras

all over the test models at contact points in

order to eliminate any kind of hook up… and

limitation of movement. For the pipes, KTM

first made them with 3d printers… and made

them more compact and Oval – less bulky

with the same combustion volume.

It’s all really scientific.

And then they get guys like Dungey and

Cairolli to give feedback – endless hours of

testing. A shorter connection between test

riders and the R&D team…

And then there are the power parts.

KTM has really hooked the lifestyle side of

things with their power wear – but for each

of these models, Joachim Sauer, the KTM

off-road product manager boasted that you

can literally build a factory racer with parts

purchased off the shelf from your dealer.

In a nutshell - what a company. Mike was

so impressed by the enthusiasm and the

incredible people behind this brand.

The two strokes: Some Techy

Stuff. There is a test at the end.

Pay attention!

Shared updates:

On all of the models, the I-beam design for

the front and rear fenders are prime examples

of an intelligent design, which guarantees

maximum stability at lowest weight through a

well thought-out structure and mounting.

A newly shaped seat provides improved

ergonomics and better seat comfort. Due

to newly developed silicone strips the seat

cover provides better feel and grip. The seat

installs with one long bolt from left side of the

frame for easier removal and installation.

Chassis changes shared among the three

two strokes include a new black frame with

a 2-percent increase in longitudinal stiffness

and a 10-percent increase in torsional

stiffness. These increases in stiffness were

done to improve feedback to the rider, offer

more precise handling, and improve straightline

stability. The bikes all have new frame

guards with a structured surface, and the

right frame guard also serves as a heat shield

for the muffler.

16 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


Introducing the ALL NEW

•Advanced Shell Moulding Technology

•Ultra lightweight, strong structure

The evolution of an icon

•3-piece EPS liner including M.E.D.S.

•E.Q.R.S. (Emergency Quick Release System)

Blazon TC-1 Blazon TC-6 Blazon TC-5 Grant3 TC-3 Grant3 TC-1 Grant3 TC-2

Glaive TC-5 Glaive TC-1 Glaive TC-8 Zinger TC-1 Zinger TC-2 (matt) Zinger TC-10 (matt)

Shoei helmets are imported and distributed by AMP. To find your nearest Shoei dealer call 011 259 7750.


The upper triple clamp has been revised

and is stiffer to coincide with the new frame

and flex characteristics of the latest WP AER

48 fork. The swingarm now has a longer

rear axle slot that allows the rear wheel to be

adjusted up to 5mm farther back than prior

year models and the subframes are 40mm

longer to improve rear fender stability. The

radiators have been redesigned and are

mounted 12mm lower, and a redesigned

coolant tube integrated in the frame triangle

features a 4mm-larger center tube increasing

the cross section by 57 percent. The fuel

tanks have also been changed to improve

the ergonomics.

The final touches to the bikes are updated

spoke nipples (designed to be more

maintenance-free), new bodywork, a new

seat shape, a revised bar pad and cover, and

new graphics.

Lastly, all KTM motocross bikes now come

with a new triangle stand that also serves

as a spacer for the front wheel for tying

the bike down when hauling it in a vehicle.

This reduces high static pressure on the air

cartridge and prevents the fork from being

compressed during transport.

The 125 SX and 150 SX feature a host of

changes shared between the two smallbore

two-strokes. Both bikes feature a

new cylinder with an updated layout of the

exhaust port, a newly developed diaphragm

steel (DS) clutch, and a new clutch cover that

is lower and reduces the width of the engine

by 10mm plus a new Pankl gearbox.

Pankl make gearboxes and clutches for F1

cars. We didn’t know that.

The 125 SX and 150 SX have reworked

carburettor settings and a new header pipe

and silencer. The silencers plastic mounting

system is replaced by a welded aluminum

bracket and the kickstarters intermediate

gear has been reinforced for better reliability.

KTM’s 2019 two-strokes share the same

suspension updates. The WP shock gets an

updated main piston and revised settings to

match with the new fork setup and provide

better damping characteristics.

Both the 125 SX and 150 SX have a

redesigned airbox and intake snorkels, a new

header pipe and silencer, and a reworked

carburetor setting to work better with the new

airbox and exhaust system.

250:

KTM made a change specifically to the 250

SX frame for 2019 that raises the engine

in the frame by one degree around the

swingarm pivot to improve the handling

characteristics, specifically front wheel grip.

Another update is that the engine hangers

(the connection between cylinder/head

and frame) on the 250 SX are now made of

aluminum instead of steel to improve precise

cornering ability and reduce vibration.

The engine boasts a revised exhaust port

for more precise function of the power valve

to improve power delivery and a reworked

water pump casing to optimize the flow of

coolant. To allow for better airflow, KTM

redesigned the airbox and intake snorkels

and developed a new carburetor setting to

work better with the two redesigned parts.

The 250 SX also has a more compact

header pipe and silencer with new perforated

inner tubes and lighter silencer packing to

reduce noise. The new silencer equates to

a weight reduction of approximately 300

grams from last year’s part. Lastly, the plastic

bracket that secured the previous model’s

silencer is replaced by lightweight, welded

mounting brackets on the 2019 machine.

Very techy stuff but some really cool

updates for the new model year.

The four strokes:

Hydraulic clutch, electric starting, super

shifting and light weight, new seats, new

plastics…

All 2019 KTM SXF models feature new

high-tech and lightweight black chromoly

steel frames in various profiles including

hydro-formed elements produced by WP

Performance Systems with state-of-the-art

robots (Not traffic lights, actual robots). Ok,

OK!

They feature optimized stiffness (2% stiffer

longitudinally and 10% stiffer torsionally).

The head stays are aluminum for all models.

New frame guards improve grip and the right

one is a heat protector for the silencer. On

the 250SXF, 350SXF and 450SXF there are

brackets to mount a composite skid plate.

The subframe is 900 grams lighter and 40mm

longer than this years model.

18 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


The air boxes have been completely

reworked for increased flow. This

improves throttle response. The

250SXF, 350SXF and 450SXF get new

intake snorkels for improved engine

performance. The large Twin-Air air

filter is mounted on a stiff cage, which

minimizes incorrect installation of

the filter and cage. The filter can be

changed without tools in seconds, a

standard, original feature by KTM.

The 250SXF, 350SXF and 450SXF

models are fitted with newly

designed polyethylene tanks that

improve ergonomics. Fuel capacity 7

litres of fuel.

Exhausts

The new exhausts are slimmer

and well within the sound limits for

racing. The 250SXF, 350SXF and

450SXF four-strokes are fitted with

new, model-specific head pipes with

an advanced Flow Design Header

(FDH). The resonator, which was only

offered on the 450 last year, is better

integrated into the pipe, making the

front part of the exhaust slimmer and

providing better engine performance

and reduced noise. The four-stroke

silencers feature a new canister profile

and end cap as well as a reworked

internal design. Best of all, there is a

slip-fit split between head pipe and

mid-pipe that allows the exhaust

system to be removed without having

to remove the shock first.

2019 Cooling System

All 2019 KTM model feature newly

designed radiators which are mounted

12mm lower than the predecessors.

This lowers the center of gravity and

in conjunction with a new radiator

shape they match perfectly with the

design of the new radiator shroud to

make the bike narrower and easier

to get forward on the bike. Thanks

to calculated liquid circulation (CFD)

and improved air ventilation cooling

is improved. The coolant tube, that

passes through the frame, is 4 mm

larger to improve coolant flow from

the cylinder head to the radiators.

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018 19


“The sound of that

150 in the hills is quite

something…. I love the

smell of two stroke in

the morning!”

20 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


The 2019 four strokes use the KTMdeveloped

DDS clutch (damped diaphragm

steel) with a wear-free steel basket and

extremely heat resistant clutch plates.

This design employs a diaphragm spring

(Belleville washer) instead of the usual coil

springs, which makes for a considerably

easier clutch action. The diaphragm

spring also leaves sufficient space

for a rubber damping system

integrated into the clutch hub,

which benefits for both traction

and durability.

Formula 1 supplier Pankl

now makes the five-speed

transmissions on the 2019 KTMs.

All four-stroke engines are fitted

with a gear sensor giving the option

of different engine characteristics for each

gear.

All the four strokes feature Keihin Engine

Management System, with electronic fuel

injection, features a new 44mm throttle

body, reworked throttle cable mount, and

improved seal of the Manifold-Absolute-

Pressure (MAP) sensor makes the system

more reliable. The ECU features new

maps adapted to the new exhaust and

cylinder head and it regulates the unique

traction and launch control. In addition it

provides different maps for optimal power

characteristics for each gear.

2019 KTM 250SXF, 350SXF &

450SXF wheels/battery/wiring

harness

The KTM wheels feature CNC machined

hubs and high-end Excel rims, but for 2019

the aluminum nipples will feature a reworked

design to reduce the frequency of tightening

the spokes. The tyres are a Dunlop Geomax

MX3S combo.

250SXF, 350SXF and 450SXF fourstrokes

get new lightweight, 2 Ah, Lithium-

Ion (lithium-iron-phosphate) starter battery

that contribute to the low weight. A

reworked packaging of the voltage regulator

and condenser concentrate the electrical

components in a tray below the seat and

makes the entire system more reliable.

2019 WP AER air forks & triple

clamp

All 2019 KTM models are fitted with the

lightweight WP AER 48mm front fork. The

damping functions are in the right fork

and the air spring is in the left. The left leg

features a two-chamber air system with

a capsuled air cartridge to prevent loss

of air pressure—even if an the outer fork

seal leaks the internal cartridge pressure

stays the same. There is only a single

air valve to adjust and an air pump is

supplied with the bike.

The CNC-machined triple clamps feature

a stiffer upper triple clamps (5% stiffer). The

rubber-damped bar mounts reduce the

vibration level and are two-way adjustable.

An hour meter comes stock already

mounted on the top triple clamp.

2019 450 SXF Engine - narrower, half

a kilogramme lighter more compact…

With its SOHC (single overhead camshaft)

Engine weight has been reduced to 27

kilogrammes (with electric starter included).

The compression ratio is 12.75:1. The

cylinder head is 15mm lower and 500 grams

lighter than last year. The gas flow through

the newly shaped ports is controlled by a

newly configured camshaft with improved

cam surface and a shorter valve timing.

The four-valve engine uses ultra-lightweight

titanium valves (intake 40mm, exhaust

33mm), extremely rigid rocker arms and a

low-friction cam chain guide.

2019 350SXF Engine

The 2019 KTM 350SXF engine features

the new clutch, improved transmission and

a re-designed DOHC cylinder head. The

reworked cylinder head design is 200 grams

lighter than last year. The two overhead

camshafts with a friction-optimized superfine

surface, finger followers with a DLC

coating are taken over as well as four

lightweight titanium valves (intake 36.3mm,

exhaust 29.1mm). The flow rate has been

maximized for an optimal power which ends

at an engine speed of 13,400 rpm.

2019 250SXF Engine

The 250 SXF engine is known to be the

strongest engine in its engine class. And

with updates on valve timing, exhaust,

airbox and EMS the entire power pack

produces even more torque and power

across the entire rpm range up to 14,000

rpm. The centerpiece of the compact

DOHC (double overhead camshaft) engine

is the cutting-edge cylinder head. It features

two overhead camshafts which activate the

titanium valves (intake 32.5mm, exhaust

26.5mm) via superlight finger followers. The

exhaust camshaft features a new timing for

improved power delivery. With a low engine

weight of only 26 kilogrammes (including

electric starter) the KTM 250SXF is the

lightest bike in the 250 class. (5KG’s lighter

than the closest competitor…)

Ride impressions.

Two strokes:

Unlike some of the Japanese

manufacturers, KTM has continued to

develop their two-strokes and the net

result is a range of bikes that are smoother,

faster and more refined. It’s quite easy

to understand why their bikes are so

successful. Each bike that I rode performed

perfectly.

The 125SX

This is a proper screamer that you need to

open wide – especially on a track like this.

Gearing, clutch so smooth with so little

vibration, easy to ride – a perfect stepping

stone for future champs. Very light easy to

move around – and I noticed that the two

female riders spent most of their time on

this one. My advice to young riders – don’t

jump from an 85 to a 250 - work your way

up the ranks, it pays dividends in the long

run.

The 150SX

My favourite two stroke on the day. It’s also

small, light, compact with just that little bit

more power that you don’t have to scream

all the time it does not work as hard, which

probably means that maintenance will

be less frequent than on its little brother.

The sound of that 150 in the hills is quite

something…. I love the smell of two stroke

in the morning! They are so light – a bit like

riding a BMX with a bad ass engine – ok

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018 21


“This is the premium

2-stroke in the KTM

lineup, and is basically

brand new for 2019. Light,

responsive, so fast… but

very controllable with

amazing suspension and

brakes. You can feel the

updates – it’s just a better

bike than last years,

amazing how they do it.”

and decent brakes and suspension – This

bridges the gap perfectly between a 125 and

a 250.

I sure hope that we’ll be allowed to ride

and race them here…

The 250SX

This is the premium 2-stroke in the KTM

lineup, and is basically brand new for

2019. Light, responsive, so fast… but very

controllable with amazing suspension and

brakes. You can feel the updates – it’s just a

better bike than last years, amazing how they

do it. Less explosive, more refined with very

useable power. It’s really to appreciate how

KTM dominates this class all over the world.

Much like with their enduro models, KTM has

made two stroke technology their own.

Slow or fast – so much fun to ride.

The Four Strokes:

For this sloppy, muddy track, we thought

that the 450 would be a real handful, but it

surprised us. The 250 is incredibly quick and

the 350 is a great blend of the two…

Mike shares his thoughts

The 250 SXF:

I was very impressed with the power

delivery – it’s only a 250 but it makes

lekker torque and has an amazing overrev.

The riders were well spaced out when I

took the 250 four out – but a few of us

had a go and I was super impressed with

the 250. It turns on a dime and moves so

easily through the air. Cornering is really

sharp with enough bottom-end that you

don’t need to aim for the outside line – you

don’t have to dig very deep to holeshot out

of the corners. The suspension soaks up

everything you throw at it.

The bike feels, once again better than the

previous model in just about every respect.

It’s lighter, sharper and damn pretty in its new

livery. Go and ride one…

The 350SXF: Bridging the gap.

KTM built the 350 and a bridge from 250 to

450 but – much discussion was had among

all of the Jounalists on the launch – some

agreed and others – especially the older

generation could not see the point. But – let’s

refer to how successful KTM’s 350 Enduro

model is – especially amongst hobby riders

and I’m sure you’ll agree that KTM is on to

something.

Personally I like the 350 for a couple of

reasons. You don’t need to ride as hard as

you would on the 250. This probably means

that the bike will last a bit longer and need

less maintenance. It has significantly more

torque than a 250 but is not as powerful as

a 450. It weighs almost the same as a 250. It

feels like a safe ride if you know what I mean

– you don’t need to pin it all over the place –

there is ample chug-a-lug in every gear – that

allows you to get away with making the odd

mistake. Handling and feel is very close to

the 250 – a 250 with a bigger bore and longer

gearing. For shorter tracks this is one heck of

a machine…

22 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


The 450 SXF: Moving the

goalposts.

It was unanimous. Nobody wanted to ride

the 450 in the mud, but once they got on –

it surprised everyone with its user friendly

nature and great traction. It felt far too easy

for a bad ass 450 MX bike. Rolling into knee

deep ruts and easing on the throttle, the

bike is just so controllable, It did not cross

rut – just sand along where you pointed her.

This is the smoothest power that I’ve felt

on a 450 to date – this in turn means more

control. In the air, the bike felt very stable –

usually there is a lot of centrifugal force that

moves you around a bit – not sure how – but

KTM has minimized this on their flagship –

so feel free to whip it like Goldman…

With the lower CG you can really get the

bike low and carry lots of corner speed

and all the while, the suspension and

chassis take care of the rest of the ride.Don’t

be fooled – open wide and this bike rewards

you with some mighty horsepower, but it’s

all kept in check by an amazing package…

I was blown away by this bike. What an

amazing feeling – and I was so happy to

hear that the other riders agreed…

Conclusions…

What can I say, I was blown away – not

only by the bikes, but also by KTM as a

brand. As a consumer we get to see the

end product – this trip gave me just a small

view of how much work and passion is

involved in building bikes like this. It seems

that everyone at KTM, including the ladies

that I met ride motorcycles – and that is

probably a big part of the reason that KTM

is so successful. The bikes are amazing – I

look forward to riding them again when they

get here…

One question that I did ask. The 2-stroke

TPI enduro bikes are amazing – why has

KTM not fitted it to the new MX machines?

I suppose the answer makes sense –

“Baby steps please Mr Mav – the TPI is

designed specifically for Enduro… for sure

in the future there will be an MX specific

system.” Kapiche?

www.ktm.com

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018 23


SA LAUNCH TRIUMPH BIKES

BRITISH INVASION

Triumph launches the 2019’s - A bike for every kind of rider

24 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


Triumph SA has made quite a splash in

recent weeks with the launch of their retail

store in Sandton and the introduction of all

the new bikes. We gave you the skinny of

what was happening with the brand earlier

this year – and since then, things have

moved along rather smartly.

We were invited along for an overdose

of British at the pecan Manor venue

near – would you believe it – Harties – a

day of riding and an evening of revelry

and banter… Now this is where you start

reading with a British accent.

Triumph has an impressive 17 models

in their product lineup – with more on the

way soon. And it was an excellent day old

fruit! We were loosely divided into groups –

pointed in the direction of the motorcycles

and told to ride – and enjoy! How bad

could that be? There was even time for

a spot of tea and pies in between each

group.

All rather civilized you know!

Please bear in mind that this launch was

not for us to test each bike and review

them, but more just to get a feel for the

brand, their ethos and what they are up

to. You can rest assured that there will be

more in depth features on each of their

bikes as we go along.

Powering the bikes:

Triumph, essentially build engines in

two derivatives – and this is just a basic

explanation – internals differ but this will

give you an idea.

Triumph is the master of triple cylinder

technology. 3 cylinders in parallel that

create some of the smoothest, most user

friendly power on the planet. Fitted to

their adventure and Roadster range.

The very compact triples are found in

a wide range of their bikes, the biggest of

which is the 1200cc found in the 1200XCA

adventure machine.

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018 25


The 1050 is fitted to their Street

triples and the dynamite road oriented

Tiger – and once you’ve ridden the

two bikes, you’ll understand why it

is such a successful configuration.

In between, of course they have the

Tiger 800. The smallest, but by no

means lacking 675cc is slotted into

our favorite road model, the street

triple RS.

Then they build the modern

classics around their famous liquid

cooled twin cylinder engines:

The engines all perform in the same

manner – each with slightly different

variants on gearing and speed – but

it’s a good, solid donk.

They are intentionally made to

look like the original air cooled

engines from the era of Steve

McQueen on the outside – bit the

internals are thoroughly modern.

They might look as though they are

fitted with old Bing carburetors – but

that’s fuel injection with a cover.

The only visual difference between

the engine displacements is the neat

inscription that is mounted at the

base of each bikes barrel.

The engines come in varying

degrees of bore and tune – from the

1200 fitted to bikes like the Thruxton,

Bobber , Triumph T120 and the

Bonneville. It’s a great big chunk of

engine that delivers smooth, strong

power all the way from the bottom

and propels you through very decent

midrange to smile inducing high

ends. Chaps – if you have never

taken one for a ride it’s strongly

recommended…

The smaller 900cc twins are fitted

to bikes like the Bonneville T100. It’s

a far more chilled configuration and

would quite possibly be our choice

for an everyday ride.

This is more a dirt oriented

magazine – so we’ll focus a bit on

the adventure offerings from this

brand shall we? You can hear a bit

about the Tigers.

Boys and Girls. Pay attention, there

is a test at the end.

The new 1200 Triumph Tiger XCA.

If you are a regular reader of this here

quality publication, you’ll know that

we’ve never really rated Triumph’s

previous 1200 Explorer as a true

adventure bike. It’s always been a

bit big and heavy – and more road

oriented than its smaller sibling the

800. A “nice” bike with good power

that all works.

Over the years they did this and

that to make it better – and then

last year they fitted some decent

suspension that made a significant

difference. But as adv bikes go, in

our opinion, it was still not quite up to

SA’s stringent dirty standards.

Well Chaps. You need to go and

sample the new one I say!

It’s a real eye opener – in fact it’s

like a whole new motorcycle.

They nipped and tucked and

shaved of a rather large chunk of

poundage and have produced a big

motorcycle that is now comparable

with the best out there. It’s actually

quite remarkable. In our opinion, this

is a real contender in the big bore

adventure market. It’s comfortable on

the road, nimble in the dirt with great

big gobs of very controllable power.

A Rather civilized ride Wot!

26 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


TRIUMPH JOHANNESBURG

READY TO ROLL

OPENING JUNE 2018

NOW OPEN

For further information please call 011 444 4441 | email info@triumphbikes.co.za

www.triumph-motorcycles.co.za | Facebook- Triumph Motorcycles South Africa

Corner South & Dartfield Roads, Eastgate ext 13, Sandton


you with too much information, but we are all

thoroughly impressed! If you are looking for a

bit more dirt prowess and sheer comfort over

the previous models, then you need to go

and ride this one. You won’t believe it’s the

same bike…

And they even throw in a television up front

dear boy. Most impressive!

You can be sure that we’ll be doing a

more in depth review of Triumphs Big Bertha

Adventure machine soon.

The 800 Tiger XCA: More of the same.

We have always been of the opinion that

Triumphs 800 really was a game changer in

the 800 market. It’s got lots of personality,

runs beautifully and, unlike the first renditions

of the 1200, from the very start, they gave

this bike excellent off- road credibility.

A couple of years back, they replaced

the first models suspension with WP units

and those are still to be found on the latest

rendition.

The good news is that although they

have spent significant sterling on all of the

upgrades to this motorcycle, it still retains the

original bikes appeal. It is still undoubtedly an

800XCX.

Some of the new tech is obvious – like, as

an example the really modern TFT display

that replaces the old digi analogue clocks

and some of the LED lighting that now

sprinkles the bike….

But, a lot of the improvements are very

subtle. They tell us that the Tiger has

undergone more than 200 upgrades to the

chassis and engine. They also tell us that the

engine is even more responsive thanks to

some fine tuning, a lighter, more free flowing

To achieve all of this, the Triumph

engineers have taken a leaf from their 800

Tiger book, with almost 100 changes to the

new 1200 Tiger.

The new bike is significantly slimmer and

toned and almost a very significant 10kg

lighter than the previous generation. Weight

savings are achieved across the engine,

chassis and exhaust components.

Significant engine upgrades have been

implemented for more immediate power

delivery and feel. And as mentioned earlier,

the clever chaps at Triumph UK have

done a sterling job at enhancing the riders

ergonomics and comfort. In short this means

that your derriere will survive the longer

trips in far greater shape than on previous

renditions of this machine.

They have included the new “Off Road

Pro” riding mode, with a choice of up to six

riding modes – and initial impressions are

that it all really works rather well!

We only took a rather short trundle through

the countryside, so we are not going to bomb

28 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


exhaust and gearing mods. Both of our riders

seemed to feel that it feels better than the old

one in the dirt.

We’ll test that claim against our previous

model in future issues – but this little

adventure route that we rode re-confirmed

this bike as one of our firm favourites.

Let’s plant a little seed Triumph. You have

that wonderful 1050 mill. How’s about slotting

that into a midrange adventure bike soon?

On The Road:

Tiger’s offering to the road market is the Tiger

Sport 1050.

Now it sounds as if we are gushing a bit,

but if we were to buy a bike for everyday use

and to head out to ET for the weekends, this

is well worth your consideration. It’s powered

by the 1050 triple cylinder mill – an amazing,

smooth configuration for all kinds of riding.

The bike is fast, with great manners – and it is

plenty comfortable for hours in the saddle. We

love it. What a cool motorcycle. You’ll read

more about this one in RideFast soon.

The street Classics:

These are all powered by Triumphs famous

twin cylinder fuel injected engines – and

– if the word pretty comes to mind, you’d

be correct. Forget about speed and

performance – these bikes are all designed

to take the road in absolute chilled style and

comfort – and each bike is a head turner in its

own right.

We rode them all. Our Ed first swung his

leg over the new speedmaster – needless to

say, he looked completely ridiculous in his

adventure gear on a bike like this. The bike

is fun. Low to the ground with these massive

cowcatcher type bars that leave everything

open to the wind. Make sure that you don’t

have a hole in the seat of your jeans…

The Thruxtons – well if you have never

ridden one – you’ve missed out on a great

big part of motorcycle life, you have to. It’s

built for superbikers (Especially the ‘R’) and

classic fans and it’s so easy to understand

why it is so popular.

The Bonnies are just what they set out to

be. Comfortable, attractive and fun to ride.

The 900 is so chilled, the 1200 makes you

smile. A very unassuming motorcycle that

just makes so much sense.

The Bobbers… now we’ve all been itching

to ride these – they were only available in

very limited quantities, so a demo was never

made available to our lot. It’s a fun machine

and the beauty of it is the fact that you can

go to town on more customization. If this

type of bike is your thing – go and have a

looksee, really good fun!

Roadsters:

Well fellows: If you have never had the

sheer joy of riding a road going triple

cylinder racer, then you’ve really missed out.

They are available in two configurations

– the 675 Street triple RS and the slightly

faster 1050 Speed Triple. We grinned from

the moment we started until the moment

we stopped and parked the bikes. You

can read all about them in this months

issue of RideFast Magazine. They are

quite simply more fun than – well just about

anything really. Please Mr bank manager this

magazine really needs a new delivery bike…

Triumph news;

The Triumph dealership is open in Sandton

and there is a team of friendly faces waiting

to greet you. They have pledged to keep one

of each bike available for test rides – and

that’s so cool - bikes are an affair of the heart

– look touch, feel smell and ride.

Give them a call, pay them a visit, a

dynamic operation for a great brand

Chat to them about service centres and

so-on in your area.

www.triumphmotorcycles.co.za

(011) 444-4441

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018 29


WHAT ARE THE

NEIGHBOURS UP TO?

LEPOKOLE HILLS ENDURO – BOTSWANA

Set on the borders of Botswana and

Zimbabwe, Muddy Face Events hosted the

first of its kind in Botswana, the Lepokole

Hills Enduro. The event was set in the

village of Lepokole, borne of rocks and river

beds galore, with campsites based within

the Lepokole Nature Reserve. Focused on

bringing adventure for the whole family,

riders of all ages could participate, with

the youngest rider was 4 years old and the

oldest in his 50’s. If you were not a rider,

there was definitely no shortage of activities

for you either.

The event was opened with a “Beat the

Beat” session, where riders rode night

enduro-cross, under floodlights, against

the rhythm of African drummers. This

was a very unique experience and quite

unfamiliar to all the riders taking part. As

the musicians from Drums of Peace plotted

out the pace, the riders had to keep up

all the while getting through the technical

challenges, set out by Ross Branch, coowner

of Muddy Face Events.

A welcome dinner was hosted within the

reserve, where riders and spectators were

treated to an evening of chilled out live

music.

On Saturday morning championship riders,

Louw Schmidt, Ross Branch and Louwrens

Mahoney from the Brother, Leader Tread,

KTM team took Botswana riders out into

the field to train on enduro style riding. “In

Botswana, enduro riding is very new and

this was the first enduro event to be held

here, hence our reason for bringing in a

training element to the event,” said Lola

Berrie, business partner to Branch. “We

are still piloting the event and the plan is

30 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


to grow the event into an annual show

piece that would attract riders from all over

Africa to visit this part of the world, as well

as enjoy some good enduro riding, with

a whole lot of other entertainment for the

whole family,” Berrie added.

As an impromptu part of the event, riders

and spectators were invited to the small

village of Lepokole to visit the chief and

people of the host village. “This was

somewhat humbling as it was then that

most of us realized, that many of these

people had never seen a motorbike before,

and that we were given this opportunity

to bring motorcycling to them as a people

of Botswana,” commented Branch.

The people of Lepokole greeted us with

song and dance, a testament to their

appreciation of bringing tourism to their

village and in essence putting Lepokole

Hills on the map. The excitement could

also be seen on the kids faces as they

watched the younger riders participate in

a demonstration with Louw, Louwrens and

Ross. Quad riders showed their style in

the village too, which got the crowd quite

ecstatic.

32 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


Later on in the day, the loop was opened

up for riders to put what they had learnt in

the morning into practice and times were

taken to find out who could complete

the loop fastest. Although, this event is

not aimed at racing per say, but rather at

bettering yourself, your time, your skill and

your technique, all without the pressures

and demands of national competition. It’s

about bringing back the fun into the man

and machine relationship. The event was

also well positioned for spectators and

families to not only enjoy watching the

riders do their magic on the route, but to

also participate in a host of activities unique

to this area.

The Lepokole Nature Reserve is home to

ancient rock art and cultural ruins hundreds

of years old. As part of the event, visitors

were taken on scenic walks up the domed,

rocky slopes of the Lepokole Hills and

into a tree cavern which then revealed

the vast wall of unique rock art. Kids were

able to explore and adventure freely up the

koppies tailed by a guide, whilst parents

took time out to absorb the breathtaking

views unique to this area of Botswana.

Another treat to the event, was an

interactive drumming session with

Drums of Peace within the hills, where

visitors acknowledged the greatness and

spirituality of the Lepokole Hills and its

wildlife through the African drums. The

jazzed up show echoed through the hills

and vibrated positive energy from all

angles of the event. Guests were given the

opportunity to beat a drum instructed by

a member of the team, to eventually put

together a master piece distinctive to the

Lepokole Hills Enduro, a truly memorable

initiative.

To close off the event, a live music show

was put on by Mandi Mashingaidze and

the night ended with a jive and celebration

of an event enjoyed by all. The Lepokole

Hills Enduro will be held again next year on

28 February to 3 March 2019.

www.muddyfacebotswana.co.bw

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018 33


34 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


A MORNING WITH

HUSQVARNA’S

KENNY

GILBERT

Kenny is well known in racing circles

around SA. He’s a 5 times national

off-road champ and as we type this

Husqvarna racer is at no 2 – and

lying joint first in the champs. 13

Gold Roof of Africa’s – this is a really

experienced man in race circles.

He has entered Dakar for 2019 and will be competing on a 450

Husqvarna Rallye replica.

Earlier this year as a “Training” and qualification exercise,

he entered Morocco’s Merzouga rally, along with SA’s Stuart

Gregory, Shane Nel and Ryan Bland with the Netherlands Bas

Racing – and man was that a huge eye opener. His first ever

race like this. He tells the story.

“The biggest thing was learning to ride a rallye bike for the

first time – and reading the dunes was quite a challenge. I have

no idea how these guys jump them – you hit these things at

full tilt – and tap off near the top, you get stuck, I’m convinced

that the dune specialists have X-Ray eyes – it’s mad!”

In my opinion, the nature of rallye’s

like this has changed a lot – take

nothing away – but it’s much like the

Roof of Africa – it has moved up a a

lot. Ten years ago, you were a semiretired

racer and you undertook the

Dakar to cap your career. NOW

– many of the top enduro and MX

boys who are at their peak are

entering Rallye races and they

have changed the whole thing.”

“It felt as if I was at a World

enduro, racing with a road book.

Lots of the current champs were

there, Joan Barreda, Andrew

Short, Pablo Quintanilla, Toby

Price, all the top factory riders.

Pretty amazing to see. “

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018 3 5


The SA contingent. Shane

Nel, ryan Bland, Kenny G,

and Stuart Gregory.

“I kinda kept my head down and tried to

focus on the race and not the distinguished

company. My goal was to achieve a result

as a run up to one of the worlds most

prestigious events – and also to see how I

stacked up in this company.”

“It was one hell of an experience. I’d heard

that following a road book was a challenge,

so I signed up for a course with Portugals

WIM Academy earlier in the year for some

training. Let me tell you – I thought that I

had it waxed, until I found myself in a race

situation. Try cruising along at speed with

loads of terrain changes while trying to read

and navigate the road book bolted to the

tower. It’s hectic!

“The race started with a 5km time

trial pure sand dunes 100 percent sand,

everything looks the same – no markers and

you collect way points to get through. If you

skip a point, its a 15 minute penalty, so you

have to concentrate to stay on track – and

keep it safe. 20m off the line and there could

be a massive hole waiting for you. And you

are trying to go as fast as you can at the

same time. It was a real challenge and I

qualified 30th out of 140 bikes…”

“From there - it was race on. Day 1 was all

fast roads with fairly rocky terrain and quite a

few sand dunes thrown into the mix. A really

cool mixup – I was in my happy place. Things

started great and I was soon catching and

overtaking. Dust is a challenge, but you work

around that – all following way points. I made

a mistake following riders and not following

the road book… 3 times. Damn, that cost

a lot of time. I ended up 25th for the day –

probably 270km’s of racing. I reckon that this

was purely due to inexperience, watch this

space.”

“Day 2, more of the same, I really

struggled with the way points. Racing and

following is totally different to riding socially. I

ended up getting quite mad at myself. Ended

the day in 22nd position. Still not totally

happy with all of the mistakes – but that what

I entered for.”

36 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018

Stuart Gregory, Shane Nel and

Kenny heading out on day 1.


Day 3 and 4, marathon stage. No bivvy you camp out

in the desert and work on your own bike. No support.

“Day 3 was a complete different mindset. I rode slower

and paid more attention to the road book – and as a result

I went faster. No result on that day, they were calculated

after day 4 – but it felt good and I managed to gain a few

positions. The marathon stages were generally much

faster than the previous days – still lots of rocks with some

fairly gnarly rocky hill climbs. An absolutely amazing place

to ride your motorcycle.”

“The overnight was great fun you get to mingle a bit

and there is serious bench racing and banter on the go.

But it was an early night – everyone has the end in sight…

The tents are set up – first come first served and you

share with a fellow racer. Camp fires, chit chat - such a

great vibe.”

Glamping, the Bivvy

Day 4 – starts at 6am,

“I kicked off at 6h34, beautiful morning, nice and cool –

perfect time to ride a motorcycle. The top five leave in 3

minute intervals, the next 5 two minutes, and then one

minute intervals between the riders. I was still buzzing

from day 3 – it was very dusty with rocky, stony roads like

tennis balls. I found myself catching the group in front of

me and we all hooked up to the refuel point about 90km

in. The terrain started getting sandy with dunes – spread

the group out quite a bit. I found myself in the zone

following one of the Yammie factory riders, so I thought I

was on the right track.

At kilometer 155 (I remember it clearly), I made a small

error and tried to catch him – in the process – eyes off

the roadbook , more haste less speed, I hit a step in the

riverbed and went flying over the bars… Fortunately, the

bike took the brunt of the hit – I walked away with a small

scratch on my leg – and my Mojo was wrecked… most

people end up in hospital after a crash like this.”

“I couldn’t believe it, got up, picked up all the exploded

bike bits… re-tied the exhaust with my tow rope – and

tried to reassemble the nav tower with cable ties. But the

tower was beyond repair, I had to follow tracks and wait

for racers to overtake me so that I could follow them. The

bike was, luckily still OK. Husky’s are tough. I felt very

sorry for myself. That Yamaha guy finished 12th for the

day – and I was ahead of him on corrected time. Fek!”

“Bart from Bas racing met me at the bivouac.

Inspected the bike, shook his head and mumbled about

angels… I thought it was over, but I owe him the race – he

gave me a pep talk and told me in no uncertain terms that

the bike would be repaired and that I’d be racing the next

day. I was still running surprisingly, 25th overall.”

Top: Repairs in progress... A somewhat modified pipe after the riverbed crash...

Broken triple clamp... One slightly panelbeaten tower...

Left: Happiness after fixing the bike.

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018 37


Day 4 – 30 kilometres of 100 percent dunes.

“Man it exciting – an MX start off the line with all of

the competitors.

A 100m wide roaring wall. Straight into the dunes,

where the boys were separated from the men – with

apologies to Laia Sanz and the other lady racers. I

saw quite few guys come short, but it’s great to get

ahead of them. At this point you realise how quick

the Pro’s are in the dunes… It’s phenomenal to watch

– a real skill that comes with time and experience.”

“I had a couple if issues, my ERTF (waypoint

finder) fell off 10km’s in… thanks to the previous

days damage, so I ended up losing the group

of frontrunners, and once again, had to wait for

someone to come past so that I could follow. You

could follow tracks, but there was a race at the same

place on the previous day (the desert challenge), so if

you followed the wrong ones…”

“What a ride and what an experience. 25th overall

– not as good as I wanted, but I’ll take it considering.

It made me realise that more work needed to be

done before Dakar – specifically with regards to

roadbook.”

“I booked for a race In Portugal with the WIM

academy, a 2 day rallye – and I’ll tell you all about that

in next months issue…”

We’ll watch Kenny’s progress, it’s going to be one

heck of a journey.

Undertaking the Dakar costs a lot – if you are in a

position to help with some sponsorship, please get

in touch.

Kennysgilbert1@gmail.com

Recovering a bike...

At the end - looking

for any penalties on

the GPS...

Mr and Mrs Gilbert.

Happy smile at the

end...

laia Sanz Toby and Pablo... Joan Pedrero

38 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


ERZBERG 2018

23 out of 500 riders finish Erzberg… that’s Hard Enduro!

The Silent Assasin does it again… Two South Africans in the top 10…

Rockstar Energy Husqvarna

Factory Racing’s Graham Jarvis

has claimed victory in Austria at

the Erzberg Rodeo Hare Scramble.

In what was a dramatic, actionpacked

and unpredictable race,

Jarvis put on a late race charge

to take the win by just 41 seconds

from Red Bull KTM Factory

Racing’s Jonny Walker with early

pace setter Manuel Lettenbichler

finishing third.

Pics by Red Bull Media House - Futue7media

/ Red Bull Media House - Sebastian Marko/

Red Bull Content Pool

Markus Berger / Red Bull Content Pool -

Philip Platzer/Red Bull Content Pool

Under sunny skies and hot temperatures,

the 24th edition of the Erzbergrodeo Red

Bull Hare Scramble saw 500 riders blast

off the start line at 14.30 hours. With

all the main contenders in this year’s

WESS securing a front row start during

qualification, it was Taddy Blazusiak who

made his move early, taking the lead. But

with Walker hot on his heels, plus WESS

round one winner Billy Bolt (Husqvarna –

GB) and Lettenbichler right in contention,

any hopes of breaking away from the

chasing field were quickly ended.

During one of the early technical

woodland sections, the young guns of

Lettenbichler and Bolt moved past both

Blazusiak and Walker to take up the lead.

At Checkpoint 15 of 25, Lettenbichler and

Bolt had built up a lead of one-minute lead

over Walker while Sherco Factory Racing’s

Wade Young overtook Blazusiak for fourth.

However, with Checkpoint 19 forming the

formidable Carl’s Dinner boulder garden,

the race was anything but over. After a bad

start, Jarvis was beginning to cut his way

through the pack and was closing on the

leaders.

At Checkpoint 21 – Green Hell, the

race took another dramatic twist as both

Lettenbichler and Bolt became stuck on the

near-vertical woodland climb. Jarvis, now

in third, heroically pushed his way past the

stricken duo to the top and took the race

lead. Walker, following suit, tried to apply

pressure to the Husqvarna rider during

the final two signature sections Dynamite

and Lazy Noon but Jarvis kept his cool

to cross the finish line in an astonishing

time of two hours, five minutes and 59

seconds.

Winner of round two of the World

Enduro Super Series, Jarvis also secured

his fourth Erzbergrodeo Red Bull Hare

Scramble victory. Finishing just 41

seconds behind, Walker claimed the

runner-up result and in turn took control

of the WESS championship standings.

Regrouping after the punishing Green

Hell section, Lettenbichler was able to

cross the finish line three minutes behind

Jarvis in third, with SA’s Wade Young

coming home in fourth. Bolt, completed

the top five. Passing both Blazusiak

and Mario Roman (Sherco – Spain) in

Green Hell, Beta Factory Racing’s Travis

Teasdale (RSA) finished sixth with Paul

Bolton (KTM – GB) seventh.

After a promising start, Blazusiak

eventually ended his race in eighth.


Spain’s Pol Tarres (Husqvarna) took ninth

with Roman dropping back to 10th in the

closing stages of the race.

In total 23 riders completed this year’s

Erzbergrodeo Red Bull Hare Scramble

within the four-hour allotted race time.

Graham Jarvis:

“It’s always special to win here, but to do

it like I did, that ranks as one of my best

victories. I had a really bad start getting

stuck on the very first climb out of the

quarry and I lost so many places. Also, with

the dust it was really difficult to overtake on

the first couple of sections. It wasn’t until

Checkpoint 15 that I got up to about sixth,

but I knew Carl’s Dinner would be decisive.

I made a lot of time up there. When I got

to Green Hell I wasn’t quite sure what was

happening but I saw Billy and Manni stuck. I

got up so far and then was able to push the

rest. That for me was where the race was

won, but with Jonny chasing me home I

couldn’t relax until the chequered flag.”

Jonny Walker:

“That was a tough race but I am happy

to finish second and importantly take the

lead in the WESS standings. Taddy made

a mistake and I got out in front, but then

Manni and Billy passed me on a hill when

I messed up a little. Their speed was way

too quick and I knew I had to pace myself a

little. Carl’s Dinner was tiring, but I kept up

a steady rhythm and tried to minimise any

mistakes. I managed to clear Green Hell

and came out of there in second. The rest

of the race from then on was less tricky and

I pushed on as hard as I could but couldn’t

quite catch Graham before the finish. I’m

happy with second and although it would

have been nice to take the win, it’s great to

be leading the championship.”


Manuel Lettenbichler:

“I gave it everything I had, I wanted to win so

badly but just lost out towards the end. I had

a really great ride up until Green Hell. Billy and

myself were pushing the pace a lot and we

had built up a gap on the others. I wasn’t my

best in Carl’s Dinner and was still in contention.

Unfortunately, things went wrong in Green

Hell and Graham came past us. But this is my

debut podium at the Erzbergrodeo Red Bull

Hare Scramble, so it is something to celebrate.

Third in Extreme XL Lagares and now third here

is a very strong start to WESS too.”

2018 ERZBERG RODEO TOP TEN RESULTS

1. Graham Jarvis (Husqvarna) 2:05:59

2. Jonny Walker (KTM) +00:41

3. Manuel Lettenbichler (KTM) +03:03

4. Wade Young (Sherco) +15:45

5. Billy Bolt (Husqvarna) +24:04

6. Travis Teasdale (Beta) +32:50

7. Paul Bolton (KTM) +33:41

8. Taddy Blazusiak (KTM) +35:52

9. Pol Tarres (Husqvarna) +48:41

10. Mario Roman (Sherco) +52:58


Galfer Brakes

Stopping motorcycles since 1952

We stumbled across some interesting

news about Galfer brakes. This lot

makes brake discs, calipers, brake lines,

pads and shoes. And did you know that

they invented the dirtbike wave disc?

GALFER is a leading manufacturer of

friction materials and components for

braking systems for the motorcycling,

and bicycle sectors.

They sell individual pads and discs – or you

can get sorted with a complete kit, discs,

pads, the works.

A complete brake solution for road,

adventure and dirt bikes.

Wave discs, standard discs floating discs

and braided brake lines – it’s a simple, one

stop solution.

They are OEM on loads of high end bikes

and they are in the KTM powerparts

catalogue - the Super Duke that we rode in

RideFast last month was fitted with them.

TM, Sherco, Benelli, Beta, Bultaco and

loads of other use this supplier on all sorts

of their models – and they manufacture

aftermarket kits for all of the major

brands…

They have a massive R&D department

and collaboration with competition teams

keeps them developing and providing

world titles in areas including the MotoGP

World Championship, SBK, Motocross,

Supercross, Enduro, Trial, Supermotard,

etc.

They have quite an interesting history and

timeline – have a read…

1952

- Maffio Milesi establishes INDUSTRIAS

GALFER S.A.

- SEAT provider for drum brake linings and

clutch discs

- First supplies for PEGASO: brake linings

for heavy vehicles

- First drum brake linings for motorcycles

(Sanglas)

- Manufacture of COBALT highperformance

brake linings

1970

- First development of aramid fibers blends

to replace asbestos

- The second generation of Milesis takes

over management of INDUSTRIAS

GALFER, S.A.

1980

- Manufacture of de HP6/2 (Brake lining

without asbestos)

- First brake pads for motorcycles

(Mototrans Ducati)

- The use of asbestos for manufacturing

brake components is reduced by 80%

- First catalogue of disk brake pads

for motorcycle with 45 products and 2

composites (Gold and Silver)

1990

- The use of asbestos is totally

discontinued (100%) for manufacturing

brake components

- GALFER USA established in California

(USA)

- Development and manufacturing of the

first disk brake pads for bicycles

- Development and manufacturing of castiron

brake discs

- CMM Motocomponentes, S.L.

established to distribute motorcycle

products in Spain

- Development and manufacturing of

stainless steel brake discs

- Creation and registering the patent for

Disc Wave® in Europe and USA

- Development of sintered metal

compounds for disk brake pads

- Start of sintered metal brake pads

manufacturing

- Opening of the new INDUSTRIAS

GALFER, S.A plant in Granollers (Spain)

2010

- Creation of the production system for

the 2nd generation of sintered metal brake

pads

- Implementation of the ISO/TS 16649

quality system

It’s quite a company with a great European

pedigree.

In the offroad market they supply brakes

to the factory Beta team, Sherco Enduro

team, Honda Montesa trials, TM – enduro

and MX world championships, Honda 114

MX team, Marchetti racing team (World

MX). And you should check all the road

race teams…

Locally the brand is imported by Trickbitz

Dealer enquiries are welcome.

1960

- Manufacture of HP high-performance

brake linings

- Supplier of disk brake pads for the SEAT

124

- Manufacture of HP6 high-performance

brake linings

2000

- GALFER Auto, S.L. established for the

distribution of car products in Spain

- Creation and registering the patent for

peripheral disc

- New GALFER USA headquarters in

Oxnard (California)

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JUNE 2016 43


Pics by Zygmund Brodalka

Start of MX 1

Bloem Booms to

With four holeshots and four victories,

Caleb Tennant was dominant at the third

round of the 2018 TRP Distributors SA

Motocross National Championship at

BORC in Bloemfontein.

There were big fights behind him though,

most notably in MX1, the one between

his team mate Maddy Malan, Kerim Fitz-

Gerald and Jayden Ashwell in heat one.

Heat 2 saw 2017 MX1 Champion Tristan

Purdon come through for a 2nd place

ahead of Malan.

The MX2 Class saw some of the best

action of the day with a close battle

between Kerim Fitz-Gerald and David

Goosen for 2nd and 3rd place. Ride of the

day arguably came from Nic Adams who

came out of the first turn twice in second

place behind Tennant, but unfortunately

just couldn’t hang on to the usual suspects.

Husqvarna SA’S Caleb Tennent took

overall in both MX 1 and MX 2. Caleb set

the fastest lap times in both classes and

led from the gate drop till the checkers

KOM MAAK N DRAAI,ONS PRAAT OOK ENGELS


National Motorcross

Proudly Brought to you by:

Monster Energy Yamaha’s

David Goosen

life!

Race two also saw a possible new threat

coming to the front in the form of Slade

Smith who ran third for most of the race but

just couldn’t fight off the epic battle behind

him between Joshua Mlimi, Fitz-Gerald,

Purdon, Anthony Raynard and Bradley Cox.

The MX3 Class saw Dewald van der Berg

take 1-1 to close the gap between himself

and Ian Topliss.

In the Ladies Class, Leah Heygate took the

win ahead of her championship rival Kayla

Raaff. Amy Sawyer took 3rd in Heat 1 but

crashed in Heat 2 allowing Jenna Bohling a

chance to get onto the Ladies podium.

In the High School Class it was all about

Dalton Venter in race 1 to beat out Reagan

Wasmuth and Justin Sangster. Heat 2 was

a rerun of the first heat and Venter held out

for great 1-1 overall.

Joshua De Hutton lead Pro Mini by a long

way in race 1 but a small mistake cost him

the win which went to Dylan Kirk. Race 2

was about the come back of championship

leader Jonathan Mlimi followed by Kirk and

Blake Young. Kirk took the overall after a

solid 1-2.

Husqvarna SA’s Maddy Malan

Red Bull KTM South Africa’s

Kerim Fitz-gerald

Willow Rock Shopping Centre, Solomon Mahlangu Drive, Equestria,

Pretoria East LANDLINE: 012 111 0190 / 012 809 1670


Pics by Zygmund Brodalka

In 85cc Juniors, the battle in Heat 1 was

between Emmanuel Bako, points leader Troy

Muraour and Wesley McGavin. In heat 2, Luke

Grundy, who had a crash in Heat 1, put the

squeeze on Bako and managed a second.

Bako had a flawless overall for the day.

he 65cc Class was a close affair seeing local

rider Wian du Plooy do everything he could to

win the first heat and get back and close the

gap to Lucca Mynhardt and Emmanuel Bako.

But in race two Mynhardt came back to win

by 0.010 seconds. Du Plooy’s 1-2 earned him

the overall for the day.

50cc was shared with wins from Andrea

Mynhardt and Nicol Smit respectively but

Mynhardt’s 1-3 would give him the overall.

Andrea Mynhardt took

overall in 50 cc class and

retained the redplate

2018 SA Motocross

Nationals BORC Results

MX1

1st Caleb Tennant

2nd Maddy Malan

3rd David Goosen

MX2

1st Caleb Tennant

2nd David Goosen

3rd Kerim Fitz-Gerald

MX3

1st Dewald van der Berg

2nd Ian Topliss

3rd Brett Bircher

Ladies

1st Leah Heygate

2nd Kayla Raaff

3rd Jenna Bohling

125 High School

1st Dalton Venter

2nd Regan Wasmuth

3rd Justin Sangster

Pro Mini

1st Dylan Kitk

2nd Jonathan Mlimi

3rd Josh De Hutton

Nicol Smit took the

holeshot in the 50cc class

David Goosen (21) chasing

down Slade Smith (737)

in MX2

Dewald van der Berg took overall

for the day with a 1-1 Moto wins

in MX3. Taking back the red plate

and points lead.

Blade Tilly in 50 cc

85cc Juniors

1st Emmanuel Bako

2nd Troy Muraout

3rd Wesley McGavin

65cc

1st Wian du Plooy

2nd Lucca Mynhardt

3rd Emmanuel Bako

50cc

1st Andrea Mynhardt

2nd Jack Pullen

3rd Nicol Smit

Emmanual Bako

Leah Haygate (76) won

the ladies class and Alec

Combrink (97) took overall

ni the support class

KOM MAAK N DRAAI,ONS PRAAT OOK ENGELS


National Motorcross

Proudly Brought to you by:

Dalton Venter from Team CIT

Husqvarna took a 1-1 in the

125cc High School class

Dylan Kirk ,the kid from

Swaziland

Bloemfotein Central

Husqvarna rider Wian Du

Plooy took overall for the

day in the 65cc class

James Thompson on one of

the first Yamaha 65cc to be

seen at National level

Lights By Linea Anthony

Raynard

Mark Carthy in the 125cc

High School class

The Shred Betty’s sister

Carika and Yanke Pieterse

going head to head in the

Ladies class

Team Lights by Linea’s

Keegan Hickson Mahonay

(914) and Brett Roberts (202)

at the start of MX2

Monster Energy Yamaha Tristan Purdon(1) and Husqvarna SA’s Caleb Tennant (444) head to head for

the holeshot.Start of MX2.

Ian Topliss MX3

Willow Rock Shopping Centre, Solomon Mahlangu Drive, Equestria,

Pretoria East LANDLINE: 012 111 0190 / 012 809 1670


MX NATIONALS

PIC BY ANDRE SCHOEMAN


Junior

ADVENTURE

We took five of the current entry lever adventure models and undertook a

300km day ride through the bush, freeways and mountain passes to see if

they cut it as South African explorers….

50 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


BIG TEST JUNIOR ADVENTURE RIDE

For this event, we roped in the

talents of a motley crew of

riders. Although all of them are

experienced motorcyclists, most

of these guys and girls had not

ridden any of these bikes, so it

was a completely fresh perspective.

Our brief to them was – go out, have fun,

swap between the bikes all day and tell us

what you think. That simple. We did the

scientific part of working a route that was a

perfect mixup, shaking up the bikes, taking

photo’s and working out fuel consumption

figures. Because we have tested these

bikes all individually, we abstained from

actually riding the bikes on this one – and

left it up to the team to decide what they did

and didn’t like.

The bikes:

5 junior bikes were roped in.

In the 250cc class, we had Yamaha’s XT250,

Honda’s 250 Rally and Suzuki’s new 250

V-Strom.

In the (Slightly) bigger class, we roped in

the services of Kawasaki’s 300 Versys X and

BMW’s GS310.

Extras on the bikes included spots, crash

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018 51


5 gleaming bikes - just

waiting for the riders...

bars and panniers on the Kawasaki and

a topbox on the Suzuki. All top quality

genuine parts.

The Yamaha was a late entry – Yamaha

does not have a titled entry level adventure

like the rest, but it is something of a legend

and we thought that it would make sense to

chuck it into the mix for the blue bike fans.

What was interesting was the fact that at the

start of the ride, everyone kind of ignored

it – but by halfway through, there was arm

wrestling over who got to ride it next…

Our Route:

We kept it fairly simple – and if you have a

free day sometime, we suggest that you

follow our steps sometime. Just leave a bit

earlier than we did and you can chill on the

way home. Loosely – from our premises

in Bredell, we cut across the farmlands on

fairly good gravel – and along our favorite

footpaths through to Irene.

In Irene we stopped in at the garage to

check tyre pressures – some of the wheels

were pumped to like 3 bars… no wonder

some of the bikes were skidding around in

the dirt. Here’s a tip - On all bikes , tyres play

a part in your suspension – Max two bars –

on adventure bikes and even a bit softer for

gnarlier terrain. It makes a huge difference in

the way the bikes behave.

From Irene, we cut across and onto

the freeway towards Krugersdorp. We

meandered along and took the Wild West

turnoff towards Harties. Great bike route, lots

of twists and turns – but that road is also still

under repair – so there is a fat stop-n-go.

These little bikes climbed into the drainage

ditch along the side and made their way to

the front of the Queue.

Quick smoke break in

the warm sun, swap

bikes and off we

went. That road takes

you along Saartjies

nek and into the

bustling metropolis

of Hartebeespoort.

Riding across the

dam wall is always

fun – be warned however that on the

weekends, that road is always mad busy. We

took time to ogle the rushing water and the

water hyacinths (Shame on you waterboard),

said hello to the monkeys and continued.

The upper deck is a firm favorite among

motorcyclists – we stopped in for a burger

and hot chocolate – yup, a very macho lot

us guys. The food is always good and on

the weekends they usually have some live

music on the go. Having never been up

Maanhaarrand pass from this side before, we

had to ask google maps. She took us onto

the Sun City freeway for 20 odd kilometres.

We took the Marikana offramp left, past the

Buffelspoort dam. Shortly after the dam you’ll

find a gravel pass to the left, which winds its

way across the mountain all the way through

to Hekpoort.

Also known as Breedt’s Nek, this gravel

pass can be found just off the R763, near the

Magaliesberg Nature Reserve. It provides

a link across the Magaliesberg from the

settlement of Maanhaarrand to Buffelspoort

and the town of Mooinooi to the north-east.

The road bears an official number (D568),

and the condition ranges from poor to

terrible. Expect gradients of 1:10 and deeply

rutted and rocky sections. However, don’t

ride this road if you’re in a hurry.

It is quite a gnarly road depending on

all sorts like the time of year, but it is really

beautiful. This time round, it was littered

with rocks and gnarly little step ups. Perfect

for this test to check the little guys off-road

capabilities. Our lot stoically battled through

with varying degrees of new expletives we

had not heard before. No crashes, quite a

few saves and lots of stopping to just enjoy.

It really is a beautiful place.

Our tour guide took us for a little walk up

the mountain to check out the old cave right

at the top of the pass. Unfortunately, the cave

is used by Muti mense so they have made

a bit of a mess of the place… but it is worth

checking out.

After the cave, the road settles a bit and

its interesting gravel – follow the Hekpoort

signs. Stop in at the café at the bottom of

the pass for a quick wetty. You’ll probably

need one. The Hekpoort pass is amazing tar,

fantastic views and lotsa twisties all the way

up towards Krugersdorp. We turned Left at

the top and back onto the R28 in peak hour

traffic for the last freeway leg back to the

offices.

52 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


Some of our riders did come a bit

unstuck on the pass...

The cave at the top of the pass.

Mandatory stop at The Top

deck for a burger...

R15.54 per litre eish! Total added

distance on the 5 1000 KM’s.

R635.00 to fill them all. You tell us

that motorcycles dont make sense...

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018 5 3


As the sun set, it got colder and colder – as

we crossed the little rivers and vleilands, the

temperature literally plummeted… the wind

chill factor is not too bad because the bikes

aren’t really that fast.

It was a very chilly bunch that arrived back

at the office to hot coffee. Big smiles all

around. Just less than 300 happy KM’s for

the day.

Here’s the skinny. These are not the

biggest baddest bikes on the planet but for

this ride/route we could not really have asked

for much more. Too much fun was had by

well – everyone.

Meet your riders:

For this test we selected a great selection of

riders from all sorts of riding backgrounds.

• Corinne Andrews is quite literally one

of the most experienced lady riders in the

country. She’s been riding bikes since

before most of us were born. She’s raced

the Roof, countless desert runs and is the

lady responsible for the annual Q4Q event.

She owned and rode a V-Strom for years

and currently outrides most boys on her

Raptor 700.

• Bryan Schwim is a qualified, very

experienced motorcycle mechanic. He’s

been riding since he was a chicken – and

currently rides an old BMW GS1100 – one of

the very first ones. An XT660Z and when he

hits the dirt it’s on his WR450.

He was not much use as a mechanic on

this trip because none of the bikes gave any

hassles.

• Kurt Beine is the man behind the Roam

Africa forum. He has a wealth of adventure

experience – has written features for

Biker lifestyle magazine and Dirt and Trail

magazines for years. He’s somewhat biased

towards orange motorcycles

For this ride, he traded his big 1290 for

these slightly faster motorcycles.

• Donovan Gibbons, better known as Nemo

for his ability to get lost anywhere traded his

road bike patch for a Triumph Explorer a few

years ago. Since then the dirt bug has really

bitten with a 350 Katoom in the garage and

lots of kilometres under the belt.

For this ride, we stuck Donovan mid pack

and made sure he had someone to follow. He

did not go missing.

• Michelle Leppan, is related to Le

Potts and Le Spoons. You should check

this girl tear around the race track on her

GSXR750. A coupla years back, the family

discovered dirt on their quads and – as

happens it has stuck.

She was chucked into the deep end when

we did the V-Strom feature a few issues

back, but we bribed her to come back and

ride all of these ones…

Except for Michelle and the V-Strom, none

of these guys and girls had ridden any of

these bikes, so we were keen to hear their

feedback… We made no suggestions and

gave no input. This was a riders test and it

is interesting to read and see what everyone

thought. If you are in the market for a bike

like this, go and ride each of them before you

part with your hard earned shekels.

Please man - dont be silly...

The views at the top of the

pass are pretty spectacular.

54 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


WANDERLUST

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The bikes:

Some interesting facts… At a Glance.

These are claimed figures but please do note that the

consumption was worked out on this trip – gravel and tar

riding.

The 250 V-Strom’s liquid-cooled, SOHC parallel-twin

unit makes 25hp at 8,000rpm and 17.26lbft at 6,500rpm.

188kg.

Honda’s liquid cooled single CRF250 Rally makes

24.7hp at 8,500 rpm and 16.6lbft at 6,750rpm, but weighs

only 157kg.

Kawasaki’s twin cylinder liquid cooled Versys-X 300

makes 40hp at 11,500rpm and 18.9lbft at 10,000rpm, and

weighs 173kg.

The 169.5 kg BMW GS 310, makes 34hp at 9,500rpm

and 20.65lbft at 7,500rpm.

Yamaha’s XT makes 22BHP and weighs in at 132KG’s.

In no particular order the bikes stack up like this:

The Yamaha XT250

Price R59950.00

Single cylinder air cooled fuel injected 250cc four stroke.

Fuel consumption: 29.35 kilometres per litre.

Like we said earlier, Yamaha has not made a mini

version of their famous Tenere’, but they do have this,

often underestimated XT. This is absolutely the most basic

bike to take part in this feature – no fancy electronics, not

wind protection – just a fuel injected four stroke engine in a

pretty off-road biased suit.

In South Africa, this bike is rated as a farm bike really

– but after doing the maffs and seeing what the other

manufacturers are aiming at, we figured that it might just

fit the bill for our little adventure.

The popular XT250 dates back to 1981, and is now in

its third generation. It’s been in the same basic form since

2008, with EFI being added in 2013. The renewed interest

in small displacement bikes globally should ensure the

XT250’s continued run.

The XT250 is not intimidating in any way. For a bike

you can take into the dirt, the seat height is perfect. The

sub-32-inch unladen seat height may sound tallish on

paper, but we got both booted feet flat on the ground.

Certainly for something you take off-road, this is a

confidence-inspiring seat height – and perfect for the

shortys out there.

The bike is narrow, as is the dirt-bike firm seat, so you

don’t waste much of your leg length getting past the bike’s

mid-section. Adding to the ease of balancing on twowheels

is the XT250’s claimed wet weight of 131 KG’s—

11 kilogrammes less than the taller Honda CRF250L. The

suspension is far from sophisticated and the damping isn’t

adjustable, so you will have to manage your expectations.

At a low-to-moderate pace, the XT250 does its job well—

just don’t push it too much.

From both a seated and standing position, the XT’s

ergonomics work well; hand and foot controls are

comfortably situated and contribute to confidence in

handling the XT250.

It comes with an air-cooled motor, but with electric

starting and fuel injection, it has the most important

modern upgrades. Fueling is smooth and predictable.

The 249cc SOHC single is oversquare so the XT250 has

a peppy response off throttle. It’s nothing fast enough to

get you in trouble, and modulating the power with the

56 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


THE

BEST

OF BOTH

WORLDS

YAMAHA XT250

R59 950

Benefits and Features

▪ Light, nimble, easy‐to‐use and ultra‐reliable

make it the perfect on and off‐road machine.

▪ Fuel injected

▪ 33km/l

www.yamaha.co.za · +27 11 259 7600 · Facebook: Yamaha Southern Africa · Instagram: @yamahasouthafrica · YouTube: YamahaMoto_SA


non-adjustable clutch lever is straightforward.

We reckon that by fitting a pipe and maybe

modifying the airbox, you’ll get a few extra

ponies out of her…

With nearly nine inches of travel for the

gaiter-equipped front fork, Our riders had

no problem bouncing over the rutted pass,

picking the best routes through the step ups,

rock strewn paths and ruts..

Although shod with dual sport tyres—

which are naturally a compromise—the

Bridgestone Trail Wing 30s do a great job on

tar and gravel. They held fast in the dirt and

on the road. The easy power delivery helps.

There’s a single 245mm front disc to keep

the Yamaha XT250’s speed in check, and

action at the right lever is appropriately mild

on initial engagement. Squeeze harder and

you’ll find enough power to slow the bike

quickly, but nothing to chuck you over the

bars. Similarly, the rear brake works just fine.

Wandering down a dirt road, or a slightly

gnarly trail on the XT250 can be as laid

back as a Sunday drive—the bike is so

comfortable and casual it really makes for a

great travel companion.

Man did our guys have fun! The 2018

Yamaha XT250 is an excellent example of

the versatility that a dual sport bike offers in

a small package. The small displacement

makes it a great motorcycle for novices,

or anyone looking for an easygoing, solid,

dependable ride.

Donovan Says:

• First impression – what’s a bike from the

80’s doing here.....????

• A very plain, no fuss little bike. No fancy

electronics or plastics.

• A little on the low side for someone of my

height and absolutely no wind protection at all.

But saying that, its motor is surprisingly

nippy with all my weight on the seat.

It’s fun to play around with in the traffic

and to use to run to the corner shop with and

back. Handles the rough stuff very well and

you need not worry about breaking plastics if

you had to drop it in the dirt.

On the highway it ran okay considering it’s

only a little 250cc. Even running it flat taps at

125km/h the motor didn’t sound like it was

being over revved at all. It’s at home in the

dirt and plays like a little mx bike.

A bike that could work very well for your

kid to run to school to and back and still go

play around in the dirt over weekends for a

little fun but not entirely suited to well for long

rides on the high way…

Michelle says:

Hits:

• It’s great for getting around on and off road.

• Nice and light.

• It’s a great bike for anyone who wants to

ride tar, then hop off into the gravel, back to

tar. (Does that make sense?)

• Very basic, so you are not worried about

smashing stuff up if you crash.

Misses:

• Man, I think it’s ugly compared to some of

the other bikes on this ride.

• It’s wobbly at speeds on the freeway.

• The big bulky bracket on the back might

be practical but – hey I’m a girl I like classy

looks.

Corinne says:

The ugly duckling with a BIG heart. User

friendly, light and goes anywhere, anytime.

This little 250 could make a mountain goat

cry. Comfortable seat and suspension, no

flash plastics basic, simple and efficient. I felt

completely at home on the tar, rocks and on

the long dirt roads. Not the fastest [133kmph]

but it had Brian and myself arm-wrestling

over this unassuming little 250.

Bryan says:

Hits:

• Plush ride.

• Fantastic little bike.

• Loads of fun to ride.

• Super light and agile.

• Very low seat height.

• Peppy well geared motor.

Misses:

• Little wind protection (not much problem at

the speeds it can get to).

• Riders with Long legs get slightly cramped.

• They need to update and modernize the

styling.

Kurt says:

On Monday I get this phone-call from

Glenn, asking if I want to go and test a few

small bore bikes on Wednesday, what a

question, work, or ride bikes, so I’m there on

Wednesday morning, bright eyed and empty

tailed, there’s this row of small bore dual

sport bikes, some more dual than others…

we kit up and get ready to go, there stands

this little Yamaha XT 250, all forlorn and

lonesome, completely ignored, I hate to see a

sad bike, so I jump aboard, the XT 250 is the

cheapest option here, and the most basic,

but once out on the trails I was glad to be

astride the little Yammie, still feeling rather

fragile myself, it is light, nimble and agile, in

the bush it will go anywhere, braking is good,

the suspension soaked up the rough terrain

comfortably. Once back on tar it was at a bit

of a disadvantage against the others at top

end, but held its own quite well.

58 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


The Suzuki V-Strom 250

Price R73250.00

Parallel twin 250cc Fuel injected four stroke.

Fuel consumption: 27.48kilometres per litre.

This is the newest addition to the entry

level adventure segment in South Africa.

The 250 ‘Strom only arrived here a month or

so ago – we took it for a good long run the

last time round, this time it was the turn of

everyone else to give it a shot.

Suzuki seems to be looking for a niche

with this bike – the parallel twin is incredibly

revvy and fun to ride, but they mounted

smaller, cast more street oriented wheels,

which limits it in the off-road department.

Despite the adventure credentials of the

V-Strom name, this bike is stressed as having

a much stronger road focus than other

bikes on test, with 17-inch wheels to allow

for agility rather than 19 or 21-inch that the

competitor models feature.

So: The V-Strom, or DL250 to give it its

proper name, joins its bigger beaked brothers

– the DL650 and DL1000 – in Suzuki’s

adventure tourer range, although in this case

the emphasis is very much on the ‘tourer’.

Its excellent fuel efficiency, low seat height,

revvy engine and great price is likely to make

it a popular option among commuters and

we’d seriously consider a bike like this for

commercial use.

Handling

In terms of handling, the V-Strom 250 does

what it says on the tin – its design concept

is ‘Massive and Smart’. That 188kg mass

keeps it steady on the road, and the bike

offers stable handling across a breadth of

speed, without jumping around like some of

its lighter counterparts.

The wind tunnel engineered faring and

screen protects the rider from the brunt of

the pressure, allowing big kilometres to be

achieved without fatigue. However, at speeds

approaching the national limit, you do get a

bit of a buzz through the bars and pegs.

Speaking of bars – these ones are pretty

narrow, we’d fit a wider set.

In saying this, however it handled this

whole test with ease. It’s only on the pass

that the lack of ground clearance became

apparent, we clobbered the plastic sump

guard (a standard feature), quite a few times.

Suspension

The suspension is firm yet forgiving, and

copes admirably across various size potholes

and on good gravel roads.

Brakes

The newly-designed 10-spoke wheels on

the V-Strom feature smart wavy-type brake

discs. This design purports to prevent brake

fade because it dissipates heat better, The

brakes are perfect for a bike like this. ABS

is standard on both front and rear wheels

and, short of removing the fuse, cannot be

switched off.

Equipment

As would be expected from any adventurer

tourer worth its salt, there is a host of

additional accessories, this one came with a

23-litre top box.

Donovan Says:

First impression - very good looking bike,

nice lines and styling - well done Suzuki!

Climbing onto the bike for the first time

I was rather taken back at how small the

bike feels. Narrow handle bars, lowish

seat position but once we got riding it was

comfortable, great riding position – even for a

big guy like me. Not so comfortable to stand

and ride in the dirt.

Everything works well and feels great on

the bike. Great clutch and brakes and easy to

ride with the motor being very responsive for

a little 250.

Handled the dirt well, had no problem on

the gravel and even climbing the rockier stuff

very well.

On the highway riding at 120km/h you

were just running below the rev limiter and

once you hit about 125km/h the rev limiter

light goes crazy.

60 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


Helena

083 382 0950


A lot more comfortable cruising on the

highway at about 115km/h leaving you

enough to overtake if you need to. Great

wind protection on the highway

Michelle says:

Hits:

• I like the Suzuki ‘coz of the height and my

feet can both reach the ground.

• It is light to handle if you need to catch it.

• It is comfortable in the saddle.

• Brakes are good.

• I like the look of it.

• It runs around happily at 120 on the freeway

and is stable … needs a little more oomph.

• It handles gravel well … on road tyres not

too bad but I would fit a dual compound tyre

for hitting the gravel roads..

Misses:

• It’s a bit lazy – compared to the other bikes

on test.

• I don’t like the mirrors as they are a bit in the

way – especially off-road.

• It could use wider handle bars ( Which

might fix the problem with mirrors)

• It gets to the limiter too quickly on the

freeway ( when you need the extra oomph).

Corinne says:

A really nice looking motorcycle – not too tall

and it handles well on road and off-road. I

found it a bit under powered and feels like it

needed another gear as it tends to over rev.

I couldn’t wait to ride it but found myself a

little underwhelmed –I did expect more but

had to remind myself that it is only a 250.

Maybe I was let down after the 650cc V

Strom because that is such a fantastic bike

and expected the same smooth, faultless

ride. Great quality feel though.

Bryan says:

Hits:

• Low seat

• Light

• Quite comfy

• Good brakes.

Misses:

• Quality feel and build quality.

• Needs more grunt – revs a lot.

• Lacks real personality, it feels a bit

confused.

Kurt says:

I only had a short stint on the Suzuki 250

V-Strom, and was very impressed; it has a

comprehensive dash, a very revvy smooth

twin cylinder motor, comfortable saddle and

ample wind protection, the only improvement

I would suggest would be wider handlebars,

especially when venturing off the beaten

track. Brakes were good, handling was

stable, it did not feel like a 250 in bike size, it

felt slightly bigger.

I did not ride dirt on the Suzuki, but others

that did were pretty impressed.

62 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


Kawasaki Verys 300X

Price R75500.00

Parallel twin Fuel injected 300cc four stroke.

Fuel consumption: 22.01 KM’s per litre.

Kawasaki has been careful with how

they present the Versys-X, stating it’s a

touring machine with ‘adventure’ styling,

so as not to oversell the bike’s adventure

capabilities, which is fair enough. This

isn’t an off-road motorcycle, what it is,

is an exceptional all-rounder with some

strong dual terrain qualities.

To match the marketing line, the Versys

is surprisingly well thought out. It’s got

spoked wheels in a 19-inch front, 17-inch

rear configuration. They’ve also given

it mildly long-travel suspension and a

deliberately strong sub-frame design. It is

pillion capable, has a decent sized 17-litre

tank, and an assist/slipper clutch. On top

of that, Kawasaki has a decent collection of

accessories including proprietary luggage.

We have to say that of the bikes on test

this is undoubtably the best equipped in

terms of pretty stuff like faring, display and

so-on.

Kawasaki SA loaned us this bike with

some quality extra’s bolted on. Crash bars,

Spot lights and genuine Kawasaki panniers

made the bike look a lot bigger than what it

actually is.

Very sexy indeed.

We last tested this bike about a year ago

when it was first introduced to the SA market.

Back then we had to comment on the overall

performance – for a little 300, this bike has

some impressive street cred.

A Recap:

The Versys makes use of the fuel-efficient

eight-valve, liquid-cooled 296cc, six-speed

parallel twin fitted to its Ninja 300 sports bike

brother. Kawasaki has tuned the motor for

greater versatility, changing the airbox shape,

intake funnels, and exhaust for greater

midrange power that’s better suited to the

Versys platform. The dual throttle valve fuel

injection system provides crisp response

with a very linear delivery from low rpm to

the rev limiter that cuts in at 12,750 rpm.

Overall ergonomics are good, it’s a

comfortable upright seating position, with

a natural reach to the ‘bars, and easy

grippable tank, which holds a generous 17L.

The clutch lever is super light, while neither

brake offers a heap of bite.

The screen also offers reasonable wind

protection, although audible wind buffeting

is noticeable on the freeway at 110km/h. The

large, tall surface area of the bike also makes

it more susceptible to side-on wind gusts on

the freeway, which is also something to be

mindful of on the freeway.

Spoked wheels are a nice touch, and while

the exhaust is quiet, remember that on bike

like this, you’re often banging around in high

revs. If you add a slip-on you’ll probably

deafen yourself and end up the least popular

person in your street…

A seat height of 815mm we never once

felt like the bike was unwieldy, or had trouble

getting feet down.

Talking of the seat… we are not sure what

Kawasaki was thinking…it may be OK for

short distance commuting, but for longer

rides, it becomes a bit uncomfortable.

We figure that they’ve kept the amount of

padding down for a low seat height, but

it is quite hard and slender. We’d look at

a modification like one of those inflatable

cushion jobs for longer forays.

While Kawasaki claims the suspension

is long travel, the travel is 130mm front and

140mm rear, offering a great mix of sporty

capabilities, with the ability to swallow up our

typically terrible road surfaces, not to mention

handling gravel sections with ease. It’s a great

blend, we reckon that Kawasaki nailed it.

Ground clearance is 180mm, so this will be

the main constraint when riding serious off

road, however for gravel or clearing gutters

and speed bumps the suspension is just

really well set-up out of the box. Power is

claimed at just under 40hp, which realistically

isn’t that far off the big 600s, and at 175kg on

the road fully fueled (with 17L weighing you

down) this is a light machine.

On any small bike like this you use the

gearbox a lot… use your gears and you’ve

got the speed to well and truly stay ahead of

the traffic, and the engine will pull smoothly

all the way.

64 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


Donovan Says:

First impression - looks like a little adventure

bike – nice! Good stance for a small bike, really

good looking.

Great riding position and very comfortable

seated riding position but not for standing in the

dirt, especially if you are a taller rider. It feels a

little more bulky than the V-Strom.

Nice feel to the clutch and brakes and

accelerates quite strongly for a 300cc.

Nice motor! Nice and nippy around town

and between the cars. She runs very well on

the highways, comfortable at 120km/h and has

some guts left to overtake nicely on the highway

and to cruise comfortable at speeds a little over

the speed limits.

Performed well on the gravel and on some of

the rocks.

Ladies might have a problem with the ride

height off road and find it a little too high for

them in the rough stuff.

Michelle says:

Hits:

• Brakes are good

• I like how big it looks … looks the part

• I like the firm suspension

• It runs well on freeway you feel safe, not like

you won’t have power to get away.

• Its handles gravel well…

Misses:

• The seat is a little wide so the reach to the

floor becomes a problem

Corinne says:

Not a bad looking bike and one of the fastest

in the stable – I saw a cool 155 km/h. I didn’t

like the clutch action-way too soft and found it

difficult on the rocks but handles the long dirt

roads and tar with style.

There is a bit of overkill with the big panniers

and this is the hardest seat my bum has

ever come into contact with. This bike would

probably be my second choice of the five bikes

tested.

Bryan says:

Hits:

• Looks pretty.

• Lots of wind protection.

• Suprisingly comfortable and well behaved on

dirt roads.

Misses:

• Low ground clearance

• Vibrates from 100km (no point in wind

protection).

• Could use more bottom end (small twin)

• Perhaps a bit bland – needs more personality.

Kurt says:

After the roadworks stop was my chance to

ride the Versys I am very impressed, that 300

cc twin is smooth, and has ample power,

comfort is good, as well as wind protection. It

handles rough dirt reasonably well but is more

comfortable on good surface dirt, and quite

happy on highway tar, this one was fully kitted,

spotlights and panniers, a very good all-rounder.

66 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


The BMW GS310

Price R80400.00

Single Cylinder Fuel injected 310cc 4-stroke.

Fuel consumption: 26.90 KM’s per litre.

It has taken us a while to get our mitts back

onto this bike. Last year, we went across to

the world launch, then there was a launch

locally – and it would appear that the bike

was in such demand, that we simply could

not get it again until now. And even then, we

only had it for one day – and we made the

absolute most of it on this trip.

People love GS. No disputing that fact it’s

become the bike BMW is known for. So why

wouldn’t the company want to extend its

glow to a much more accessible motorcycle

for a wider audience?

That bike is the G310GS. This singlecylinder

lightweight adventure machine takes

the company’s offerings for multi-surface

touring into new lower-cost, more accessible

territory. It’s perfect in size and character for

new riders and virtually anyone else who

wants a fun, well-mannered, adventure-ready

motorcycle for a relatively affordable price

with ABS as standard equipment.

That BMW chose to build the bike in India

is not so surprising. Manufacturing standards

can be managed more easily than expense.

And since these bikes are aimed pointedly

at the lucrative world market, where massive

populations in regions like South America

and Asia are eager for affordable efficiency,

end cost is key.

The G310GS is largely based on the

G310R roadster and therefore shares the

same unusual reverse single-cylinder engine

with the intake at the front and the exhaust at

the rear, as well as many other common parts

that help to keeps costs down a bit.

The bike is small (32.8-inch seat height),

easy to manage, and aimed squarely at new

riders. Clutch pull is light, gearbox action

positive, and the ABS-equipped brakes offer

friendly response. Suspension tuning is on

the soft side and copes well with bumps,

while the tall off-roady riding position gives

you some “houding” on the road.

Longer-travel suspension and a largerdiameter,

off-road-friendly 19-inch front wheel

help with this in-command stance on this

claimed 168KG wet motorcycle. Heaps of

fun, far less serious than the bigger beemers

on the market.

At the heart of that fun is BMW’s highrevving

310, a modern single that purrs more

than it thumps. Power delivery is smooth

and consistent all the way up to a 10,500-

rpm redline, with maximum power residing

right around 9,500 rpm. And yup, we’re only

talking about 34 ponies, but these ponies are

well marshalled. The only place you’ll truly

pine for top-end is on the highway, where the

little GS begins to feel taxed over 130 kph.

Vibration is minimal until you reach about

7,000 rpm, where it builds as a shiver felt

through the seat and secondarily through the

bar and the enduro-style pegs.

It boasts easy handling, the same edgy

enduro-styling of its GS relatives – albeit in a

significantly smaller and more learner-friendly

package – and a fun engine.

The small screen is standard as is the large

luggage rack, which can accommodate a

factory BMW top box. BMW doesn’t offer

panniers in the accessories pack, but you

can get an optional top box and tank bag.

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018 67


Donovan Says:

First impression - a sexy looking little bike, great lines and stance

It’s a comfortable bike to sit and ride for a taller rider, nice riding

position.

The motor is nippy all though it does sound like a little popcorn

machine when revved. Awesome fun in the traffic and easy to move

around with.

On the highway it performed well and was comfortable cruising at

120km/h and had lots left for overtaking and cruising above the speed

limit. Motor was comfortable at speeds of 130 -135km/h and was not

over revving at those speeds.

The bike offers little to no wind protection and taller rides will feel this

on the highways. The front brake took some getting used to though, the

nose of the bike dives every time you pull it.

The BMW handled the dirt very well and was comfortable on the dirt

and rocks, as long as you remember to leave the front brake alone. Nice

ground clearance allows it to climb the rocks nicely

Michelle says:

Hits:

• I like the look very pretty

Misses:

• I found the bike a bit uncomfortable.

• The front suspension is too soft

• When you brake it sticks it nose in the ground it didn’t make me feel

comfortable.

• I had to look for the rear brake

• Build quality not as good as the other bikes.

Corinne says:

My first ride of the day – we hadn’t checked the tyre pressure and so I

was all over the show in the dirt and the slippery grass twee spoor trail [a

bit scary]. Turns out that the wheels were pumped to 3 bars of pressure.

Not bad on the tar and handles well, though I thought a bit under

powered for a 310cc. I found the bike a little bit big and bulky with a

seat from hell when sitting astride. The seat cut into my inner thighs but

once your feet are on the pegs the seat is okay. A nice looking bike but

somehow doesn’t feel quality like a BMW should.

Bryan says:

Hits:

• BMW 310- Pros- Nice and light

• Good looking bike

• Comfortable seat

• Very soft ride

• Motor quite strong (but noisy)

Misses:

• I got a bit of a head shake on dirt

• Build quality not as good as I expected

• The tank shape odd for long legs

• Front end feels a bit too soft

• Found that it stalled a lot.

Kurt says:

I saved my turn on the BMW 310 GS for the pass. I’ve read all the

reviews, it sounded impressive. I jumped on board the BMW just

before Breedsnek, I had not been over this pass in years and had

forgotten what it was like after getting used to the GS clutch. I think it

stalls far too easily.

The 310 GS handled all the gnarly sections, and gnarly they were,

quite comfortably, braking is good, suspension coped well, quick

direction changes, which were often, were handled well. Not once did I

feel uncomfortable, or that I wanted to be on any of the other bikes over

this very rough pass, I am suitably impressed.

68 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


Honda’s XL250 Rally. Price: R84999.00

Single cylinder fuel injected 250cc 4-stroke.

Fuel consumption: 28.6 kilometres per litre.

When they launched this bike last year,

Honda SA dragged us off to the Karoo for a

two day ride.

We thrashed the bikes back then and

can state with absolute certainty that these

are amongst some of the most bulletproof

machines out there.

They had their standard ‘L’ along on the

same launch and some of our colleagues

derided the Rally as nothing more than

CRF250L in Africa Twin livery — the same

bike, pretending to be related to Honda’s

Dakar bike. That wasn’t fair, and turned out to

be not quite true. The Rally, while still tame by

Dakar standards, included some upgrades

that gave it considerably more capability.

If you don’t already know, the 250L is a

budget bike that Honda manufactures in

Southeast Asia. The bike’s technology is

modern, a fuel-injected, DOHC, four-valve

four-stroke with a six-speed gearbox and

electric start. It’s not, however, known

for its performance. It makes less than

25 horsepower and has inexpensive

components everywhere.

The Rally is more than just a dressedup

version of the 250L. In addition to

more powerful front brakes, a windscreen,

blacked-out wheels and that “Rally-style”

color scheme, there are several areas in

which the Rally is a more capable bike than

the 250L — off-road and on.

Honda took the 2016 250L and gave it a

larger throttle body (38mm from 36mm), a

big front brake rotor (296mm), a new exhaust

and then added adventure hardware.

That includes a 2.7-gallon fuel tank, a

floating windscreen, an asymmetrical LED

headlight, radiator shrouds that blend in

with the bodywork and a radiator fan. The

suspension is longer on the Rally, coming

out to 11 inches in front and 10.3 inches

in the rear. That brings the seat height up

almost an inch over the standard L model.

The suspension has no clickers or preload

adjusters; what they give you is what they

give you.

The layout is roomy for a medium-sized

man. Women and teenagers might struggle

with the seat height, but it’s no taller than a

full-sized off-road bike. The clutch is smooth

and the gearbox is easy to shift, as long as

your feet aren’t too big. In overall quality,

the bike far exceeds anything in its price

range. Even though this doesn’t come out

of mainland Japan, Honda clearly demands

that its satellite factories adhere to the same

standards of quality control. There are no

sloppy welds, bad castings or anything to

suggest third-world quality

Honda says that the curb weight is 346

pounds. You can have abs brakes if you

want, but that will cost you an extra $300.

Although sharing the 250L liquid-cooled

engine, six-speed gearbox and chassis and

strapped with the same 18” rear and 21”

front wheels, the Rally version stands taller,

has more ground clearance, and has more

suspension travel than its little brother bike.

This immediately tells you that this one is

aimed squarely at the off-road brigade rather

than just the commuter fraternity.

And let’s not forget one of the most

important features – Honda absolutely

nailed it with the styling on the Rally. There’s

nothing to give it away; it looks every bit as

legitimate as an Africa Twin. It’s flippen pretty.

It seems that our riders were pleasantly

surprised by the rally. At 100KPh, the Rally

had enough power to keep up with traffic

and offers enough wind protection for a rider

to stay unbuffetted and comfortable.

There were plenty of times when we

wished for more power, and plenty of times

when we had to drop a gear to maintain

pace. The gearing on the bike is quite low,

low down and high in the higher gears – so

we’d probably fiddle around with that a bit

to make it a bit more balanced in the power

department.

Up and down the pass, the Honda really

shone – we made good use of the 21-inch

front wheel, off-road tyres and the , 11 inches

of front end suspension travel. These got us

nimbly through the nasty sections and off the

mountain pass without too much drama…

If you’re not interested in aggressive trail

riding, blitzing freeways and aren’t planning

to rip up any sandy hill climbs, the Rally

ably answers a lot of motorcycling needs. It

simply does everything well…

70 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


Donovan Says:

First impression - let the fun begin !!! It looks

like a smaller version on the African Twin.

Looks the part of a small adventure bike

and looks ready to take on Africa.

It is the tallest of the bikes we road on the

day but that was perfect for a bigger guy like

me.

Great riding position and super

comfortable.

On the road the motor does feel a little

under powered at first but once you out and

about on the highways and hitting the dirt it

makes sense, geared to do long trips and the

Honda is super comfortable cruising along

at 120km/h on the highway and has the

best wind protection of all the bikes. A gear

indicator would be nice.

Once you hit the dirt the little 250 comes

into its own, so planted on the dirt, it’s tall,

soft suspension soaking up all the bumps. Its

wider foot pigs and handle bar positions lets

you stand up and enjoy the dirt roads to the

fullest.

Climbing the rocks on the Honda was a

breeze , 2nd gear and you stand and just

go, suspension allows you to point the front

wheel and go.

This set up with a little stronger engine,

maybe a 350 or 450 and Honda would have

a peach of a small adventure bike…

Michelle says:

Hits:

• Loved the Honda.

• Looks the part.

• Light.

• It doesn’t have all the add on’s you don’t

need.

• I could get off and move it around no

problem

Misses:

• It’s a little tall for me

Corinne says:

If I had a young son who wanted an entry

level adventure bike, this would be it – super

looking, slim and no bulky plastics. It handles

really well in the dirt and rocks and not too

shabby on the tar as well. A bit tall for me

but the suspension is good and I felt quite at

home in the saddle. A nice all round bike and

would be my first choice out of the 5 bikes

tested.

Bryan says:

Hits:

• Feels like a Dakar type bike but way lighter.

• Super soft plushy ride.

• Great revving engine.

• Looks the part

• Comfortable dirt bike

Misses:

• The final drive gear ratio way too long.

About 5 teeth bigger on the rear should wake

it up a bit…

• Bit too much plastic for fall overs.

Kurt says:

This was my second bike for the day and I

would have liked some more dirt time on the

Honda, but this was not to be, on tar wind

protection was good, and 140km/h on the

level sections quite easy, comfort was good,

high end equipment justified the higher price,

but more on this later…

After riding all 5 bikes, the last section

home, which was to be mostly highway. I

found my way aboard the Honda 250 Rally

again. By now I knew that the biggest ally

of a small bore bike on tar is momentum,

everything must be planned ahead, no

twist and go that I am used to on big bore

bikes. The Honda coped well, by now it was

getting cold, wind protection was adequate

given that I am tall, comfort was good, and

although the Honda Rally only has a 250cc

motor, it has a big heart - I even passed a

Harley on the highway, which we all know is

quite difficult to do.

I hit rush hour traffic, the little Honda

breezed through it all with ease, the bright

headlight letting everyone know I was coming

through…

And Kurts finisher was perfect to round

this story off:

This whole exercise made me realize that

we don’t really need these huge horsepower

big bore adventure bikes to have fun, all

5 of these bikes handled the route very

comfortably, I think each of us had a favourite

bike, and I don’t think any one bike was the

favourite to all. Although prices vary, so does

equipment and features, but I think fun factor

was pretty similar throughout…..

I for one was quite glad to be re-introduced

to Breedsnek on a smaller bike than my

own personal bike, but next time, it’s the big

orange and I…

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018 7 1


MAKE IT A

DOU

IT’S NEVER HAPPENED BEFORE IN THE 10 YEARS OF THE INT. GS TROPHY BUT REIGNING 2016

CHAMPIONS CHAMPIONS TEAM TEAM SOUTH SOUTH AFRICA AFRICA HAVE HAVE MADE MADE HISTORY HISTORY AND AND WON WON THE THE PRESTIGIOUS PRESTIGIOUS EVENT EVENT

FOR FOR THE THE SECOND SECOND TIME TIME IN IN SUCCESSION. SUCCESSION. ALL ALL THE THE PRESSURE PRESSURE WAS WAS ON ON THEM THEM ON ON THE THE FINAL FINAL

STAGE OF THIS HARD-FOUGHT EIGHT-DAY COMPETITION BUT THEY HELD THEIR NERVES TO

SECURE THE TITLE. FIND OUT EXACTLY HOW THEY DID IT.

72 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


BLE

Leonard van

Greunen

Every two years since 2008 BMW Motorrad has hosted the BMW Motorrad International GS Trophy

that started in deserts of Tunisia. Since then it has been hosted in South Africa in 2010, South America

in 2012, Canada in 2014, Thailand in 2016 and for 2018 in Mongolia.

The Trophy is an opportunity for the BMW customer to use the GS and put their skills to the test

against other top teams selected from around the globe. Each participating country hosts a local GS

Trophy competition to select their best 3 riders to partake in the International GS Trophy.

No professionals. No race license holders. No GS instructors are allowed.

This creates a great opportunity for the average GS owner to be able to participate.

Once you have been selected to represent your country in the International GS Trophy you are not

allowed to go again, thus there will always be new heroes…

Our friend Leonard van Gruenen was invited along with 18 other global ambassadors to marshal this

years event. We wanted the story from a slightly different angle – and he told us what it was like…

Pics by Leonard van Greunen and Vanessa Blankenagel…

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018 73


How the bug bit…

This was a dream for me. I bought my

first BMW GS in 2006, a R 1100 GS - all I

could afford at that stage but a R 1150 GS

Adventure soon followed. With no riding dirt

experience and always on the cautious end,

my mate Herman Kirstein and I decided that

it was time for a course. The Intermediate

course at Country Trax Off-Road Academy.

Best choice I have made. Understanding

and practicing the basics just boosted the

confidence and then going off-road just

made it a blast. All worth it.

After seeing some mates competing in the

2010 GS Trophy here in SA, the dream came

to life again. 2012 was time for an Advanced

Course.

The Country Trax Advanced course is

a 4 day training course that pushes and

challenges you as a rider with all different

obstacles and exercises. While attending the

course, you think to yourself, why am I doing

this? But looking back now, the experience

and skills not only make you a much better,

safer rider but there is a riding discipline

and respect to fellow riders that you would

understand once you have done this course.

Thus, all, or most of the last 8 years of

International GS Trophy participants and

teams are all survivors of this course…

Herman soon became an instructor at

Country Trax. I asked if I could join for the

weekend as I just needed some time away

and I took my R 1150 GS Adventure with

me. I took some pictures of the participants

and the next thing I was there once a month

taking pics, picking up cones and bikes. My

riding skills were improving day by day and

many many hours were spent on the GS.

The challenge was on to participate in

the 2015 qualifier for 2016 International GS

Trophy in Thailand. I got the call from Jan

asking if I wanted to take part in the BMW

International Instructors Academy course

that was happening in February 2015. An

opportunity of a life time. And experiencing

the skill of John, Charl and Byron it was a

good call. They went on to become the world

Champions in 2016.

With the BMW Instructors course done,

the dream of attending as a competitor in the

International GS Trophy was forfeited, but the

journey to follow was unbelievable…

Over the next 3 years I was privileged to

attend the BMW Mottorad days in Germany

with Country Trax as an Instructor. There, you

get to meet and spend time with the people

involved in the BMW Motorrad family, from

the designers, to the management from

BMW Motorrad. This event welcomes over

40 000 motorcycles every year from all over

the world. This year it is 6-8 July and we will

be there again.

In 2016 the South African Trophy winning

team was there and we had an awesome trip

through the Alps on the motorcycles.

The announcement was made in February

2017 that the next International GS Trophy

would be hosted in Mongolia.

The only reference we had to Mongolia and

motorcycles was the Long Way Round series

that put GS on the map. The excitement

was growing in SA and the local qualifiers

74 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


were in progress all over the world. This year

it was the turns of Mark Dickinson, Eugene

Fourie and Chris Meyer as well as two SA

ladies Linda Steyn Boddington and Ezelda

Van Jaarsveld. (You’d have seen all of this in

previous issues). In November 2017 the two

SA ladies had to compete against 23 other

International ladies to get a spot of 6 to go to

Mongolia. And so they did.

This event was also my dream come true. I

was contacted a few weeks before by Tomm

Wolf, the father of GS Trophy to ask if I would

be available for a month as a Marshal in the

GS Trophy. Of course it was a YES!!!!!

BMW Management had to make the final

selection of 18 Marshals worldwide. Few

weeks later I got the Invitation letter. It was

a go but still so unreal. A few months later, I

received the bag with all the kit, rally suite etc

etc – Game ON!.

14 May was the departure date. I joined Jan

du Toit, Gert Becker and Marchant Maasdorp

as the 4 South African Marshals on the GS

Trophy. Nerves were at a peak as I soon

would be joining so many respected men and

woman in the business. After a long journey to

Ulaanbaatar, we met the rest of the crew - and

it was clear that it was not about individuals,

but a team effort to get a job done.

We left the Hotel and swopped our

rooms for the traditional ‘Gers’ or yurts

at the Chingisiin Khuree camp, near

Ulaanbaatar. Some paperwork, medicals

and presentations. I must say BMW is very,

very professional in this matter. We then got

our personalized bikes with our names on

and this feeling is indescribable. It was quite

the moment. Prepping on bikes done and

time to drink a local beer and discuss the

next days agenda…

The marshals are responsible to lead

groups from 2 countries from the start to

finish on each day. Every day the teams are

swapped.

They also set the pace. With the

continuous changing terrain of every

day’s route it is not an easy job. With the

participants on a mission to go flat out, safety

is the biggest concern for BMW. For that

reason there is a sticker on the handlebar

#itsnotarace just to remind them about this.

The real race starts when they arrive at

the different special stages. Normally there

are 2 or 3 stages per day. The special stages

consist of different exercises to test each

participant’s skill on the bike as well as some

exercises like Navigation by GPS. This was

the job for Gert and I. We were two of four

marshals responsible to set up and score

the special stages. Every morning we would

leave an hour or so before the participants

to build the stages. The other two marshals

then proceed to the next stages and build

there, they were both from Germany.

Days were long with 10-12 hours out

riding. But so worth it.

A team of 23 people, marshals, film crew

and photographer embarked on a 12 day

scouting of the route to set up and plan the

special stages that would determine the

scoring of the teams and just to get familiar

with the Mongolian terrain.

A total of 2800 km covered in 12 days.

This is what it was like – and I break it into

two sections – the scouting and setting up –

and then the participation.

Day 1 (Scouting)

(470 km) started slowly with a 100 km tar

section. It’s like riding in Lesotho, you have to

look for all kinds of livestock, cars overtaking

and potholes. But we were looking forward

to hitting the gravel. And what a surprise it

was. You start straight into some loose sand.

We could not deflate the tyres as the terrain

changes all the time from gravel to sand to

rocky areas. Momentum and positive throttle

is key. Stand up, Look up and open up! So

1.8 BAR front and rear was the limit.

All 120 BMW R 1200 GS Rallye Bikes

with the Sport Suspension are fitted with the

Metzeler Karoo 3 tyres. I have never been a

fan of the Karoo but man was I impressed.

2800km x 23 bikes and no punctures. Ok

except for a nail on one of the ladies bikes.

During trophy with participants:

Special stages for the day were firstly trail

riding over and between rocks. 160 km

further, they arrived, to do a Navigation test.

Each team gets a GPS. We give them the first

Coordinate point and from there they have to

find 4 more. Each one leads to the next. Also

on each post for the next coordinates there

would be letters - like “IKE”, 3 or 4 letters per

post. At the end it would form a sentence.

At the end they had 20 minutes to

complete the task. Get all 4 the points with a

proof of a picture as well give the sentence

“Make life a Ride” and they would get a time

credit bonus.

Team Korea was killing it with a time of

16 min and all the bonus points. This was a

good start for them leading the GS Trophy

early.

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018 75


Day 2 (Scouting) 280 km

Started early as this was the trend for the

next few weeks. 100 km’s into the route I

“accidently” rode right into a rock that was

flying towards me from another GS and

destroyed the front rim. 600 km’s in and

I already had damaged a wheel. Not too

impressed with myself. But the mechanics

were there in 5 minutes. A quick wheel

change and we were off again. By this stage

we were heading more and more South

towards the Gobi desert and you can see the

landscape change. But the sand was always

a factor.

Every end of the day was celebrated with a

local “Gobi Beer” very, very nice.

Competition day 2:

We called this the Camel Head challenge. All

3 team riders, without the journalist had to

start directly after each other on a twisty trail

over rocks and through some sand. Halfway

through, they had to lay the bike down, walk

around it, pick it up and push the bike with

the engine running on the RIGHT side to the

next point get on as quickly as possible and

finish the course.

Time starts when first heel crosses the line

and time stops when last riders rear wheel

crosses the line.

No penalties for drops or dabs. Skill was

very important here and I think South Africa

had a brilliant run here. The ladies struggle

a bit as this is a very physical and energy

tapping exercise. Sadly… We had to timebar

both ladies teams just for safety reasons.

There were still 6 days left. Gert and I

finished cleaning and with the open road

ahead we thought it would be a nice ride.

Boy, were we wrong. About 2 km from the

stage it was just bikes scattered all over.

The AusAmerica and EurAfrica team was

together on this day, with Brian Kiely as the

Marshal. It was like a beach with a traffic jam.

You can imagine 100+ bikes already passed

this river bed and the sand was all worn out.

Unfortunately the AusAmerica Journo Jamie

hurt her ankle and she could not proceed.

This was around 1:30 pm and there was

still a good 200 km’s to home and the next

special stage ahead. We decided to stay

with Brian and the ladies and help them get

trough the next 120+- km of sand sections.

This was no easy task but the girls spirits

were good and at the end we made it to

Special stage 2 for the day. This was a quick

exercise as they had to brake and powerslide

through rocks. Easy job? The last stretch of

+-80km home was no easy task. With loose

sand allover and trails looks like spaghetti

lines. We just had to go on and on. After

a quick long overdue lunch we took the

shortcut back to camp.

A 12 hour day but very proud of all the

ladies for not giving up. Even after a day like

this there is not much sleep as dinner follows,

then briefing and points tables. Few hours

sleep and repeat…

Day 3 (Scouting) (300km)

This was a day with mixed scenery. We

started the day with a brilliant ride in between

canyons, in and out of a small river. Quick

stop to plan the special stage for the day.

Next moment as we went around the corner

there was this massive ICE bank, yes ice.

This was unbelievable. Just weeks before we

were there it was -47 Deg and this day was

+30 deg. We had to pose for the cameras to

make a movie and we had some fun on the

ice. From there, we took a detour over the

mountains. We stopped at a small village and

then we were heading for the desert dunes.

We were looking forward to this. Through

and over some camel grass bumps and the

next thing we ended up at some iron look

alike umbrella. In the middle of nowhere. We

stopped before the dunes to deflate the tyres

to around 0.5-0.8 BAR. This is where the

fun started. We had some time to play in the

The dash

on the

new GS’

76 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


dunes and really made the best of it in the hour or so we

were there. This was also my 2nd “incident” that I was

not happy with.

I was on top of this huge dune, going down and cross

over to the next. Not knowing what is on the other side

I decided to turn but my whole approach was wrong.

The bike dipped to the left down side and we took a

tumble. The bike almost buried under the sand and I

managed to break the screen brackets. Luckily there

was some spares at the camp it could be repaired. The

next day was a movie shoot day. For the first time, we

experienced a massive sandstorm that we had to ride in

on the way back from shooting.

You just follow the track on the GPS to the camp…

Competition Day 3:

Day 2 was a bit tough on the participants and a few got

injured. BMW made the call to make it a transport day

to the next camp. Still 300 km for the day it was no easy

task. Gert and I had to leave early to see if the ice had

melted already and that participants could pass through

the canyons which are so breathtaking to ride in.

There were no special stages for the day so everyone

could relax and just enjoy the ride. We arrived at the ice

bank that was still there, but managed to cross it. So the

call was made that all could cross but only by pushing

the bike over. This was so much fun. We just stuck to the

end of the pack till we got to the Gobi desert camp.

It is like a painting that cannot be explained. For the

first time, I managed to skip sleeping in a tent and got a

Ger for the night. Later a massive sandstorm approached

again and some were left tent less. Not much sleep for

the night.

The Country

Trax boys...

Day 3 in the

canyon...

78 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


Day 4 (Scouting) 270km:

This riding day was amazing starting through

some canyons again then the next moment

we are in the desert again but not dunes

just some sand. Stop for Special stage info

and off again. Quick stop at a small village

for some fuel and then of to the Flaming

canyons (I think). To try to understand how

these canyons are formed is mind blowing.

Then, through some sandy bits to the next

special stage. Towing the bike. To make it

even more complicated it is very sandy so to

get the course finalized is not easy.

Competition day 4:

Gert and I had no job for the day as the

Tyre change challenge was moved to the

next day. Again we just slotted in behind a

group starting early as we wanted to witness

most of the Towing the bike exercise. Here

I had to do a Facebook Live broadcast

with Andy Dukes, this was fun. Team South

Africa nailed it and extended their lead on

the tables. Later when we arrived at the

camp, we surprised the participants with a

tent pitching competition. After a long day,

this is the last thing on your list… other than

eat and sleep. The winners here were our 2

ladies with Sonia from France with a record

tent pitching time.

The spirits were good in camp and we

got entertained with a show of traditional

clothing. Very exiting.

Day 5 (Scouting)

Nothing much in the morning with a visit to

the first special stage and then we moved on

to continue North. We started the day in the

desert and we ended the day in the lavish

green mountains that remind you of Lesotho.

On top of the mountain was the stop for

Special stage 2 .You just have to stop and

take in the scenery for a moment. We took

extra long to get to the next camp as we

were enjoying the landscaping to much.

Luckily for us we spend another day here as

we had to do some filming.

Competition day 5:

It was an easy start, weather was good and

everybody is in a good mood. Gert and I

were responsible to set up stage no 1. Teams

had to cross a river section 4 times riding

slalom through “gates”. It was not easy as

it was very sandy and momentum was key.

Everybody did very well here and we were

proud of everybody’s performances. It was

a quick cleanup and we knew that there

were no major sand issues ahead, just a

lot of single track riding. We followed the

teams to the next filling point, then took the

shortcut to the next special stage to witness

the teams taking on the trails route that was

set for them. This was all about clutch and

throttle control. The only distracting fact

about this exercise is the view from the top.

I managed to get a good spot on some

boulders to spectate this exercise. Had a

quick snooze too... After the stage everybody

took a relaxed scenic route to camp. Again

the teams were faced with a curveball special

stage. It was time for the Metzeler tyre

challenge. It was simple. Get the tyre off the

rim and back on again. The bead was already

broken so it was just a go.

Team USA were the masters here. A nice

cool quite night made for a good sleep.

Day 6 (Scouting):

Early start again as we had a long day in the

saddle. Soon we stopped at a forest for the

first special stage. It’s unbelievable that you

can be in the desert the one day and the next

in the mountain forest. We stopped for the

next stage to cross a deep river. Wet boots

are not nice, but we had to do it. It was a

long, long ride to the camp that is based on

the side of the Ugij Lake. A massive lake in

the desert area.

It was cool but so pretty.

Competition day 6:

We got the news that there was a massive

outbreak of Foot and Mouth disease in the

area. 4 of us left early to set up the river

crossing challenge. Then we got the bad

news, the special was cancelled.

We headed back to the last town where we

met the rest of the group. It was decided then

to make a special stage in between the trees

At the

demonstration the

mongol warriors

said hello.

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018 79


on the river bank. The teams had to get all 3

times as close as possible to each other.

The first rider sets off on a small trail

between the trees and set the time. Team

members 2 and 3 had to finish as close as

possible to this time.

This was quite something to watch

as strategies were planned and some

masterminds perfected it. We then all

headed back to the city where we started the

morning to join the convoy of 120 bikes and

36 backup trucks and 4x4’s to the lake.

This was special as you can imagine.

Again, we surprised the teams with a special

stage of bow and arrow shooting. Believe

it or not but the ladies team of AusAmerica

took the stage as well as the first stage giving

them an overall win for the day!!!

A late fire pit was accompanied by some

good moods. It was a good day.

Day 7 (Scouting):

We left the lake early as we had some sand

to cover for the day. After an amazing twisty

section of about 80 km we arrived at to a

small town to fill up. Into the sand sections

to the first special stage location. From there

we had about 60 km of thick loose sand that

you can compare to riding into Ponta. You

just get into 3rd gear sit all the way back and

keep the throttle open. You do not dare to

back off, it will hurt you. After this we arrived

at these magical rocky mountains for the next

Special stage.

This day was a favourite for most.

(During the competition)

We left the camp early. Gert and I were in

charge of the 2nd special stage for the day.

The teams first had to complete special one

that was the slow race. Team France nailed it

with some clever thinking.

The rest of the sand sections were taken

out as there was a concern for safety.

It was a good call as the energy levels were

not good anymore for most. From there, a

lunch stop next to the tar road and then a

very, very beautiful twisty road to Special

stage 2. Here teams had to pillion each other

and a 5L and 10 L can each filled with water.

It was called the Shell challenge. Teams

had to carry “fuel” to stranded bikers. A

challenging route over rocks and some grass

polls saw some teams not making it. Again

team France took the stage.

Today was “Frenchday”. The moods were

good and a small party was the proof of this.

Day 8 Scouting and Competition day:

This was a 300 km ride to the capital to end

where it all started. Tomm and a team of

marshals took the tar road to prepare the

last Monster trail for the event. A lot of points

were up for grabs, worth 3 times the normal

points. It started with a small trail, then right

into pushing the bike in reverse in a small

barricaded space.

Then off to the garage section then on to

finish with the Elephant turn as we know it.

All 3 team members together on the

course with a combined time.

Again Team France were the victors on

this day. Bikes are parked and everybody is

getting ready for the big night

It was a tough 8 days but at the end it was

Team South Africa with 338 points taking

80 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


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//STRIKE250

//SECTOR750

R68 100 R149 000

R121 000

R154 300 R227 000

R196 700

//SECTOR450

//SECTORE1

//SECTOR1000CREW

//STRIKE1000


the overall win. Team USA took 2nd with 286

points and the French not far behind in 3rd on

284 points

This was an experience of a lifetime. Being

a marshal just made it extra special. No

words can explain how grateful I am for this

opportunity. The night was long with a good

party but everybody was happy. After being

away for nearly a month, the team was looking

forward to going home. Although it was sad

to say goodbye we were exited to get on the

plane. On arrival we had a massive reception.

Thank you all for this opportunity and hope to

see some of you at the next GS Trophy event.

Final standings:

1. South Africa 338

2. USA 286

3. France 284

4. Latin America 246

5. Mexico 236

6. Korea 221

7. UK 196

8. Germany 193

9. Russia 171

10. Australia 170

11. Argentina 162

12. Southeast Asia 155

13. China 144

14. Canada 137

Find all the info and pictures of the GS

Trophy 2018 on www.gstrophy.com. You can

also visit GS Trophy on Youtube to see the

daily videos.

82 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018

oster_KTM Factory Racing Team_Rev1.13_A2.pdf 1 2017/12/12 9:47:13


COLOUR CHAINS AVAILABLE

RK Chains are imported and distributed by AMP. To find your nearest RK Chains dealer call 011 259 7750.


LOCAL RIDE KTM 4-STROKES

84 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


Get Lost! That’s the reply when we asked the orange manufacturer

for a long (Long) term 790 Duke. “But we’ll make you a deal! Come

and join us for a ride on all of our four-stroke dirtbikes.”

By Glenn Foley. Pics by ZC marketing and Kyle Lawrenson.

Talk about last minute dot

comm. That message was on

Sunday evening . Meet us at

ADA near Harties on Monday

morning. Ummm. Ok – no need

to twist our rubber arms now.

We shuffled through bright

and breezy to the venue and

were greeted by a sea of orange

and 3 gleaming brand new

bikes. We know the ADA venue

and were not really expecting

a huge amount of riding fun –

but as they say – I have a friend

who has a friend…

We got chatting to the guys.

KTM has put so much focus on

their TPI two strokes this year

– that they needed to remind

everyone that they also have

an awesome range (8 in total),

Ok PLUS the six days, of four

stroke enduro machines.

Let’s put that into context.

8 different four-stroke enduro

bikes. Think Japanese – maybe

2 per manufacturer, other

European brands – 3 and

maybe 4. How’s this giant of a

brand?

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018 85


Why a four stroke?

OK so most riders initial reaction would be

to say that the thumpers are heavier than

2-strokes – and a few years ago you’d have

been correct. But is that actually true? If you

look at the data for the KTM EXC250 and

EXCF 250, the four-stroke is a mere 3 kg

heavier, which in the grand scheme of things

is not vast. And in terms of the top capacities

in each engine type, the EXC300 is only

6.5 kg lighter than the 500. Whatever might

have been the case in the past, the weight

differences are nothing like as marked as

they used to be.

Four-strokes have changed remarkably

over the years. Gone are the pistons as big as

bean cans and now modern thumpers have

slim line pistons that are barely a centimetre

deep, capable of moving at up to 12,000 rpm

– that’s an astonishing 200 times a second!

Faced with technology that seems more at

home on Formula 1 cars, if you ride a modern

four-stroke, the flexibility and response from

the engine is staggering. From tick over to red

line, the new breeds of four-strokes deliver

a progressive and linear power curve that

would have been unimaginable twenty years

ago. And that’s what makes these so fun to

ride in the bush…

Present for duty on the day were the 250,

350 and 450 EXC-F’s.

EXC means PDS system (no linkage), and

wide-ratio transmission. F means four-stroke.

The EXC-Fs were the last of the orange

bikes to get the latest generation KTM frame/

engine/seat layout that has been on the SX

models since the 2015. Now the SX/SX-

Fs, XC/XC-Fs, and XC-W/EXC-Fs all have

the same lightweight frame and lightweight

engine configuration.

Another way to look at it is that these bikes

now have the exact same frame and engine

DNA as Ryan Dungey’s race bike, which is

pretty cool.

86 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


JHB TO THE BAY Q4Q 2018

KICKS OFF FROM JHB 29TH SEPT

1000 kilometres. Four days.

Off-road all the way.

Ends in Richards Bay, 2nd October.

A Fantastic Trail Ride!

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The bikes come with open-cartridge WP

XPlor 48 Fork, separate function fork with

compression adjustment on one side and

rebound on the other.

Also along for the day were Duane

Kleynhans’ practice and race 250 fitted with

SX slip-ons. Read about that a bit later…

The ever-smiling Dieter took us for a

couple of warm up laps around their training

ground – what a cool venue it is short sweet

and interesting with cuttings through the

trees, donga’s and sand pits – well thought

out but short for a ride like this.

“Not to worry” says Dieter – let’s go and

see the neighbours…

And we were introduced to one of the best

kept secrets in JHB. A farm with everything

from rocky trails, to challenging climbs, the

coolest riverbed… and three or so hours later

we were all well tired out from the play. It was

fantastic – not open to the general public,

but watch this space we feel a Dirt And trail

Magazine fun enduro coming on soon…

As the day started we drifted towards

our respective bikes – KTM does build a

bike for everyone… and we might be trying

to convince ourselves but they seem to be

substantially lower in seat height than their

previous models. You can now get your feet

down all over – no issues. The bravest soul

made his way to the 450 – we’ve ridden that

a lot - last year it was our choice for the Tri

Nations Adventure – perfectly suited to fast

flowing trails. The ed headed across to the

350 – a great bike for everyone fast, slow and

medium and the least experienced of the

pack hit the 250.

Throughout the day we chopped and

changed as we went along.

All three of the bikes are fuel injected with

happy buttons. No kick start. Brave for sure

but we had no issues for the duration of our

ride. Modern technology is too cool!

As it happens, the faster guys got ahead

and blasted off. Two stragglers got lost the

trail and headed down into deepest darkest

Africa – a huge gorge and promptly hit a

dead end… In fact, we got the bikes firmly

wedged into a narrow, rutted groove. Oops!

Muscle power kicked in and we tested

the bikes respective weights (Very scientific

ya knows), as we had to manhandle them

out with a little bit of colourful language and

a few huffs n puffs. Bjorn Moreira is brand

new to dirtbiking – for him, this was baptism

under fire… but man it was fun. He spent the

whole day with a grin plastered on his rather

sweaty face.

Once we managed to extricate ourselves,

we followed the rut in the opposite direction,

hit a very cool riverbed section and clambered

in and out while we looked for our colleagues.

Here’s the interesting bit – we rode all of the

slippery stuff perfectly fine while we were

alone (Promise!), later when we were all

reunited and the camera’s were rolling – both

riders fell on their bums. Funny that huh!

The bikes.

All of these bikes share the same chassis

and suspension.

All of the bikes were shod in Pirelli Mid-

Softs complete with mousses.

The bikes were all totally at home in this

terrain – and once again reinforced why four

strokes often make sense.

The 250, which was completely

redesigned for 2017, is such a gem. Tight,

light and nimble with such lekker power

delivery. You don’t have to rev the wheels off

it to get going and it absolutely held it’s own

in this company. The wide ratio gear box is

great for trail riding with second, third, and

fourth gears being wide, but surprisingly

useable. In fact, thanks to its user friendly

nature and lighter weight – it was the choice

of the day for three of the riders… high praise

for the small cc four-stroke.

If you are getting in to the sport – or have

out grown bigger cc motorcycles – then this

is a great choice for you – but… Make sure

that you grab an SX-F slip on and fit it – it

really brings this little bike to life…

88 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


Exploring

made easy

200cc’s of pure power

ready for any terrain

DINGO 150

A UTILITY WITH A PASSION FOR THE OUTDOORS

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Johannesburg

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011 493 6001

011 493 6101

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The 350: We have no idea why all of the manufacturers

don’t explore the 350cc configuration – it is such a

well-balanced motorcycle. If you want to go slowly, you

can, fast, just open the throttle – and it has significantly

more torque than the 250 without going mad. It climbed

every slope easier than the other bikes and always felt

completely in control. Such an easy to ride motorcycle,

it’s quite obvious to us why this bike is so popular. It feels

closer to the 450 than it does to the 250.

The 450 – is still a 450, but it’s so easy to ride. It makes

linear power all the way from the bottom – and to be

frank, in this terrain, we seldom got out of second gear. It

tends to bully the rider a bit in the tight twisties – but the

grin inducing power makes so much sense on the steep

mountain climbs. KTM has worked hard at taming things

down and they have achieved this with great distinction.

This bike is not for sissies, but it is soooo much fun – the

kind of fun that only a big bore dirtbike can deliver.

And that, ladies and gents was our day. Too much fun

for sure. Modern four-strokes are so light and nimble –

very different to what they used to be.

Chuck in the fact that you don’t need to concern

yourself with two stroke oil ratios and all that – they really

do make good sense. Hassle free biking. Go and ride

one for yourself.

We rode, and laughed and fell over and laughed and

wheelied and laughed…

You get the idea. Ride more… stress less.

At a KTM dealer near you.

www.ktm.com

90 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


WE NEED A HOME

Orphaned baboons Lollos and Fielies need a home… can you help? These innocent babies are victims

of the unforgiving rate of human-urban sprawl, wildlife habitat destruction and fragmentation. They

were orphaned because their mothers were killed and now they are residing at CARE a rehabilitation

centre which specialises in the rehabilitation and release of baboons.

Orphaned baboons Lollos and Fielies need a home… can you help? These innocent babies are victims

of the unforgiving rate of human-urban sprawl, wildlife habitat destruction and fragmentation. They

were orphaned because their mothers were killed and now they are residing at CARE a rehabilitation

centre which specialises in the rehabilitation and release of baboons.

These two youngsters have been given an adoptive baboon surrogate mother and are now ready to

be released again with their troop; but we cannot find any humans who have wild spaces (+2000 ha)

with caring hearts passionate enough to want to see these wild animals free again. If you can help, if

you have +2000 ha of game farm / bushveld / mountain areas and want to ensure these wild animals

do not spend the rest of their lives behind bars, please help us set them free again and give them the

life that nature intended. We have successfully conducted releases of over 150 rehabilitated baboons,

are renowned for our rewilding process, test each individual for release suitability, have over 20 years

of experience and are passionate and dedicated to ensure that they do not remain behind bars. Help

us ensure wildlife remains wild and let us release these rehabilitated orphans back into nature. For

more information, get in touch today; www.primatecare.org, samantha@primatecare.org.za,

stephen@primatecare.org.za , 0825851759 YOU COULD BE THEIR LIFELINE TO A LIFE BACK WHERE

THEY BELONG

These two youngsters have been given an adoptive baboon surrogate mother and are now ready to

be released again with their troop; but we cannot find any humans who have wild spaces (+2000 ha)

with caring hearts passionate enough to want to see these wild animals free again. If you can help, if

you have +2000 ha of game farm / bushveld / mountain areas and want to ensure these wild animals

do not spend the rest of their lives behind bars, please help us set them free again and give them the

life that nature intended. We have successfully conducted releases of over 150 rehabilitated baboons,

are renowned for our rewilding process, test each individual for release suitability, have over 20 years

of experience and are passionate and dedicated to ensure that they do not remain behind bars. Help

us ensure wildlife remains wild and let us release these rehabilitated orphans back into nature. For

more information, get in touch today; www.primatecare.org, samantha@primatecare.org.za,

stephen@primatecare.org.za , 0825851759 YOU COULD BE THEIR LIFELINE TO A LIFE BACK WHERE

THEY BELONG


ebuilds

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072 903 6310

tiaan@oscbikes.co.za

services sales

Old School Customs is your one-stop shop for all your bike

needs. We do customized sticker kits, repairs, custom

modifications, new tyres and much more. We buy and sell

off-road bikes, quads, adventure bikes and trailers.

Phone us today and see what OSC can do for you.

“transforming the original to the exceptional”


WE BUY AND SELL

GOOD CONDITION

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Cnr. Breed & Taaifontein Road,

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Tel. 012 548 0040/45

Grant Scott 082 706 0070

grant@bobbyscott.co.za

GPS - S25’ 40.724’

E 028’ 16.326’


Wow guys and gals, the response so far is amazing!!

And the winner is...

Here are the top few that we have selected so far, you need to

put a bit of effort not just send a pic of boots, let the guys out

there laugh a bit.

It has been one of the best competitions we have ever done and had a massive response.

A big thanks to all who entered, but there Final can selection only be one for winner. the winner Here to are be the announced 4 finalists and our overall July issue. winner

Hey guys,

Allow me to tell you a short background about how this picture came to be. You see,

I have been dreaming of a new pair of boots for sometime now (about 5 years) and

when I came across this competition in my favorite bike magazine, I new my chance

had come for my dreams to come true.

Now, there were many factors that played a part in getting the perfect shot, I will only

tell you two for if I had to tell you more my short paragraph will most likely turn into

an essay, and no-one has time for that!

1) My imagination led me to the idea of this photo but the problem was, I needed rain

and a puddle for my ideas to come to life which I highly doubted since we are experiencing

a drought in the Cape. But then, you won’t believe it, that night, it started to

rain and it rained hard! Unbelievable. And the next morning, there was my puddle,

just like that! (surely it’s a sign)

2) My old man is really not a master with technology, in fact, he avoids it. He was my

only hope in capturing this shot as no one else was around and the common selfie

wouldn’t have done justice in bringing to life my plight. Incredibly, after exceeding my

phones memory limit due to the hitting of the capture button multiple times, we got

the shot, the last one, the perfect one on the camera roll! Just amazing.

We had so much fun putting this together and I really hope you take it into serious

consideration!

Thanks for a great mag! Keep them coming!

Yours in riding,

Bruce

This is my SIDI boots I ride with today. I got them from my Dad who

won “King of the Dirt” on that day and he finished 2nd in is class with

his new YZ465 in Swakopmund (Namibia) in December of 1979.

This is whats left of my boots. My girlfriend threw them away

because they where falling apart lol.

Really need a new pair riding barefoot is not fun

CONGRATULATIONS!!!!

Mr Llyod Atkinson you have been

selected as the lucky winner of the

brand new pair of Limited Edition

ANTONIO CAIROLI Sidi Boots valued at

R9999. Now go buy them nappies!!!

CROSSFIRE 3 SRS CROSSFIRE 3

CROSSFIRE 3

CROSSFIRE 3

FLU YELLOW/BLACK ASH

FLU YELLOW/BLACK

WHITE/ORANGE/BLACK

WHITE/BLUE/RED

LIM

AN

CROSSFIRE 3

CROSSFIRE 3

CROSSFIRE 2

CROSSFIRE 2

BLACK/BLACK

WHITE/FLU YELLOW/BLUE

FLU YELLOW/GREY

WHITE/BLUE/FLU ORANGE


The New Linhai 550

T-BOSS

Linhai is one of those “Alternative” brands

that has a credible track record in South

Africa. There must be zillions of those little

Rustler Quads still operating on farms and

mines all over South Africa – and lets not

exclude the social scene where people

were looking for reliable, economical fun.

Over the years, we’ve watched this brand

progress. Sure – they do copy quite a few

of the innovations found on the mainstream

brands – but that’s how technology

improves.

We remember testing their very first Rebel

400 Side By Side all those years ago – when

we think back – the new ones are just so

much more refined.

The new 550 T-Boss.

This is Linhai’s latest and greatest

technology and it is obvious that they

have taken ideas and innovations from all

over. It’s a full sized AG unit that seats two

passengers comfortably, with a smaller seat

in the middle for a third occupant .

It features some of the expected safety

bits like a sturdy roll cage and seatbelts to

hold occupants in place. This is the first

unit, sale units will include safety nets on the

doors.

In the cab, there is a handy cubby hole

and lots of little nooks for all your goodies

andand this is a cool innovation, you even

get a foldable armrest when the middle

seat is not being used, complete with

cup holders to support your coffee in the

mornings when you head out to check on

the sheep.

It’s all quite well designed ergonomically,

the switches, levers and so –on are all easy

to reach and use.

4wd, diff lock etc, is all activated via

switches on the dash. High, low is all simple

as per usual on the automatic gear selector.

We really like the cool digital display that

incorporates the fuel gauge and so-on.

Lighting is quite modern. All low

consumption LED tech and it all looks pretty

stylish.

One feature that we like is the inclusion

of a handy USB port for charging your stuff.

You also get a 12v socket for your portable

pump. The passenger did find that the

footwell is slightly tight for bigger occupants.

Out back they have fitted a mighty large

load bed for all sorts of stuff – camping

fishing or farmwork.

It tips manually with a tailgate so

emptying it all is quite simple.

Ground clearance is provided by large

25” Duro tyres mounted on stylish black

cast wheels and bolted to independent

96 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018


suspension all round.

Powering the unit is a peppy, fuel injected

four stroke 550 cc engine.

We took it out back here and were

suitably impressed with this units versatility.

It’s more than strong enough for lugging a

load and is fun to drive. We pointed her at

all kinds of hills and slopes and found her

very willing and stable, with great throttle

response, smooth power delivery and

torque.

The suspension feels pretty good, quite

firm with no untoward body roll – and

clambering over the little yumps, we did not

feel any big hits or experience bottoming

out. Through the rocks, we felt no scrapes

– the clearance is exactly what you need

on a vehicle like this. We tried out the 4wd

system – it’s plenty strong, with lots of

torque delivery, we clambered up the steep

test slope near our offices with a minimum

of fuss and two fat oafs inside.

Riding through the river – it felt good

and watertight, no splutters or misfires.

The occupants did get a bit wet at speed,

but if you take it easy you won’t wet your

tootsies…

Really impressive.

This unit was brand new, so we did not

push her too much, but on the return trip

we found that she accelerates quickly to

the 70kph mark – but will happily sit at the

60kph mark all day long.

We all felt that the unit has a quality feel to

it – a great companion for the farm …

We had a guest driver along who passed

the comment that –“Going to work in this

thing would make your day a lot more

enjoyable.”

Great fun. Versatile. Not sure on the

pricing just yet.

Definitely worth consideration.

www.linhaisa.co.za

FEATURES:

• 493cc Engine

• 2x4 & 4x4 Wheel Drive

• Fuel Tank 26 liters

• Ground Clearance 280mm

• Automatic H/L/N/R

• 2730mm (L) x 1460mm (W) x 1890mm (H)

Triple seat...

Cool armrest...

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE JULY 2018 97


METAL HEART

CARBON SOUL

Worlds first Carbon Fiber and Aluminum

constructred knee brace .

• Adjustable hyperextension lock-outs, allows personalized fitment

• DualDefense Patella Guard total tracking knee cup design • Full protection at all times

• Ultra-lite construction • Perfect FormFit Frame

• Tru-Motion 2.0 Anatomically Correct Hinges • Thermo Fit Liner

To find your nearest dealer contact:

· Henderson Racing Products - 011 708 5905

www.facebook.com/Hendersonracingproducts

EVS-SPORTS.COM

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