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The Deli NYC #55 - Half Waif, NYC MixCon 2018

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Elbows

Trip-Funk Avant-Lounge

Under the Elbows moniker, Brooklyn-based producer

and songwriter Max Scheible crafts music that travels

through genres, bending tastes and traditions and creating

something that sounds totally fresh. Scheible, also

a multimedia artist, chronicles in his tracks his Bay Area

roots, shifting genres with the moods of the songs, going

from old-school hip-hop to smooth synth-heavy jazz to

lounge music. (Will Sisskind)

[Top] Roland GAIA SH-01 [Bottom] Moog Sub 37

We hear all sorts of influences in your records, what’s your

musical background?

Growing up, my folks played a lot of ’60s/’70s psychedelia and

soul, and my mom definitely kept Sade and Badu in the car.

When I was around ten someone gave me a copy of 93 ‘til Infinity

from Souls of Mischief, which got me into hip hop, and by

extension, jazz. In middle school I started renting out CDs from

the library by the tens and just started listening to a ton of jazz

and whatever hip hop they had. I started playing guitar, writing

songs, and recording on a four-track tape recorder when I was

thirteen, and have been writing and recording ever since.

From the art on your records, it’s clear that there are some

non-musical influences that are worked into your songs and

persona.

My earliest memories are of drawing and most of my family

thinks of me as a visual artist. My Aunt Julie once asked me, if

you had to pick one—visual art or music—which would it be?

And to her I said: Aunt Julie, to me there’s no difference. When I

write a song I have an idea for a visual to go with it, and if I make

a drawing I can hear a soundtrack to that drawing. Ultimately I

want to tell stories that stretch completely from music, to visual,

to film, to physical things.

Do you have some pieces of gear that you find yourself turning

to the most while you compose?

For me the initial composition always starts with a story that needs

to be told, which then dictates the colors and feel. I usually start

with guitar or rhodes to get the chords down, and from there move

to synths to find the particular sounds of the record. I have an

amazing crew of friends that play live with me, like a band, and

help expand the records. The four main synths we used on this EP

are the Roland Juno-106, the Moog Sub 37, the Moog Sub Phatty,

and the Roland GAIA. The most influential piece of gear, however,

ended up being this old toy organ, made by I want to say Farfisa

I found in a shared studio space in Williamsburg. The entirety of

“Oatmeal” (outside of the 808s, percussion, and samples) came

from that organ, and it pops up again on “Corduroy” and “Blimp.”

22 the deli Summer 2018

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