Pure Jazz Magazine Special Women's/Jazz Month Issue

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PJM celebrates women's month and Jazz month with this special issue

Magazine

Special

Woman’s/Jazz Month Edition


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Pure Jazz Magazine was conceived in 1997 and began publishing in 1999. Since

that time PJM made its mission to bring the inside stories about the music

called Jazz with its related industries to its readers, and to carve out a niche

not found in other publications. Founded by JoAnn Brewster Cheatham who

did her very best to create a magazine in which women could have a strong

voice. She NEVER forgot the names of the people who helped her along the

way. Along with the positives Ms. Cheatham suffered serious back biting and

outright bias against her creating the magazine. By taking the necessary pictures

herself, writing and procuring the stories, she made her prized project go

and was able to persevere through those lean years to create the magazine we

are honored to publish today.

As we gear up we receive inquiries all the time about past magazines and where

they can be viewed. Many of the middle years’ publications are available online

now for your perusal. We hope you will take a moment to view some of those

early issues. Please enjoy… to view follow the link: Visit Here

PJM

Support PJM Click Here...


2018 SPECIAL

EDITION

Volume 1 Number 2

Founder

Jo Ann Cheatham

-Publisher-

Agneta Brewster-Ballesteros

-Editor in Chief-

Temp - D. Milroy

-Contributing Writers-

Playthell Benjamin

Patricia Kelly

Ray Leitos

-Poetry-

IMMANI

SUBSCRIPTION - 4 ISS

Miriam

$24.95 Makeba

Page ........... 19

-Graphic Design-

Direct Communications

-Marketing-

Danyelle Ballesteros

-Consultants-

Playthell Benjamin

Dwight Brewster

Chester Lewis Jr.

Dr. Randy Weston

-Social Media-

Darryl Brewster

William K. Crosby

Beverly Jensen

This magazine was made partially with public

funds from BAC the Brooklyn Arts Council

and the Department of Cultural Affairs.

Page 4 - Pure Jazz Magazine

Abby

Lincoln

Page ........... 23

www.purejazzmagazine.net

PureJazz Magazin

P.O. Box 22101

Brooklyn, NY 11202

Visit Us Online

Visit Us Online

www.purejazzmagazine.com

© TMG, LLC

718


2

Features

A Long Way Home ... 4

#MeToo How about You? ... 8

Lady’s Got Chops ... 14

Silence Breaker ... 16

Woman of Courage ... 18

Miriam Mekaba ... 19

Columns

With The Music In Mind .... 5

Now Showing .... 11

Pure Jazz Archives

Abby Lincoln.... 22

Support Pure Jazz Magazine ... Visit Here...

Pure Jazz magazine iWomans/Jazz ispecial issues published

semi-annually with editorial and advertising headquarters in

Brooklyn, NY. staff@purejazzmagazine.net. All rights reserved.

The authors and editors have taken care to insure that all information

in this issue is accurate. Nevertheless, the publisher disclaims

any liability loss or damages incurred as a consequence

directly or indirectly of the use and application of any contents.

Pure Jazz Magazine - Page 5


With The

Music In Mind

Publisher’s Statement

It is my pleasure to introduce an all women’s issue to celebrate Women’s History

Month. In addition, for April we are celebrating Jazz Month. Since the essence of

this magazine is Jazz we will always give you our pure version of it. In this issue

you will see women in all phases of the industry giving you their view musically

from real life perspectives.

As a staff we decided to “dig in the crates” and reprint our Abby Lincoln article.

Although she is no longer with us, there is still relevance in her story. We feel

confident you will enjoy it.

Our feature artist; Kim Clarke has a long resume that you will find fascinating.

Although black women haven’t been very visible in the #MeToo Movement, many

women in our community have a story to tell. We are sharing one women’s as well

as a view from a long overlooked community’s view. In past issues we’ve had male

poets share with us but I think you will fall in love with our female version this

month! Your support is always welcomed and we need your continued viewership

to assist us to remain a success in the Jazz community.

With the country as deeply divided as it is Pure Jazz is a great place to relax and

chill knowing that Jazz remains Jazz.

Enjoy!

Agneta Ballesteros

Publisher

Page 6 - Pure Jazz Magazine


A LONG WAY FROM HOME

C. Imani Parker – Revised 6/12©

CHOCOLATE…CARAMEL…TAN…EBONY BLACK WOMAN

ACROSS THE OCEAN OF TIME, SHE SAILED

A LONG WAY FROM HOME..

ON BENDED KNEES AND ACHING BACK SHE HUMMED

A LONG WAY FROM HOME.

MAMA, MAMA, MAMA…SINGING, CLAPPING, PRAYING

A LONG WAY FROM HOME….A LONG LONG WAY FROM HOME

IN THE KITCHEN BAKING HOMEMADE BISCUITS, FATBACK,

COLLARD GREENS

NOBODY KNOW THE TROUBLE SHE’S SEEN

A LONG WAY FROM HOME

THE STRUGGLES HAVE COME AND GONE, YET SHE’S STILL

MOVING ON

A LONG WAY FROM HOME.

CHOCOLATE…CARAMEL…TAN…EBONY BLACK WOMAN

ALL COLORS….ALL SHAPES…ALL STYLES…ALL HUES

TIPPIN’ DOWN THE AVENUE

IN HER STILLETO HIGH HEEL SHOES

HOT TIGHT TIGHT SHORTS…HUGGIN’ HER BIG JUICY

THIGHS

A LONG WAY FROM HOME

YES, SHE’S STUTTING, STRUTTING WITH PRIDE IN HER CORN

ROWED, TWISTED, DREADLOCKED, BALD, PERMED, FREE

STYLE, WEAVED HAIR FLOWING WITHOUT A CARE.

CHOCOLATE…CARAMEL…TAN…EBONY BLACK WOMAN

STRUTTING…PRANCING…STROLLING MAJESTICALLY

GOT A BRAND NEW RHYTHM…A BRAND NEW BEAT

NOBODY KNOWS DE TROUBLE SHE’S SEEN…

A LONG WAY FROM HOME

MAMA…MAMA…MAMA STRUTTING TALL, PROUD AND

STRONG

GOT A BRAND NEW RHYTHM…A BRAND NEW SONG

I WILL SURVIVE SHE SINGS…I WILL SURVIVE

AIN’T NOTHING GONNA STOP ME NOW…

AIN’T NOTHING GONNA STOP ME NOW

A LONG WAY FROM HOME….A LONG LONG WAY FROM

HOME..

*Excerpts from ESSENCE 25 by Kephra Burns

Pure Jazz Magazine - Page 7


#METOO! HOW ABOUT YOU?:

SEXUAL HARRASSMENT,

YES IT EXISTS IN THE JAZZ INDUSTRY

By Tamm E Hunt

In the wake of sexual harassment allegations

and the firing of actors, executives,

lascivious men, along with our

very own distinguished jazz patron, Dr.

William “Bill” Cosby and a pussy grabbing

POTUS; the tide continues to swell

and brave fingers are pointing in the direction

of least suspected faces in high

places. But, what about the male dominated

jazz industry; who’s stepping up

and out in protest to make a difference

both creatively and in business?

Inspirited by the Hollywood sweep of

#MeToo, a collective of female jazz musicians

that includes drummer/producer

Terri Lyne Carrington, saxophonist

Tia Fuller, jazz educator/singer Fay Victor

together with Ganavya Doraiswamy,

María Grand, Okkyung Lee, Linda May

Han Oh, Nicole Mitchell, Kavita Shah,

Tamar Sella, Sara Serpa, Jen Shyu, Rajna

Swaminathan, Imani Uzuri, have

Page 8 - Pure Jazz Magazine

joined forces and taken a crucial step

against gender discrimination and sexual

violence, their objective is to foster

open conversations that reveal sexism

and misogyny leading to gender discrimination

and sexual violence and

harassment in music that includes the

male dominated jazz industry. Through

an open letter at www.wehavevoice.

org, #WeHaveVoice invites others to

stand with us and add their names to

this letter as an act of support, solidarity,

and commitment to creating a culture

of equity in our professional world.

Definition of Sexual Harassment

We are in agreement with this definition

of sexual harassment (so clearly

outlined in the website:

http://www.not-surprised.org/definition-of-sexual-harassment/www.

not-surprised.org):

Rochelle Thompson


Sexual harassment is a type of personal or

institutional abuse that uses sexual behavior

to alarm, control, demean, intimidate,

bully, belittle, humiliate, or embarrass

another person.

Sexual harassment can occur between

anyone, regardless of sexual or gender

orientation.

Sexual harassment is rarely purely related

to sexual desire. It is often a misuse

and abuse of power and position, whose

perpetrators use sexual behavior as a tool

or weapon.

It is predatory and manipulative, often

used to assert the superiority or dominance

of one person over another person.

Sexual harassment is any unwelcome behavior

of a sexual kind and can take many

forms, including:

making unnecessary, unwanted, or

unsolicited physical contact, unwelcome

comments about a person’s physical

appearance or clothing, commenting on

a person’s sexual orientation or gender

identity, asking questions about a person’s

sex life, engaging in unwelcome sexual

propositions, invitations, and flirtation;

making somebody feel uncomfortable

through displaying or sharing sexual

material

· giving unwelcome personal gifts

· wolf-whistling

· catcalling

· following

· leering

· stalking

Sexual harassment does not always occur

in person. It can take the form of:

· emails

· visual images

· social media

· telephone

· text messages

· or any other media.

The abuser need not recognize their own

actions or words as sexual harassment in

order for it to be considered as such.

According to MeToo movement.org

17,700,000 women have reported a

sexual assault since 1998. Then around

October 2017 a deluge of women took

to social media telling their stories of

sexual harassment, causing a viral explosion

that propelled a worldwide

conversation on the topic. But, let us be

clear that sexual harassment has many

branches that are not physical or verbally

abusive, but psychological and

puts women in any industry or level

of life at risk of harassment simply because

they are female and victims of

male-dominated systems as in the Jazz

industry.

While lauding Tarana Burke, founder of

the #MeToo movement for stepping up

and out, in 2006, the founder of the #me

too movement helped survivors of sexual

violence, particularly young women

of color from low wealth communities,

find avenues to gaining strength. Using

the idea of “empowerment through

empathy,” the #metoo movement was

ultimately created to ensure survivors

know they›re not alone in their journey.

The #MeToo movement has built

a community of survivors from

all walks of life. By bringing vital

conversations about sexual violence

into the mainstream, we›re helping to

de-stigmatize survivors by highlighting

the breadth and impact sexual violence

has on thousands of women, and we’re

helping those who need it to find

entry points to healing. Ultimately,

with survivors at the forefront of this

movement, we›re aiding the fight to

end sexual violence. We want to uplift

radical community healing as a social

justice issue and are committed to

disrupting all systems that allow sexual

violence to flourish.

I’ve been reluctant to write this treatise

after accepting the task from Pure Jazz

Magazine. My first reaction was, hell, if

I do this piece what am I going to say;

so, I wrestled with the idea, did my research,

pondered what difference can I

make in all this and what do I want this

article to do and say? So, with great

respect to the late JoAnn Cheatham,

founder/publisher emeritus of Pure

Jazz Magazine and a diehard Jazz activist,

and patron who also was a victim of

#MeToo levels of sexual harassment in

the Jazz industry. I decided that if not

for me, but for her, I would be the best

that I can be as a writer and woman in

Jazz and all of its colors and twist and

turns from the creative to the business.

My goal is to enlighten the masses to

the disrespect and disregard for women

in a male-dominated industry call Jazz.

There will be nothing salacious, nor will

I point any fingers or set out to destroy

anybody and or their career(s), dead or

alive, simply because I have been the

mentee and the student of some of the

most brilliant creative and business entities

whose names are synonymous to

the banner Jazz.

Never once was I a victim, at least not

in my mind because I didn’t and don’t

I allow ignorance to deter me from my

goals and destination. Much like the

great Betty Carter, I learned to create

my own opportunities and build my

own dreams rather than compromise

my dignity and self-respect. However,

in that process I will say, yes! I have

been petted, squeezed a bit too hard

to long and hugged much too tight, I

have been spoken to in terms that are

not so dear, humped in public, had my

butt fondled, breast pinched, unsolicited

nasty thoughts whispered in to my

delicate ears, hotel keys thrusted into

my hands, called names that are not my

own nor descriptive of me; not excluding

text, sext, pictures and raw phones

calls composed of unsolicited primal

animal like breathing, moans; evidence

of a fool masturbating to his fantasy of

me.

While telling the truth to shame the

devil, I have also been molested, raped

and summoned under false pretenses

and promises related to my dreams,

only to find all the perverted jerk wanted

was my head. As low life and de-

Pure Jazz Magazine - Page 9


meaning as this all may seem, somehow

it makes me wonder, how much of all of

this is my/their/your fault? What did I/

they/you do to encourage this type of

behavior and energy?... Probably, nothing.

Living in the hyper-sexual world and

culture that we do, women are constantly

subjected to harassment on one

level or the other in the work place not

only by men, but other women too. So,

I decided I would include experiences

from fellow female Jazz artist and their

#MeToo experiences and how they

handled their situations.

Actress/Jazz singer Rochelle Thompson

reveals in her own words the challenges

being the bandleader with a group

of disgruntled, disrespectful men who

refuse to take instruction from a woman...

“It is quite disheartening to sing

and be the bandleader and hear one

of your band members tell you a set

should only be 40 minutes and cut it

off; as well as show up inappropriately

dressed after having been informed of

the dress code. Displaying that my executive

decision meant nothing.

“I was singing in a club and a couple

from Italy came in toward the end of

my second set, ordered a magnum

of champagne and dinner. The place

wasn’t packed, but I immediately extended

the set to make them comfortable

until the next set. I felt the need to

“school” the musicians saying: “I am

proud to be standing on the shoulders

of strong women who endured but did

not tolerate inequity in the workplace;,

Ella Fitzgerald who took over the band

for three (3) years after Chick Webb’s

passing, Dinah Washington, who had

her own agency, Queen’s Booking

Agency run by Ruth Bowen and LaRue

Manns because she refused inequity.

She was also the first African Ame

rican female singer to play Las Vegas.

Billie Holiday, Sarah Vaughan, Carmen

McRae, Mary Lou Williams were bosses

and bandleaders that took care of

business in a man’s world.

” I am continuing that legacy!” You

would have thought those musicians

knew better, it is the 21st Century! Well,

as Abbey Lincoln once said: “You got to

pay the Band!”

Baltimore Jazz singer Adrienne Townes,

expressed “I’ve been very blessed dealing

with musicians here in the USA and

abroad. Never had any problems. That’s

funny isn’t it?... Jazz was fine, acting was

another story. If I didn’t have values and

morals, I might be a star in Hollywood

now.”

Tamm E. Hunt

About TAMM E HUNT: Actor, Jazz

Vocalist, Producer, Director, Activist,

Visual Artist, Lyricist and Author of

the forthcoming dissertation BAL-

TIMORE JAZZ CHRONICLES.

Tamm E is also a Lecturer, Public

Speaker, Entrepreneur/Business

Woman, Writer, Playwright... A

Renaissance Woman who lives in

Baltimore with her cat, Mali Hepshetsut

Searcy, her keyboard and

laptop praising and giving thanks to

the UNIVERSE.

To order copies contact

Duke University Press

Box 90660

Durham, NC 27708-0660

www.dukeupress.edu

646.492.2904

Sololist to Choir

www.sherylrenee.com

Info@ sherylrenee.com

Page 10 - Pure Jazz Magazine


What Happened

to Nina Simone?

This is a must see movie, the “High Priestess of Soul” is captured. Her life is told with all

the unique subtleties of the star she was destined to become. When you think of Nina

Simone all you can remember is the extraordinary talent this lady would display. This

feature had a full length run at the ICP theater in New York City ( at Sixth Avenue and

Third street) and was well worth seeing on both the large and small screens. It still airs

from time to time. Most filmgoers have seen it twice. You will not be disappointed. A

huge thank you goes to the film distributor Netflix where you can catch it anytime, a

movie not to be missed — www.netflix.com

Pure Jazz Magazine - Page 11


Music Is My Life Politics My Mistress DVD

www.cduniverse.com/productinfo.asp?pid=8097344

Louis Armstrong House Museum

34-56 107th Street,

Corona Queens,

New York 11368

718.178.8274

Page 12 - Pure Jazz Magazine

www.louisarmstronghouse.org


Pure Jazz Magazine - Page 13


Pure Jazz Magazine Recognizes Kim Clarke

for Woman’s/Jazz Month 2018

LADY GOT CHOPS WOMANS’S HISTORY MONTH

MUSIC AND ARTS FESTIVAL INC.

When saluting women in the Jazz field

I would be remised if Kim Clarke’s

name were not mentioned. Kim is

best known for her tenure with the

avant-funk band Defunkt. She played

with them for ten years. She hails

from New York and performs popularly

as a bassist. As a performing musician

her main instrument is acoustic

bass and its cousins electric upright

and four and five stringed electric

bass guitars. Kim plays a variety of

genres: R&B, Funk, Jazz Fusion, Blues,

Indie Rock, Jazz Alternative, Classical,

Reggae and Industrial. Among the

elites of the greater New York Jazz

scene she is thought of as an accomplished

musician.

Page 14 - Pure Jazz Magazine

Ms. Clarke taught herself to play guitar

by ear before deciding to dedicate

her life’s work to music. Her jazz interests

start with her father, Henry

Clarke and her late Guyanese grandfather,

trombonist/bassist Henry (Hy)

Clarke Sr. They are her heroes. She

obtained a Bachelor of Arts in Communications

and Music from City College,

New York, NY and Long Island

University, NY respectively. After her

freshman year she transferred to Bennett

College in North Carolina. It was

there she met several musicians who

told her about the Jazzmobile Program

in New York. While studying in

New York she purchased an acoustic

bass that had a long history in Germany

as well as the United States.

She was a three-time recipient of

the National Endowment of the Arts

Jazz Study Fellowship. Ms. Clarke is a

long-time student of the Jazzmobile,

studying under Jimmy Owens, Lisle

Atkinson, Buster Williams, Victor Gaskins,

Jimmy Heath and Ernie Wilkins.

Barry Harris Workshops continues her

formal studies. She was also a member

of Harris’ Jazz Cultural Theatre’s

house band for the famed Art Blakey

Breakfast Jam. Her formal training,

education and heritage all have factored

into her success. As with woman

in any industry she has additional

skills. Her electric guitar playing has

been described on many occasions as

soulful, funky, rich and tight. Kim is

also a composer, band leader and educator.

Plus, she is a jewelry designer,

website developer and most importantly

a parent.

Inspiration for the Lady Got Chops

festival came in 2003, when Clarke

was called to sub for another bassist

at a new club in Brooklyn called

The Jazz Spot, which was owned by a

mother-daughter team, Lillithe Meyers

and Tiecha Merritt. Clarke was impressed

with the two women’s entrepreneurship,

and Meyers and Merritt

were happy to see a female musician

come through the doors. They asked


Clarke where all the other female jazz

musicians were? Clarke had toured

with saxophonist band leader, Kit Mc-

Clure and her all-women Big Band,

so she knew plenty of other women

musicians, and before long, she and

her new friends were planning a celebration

in honor of women’s history

month. They decided to focus primarily

on women jazz instrumentalists,

since they tend to be more overlooked

than vocalists.

The club provided the space and food,

and Clarke created a website, made

flyers, booked

the musicians,

and promoted

the event.

“In particular,

we wanted to

address the

anonymity issue,

as refers

to women (primarily

instrumentalists)

in

music as well as

provide a platform

for those

who had never

met to enjoy

an evening of

performing together

outside

of their comfort zone,” reminisced

Clarke about that first festival.

The mission is to elevate Women’s

History Month through promotion

of women’s outstanding contributions

artistic and otherwise, during

the month of March. After the Café

closed in 2009 Ms. Clarke continued

this project with the support of female

artists and caring club owners.

The venues included the boroughs in

NYC, Long Island and Peeksill. In 2010

a dance troupe was included, and the

festival was renamed, Lady Got Chops

Women’s History Month Music and

Arts Festival. This grassroots festival

is celebrating its 18 th year. During the

16 th year (2016) there were musical

contributions from over 200 women.

Recently she has been affiliated with

Black Girls Rock since 2016. This year,

2018 Kim Clarke is being honored for

all her accomplishments and I say;

about time!

Kim Clarke has an expansive touring/

performance schedule that started in

her grandfather’s native country of

Guyana in 1975. The tour was with

the National Black Theatre of Harlem

entitled Soul Journey into Truth. She

has been connected to artists internationally

such as;

Michael

Urbaniak,

George

Gruntz,

Jens Wendelboe,

Christy

Doran,

F r e d y

Studer, Erika

Stucky,

Marilyn

Mazur, Annie

Whitehead,

and

Ursla Dudziak.

Her

tour experiences

include; Joseph Bowie’s Defunkt,

National Black Theatre, The Are

and Be Ensemble, Yusef Lateef Quartet,

Teri Thornton Trio, Bertha Hope

Trio, Robert Palmer, Kit McClure Big

Band, Rachel Z Trio, Bigfood, Wallace

Roney and Cindy Blackman Quartet,

Rhonda Ross-Kendrick, Oliver Lake

and Jump Up, James Blood Ulmer

Experience, Jack Mc Duff Quartet,

Rodney Kendricks Quartet, Jazzberry

Jam. She performed as house bassist

in Manhattan and Jazz Clubs in New

York City, the most prominent, The

Blue Note and Pumpkins.

Ms. Clarke had the opportunity to

work with many famous names in the

jazz world. Saxophonists Joe Henderson,

George Braith Charles Davis and

Branford Marsalis in addition, Louis

Armstrong’s bass player Arvell Shaw.

Drummer; Louis Haynes is also a part

of her repertoire as well as pianists

Dr Billy Taylor, Gilly Coggins, Bertha

Hope, Geri Allen, and Danny Mixon

After her ten (10) year stint with

Defunkt, Kim went on to lead a jazz

group Inner Circle Quartet and AWOL

(Angels with Outstanding Lawyers).

Kim is an active activist for woman

in jazz and is dedicated to exposing

audiences to women in jazz past and

present. Having done extensive work

with Kit McClure Big Band where she

has been a member since 1986 to

honor International Sweethearts of

Rhythm. You can see this is important

and ongoing work for Ms. Clarke. This

band has released an album called

the Sweethearts Project. She remains

actively connected with many female

artists such as Lakecia Benjamin, Tia

Fuller, Akua Dixon, Sherry Maricle and

Kim Thompson.

In reviewing Kim Clarke’s career it is

evident that she is committed to jazz

and being at the “top of her game.”

She is also known as coming from the

“Ron Carter School of Hard Beebop.”

She is far from egocentric and helps

all musicians especially those from

Guyana. She believes in giving back

as she gives jazz workshops from kindergarten

to college willing to expose

all to the music that she loves and is

ingrained deeply in her heart.

Elizabeth K. Collins

Ms. Collins is PJM’s special products writer

Staff@purejazzmagazine.net

Pure Jazz Magazine - Page 15


Tiana M. Baker is an aspiring Transgender rights

Activist and loving mother working towards building

a platform to assist young trans woman in reaching

a higher goal than just living in a stigma she

works hard in hopes of becoming a life coach in the

trans community with that being said family is very

important to her and she wants the world to know

she is ready to fight for thier rights to contact her she

can be reached at tianaactivistbaker@gmail.com

Pure Jazz

Needs your

SUPPORT

It keeps us

moving forward

Click Here!

Let me start by saying #MeToo.

I just recently came across this

movement when I was asked to

right this article. Not having any

idea of what this was all about I

graciously accepted the offer to

share my perspective. So without

any hesitation I dove into my

research on the matter head first.

Once i did I came to find that this

was a very important issue that

needed awareness and was very

pleased to find that awareness

was being raised on an issue that

has been happening throughout

our history to all women in one

form or another.

I’ll share one of my #MeToo moments

with you... It started when

I arrived in New York City and

was residing in Far Rockaway

Queens. I was struggling with

acclimating to the culture of being

in a place I’d never been before.

Finding work was scarce

or so I thought having worked

on the internship level with a few

non-profit organizations I might

just find something which I did.

But once that was over i found

myself unemployed and needing

the income to care for my son.

As if being a single parent isn’t

hard enough right without the

added distractions so I came up

with what i felt was an amazing

idea which was to ask my Landlord

at the time with whom I had

a great rapport if he knew of any

career opportunities. He told me

that he would look into it and get

back to me. He most definitely

kept his word and I bet at this

point you think that he at some

point was the person to become

inappropriate with me but you

would be wrong. it wasn’t until

after my interviewing process

which went extremely well if I do

say so myself.

I digress, it was a small company

of five employees including

myself. It was two women and

three men two of the men were

the owners they were absolute

gentlemen but the last man (the

culprit) was a little too friendly.

He would inappropriately touch

me and then say “ I’m sorry Miss

Page 16 - Pure Jazz Magazine


Baker” I would then brush it off

smile and say its ok, meanwhile

in my head it made me extremely

uncomfortable. I would go home

and share these stories with my

best friend saying in an un easy

voice, “at least I have a job”. As

time progressed his advances

became more and more blatant

and I began to reach my breaking

point. I went home and said

to my friend “ I think I have to quit

my job but I don’t want to cause

a big scene” so he asked “well

what are you going to do?” I said

I don’t know I’ll have to sleep on

it. I did and came to the conclusion

i wasn’t going to it that i

would just speak to my coworker

and see if we could move on

from there.

Unknowingly I walked into work

to find that he had switched my

desk with his when i asked him

about it he said to me “ Well Miss

Baker I love looking at you and

this makes it easier” he said that

along with some other things that

I will leave unmentioned. Moving

on I sat for a moment to gather

my thoughts, of course he was

watching my body language and

asked “are you ok? You look aggravated”

I said I am then got up

and told my boss I didn’t want

to start trouble but my coworker

was making me really uncomfortable

and has been for a while and

i needed to resign he asked if i

was sure i said yes and proceeded

out of the building. That’s just

one of many #MeToo moments.

Question, how would you feel

if I told you that not only am I a

woman, but I am a woman of

transgender experience that

has gone and is going through

her M to F transition... Now I’d

like you to take a moment and

think about it..... I’ll wait...... so

now that you have collected your

thoughts, whatever they may be

you cold only imagine how i felt

to see that this movement as not

been as inclusive to Trans women

as it possibly should have.

Women who not only deal with

the everyday struggle of being a

woman but in addition deal with

the LABLE of being so called

Trans. I’ve come to understand

that too many times stereotypes

overshadow what really goes on.

Believe me when I say this is not

a cry for help but a cry for Justice

for all women everywhere

no matter her color creed or

socio-economic status. It is in

my opinion that this movement

should not only support one demographic

of women but all.

Question #2 would you exclude

a lesbian woman because her interest

is in other women? I don’t

think so because just like you or

I it can happen to any woman.

Note I don’t wish to be aggressive

but humble in hopes that you understand

that you have fought to

have equal rights to men and are

still fighting for those rights to be

equal and now here i am trying

to be a voice for Trans women

across the globe. Saying we are

here and we are just as affected

by this as you I feel i speak

for us all when I say we should

be included while you’re at it remember

that there are power in

numbers so let’s stand together

and fight this fight because it is

worth fighting.

I’ll end this by saying my name

is Tiana Michelle Baker and I’m

here to say #MeToo

Support our

Annual Blues Festival

For more information:

beeincd@gmail.com

WANTS:

Writers/

Social Media

Reps

Contact:

submit@purejazzmagazine.net

www.wbai.org

Pure Jazz Magazine - Page 17


A WOMAN OF COURAGE

PEOPLE WONDER WHERE YOUR COURAGE LIES.

IF THEY ONLY KNEW WHO AND WHOSE YOU WERE

IT WOULD BE NO SURPRISE.

IT’S YOUR WISDOM, YOUR DETERMINATION AND COMPASSION,

YOUR QUEST FOR FREEDOM & JUSTICE… YOUR CALL TO ACTION.

I

YOU WERE A WOMAN OF COURAGE,

FIGHTING FOR EQUALITY

WITH STRENGTH, FAITH AND DIGNITY

WHEN YOU STEPPED INTO A ROOM JUST AS REGAL AS YOU PLEASED

YOU WALKED WITH PRIDE AND DIGNITY

T’WAS YOUR PERSISTENCE, YOUR PASSION,

THE WORK THAT YOU’VE DONE

YOUR COMMITMENT TO YOUR COMMUNITY, TO HELP EACH AND EVERYONE

YOU WERE A WOMAN OF COURAGE, FIGHTING FOR EQUALITY

WITH STRENGTH, FAITH AND DIGNITY

ALTHOUGH CHALLENGES MAY HAVE UPSET YOU

AND OBSTACLES TRIED TO KNOCK YOU DOWN

YOU KEPT ON FIGHTING AND STANDING YOUR GROUND

NOW WE UNDERSTAND JUST WHY YOU STOOD SO TALL

YOU FOUGHT FOR FREEDOM AND JUSTICE FOR ALL

WE’LL FOREVER GIVE THANKS FOR ALL THAT YOU’VE DONE

TO MAKE A BETTER WORLD FOR EACH AND EVERYONE

SO WE PAY TRIBUTE TO YOU TODAY

AND KEEP YOU IN OUR PRAYERS

FOR YOUR COURAGE AND DETERMINATION

AND THE LOVE THAT YOU SHARED

YOUR CONCERN FOR OTHERS AND

THE FACT THAT YOU CARED.

YES, YOU WERE A WOMAN OF COURAGE, WHO FOUGHT FOR EQUALITY

WITH STRENGTH, FAITH AND DIGNITY

THIS, DR. HEIGHT IS YOUR LEGACY.

BY C. Imani Parker

(Based on Maya Angelou’s Poem “Phenomenal Woman”)

Page 18 - Pure Jazz Magazine


Miriam Makeba Lives….

“You judge a country by the consciousness

of their women; they are the mothers, and if

they have the IDEOLOGY intact, they can

give it to the children at this age! (she raises

her hand to toddler). Now, if the woman

doesn’t have it, your LOST! So, a country

that has ACTIVE women has much more

possibilities to spread the ideology of that

particular country because they GIVE IT

TO THE CHILDREN!”

-Miriam Makeba, Ali-Foreman bout

Miriam Makeba was a warrior songstress

(1932-2008) She’s still Internationally

loved and respected as “Mama Africa.”

In October 1974, I traveled again to

Kinshasa to write a ‘woman’s view of the

Ali-Foreman bout. FESTAC’74- was

the musical concert event organized

by Miriam’s former husband, Hugh

Masekela, (1964-1966), and Stewart

Levine. It featured the Spinners, James

Brown, Sister Sledge, JAZZ CRUSAD-

ERS, ETTA JAMES, BILL WHITERS,

and other artists. I helped as female DJ

backstage playing cassettes of American

music during act breaks, and witnessed

Miriam Makeba’s memorable performance.

A true revolutionary artist. Hair

adorned in colorful beads… music, and

song electrifying the mixed crowd of

Africans, Europeans, and Americans

with her blend; saying ours is the same

fight, the same struggle with a common

foe she belted the words to “Westwind;”

Why didn’t they win? Blame it on the

“Westwind.” Her vocals soared;

“Unify us—don’t divide us!

The point being had Zulu warrior, U

T’Chaka, and two other tribes joined

together, Azania’s history would be different.

She praised, U T’Chaka’s courage

(Zulus were last to fall to the British). Yet

it was still labeled “protest” and clearly

annoyed forces of oppression. Others

songs (Soweto Blues) speak of the courageous

men, women, and children who

lost their lives or were maimed during

the Sharpeville Massacre during the

reign of the Boers’ apartheid system.

(Colonizers who invaded and took the

best land- This a recurring theme in

African history). Thanks to worldwide

support, boycotts, and protests, the illegal,

and immoral government of Pretoria

came to an end.

On a typical, hot sunny Kinshasa day

we met. Zensi Miriam Makeba (her

traditional name is a total of 22 words

and she said every one), and I finally

chat during a press party prior to the

Ali-Foreman fight. First, I met a fellow

“Black” photographer who tried to

block me, as he didn’t want me to speak

to her. She was watching…we made eye

contact. I walked around him, and as

Mama Africa motioned for me to sit, he

finally left.

Pure Jazz Magazine - Page 19


Miriam Makeba’s wearing a long, elegant

pink, and sky blue chiffon native dress,

while her cousin, Malika, sits quietly

at the umbrella table with us. Miriam’s

shoulder length hair is intricately braided

into tiny strands (her style I would

emulate later), adorned at the tips with

matching colorful beads, and cowry

shells. Makeba doesn’t need any makeup.

Her brown complexion is flawless

with facial features that reminded me of

my mother’s. Something about

people from Azania, how close we are,

not only physically, but race hate experiences.

I’m very fond of her musicportraits

of poetic images like Malaika.

Music told tales. It’s Makeba’s belief that

apartheid, and racism are one, and the

same, despite, “cultural differences.”

(We agreed), She speaks with great passion,

and her eyes can’t deny the pain

of family separation. She couldn’t even

attend her mother’s funeral. It was her

performance in Come Back, Africa

(1959) caught the attention of Harry Belafonte

who help her settle in America,

and where she began an extraordinary

recording, and singing legacy. The quote

about how “you judge a country was

moving. Even how she spoke was musical/magical.

Enunciations, and diction

perfect. Looking directly at me she says

I could ‘pass’ for an “Ama Baca” and Malika

agrees.

“It’s her features…the gap in her

teeth”

I knew it. We’re thinking the same

thing. Miriam then speaks of her

own “passing” as a Black American

but catches me off-guard saying

I remind her of Stokely.

“I use to walk down the streets

in New York, and nobody knew

I wasn’t from the States until I

opened my mouth to speak. So,

I don’t see any DIFFERENCE

between me, and my sisters in

the States. We are the same people,

and the people who divide

us are the same people who came

Page 20 - Pure Jazz Magazine

to Africa to enslave us on the motherland;

it’s the same people who tell us

you Afro-Americans are slaves, you are

Negroes, and who come to you and say,

we Africans are savages, we eat people,

and all that! (We are laughing now at

the colonizers though patterns) It’s the

same man with the same reason. For no

matter where white people are, whether

they are the majority or the minority,

THEY MUST RULE! They have a terrible

complex. They’ve GOT TO RULE!

Whether they’re the majority, or the minority.”

As she gently pounds her fists on the table,

Malika chuckles, and nods her head,

as I do. In 1965, Miriam, and Harry Belafonte

won a Grammy for Best Folk

Recording. Makeba’s music was banned

in her mother country because she sang

“protest songs.” Even though her genre

includes “township music” (labeled as

racially segregated urban areas of South

Africa) the Marabi, mbaqanga, and

kwela, but also she knew world music,

JAZZ, Afropop, and traditional Zulu.

It didn’t matter. She taught the world

Zulu, and Xhosa songs.

In 1968 her music, still prohibited in her

native Azania found its way to America

the same year she married ‘fiery militant’

Stokely Carmichael of SNCC (Student

Non-Violent Coordinating Committee).

I ask about her best-known songs, and

which one wasn’t a favorite? Without

hesitation, it’s the hit, “Pata Pata”-

…’it was an insignificant song…

Why? ecause it was commercial.

\ Compositions that meant the most

to Miriam were Xhosa, Zulu love, and

lullaby songs; words to heal the young,

and old of the pain of being subjugated

in your OWN country by Europeans.

The song, “Malcolm” dedicated to our

“Shinning Black Prince” was penned by

her daughter, Bongi. It’s a guitar based

tribute to a great leader gunned down

before us. Again, she gave a “woke” response;

“In America, people are used to AD-

VERTISEMENT. So, if something isn’t

advertised, they don’t know it exists.

It has to be played for people to know

there’s an album, but its’ done consciously.

Still with all that, my LP’s were never

played. I went to the States in ’72 and

sang at Lincoln Center. You couldn’t get

in! This was without my records being

advertised. Every day I receive letters,

people asking me to come, and perform.

I have no problems when I go there…

even today. The places are really packed.

Sometimes I really wonder…”

So true…Miriam Makeba knew.

Among her back-up singers in

America was my sister/friend,

the late singer/activist Fulani

Sunni-Ali, whom I met when she

married Bilal.

In additions to being a songstress

of universal acclaim, Makeba

spoke before the United Nations

General Assembly against apartheid

policies of evil, and brutality.

Her testimony on the Sharpeville

massacre went unheeded, as the

struggle continued. The guerilla

movement in southern Africa

was born of unceasing intolerable

acts of violence, and genocide; the


slaughter of schoolchildren in Soweto,

Steven Biko’s death at the hands of the

police, and countless others martyrs.

While in exile, Miriam Makeba became

a citizen of Guinea, and praised

the leadership of both the late Kwame

Nkrumah (Ghana’s first present, and a

graduate of Lincoln University), and

President Sekou Touré who appointed

her ambassador to the Republic. I asked

about a photo of her in Conakry, carrying

a gun, and wearing military gear;

“Well, in Guinea we have a People’s militia.

EVERBODY…children from 12

years old in school, EVERYBODY…

minister’s wife, president’s wife learns

how to dismantle a gun, put it back together,

and learns how to shoot? EV-

ERYBODY has arms in their house. “

Since the Black Panthers stood in 1967

on the State capitol steps in Sacramento

with open arms, www.history.com/

news/black-panthers-gun-control-nrasupport-mulford-act

I’d never heard

reveal this about the invasion.

The next thing she revealed EVERY

AMERICAN now should know;

“It’s very rare you hear a Guinean has

shot another Guinean. Because while

they have WEAPONS, they’re also

given the IDEOLOGY to know WHO

TO SHOOT WITH A GUN!” In 1970

when the country was invaded by the

Portuguese, it was the same people, not

just the army who came out to defend

the country. When Stokely was tired, I

would stand guard for three hours, and

then he wakes, and stands guard…for as

long as I sleep!”

We’re giggling now…. Miriam smiles,

then acknowledges being on post is serious.

In 1974 her life was a mixture of

traditional, and modern roles adding;

“I’m a mother, and grandmother. I’ve got

wo grandchildren-Lumumba, and Zenzile.

Most of the time I travel with my

grandchildren all over the world, and

I babysit while I sing at the same time.

It’s by choice, and I think the African

woman is now being given the chance

to do the things she wants to do, thanks

to some of our leaders who feel we can

playa positive role in our society…”

Reflecting on her clairvoyant words…

“They will probably be mad at me, but I

lived in the United States, and I saw the

consciousness of Black people rising.

They are fighting every day to get closer

to Africa, but there’s not much being

done in Africa…”

“We must stop being negative as a people.

Push the positive! If somebody tells

you, you’re not an African…tell them,

my brother, or my sister, I AM AN AF-

RICAN! Don’t even discuss it because it

doesn’t make any sense. Okay, so what’s

the difference? They took our people,

made them slaves abroad, then came

here, and made us slaves on the land--

-which is worse?”

The incredible music of Azania (South

Africa), is full of life’s freedom themes,

and interpretations. Besides “Malcolm

X” and “Westwind” favorites include the

Brazilian/JAZZ, “Reza,” and “Masque

Nada” (Hugh recorded the instrumental),

her vibrant music was/is key to the

spiritual upliftment of a people.

Miriam Makeba lived to see apartheid’s

end. Zenzile made history, and blessed

us with a legacy style of song, and the

awesome lessons of African life.

Thank you, Mama Africa, for your wisdom,

vision, our talk, and sharing the

music. They’re prophecies from your

heart, and soul to ours for eternity.

Patricia A. Kelly is a

freelance writer. She

is currently editing a

book about Gil Scott

Heron...

Pure Jazz Magazine - Page 21


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Page 22 - Pure Jazz Magazine


Archive

From the first time I ever heard of

Abbey Lincoln she was associated

with the struggle for the freedom

and dignity of black folks. Since I

was a boy I had been a fanatic or her

husband Max Roach’s drumming.

Growing up in a community where

mastering a musical instrument was

considered a heroic deed, and playing

the drums was a manifestation of

manly prowess only slightly less

masculine than playing football –

which was a civic religion in Florida

– Max Roach was both a manly role

model and artistic icon, a God-like

presence with mythical powers.

When Max married Abbey she

instantly became something of a

Goddess in my mind. And since I

had already rejected the God people

around me worshipped, I was free

to pick and choose my own Gods. So

why not them? I had never heard of

Abbey before she married Max, but

they quickly became the “first couple”

of the Black Arts Movement. Teasing

brown and strikingly beautiful, she

was well spoken, a talented singer

and actress, who carried herself

like an African warrior Queen

prepared to do battle in defense of

her own freedom and dignity, and

by word and deed that of her people.

Although her fame would have been

restricted by white racism – a white

girl with her attributes would have

blown up as big as ice cream – she

still could have found commercial

success. But Abbey was committed

to higher goals, like the liberation

and elevation of her oppressed people;

once you experience that freedom

high nothing can compare with it.

Many years later Abbey was still

unrepentant about her decision. In

a 1992 Essence Magazine interview

she told Jill Nelson, “People make

Pure Jazz Magazine - Page 23


you over, they give you other songs to

sing, you wear the clothes they choose,

they find you a personality they think

will sell. It’s all about prostitution,

when you come down to it.”

Abbey was one of the first black

female stars, following the great

folk singer and freedom fighter

Odetta, to wear her

hair “au natural.”

Unlike Odetta however,

Abbey had the look that

could have made her a

famous glamour girl

ala Lena Horne and

Dorothy Dandridge. It

is enough to see her in

that red dress in the

1956 movie “The Girl

Can’t Help It” starring

Jane Mansfield, to

know that this is no

exaggeration. This dress

had been previously

worn by Marylyn

Monroe in “Gentlemen

Prefer Blonds,” but I

prefer Abbey, honey

brown and gorgeous

with more curves

than a country road in

the hills of Jamaica.

However, unlike Lena and Dorothy,

who allowed their images and

career paths to be molded by white

producers and public relations

experts, Abbey chose a different

role for herself and rejected the

superficiality of pop fame in favor

of becoming a serious artist in

the complex Afro-American art

music called Jazz. This was a risky

business compared to the instant

stardom and the spoils that come

with it, if one achieves success

in pop music or the movies.

When Abbey joined Max and the

Braithwaite brothers, Kwame and

Elombe, in creating the “African Jazz

Art Society” in Harlem during 1958

it was the beginning of the “Black

Arts Movement.” She caught the

zeitgeist and moved with the spirit

of the times. The result was one

of the most interesting collaborations

in twentieth century American

music. The apotheosis of that

Page 24 - Pure Jazz Magazine

collaboration was the “Freedom

Suite,” which was recorded as “We

Insist: Freedom Now!” in 1960. It was

a prophetic work of art that presaged

the militant struggles that would

mark the decade and scared a lot of

the white cultural critics to death.

With music by Max Roach, who had

a degree in composition from the

Abbey Lincoln

Manhattan School of Music, and lyrics

by the great Chicago song poet and

musical dramatist Oscar Brown Jr.

the album was electrifying. Listening

to it now, I hear echoes of the era, a

sound portrait of one of the most

dynamic periods in American history.

It is no exaggeration to say that

the events of the 1960’s reshaped

the way millions of Americans view

their country. Everything from the

way we treat the environment to

gender relations, and even the

definition of gender itself, were

called into question as a result of

the Afro-American assault on the

racial caste system and the cultural

redefinition inspired by that

movement. The freedom suite gave

artistic expression to that ferment.

On compositions like “Driva Man,”

“Tears for Johannesburg” and

“Triptych: Prayer / Protest / Peace”

the power of Abbey’s soulful contralto

voice gives life to Max’s music, and

power to Oscar’s poignant lyrics.

The dramatic timbres and dark

indigo colors of her voice embody

all the pathos of the experience

the compositions describe in words

and music. Given her talents as an

actress Abbey was the ideal artist

for this project, which often required

her to assume the dramatis personae

suggested by the lyrics she

sang. “Triptych”, which

is just Max on drums and

Abbey’s vocalese, is blood

curdling; no one can listen

to it and not be moved.

The testimony of the New

Orleans writer and college

teacher Kalamu ya Salaam’s

description of his response

upon first hearing it when Max

and Abbey came to New

Orleans and performed at

Dillard University – a black

school – mirrors what many

of us felt: “I just stood next to

the stage, holding my camera

in my hand but not raising it

to shoot. I was mesmerized.

Abbey Lincoln was riveting.

I was stunned. I literally

just stood there. I’m sure my

mouth was hanging agape.”

He goes on to explain,

“Abbey and Max made me believe

in time travel, believe in the power

of a secular Holy Ghost, a terrible

Shiva-force that destroyed you to

renew you. I was afraid for her--and

for myself also. It seemed as though

she might hurt herself. It seemed as

if I should do something helpful and

not just be a stationary stump while

she was going through this. This was

not just jazz. This was a religious

experience. A new way to live.”

***********

Max and Abbey split up after a decade

of marriage and an even longer period

of collaboration. Max never worked

with a singer on a regular basis again

and Abbey went her on way, but she

has been clear about the role Max

played in the artistic path she took.

In a 1970 interview with Gallery 41,

Abbey recalled, “I was in New York,

miserable because I was working

supper clubs but I wasn’t expressing

myself. I was really unhappy with my


life. I saw Max again and he told

me I didn’t have to do things

like that. He made me an honest

woman on the stage. I have been

performing in that tradition since.

I feel that I’m a serious performer

now whereas then I wanted

to be but I didn’t know how.”

Abbey would appear in two

memorable movies: “Nothing But A

Man” with Ivan Dixon and “For the

Abbey Lincoln

Love Of Ivy” with Sidney Portier.

Although these films did not lead

to a rash of roles for Abbey – which

is par for the course where black

actresses are concerned these

performances do display her

versatility as an actress. In the

former film she is a proper daughter

of the middle class, and in the latter

she is a working class woman,

and is quite convincing in

both roles. She also became an

essayist and a powerful lyricist.

Born in Chicago in 1930, during the

Great Depression, Abbey Lincoln,

whose given name at birth was Anna

Marie Wooldridge, was raised in

rural Michigan as the tenth

of twelve children. She was

a woman who reinvented

herself several times before

she finally became Aminata

Moseka. In an interview with Lara

Pellegrinelli she explained her

fantastic journey from Anna

Marie to Aminata. “I’m Aminata

Moseka. I got a bunch of names.

Anna Marie Wooldridge was the

name I was born with. Then I

took Gaby because the people at

the Moulin Rouge in Los Angeles

wanted me to have

a French name.

They didn’t know

I already had one.

I didn’t either.

Anna Marie is as

French as it gets,

and Wooldridge is

English. They gave

me Gaby and kept

Wooldridge so I

had a German and

an English name.

It’s America!

[laughs] And

then Bob Russell

named me Abbey

Lincoln, because

we used to sit and

talk about life. He

understood how I

felt about my people

because he felt the same way about

his. He said to me, “Well, since

Abraham Lincoln didn’t free the

slaves, maybe you could handle

it.” He named me Abbey Lincoln

and I laughed, but that’s the name

that I took. Abbey for Westminster

Abbey he told me, and Lincoln for

Abraham Lincoln. He was aware of

himself and of his people—socially

aware. He’s the first socially aware

person that I met. Bob Russell.

Roach is socially aware. Duke

Ellington, all of the great ones.”

It goes without saying that she

too is one of the great ones. The

marvelous saga of her life is

evidence of it. It is not often that we

witness a performer walk away

from the glamorous life of fame and

fortune to stand on principle and

devote her life to the service of

others out of sheer love for her

people. Aminata Moseka was a

great lady and cultural warrior who

used her art as a weapon for the

oppressed. The last two times I saw

her perform was at the funeral of

Betty Carter, where she gave a soul

stirring rendition of “Land of the

Midnight Sun.” She healed the

spirits of the refugees from the

destruction of Katrina in the great

celebration / fundraiser for the

Crescent City at Jazz at Lincoln

Center. I shall always remember

her voice as a healing vibration – a

salve for wounded spirits. There are

not nearly enough of such generous

people in this world; if there

were, the world would be a better

place. We shall miss her, for we

shall not soon find her equal…if ever.

Aminata Moseka A Cultural

Warrior to the End!

Playthell G.

Benjamin

Harlem, NY

Playthell Benjamin is an award

winning journalist.

More from Playthell at his blog:

https://commentariesonthetimes.me/

www.drmambo.com

Pure Jazz Magazine - Page 25


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Page 26 - Pure Jazz Magazine


Philanthropic

Organizations with

musicians in mind

PJM’s very short list of Philanthropic

organizations who

specialize in supporting the

performance arts. That support

is directed to the performers

who make the magic

possible. Please donate to the

organizations below, they can

use your financial support.

Music that captures you mind...

(your listening pleasure)

Music that captures your body...

(your dancing pleasure)

Music that will affect your soul!

The Actors Fund of America is a charitable

organization that supports performers

and behind-the-scenes workers

in performing arts and entertainment,

helping more than 17,000 people directly

each year. Click Here..

Since its inception, the Musicians

Foundation has provided nation-wide

support to thousands of musicians

across all genres, offering compassion,

respect and the support necessary for

them to weather financial difficulties

and personal setbacks with dignity

and security. Click Here...

Caribbean Jazz 2018 at its best.

Download your copy today from your favorite

download/streaming service...

More opportunities for musi-

cians and performance artists

are available in a

downloadable pdf.

PRODUCTIONS

Emergency Funds and Fundraising

Platforms, click here

www.drmambo.com

Pure Jazz Magazine - Page 27

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