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Great Expectations - Planet eBook

Great Expectations - Planet eBook

Great Expectations - Planet

Great Expectations By Charles Dickens Download free eBooks of classic literature, books and novels at Planet eBook. Subscribe to our free eBooks blog and email newsletter.

  • Page 2 and 3: Chapter 1 M y father’s family nam
  • Page 4 and 5: ‘Pip, sir.’ ‘Once more,’ sa
  • Page 6 and 7: to let me keep upright, sir, perhap
  • Page 8 and 9: lines intermixed. On the edge of th
  • Page 10 and 11: Joe, that she wore this apron so mu
  • Page 12 and 13: with the ironed leg, the mysterious
  • Page 14 and 15: out of his slice, which he didn’t
  • Page 16 and 17: Conscience is a dreadful thing when
  • Page 18 and 19: form of a most emphatic word out of
  • Page 20 and 21: pantry, which was far more abundant
  • Page 22 and 23: ound in such an accusatory manner a
  • Page 24 and 25: teeth, without biting it off. ‘I
  • Page 26 and 27: est scrutiny and the greatest surpr
  • Page 28 and 29: Chapter 4 I fully expected to find
  • Page 30 and 31: some people do the same by their re
  • Page 32 and 33: ing the whole verse - he looked all
  • Page 34 and 35: aspiration that we might be truly g
  • Page 36 and 37: here now? Not you—‘ ‘Unless i
  • Page 38 and 39: ound several times in an appalling
  • Page 40 and 41: head foremost into a party of soldi
  • Page 42 and 43: ‘You see, blacksmith,’ said the
  • Page 44 and 45: take wine, if it was equally conven
  • Page 46 and 47: speak no word after we reached the
  • Page 48 and 49: long and loud. Nay, there seemed to
  • Page 50 and 51: ‘Try, and not do it? I took him,
  • Page 52 and 53:

    me a look that I did not understand

  • Page 54 and 55:

    ing coolly looking at him with his

  • Page 56 and 57:

    Chapter 6 M y state of mind regardi

  • Page 58 and 59:

    the premises, that he had first got

  • Page 60 and 61:

    made known that all my earnings wer

  • Page 62 and 63:

    AN BLEVE ME INF XN PIP.’ There wa

  • Page 64 and 65:

    my father, several times; and then

  • Page 66 and 67:

    ‘So am I,’ returned Joe, catchi

  • Page 68 and 69:

    ‘Yes, Joe.’ ‘Well,’ said Jo

  • Page 70 and 71:

    all the heat out of the fire. ‘No

  • Page 72 and 73:

    while Joe apologetically drew the b

  • Page 74 and 75:

    Chapter 8 M r. Pumblechook’s prem

  • Page 76 and 77:

    eating bacon and hot roll, in (if I

  • Page 78 and 79:

    As to strong beer, there’s enough

  • Page 80 and 81:

    and a prayer-book, all confusedly h

  • Page 82 and 83:

    what I suppose she took for a dogge

  • Page 84 and 85:

    her to dust. ‘He calls the knaves

  • Page 86 and 87:

    it. Until she opened the side entra

  • Page 88 and 89:

    To be sure, it was a deserted place

  • Page 90 and 91:

    She gave me a triumphant glance in

  • Page 92 and 93:

    at tea-time, to have the details di

  • Page 94 and 95:

    coach?’ ‘Yes,’ said I. ‘And

  • Page 96 and 97:

    and should have hazarded the statem

  • Page 98 and 99:

    And then I told Joe that I felt ver

  • Page 100 and 101:

    all, old chap, and don’t never do

  • Page 102 and 103:

    taining who could tread the hardest

  • Page 104 and 105:

    He was a secret-looking man whom I

  • Page 106 and 107:

    ‘Once,’ returned Joe. ‘Not th

  • Page 108 and 109:

    ound. But he now reclined on his se

  • Page 110 and 111:

    seeing who held it, and I screamed

  • Page 112 and 113:

    I crossed to it, and stood ‘there

  • Page 114 and 115:

    proprieties.’ ‘You know I was o

  • Page 116 and 117:

    ushy black eyebrows that wouldn’t

  • Page 118 and 119:

    cloth spread on it, as if a feast h

  • Page 120 and 121:

    ‘Dear Miss Havisham,’ said Miss

  • Page 122 and 123:

    against the skirts of the visitors:

  • Page 124 and 125:

    was obliged to take precedence. Sar

  • Page 126 and 127:

    and there were old melon-frames and

  • Page 128 and 129:

    my replying Yes, he begged my leave

  • Page 130 and 131:

    have gone through a great deal to k

  • Page 132 and 133:

    Whether myrmidons of Justice, speci

  • Page 134 and 135:

    Havisham would look on, with a mise

  • Page 136 and 137:

    fore the fire as if I were going to

  • Page 138 and 139:

    I signified that I had no doubt he

  • Page 140 and 141:

    displayed as articles of property -

  • Page 142 and 143:

    Havisham. ‘Well, Pip, you know,

  • Page 144 and 145:

    up against a wall, and said to me,

  • Page 146 and 147:

    ‘Handsome would be the word,’ r

  • Page 148 and 149:

    fall, at the Blue Boar, and that Pu

  • Page 150 and 151:

    Chapter 14 I t is a most miserable

  • Page 152 and 153:

    duty-doing man flies out into the w

  • Page 154 and 155:

    pass unexplained. I wanted to make

  • Page 156 and 157:

    ‘Yes, old chap.’ ‘Here am I,

  • Page 158 and 159:

    ways slouching. He never even seeme

  • Page 160 and 161:

    ‘Are you all right now?’ demand

  • Page 162 and 163:

    against Joe, I never saw the man. O

  • Page 164 and 165:

    was closed upon me by Sarah of the

  • Page 166 and 167:

    ‘Halloa!’ we said, stopping.

  • Page 168 and 169:

    and there was a surgeon, and there

  • Page 170 and 171:

    her when she stood facing the fire

  • Page 172 and 173:

    disclosure if I should see any such

  • Page 174 and 175:

    in regarding him as one of the deep

  • Page 176 and 177:

    Chapter 17 I now fell into a regula

  • Page 178 and 179:

    ‘No; because when I come in from

  • Page 180 and 181:

    I began to combine Miss Havisham an

  • Page 182 and 183:

    I was disconcerted, for I had broke

  • Page 184 and 185:

    ‘Ah!’ said Biddy, quite in a wh

  • Page 186 and 187:

    we thanked him, but we didn’t wan

  • Page 188 and 189:

    Chapter 18 I t was in the fourth ye

  • Page 190 and 191:

    Mr. Wopsle was beginning, ‘I can

  • Page 192 and 193:

    Wopsle had gone too far, and had be

  • Page 194 and 195:

    ‘Now, Joseph Gargery, I am the be

  • Page 196 and 197:

    picion in your own breast, keep tha

  • Page 198 and 199:

    My answer was, that I had heard of

  • Page 200 and 201:

    But I encouraged Joe at the time. I

  • Page 202 and 203:

    was said for a long time. My sister

  • Page 204 and 205:

    ‘Saturday night,’ said I, when

  • Page 206 and 207:

    tunes should be the loneliest I had

  • Page 208 and 209:

    something for them one of these day

  • Page 210 and 211:

    Biddy into our little garden by the

  • Page 212 and 213:

    Biddy, ‘you may equally depend up

  • Page 214 and 215:

    purpose, sir, because it really is

  • Page 216 and 217:

    the Barnwell parlour, and he too or

  • Page 218 and 219:

    ‘which had the honour of bringing

  • Page 220 and 221:

    We drank all the wine, and Mr. Pumb

  • Page 222 and 223:

    ‘You?’ said she. ‘You, good g

  • Page 224 and 225:

    - much more at my ease too, though

  • Page 226 and 227:

    there, and all beyond was so unknow

  • Page 228 and 229:

    I had scarcely had time to enjoy th

  • Page 230 and 231:

    same air of knowing something to ev

  • Page 232 and 233:

    Close, and thoughtfully fitting the

  • Page 234 and 235:

    ‘Now, I tell you what!’ said Mr

  • Page 236 and 237:

    with his elbow. ‘Soft Head! Need

  • Page 238 and 239:

    his place while he was out, and I a

  • Page 240 and 241:

    ‘You are well acquainted with it

  • Page 242 and 243:

    this forlorn creation of Barnard, a

  • Page 244 and 245:

    For a reason that I had, I felt as

  • Page 246 and 247:

    Chapter 22 T he pale young gentlema

  • Page 248 and 249:

    ‘Mr. Jaggers is your guardian, I

  • Page 250 and 251:

    hood. I tell you what I should like

  • Page 252 and 253:

    ich and very proud. So was his daug

  • Page 254 and 255:

    money from her, and he induced her

  • Page 256 and 257:

    Havisham, but adopted. When adopted

  • Page 258 and 259:

    Barnard’s Inn. I said (in a tone

  • Page 260 and 261:

    ert went to the counting-house to r

  • Page 262 and 263:

    that don’t make seven times! What

  • Page 264 and 265:

    Chapter 23 M r. Pocket said he was

  • Page 266 and 267:

    for a Prince.’ Mr. Pocket had inv

  • Page 268 and 269:

    to dinner on the day of my installa

  • Page 270 and 271:

    legs - a sagacious way of improving

  • Page 272 and 273:

    late desperation. ‘Are infants to

  • Page 274 and 275:

    think we should all have enjoyed ou

  • Page 276 and 277:

    Chapter 24 A fter two or three days

  • Page 278 and 279:

    that do? Three times five; will tha

  • Page 280 and 281:

    catcher - a large pale puffed swoll

  • Page 282 and 283:

    You were a gentlemanly Cove, though

  • Page 284 and 285:

    ‘I’ll have it out of you!’ an

  • Page 286 and 287:

    ways creep in-shore like some uncom

  • Page 288 and 289:

    of the best fowl in the shop.’ I

  • Page 290 and 291:

    little gardens, and to present the

  • Page 292 and 293:

    ‘Well aged parent,’ said Wemmic

  • Page 294 and 295:

    distinguished razor or two, some lo

  • Page 296 and 297:

    Chapter 26 I t fell out as Wemmick

  • Page 298 and 299:

    uted everything himself. There was

  • Page 300 and 301:

    flaming spirits in a dark room. Ind

  • Page 302 and 303:

    ured - deeply scarred and scarred a

  • Page 304 and 305:

    or not. We said that as you put it

  • Page 306 and 307:

    house but Mrs. Pocket, he went home

  • Page 308 and 309:

    cation, and a keen sense of incongr

  • Page 310 and 311:

    his hat put down on the floor betwe

  • Page 312 and 313:

    young gentleman one of the family,

  • Page 314 and 315:

    consider himself full dressed? Why

  • Page 316 and 317:

    ter from you, I were able to say

  • Page 318 and 319:

    Chapter 28 I t was clear that I mus

  • Page 320 and 321:

    ‘See! There they are,’ said Her

  • Page 322 and 323:

    about. - As I really think I should

  • Page 324 and 325:

    ‘And was that - Honour! - the onl

  • Page 326 and 327:

    nient and commodious business premi

  • Page 328 and 329:

    lowed into my poor labyrinth. Accor

  • Page 330 and 331:

    dormouse for whom it was fitted up

  • Page 332 and 333:

    seemed to have made none. I fancied

  • Page 334 and 335:

    that fight that day: but I did, and

  • Page 336 and 337:

    isham which may often be noticed to

  • Page 338 and 339:

    of the bridal feast. But, in the fu

  • Page 340 and 341:

    saw him in the room, he had this ex

  • Page 342 and 343:

    he listened, and in due course answ

  • Page 344 and 345:

    Far into the night, Miss Havisham

  • Page 346 and 347:

    get into my place when overtaken. I

  • Page 348 and 349:

    soul don’t know yah!’ The disgr

  • Page 350 and 351:

    hair cut, but I have had senses to

  • Page 352 and 353:

    had not told you so - though that i

  • Page 354 and 355:

    ‘You can’t try, Handel?’ ‘N

  • Page 356 and 357:

    his means. ‘I have never seen him

  • Page 358 and 359:

    Chapter 31 O n our arrival in Denma

  • Page 360 and 361:

    whether ‘twas nobler in the mind

  • Page 362 and 363:

    Identity of Mr. Pip and friend conf

  • Page 364 and 365:

    eading. Now mind! I don’t care wh

  • Page 366 and 367:

    Chapter 32 O ne day when I was busy

  • Page 368 and 369:

    that I would make the inquiry wheth

  • Page 370 and 371:

    (whom I can see now, as I write) in

  • Page 372 and 373:

    ‘Now, that’s the way with them

  • Page 374 and 375:

    What was the nameless shadow which

  • Page 376 and 377:

    She drew her arm through mine, as i

  • Page 378 and 379:

    was very singular to me, and I look

  • Page 380 and 381:

    and against hope. Why repeat it a t

  • Page 382 and 383:

    city was almost new to her, she tol

  • Page 384 and 385:

    ing home from a little party escort

  • Page 386 and 387:

    into expenses that he could not aff

  • Page 388 and 389:

    out in life somewhere, was a thing

  • Page 390 and 391:

    ity, if you will believe me, those

  • Page 392 and 393:

    formly, docketed each on the back,

  • Page 394 and 395:

    Chapter 35 I t was the first time t

  • Page 396 and 397:

    the best parlour. Here, Mr. Trabb h

  • Page 398 and 399:

    keepers - the postboy and his comra

  • Page 400 and 401:

    He was very much pleased by my aski

  • Page 402 and 403:

    stars that were coming out, were bl

  • Page 404 and 405:

    was every quarter of an hour, I ref

  • Page 406 and 407:

    he said nothing respecting it, and

  • Page 408 and 409:

    and if you did know, you wouldn’t

  • Page 410 and 411:

    getting anything out of him. ‘Do

  • Page 412 and 413:

    that sort. ‘This friend,’ I pur

  • Page 414 and 415:

    and I turned ours. I could not help

  • Page 416 and 417:

    concerning the reputation of Mr. Ja

  • Page 418 and 419:

    ly shut up together. On Wemmick’s

  • Page 420 and 421:

    other) is an accountant and agent.

  • Page 422 and 423:

    it seemed to come through a keyhole

  • Page 424 and 425:

    was the subject, and I paid him hal

  • Page 426 and 427:

    made use of me to tease other admir

  • Page 428 and 429:

    ‘You can then? The day after to-m

  • Page 430 and 431:

    tion thrown large by the fire upon

  • Page 432 and 433:

    nothing. And if you ask me to give

  • Page 434 and 435:

    taught her, from the dawn of her in

  • Page 436 and 437:

    day strayed in and showed me where

  • Page 438 and 439:

    importing that he had the honour of

  • Page 440 and 441:

    ‘Estella,’ said I, ‘do look a

  • Page 442 and 443:

    prepared for, before I knew that th

  • Page 444 and 445:

    their roofs; and in the country, tr

  • Page 446 and 447:

    was browned and hardened by exposur

  • Page 448 and 449:

    identity. He came back to where I s

  • Page 450 and 451:

    ‘I hope you have done well?’

  • Page 452 and 453:

    y them and had to struggle for ever

  • Page 454 and 455:

    when I come in. Ha, ha, ha! You sha

  • Page 456 and 457:

    Throughout, I had seemed to myself

  • Page 458 and 459:

    But, sharpest and deepest pain of a

  • Page 460 and 461:

    Chapter 20 I t was fortunate for me

  • Page 462 and 463:

    a stranger asked for you.’ ‘My

  • Page 464 and 465:

    ‘I do not even know,’ said I, s

  • Page 466 and 467:

    As he said so, he got up from the t

  • Page 468 and 469:

    ‘Yes, but look’ee here,’ he p

  • Page 470 and 471:

    ‘we’ll have him on his oath.’

  • Page 472 and 473:

    know.’ ‘I will say, informed, M

  • Page 474 and 475:

    planation of Magwitch - in New Sout

  • Page 476 and 477:

    asleep of an evening, with his knot

  • Page 478 and 479:

    thing very strange has happened. Th

  • Page 480 and 481:

    Pip ain’t a-going to make you a g

  • Page 482 and 483:

    An involuntary shudder passed over

  • Page 484 and 485:

    the forge all the days of my life t

  • Page 486 and 487:

    ‘After you were gone last night,

  • Page 488 and 489:

    eg’larly grow’d up took up. ‘

  • Page 490 and 491:

    giv me five shillings, and appointe

  • Page 492 and 493:

    I see her myself. ‘Compeyson’s

  • Page 494 and 495:

    and get the profit. But, when the d

  • Page 496 and 497:

    face. ‘And now,’ says I ‘as t

  • Page 498 and 499:

    night of the day when Provis told u

  • Page 500 and 501:

    to put my hand behind his legs for

  • Page 502 and 503:

    der and foot to foot, with our hand

  • Page 504 and 505:

    fee-room windows, the slouching sho

  • Page 506 and 507:

    efore you, presently - in a few mom

  • Page 508 and 509:

    since I went to London. I know them

  • Page 510 and 511:

    gers still going, Estella shook her

  • Page 512 and 513:

    thier person than Drummle. Miss Hav

  • Page 514 and 515:

    out of myself, I don’t know. The

  • Page 516 and 517:

    Chapter 45 T urning from the Temple

  • Page 518 and 519:

    the passages, and cheer myself with

  • Page 520 and 521:

    al capacities, and we have been eng

  • Page 522 and 523:

    tation over the fire, that I would

  • Page 524 and 525:

    and remembrances by Herbert, I had

  • Page 526 and 527:

    ‘Of course,’ said I. ‘Well; a

  • Page 528 and 529:

    Rope-Walk - whose long and narrow v

  • Page 530 and 531:

    who can never bother herself, or an

  • Page 532 and 533:

    Clara returned soon afterwards, and

  • Page 534 and 535:

    arising out of Wemmick’s suggesti

  • Page 536 and 537:

    our parting, and went home very sad

  • Page 538 and 539:

    Chapter 47 S ome weeks passed witho

  • Page 540 and 541:

    had seen the signal in his window,

  • Page 542 and 543:

    shoved into a dusty corner while ev

  • Page 544 and 545:

    not to speak yet, for it was quite

  • Page 546 and 547:

    he had from the first vaguely assoc

  • Page 548 and 549:

    - the few words I had uttered, serv

  • Page 550 and 551:

    ‘Surely,’ I interrupted, with a

  • Page 552 and 553:

    to have missed the sentiments I had

  • Page 554 and 555:

    ‘Of course.’ ‘A score or so o

  • Page 556 and 557:

    pothesis that she destroyed her chi

  • Page 558 and 559:

    in the dark passage within, as of o

  • Page 560 and 561:

    at me. ‘And how much money is wan

  • Page 562 and 563:

    aised to me in the manner in which,

  • Page 564 and 565:

    els, and with my teachings, and wit

  • Page 566 and 567:

    way to the ruined garden. I went al

  • Page 568 and 569:

    or even touched. Assistance was sen

  • Page 570 and 571:

    Chapter 50 M y hands had been dress

  • Page 572 and 573:

    ‘I said to you I thought he was s

  • Page 574 and 575:

    ‘No, to be sure.’ ‘Now, wheth

  • Page 576 and 577:

    Chapter 51 W hat purpose I had in v

  • Page 578 and 579:

    ut he presently handed them over to

  • Page 580 and 581:

    nouncement I am unable to say, for

  • Page 582 and 583:

    and you with pleasant and playful w

  • Page 584 and 585:

    is still saved.’ Put the case tha

  • Page 586 and 587:

    it of wiping his nose on his sleeve

  • Page 588 and 589:

    my own part in these bright plans,

  • Page 590 and 591:

    Those two should pull a pair of oar

  • Page 592 and 593:

    had come like a surprise at last. A

  • Page 594 and 595:

    mused over the fire for an hour or

  • Page 596 and 597:

    anked-up pathway, arose and blunder

  • Page 598 and 599:

    closed a shutter. After groping abo

  • Page 600 and 601:

    well worth your while to get me out

  • Page 602 and 603:

    and I smelt the strong spirits that

  • Page 604 and 605:

    - writes my letters, wolf! They wri

  • Page 606 and 607:

    Of a sudden, he stopped, took the c

  • Page 608 and 609:

    dark and empty sluice-house, and we

  • Page 610 and 611:

    ment, if he had known that his inte

  • Page 612 and 613:

    ing into the unusually clear air, t

  • Page 614 and 615:

    and solitary, where the waterside i

  • Page 616 and 617:

    ing rusty chain-cables frayed hempe

  • Page 618 and 619:

    ‘Well,’ he returned, drawing a

  • Page 620 and 621:

    a little squat shoal-lighthouse on

  • Page 622 and 623:

    occupy one; I and our charge the ot

  • Page 624 and 625:

    was flapping at the shore, and I ha

  • Page 626 and 627:

    saw that I waved my hat to him to c

  • Page 628 and 629:

    other convict of long ago. Still in

  • Page 630 and 631:

    ing that he must take charge of eve

  • Page 632 and 633:

    I felt his hand tremble as it held

  • Page 634 and 635:

    settlement in my favour before his

  • Page 636 and 637:

    expand (as a clerk of your acquaint

  • Page 638 and 639:

    transacted, and it was from the tal

  • Page 640 and 641:

    have been stirring with the lark, f

  • Page 642 and 643:

    accustomed voice, ‘Now Aged P. yo

  • Page 644 and 645:

    Chapter 56 H e lay in prison very i

  • Page 646 and 647:

    At that time, it was the custom (as

  • Page 648 and 649:

    a haggard look of bravery, and a fe

  • Page 650 and 651:

    ‘Thank’ee dear boy, thank’ee.

  • Page 652 and 653:

    Chapter 57 N ow that I was left who

  • Page 654 and 655:

    Perhaps they replied, or argued the

  • Page 656 and 657:

    ‘Yes, Joe.’ ‘It’s the end o

  • Page 658 and 659:

    ‘Is she dead, Joe?’ ‘Why you

  • Page 660 and 661:

    Orlick, and Orlick’s in the count

  • Page 662 and 663:

    not. ‘Have you heard, Joe,’ I a

  • Page 664 and 665:

    nations. Therefore, think no more o

  • Page 666 and 667:

    fore we went to bed, I had resolved

  • Page 668 and 669:

    happy time. Then, I would say to he

  • Page 670 and 671:

    house; LOT 2 on that part of the ma

  • Page 672 and 673:

    ticle in question, retiring a step

  • Page 674 and 675:

    Joseph. Reward of ingratitoode to h

  • Page 676 and 677:

    lows; all shut up, and still. But,

  • Page 678 and 679:

    another little fellow gone out of i

  • Page 680 and 681:

    Chapter 59 F or eleven years, I had

  • Page 682 and 683:

    The early dinner-hour at Joe’s, l

  • Page 684 and 685:

    determined resistance I made in all

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