17.07.2018 Views

UJ #14 - Qhapac Ñan

You also want an ePaper? Increase the reach of your titles

YUMPU automatically turns print PDFs into web optimized ePapers that Google loves.

THE GREAT INCA TRAIL

QHAPAQ ÑAN

REDISCOVERING THE FOOTSTEPS OF THE INCAS

Interview with François Morin,

Business Development Director of LimaTours

1


2


3


CURRENT ISSUES / 8

QHAPAQ ÑAN A LIVING LEGACY / 14

IN MEMORIAM / 12

QHAPAQ ÑAN:

MAP OF THE

ANDEAN ROAD

SYSTEM / 17

INFOGRAPHIC

ANCESTRAL

TREASURES / 22

INDEX

REDISCOVERING THE

FOOTSTEPS OF

THE INCAS / 24

MAP OF THE

HUANUCO PAMPA ROUTE / 38

INTERVIEW TO FRANÇOIS MORIN / 40

Business Development Director of LimaTours


This edition of Ultimate

Journeys - Travel in Peru was

produced by LimaTours’

marketing team.

UJ GENERAL DIRECTOR

Gerardo Sugay

CONTENT DIRECTOR

Gerardo Sugay

Ana Paula Albín

Ximena Arrieta

SEARCHING FOR THE LEGACY FAR FROM THE ASPHALT / 48

INFOGRAPHIC

PERU’S GREAT

RICHES / 60

GENERAL EDITOR

Ximena Arrieta

GENERAL COORDINATOR

Karla Huertas

ART DIRECTOR

LimaTours

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Sergio Salazar

QHAPAQ CAMP

MAP / 76

THE ROAD OF ALL OF US / 62

ILLUSTRATIONS

Juan Diego León

INFOGRAPHICS

LimaTours

EDITORIAL STAFF

Ximena Arrieta

PHOTOGRAPHS

Archivo LimaTours

Archivo KM Cero

Archivo Qhapaq Ñan - Sede

Nacional

Kevin Floerke

Sergio Salazar

Ximena Arrieta

Ana Paula Albín

INTERVIEW TO NICK STANZIANO

AND JOHN LEIVERS / 78

CALENDAR / 82

COVER PAGE PHOTO CREDIT

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s

National Office


EDITORIAL

DEAR READER:

At LimaTours, we believe that, to offer unforgettable memories, it is necessary to go to the roots of

our country, experiencing and researching it in depth. For this reason, in this new edition of Ultimate

Journeys – Travel in Peru, we want to take you to the past in a memorable visit to our country along a path

of exuberant richness and traditions that have remained alive for more than 500 years.

Tour the Qhapaq Ñan with us, the backbone of the Inca Empire (Tahuantinsuyo). This road system

covers a large part of South America and is considered one of the most important engineering works in

the world, both for the quality of its construction and the rugged geography that surrounds it.

This issue of Ultimate Journeys – Travel in Peru will immerse you in the world of this thousand-year-old

culture and its legacy, which lasts until today. Join ‘The Great Inca Trail’ expedition of which LimaTours is

an integral part, in what used to be its 3,200-km trek along the Qhapaq Ñan, and discover the treasures

it protects.

Embark on a trip by the communities located in deepest Peru, where the Inca Trail is still used, and

explore their relationship with this wonder. Also learn about the Qhapaq Ñan’s integrating capacity

and the work performed to include it on the UNESCO World Heritage List, a historical candidacy that

required the participation of the six countries that share it.

Be blown away by Peru’s mystical aspect that stands out for its heritage and makes us proud of its

customs that transform us into a multicultural country.

Happy reading and good learning!

Your friends at LimaTours


PROUD

INNOVATORS FOR

PERU´S DEVELOPMENT

LimaTours has won the Business Creativity Award five

times for the most innovative proposals. We have been

selected among thousands of companies with extensive

experience and national renown.

WINNING PROJECTS

2005 - Peru Collection

2006 - Wings Over Peru

2008 - Peru Gourmet

2014 - Ultimate Journeys

2017 - Qhapaq Ñan Project

an expedition along the Great

Inca Trail, which aims to renew

its value and collaborate with

the development of Andean

communities.


CURRENT ISSUES

Maido restaurant was placed first on the list

of the fifty best restaurants in the region at

the fifth edition of Latin America’s 50 best

restaurants held in Bogota, Colombia. The

establishment managed by Chef Mitsuharu

Tsumura took the first place from Central led

CURRENT ISSUES

by Virgilio Martinez, which topped the ranking

for three consecutive years and was placed

second now. Astrid y Gaston restaurant also

ranked among the Top 10 of the event as

number 7.

Maido

Maido

Central

Restaurante Central

This is the first time that a Peruvian museum has

been included among the 25 best museums in

the world at the Traveller’s Choice Awards on

TripAdvisor’s web platform. The Larco Museum

won the 22nd place on the ranking with

more than 8,000 comments. Other national

attractions considered were Machu Picchu (8th

place in the category of ‘Most popular places’)

and Cusco (25th place in the category of ‘Most

popular destinations’).

Museo Larco

MAIDO IS THE BEST

RESTAURANT IN LATIN

AMERICA

LARCO MUSEUM,

THE TRAVELERS’

FAVORITE

LimaTours

Astrid y Gaston

Maido

Maido

Astrid y Gastón

Maido

8


LimaTours

PROMPERU LAUNCHES A

NEW CAMPAIGN

LimaTours

The Commission for the Promotion of

Peruvian Exports and Tourism (PromPeru)

presented its most recent campaign at the

World Travel Market in London under the

slogan “Peru, the richest country in the

world.” This campaign aims to attract foreign

audiences to learn about the incomparable

riches the country has to offer in terms of

culture, nature, gastronomy and adventure.

DISCOVER THE

PERUVIAN RAINFOREST

ON THE “AMAZON STAR”

The “Amazon Star” offers a dream journey. The

cruise will get its crew as close to nature as never

before. Sailing away from Iquitos, the route will

cruise the Amazon, Marañon and Ucayali rivers,

where the guests will travel on 15 luxury cabins with

private balcony. The five- and seven-day programs

include full board, kayak and paddle, night time

explorations in the jungle and sighting of species

such as the pygmy marmoset and the pink dolphin.

Departures start in January 2018.

LimaTours

9


CURRENT ISSUES

Hotel Inkaterra La Casona

Hotel

Inkaterra

La Casona

PERUVIAN HOTELS

RANK AMONG THE

BEST IN THE WORLD

Ten other hotels were recognized by the readers

of Condé Nast magazine at the Readers’ Choice

Awards 2017. In the category of Best Hotel in South

America stood out Inkaterra La Casona - Cusco (2nd

place), Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel – Aguas

Calientes (3rd place), Country Club Lima Hotel (9th

place), Belmond Hotel Monasterio - Cusco (10th

place), Palacio del Inka Luxury Collection - Cusco

(12th place), Sumaq Machu Picchu Hotel – Aguas

Calientes (14th place), JW Marriot El Convento

Cusco (20th place), Belmond Miraflores Park - Lima

(21st place), JW Marriott Hotel - Lima (24thplace)

and Belmond Sanctuary Lodge -Machu Picchu

(25th place).

The Travel and Leisure magazine included the

Belmond Palacio Nazarenas and Tambo del Inka,

a Luxury Collection Resort & Spa, on its list of the

best 100 hotels in 2017. Both lodgings are located

in Cusco and ranked 67th and 90th, respectively.

The selected hotels are evaluated by the readers

of the publication based on their location, services,

food, facilities and general value.

Hotel Inkaterra Machu

Picchu Pueblo

Hotel Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo

Belmond Hotel Monasterio

Hotel Country Club de Lima

Hotel Country Club de Lima

Belmond Hotel Monasterio

10


Shutterstock

THE HUACACHINA

OASIS, AN IMPRESSIVE

DESTINATION

The British newspaper The Telegraph highlighted

the great attractions offered by the Huacachina

Oasis. “Known among tourists as a sandboarding

destination, this oasis is worth a visit for its location

alone, hidden among golden dunes in the desert

outside Ica.” This was the only Latin American

destination mentioned on the list of “21 of the

world’s most dramatic villages”, selected for its

lodgings and activities such as buggy rides and

paragliding.

LimaTours

11


IN MEMORIAM

CARLOS ALBERTO IN THE HEART OF LIMATOURS

The loss of Carlos Alberto Arrarte, Chairman of the Board of

LimaTours, leaves a great sadness for all of us who worked

alongside him. Some people get the sympathy of others quickly,

and Carlos was one of them, always leaving a lesson in hard work

and conviction that we try to follow day by day.

As the son of our founder, Eduardo R. Arrarte, tourism was part

of Carlos Alberto’s life from the time he was a little boy. His father

instilled in him and his siblings the idea of continuing with the

family business, and so he did. From 1980 to 1991, after finishing

his studies at the University of Pennsylvania, Carlos held the

position of LimaTours’ Receptive Tourism Manager in Lima, and

later, in Miami.

In 1991, Carlos left LimaTours, joining Hertz Rent a Car as the

Director of Marketing for Latin America and The Caribbean based

in Miami. Carlos returned to LimaTours as General Manager

1997, and remained at the helm of the company until 2013,

when LimaTours was sold to TUI Travel PLC and he was named

Chairman of the Board. Additionally, he assumed the presidency

of Expediciones Amazonicas in 2014.

Carlos was a long time member of ASTA the American Society of

Travel Agents (ASTA), founder president of the South American

Travel Association (SATA) and member of the United States Tour

Operators Association (USTOA). He was a director of the Peruvian

Association of Receptive Tourism Operators (APOTUR) from 1998

to 2004; executive director and vice-president of the National

Tourism Camera (CANATUR) from 2000 to 2004. Carlos was a

member of the board of directors at TURPERU from 1997 to 2010.

He also was a leader in not-for-profit tourism development. He

was the founder and president of the LimaTours Foundation, as

well as Turismo Cuida, the Peruvian chapter of Tourism Cares.

Carlos also was a board member of the Sustainable Preservation

Initiative (SPI) and had recently been named Peru’s representative

on the Global Sustainable Tourism Council.

Innovation was one of the characteristics of Carlos Alberto’s

work, as he developed unique travel concepts that built on the

richness of our country to create unforgettable experiences.

Under his management, LimaTours was a pioneer in Amazon

cruises, building our own ship: The Amazon Star. He also created

the concept of the Peru Collection, a luxury tourism program that

focuses on bespoke itineraries designed around gastronomy,

adventure tourism and health and wellness activities. Plan Wallata,

Carlos’s ongoing major project, will turn the ancient Andean village

of Ollantaytambo, the jumping off point for a trip to Machu Picchu,

into a living Inca town, bringing back traditional economic activity

and preserving Ollanta’s rich cultural heritage.

As a renowned tourism executive in Peru, Carlos was an industry

leader in sustainable growth. He understood that the travel

industry is intimately tied to the communities it touches, and

that sustainable growth is based on thoughtful development in

tourism-rich areas. He also was passionate about protecting the

environment and believed responsible travel was key to longterm

business success. To help support this vision, Carlos created

the LimaTours Foundation, a not-for-profit arm of LimaTours

dedicated to managing and promoting the company’s social

responsibility work with projects in villages such as Huilloc, where

the Foundation helped the community develop a village home

stay program; and the Plan Wallata, which includes a focus on

tourism development in the villages of the Sacred Valley in Cusco.

Thanks to these projects, thousands of people who live in Huilloc

and the many villages in the Ollantaytambo district are slowly

strengthening their national identity and improving their quality of

life through sustainable tourism.

Carlos Alberto loved Peru and he was proud of sharing that

passion with all who had the chance to meet him. His commitment

and dedication were a constant beacon of his leadership and open

relationship with his LimaTours’ family. Carlos was dedicated to

“Lito” – as LimaTours is called by insiders- and believed the strength

of the business was built on ensuring the well-being of each and

every employee. His example inspires us to offer the best possible

experiences to each LimaTours passenger.

In LimaTours, we are honored to have shared time with Carlos

Alberto and learned so many things from him. We are glad to

know that, like us, many other people around the world were

able to enjoy his good humor, his vocation for service and, most

importantly, his passion for Peru.

12


13


14

QHAPAQ ÑAN: A LIVING LEGACY


QHAPAQ

ÑAN

A LIVING LEGACY

A ROAD SYSTEM OF

NEARLY 60,000 KM

WAS THE BACKBONE OF

THE TAHUANTINSUYO,

AN INCA JEWEL THAT

STILL STANDS AFTER

500 YEARS. THE

NATURAL BEAUTY

AND MAGNIFICENT

ENGINEERING WORKS

MAKE THE QHAPAQ

ÑAN A UNIQUE LEGACY

THAT WAS LISTED AS

A WORLD HERITAGE

SITE BY UNESCO,

BECOMING A SOURCE

OF PRIDE FOR THE

SIX COUNTRIES THAT

CURRENTLY SHARE IT.

Christian Declercq / KM Cero

The Qhapaq Ñan

blends in with

the geography

of the Peruvian

highlands.

15


QHAPAQ ÑAN: A LIVING LEGACY

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

Peru’s richness is noted across its territory:

breathtaking landscapes, archaeological

complexes that take you to an impressive past or

cultural expressions such as dances and rituals

that pass on from generation to generation

and strengthen the connection with our roots.

With more than one million square kilometers

of deserts, mountains and forests, is there any

way of connecting each corner maintaining the

authenticity of nature and the population?

LimaTours

This is not a modern question; it was also an

important issue for ancient Peruvians such as

the Incas. Given the ongoing expansion of the

Tahuantinsuyo, the rulers had to find a way of

uniting it and creating a feeling of belonging in

the new citizens, and of showing their power.

They decided to create a road system, not only

to connect the most remote towns with Cusco,

but also to use it for political, military and social

purposes. This is the origin of the Qhapaq Ñan,

the ‘Royal Road’.

The Longitudinal Coastal Highway between

the Casma and Huarmey valleys (Ancash).

The Qhapaq Ñan is considered one of the most

impressive engineering works in history. It is

composed of nearly 60,000 km of roads that

traversed the entire empire from what is currently

Colombia to Chile, crossing Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia

and Argentina. Four routes beginning from

the Huak’aypata square – currently the Cusco

Main Square - went to the regions or suyos:

Chinchaysuyo (north), Collasuyo (south), Antisuyo

(east) and Contisuyo (west).

To make the most of the territory and facilitate

the organization along the entire road network,

the Incas divided it into sections: the Longitudinal

Highland Highway, the Longitudinal Coastal

Highway, and the transversal and penetration

roads. Places to shelter and feed the travelers

were built on each road, and sacred spaces were

determined by the presence of snow-capped

peaks or lagoons.

Cusco was the center of

the empire, and today it is

a combination of the Inca

and Colonial heritage.

16


Source: Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

PASTO

COLOMBIA

ECUADOR

QUITO

60 000 km

of extension had the

Qhapaq Ñan.

Huaca Cabeza

de Vaca

Ingapirca

CUENCA

PERU

780 km and

291 associated

archaeological sites have

Aypate

Caxas o Baños

del Inca

been declared World

Heritage by UNESCO.

Tucume

CAJAMARCA

Cochabamba

BRASIL

250 km and

82 of those associated

Marcahuamachuco

sites are located in Peru.

Chan Chan

Huanuco Pampa

PACIFIC

OCEAN

LIMA

Pachacamac

Inkawasi de Lunahuana

Tambo

Colorado

Huanacaure

Pumpu

Huaycan de Cieneguilla

Hatun Xauxa

VILCASHUAMAN

Machu Picchu

Huaytara

CUSCO

Vilcashuaman

Quebrada

de la Vaca

Sillustani

Hatun Colla

Chucuito

LAGO

TITICACA

LA PAZ

BOLIVIA

PARIA

ANDEAN

ROAD

SYSTEM

CHILE

CATARPO

Tilcara

LA PAYA

MAP KEY

Longitudinal Highways

REGIONS OF TAHUANTINSUYO

Pucara de

Andagala

Transversal roads

Chinchaysuyo

Comprehensive projects

Archaeological sites

Antisuyo

Contisuyo

Chilecito

ARGENTINA

Collasuyo

Ranchillos

SANTIAGO

TALCA


QHAPAQ ÑAN: A LIVING LEGACY

The Longitudinal Highland Highway, the original

Qhapaq Ñan, was the core axis of the entire

route and covered from the Chinchaysuyo to the

Collasuyo, crossing the territory at the foot of the

Andean Mountain Range. The stretch covered

approximately 5,658 km from the current city of

Quito to Santiago de Chile with a perfectly built

road that reached a maximum width of 18m. The

penetration roads to the jungle, built to adapt to

the terrain and humidity of the region, stemmed

from this road.

Kevin Floerke

Compared to the winding and challenging

Qhapaq Ñan, the Longitudinal Coastal Highway

was characterized by its straightness along the

coastal valleys and deserts. It covered an area of

3,943 km, also from Ecuador to Chile. This artery

connected with its counterpart in the highlands

through transversal roads, which ran from west

to east between mountains and ravines, following

the course of the valleys.

Why did this network impress the Spaniards upon

their arrival in Peru and continues to astonish

the world? We only have to imagine ourselves

standing in front of an impressive Apu, such

as Mount Pariacaca, on a cobbled road with

stairways to climb the mountains and suspension

bridges woven with vegetable fibers to cross the

rivers. We have to make a mental tour of the

route, finding tambos used to lodge the pilgrims,

ushnus from where the Inca thanked the gods and

administrative centers magnificently built amidst

one of the most rugged geographies on the planet.

Inca structures such as the Soledad

de Tambo ushnu (Ancash) are found

along the trail.

The greatness of the Qhapaq Ñan has not been

left in the past, as a limited archaeological site.

Its very essence of being a road that serves the

community prevails until today. For this reason, it

is regarded as a living heritage used by tenths of

residents of the Peruvian highlands as their only

means of communication with other towns and

cities. These areas broaden the experience of

following into the footsteps of the Incas with their

customs, turning the tour into a cultural route that

merges a masterpiece of Inca construction with

traditions that have been preserved for more than

500 years.

18


Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

The Qhapaq Ñan became a UNESCO World

Heritage Site since 2014, after a joint work

performed by the six countries that share it:

Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Argentina and

Chile. This candidacy made history, as this was the

first time that several nations teamed up to work

and made a joint submission. Once listed, all the

countries committed to protect the road system

and continue to carry out a joint work to preserve

it for future generations.

The scenic beauty that surrounds it, the

construction techniques it includes and the

cultural expressions that originated around it turn

the Qhapaq Ñan into a jewel that is Inca as well as

modern and does not stop astonishing the locals

and visitors alike.

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

This stone bridge in Huarautambo

(Cerro de Pasco) is an example of

the Inca construction technology.

WHAT IS A CULTURAL ROUTE?

ACCORDING TO THE INTERNATIONAL

COUNCIL ON MONUMENTS AND SITES

(ICOMOS), ‘CULTURAL ROUTES’ ARE

THE MEANS OF COMMUNICATION THAT

HAVE THEIR OWN SPECIFIC DYNAMICS

AND HISTORIC FUNCTIONALITY. THE

STAND OUT CHARACTERISTICS OF THE

INCA TRAIL INCLUDE THE EXCHANGE

BETWEEN PEOPLES AND COUNTRIES,

THE AMALGAMATION OF CULTURES

ALONG THE ENTIRE ROUTE AND THE

CREATION OF A DYNAMIC SYSTEM

THAT MERGES HISTORY WITH THE

ASSET, REPRESENTED BY THE USE IT

CURRENTLY HAS.

Well preserved steps in

the Escalerayoc sector in

Yauyos (Lima).

19


QHAPAQ ÑAN: A LIVING LEGACY

SIX COUNTRIES, ONE LEGACY

From the arid deserts to the lush forest, the

Qhapaq Ñan connected a huge and rich territory.

The listing of a World Heritage Site by

UNESCO fills our whole nation with pride.

In the case of the Qhapaq Ñan, this

emotion is shared by several countries

after carrying out a thorough work of

almost ten years until its official listing on

June 21, 2014.

The importance of this listing goes beyond

all the benefits that recognition involves.

The Qhapaq Ñan has become a landmark

in the history of humanity once again, as

it is the first time that six republics (Peru,

Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia, Argentina and

Chile) submit a joint candidacy for a World

Heritage Site. The Andean Road System

was not only able to connect peoples in

the Tahuantinsuyo; it also did it again 500

years later with the same effectiveness.

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

The Process

In 2001, Peru decided to register the Qhapaq Ñan on UNESCO’s

Tentative List of World Heritage Sites. “At that time, there was a need

to reconnect the country, to reconcile parts of Peru that had come into

conflict,” said Giancarlo Marcone, Director of the Qhapaq Ñan Project’s

National Office of the Ministry of Culture.

The great material and intangible cultural value of the road network, its

integrating function and its current use by the Andean communities

caught the attention of the other countries, which opted for joining the

Peruvian initiative in 2003. In February 2013, the final file jointly worked

was submitted to the UNESCO World Heritage Center, presenting the

status of the Qhapaq Ñan that met the ‘Exceptional Universal Value

Criteria’ required by the organization.

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

Dances and traditions mark the unique relationship

of the population with the trail across South America.

20


The Peru-Bolivia Binational Trek is an example

of the unity generated by the Qhapaq Ñan.

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

What benefits is receiving each country?

The most important benefit is the international

positioning that increases the flow of visitors and is

essential for the economic and social development of

the nearby areas. This will allow boosting the tourist

potential of the Qhapaq Ñan in areas outside the

traditional Cusco route.

The countries with listed heritage sites belong to

a global community concerned about maintaining

these assets, they gain access to the World Heritage

Fund that provides economic support to remediate

damages caused by natural disasters and to the signing

of international agreements for the conservation and

protection of the sites.

Finally, a mention of this type involves raising further

awareness in the public in favor of the heritage

and, consequently, the commitment of government

authorities and communities to protect their legacy

and find forms of sustainable development that

benefit them.

The Qhapaq Ñan today

Rather than perceiving it as a topic of the past, the Qhapaq

Ñan is the tool to talk about a “new history” without borders,

which highlights the diversity among the six countries

but does not prevent them from coexisting in the same

territory. The meaning of this trail goes beyond being a

mere road that connects the Tahuantinsuyo, but it has a

great transformational and unifying potential.

Its functional nature and the fact that it continues to be

currently used as a means of communications, allows

raising awareness of a public space that can be enjoyed

and used by the citizens. “The Qhapaq Ñan is not really

about the Incas, but about the present. We can use it to

create stories of who we are today, what is our relationship

with the people and how we allow them to enjoy a heritage

that belongs to all of us,” highlighted Marcone.

21


THE QHAPAQ ÑAN

AND ITS ANCESTRAL TREASURES

THE QHAPAQ ÑAN IS NOT ONLY A ROAD; IT IS A ROUTE FULL OF MEANINGS. EACH

CONSTRUCTION, NATURAL ATTRACTION OR TOWN HAS A STORY THAT GIVES NEW VALUE TO

THE TOUR AND WE CAN STILL APPRECIATE IT ALTHOUGH MORE THAN 500 YEARS HAVE

ELAPSED SINCE THE INCA EMPIRE WAS AT ITS HEIGHT.

SNOW-CAPPED PEAKS

The Qhapaq Ñan extends along the Andes

Mountain Range and it usually approaches

the impressive snow-capped peaks (Apus),

the deities worshipped by the Incas.

ADMINISTRATIVE CENTERS

The rulers controlled the population and led

the use of the resources in the area from

these centers. Its construction included

colcas to store food, ceremonial ushnus and

kallankas to lodge the authorities.

COMMUNITIES

Hundreds of people and villages

are located in neighboring areas

of the Qhapaq Ñan or are crossed

by it. For the local residents, the

road continues to be their main

means of communication with

other areas.

CHASQUIWASI

These were the houses of the chasquis

(messengers), located along the road. They

remained there waiting for the arrival of their

colleague to take over the errand and run to the

next shelter.

THE QHAPAQ ÑAN

The road was made of cobblestones, flanked by

walls that bounded it or were used for containment

and prevention of landslides on the stretches built

22

on the mountains.

Source:

Guía de Identificación y Registro del Qhapaq Ñan (Guide for the Identification and Registration of the Qhapaq Ñan). Ministry of Culture


COLCAS

Facilities used to store food, weapons

and clothes. They were built at the

high part of the mountains to be at an

appropriate temperature and keep

the food in good condition.

TAMBOS

Facilities used as lodging and storage

along the Qhapaq Ñan, located at 15

and 20 km from each other. The

same as the administrative centers,

some large tambos had ushnus,

kallankas and squares.

BRIDGES

Depending on the geographic features, wood,

stone or suspension bridges were used. The

latter, made with braided natural fibers, are the

most impressive ones. The Q’eswachaka Bridge

in Cusco is the only one that remains today.

STAIRWAYS

The steep slopes of the Andes required

special measures. Stone steps grouped

in sections and separated by resting

platforms facilitated the ascent to the

mountains.

APACHETAS

Groups of stones piled by

wayfarers on the side of the roads

or on mountain passes as offerings

to the gods to request protection

and strength during their trip.

23


24

REDISCOVERING THE FOOTSTEPS OF THE INCAS


REDISCOVERING

THE

FOOTSTEPS

OF THE

INCAS

FOR FIVE MONTHS,

‘THE GREAT INCA

TRAIL’ EXPEDITION

TOURED A STRETCH

OF THE QHAPAQ

ÑAN, THE MAIN

ARTERY OF THE

ROAD SYSTEM THAT

CONNECTED THE

TAHUANTINSUYO. AS

A PARTNER IN THIS

PROJECT, LIMATOURS

ACCOMPANIED THE

TREKKERS ACROSS

THIS LEGENDARY

ROUTE SURROUNDED

BY AMAZING

LANDSCAPES

STEEPED IN HISTORY.

Christian Declercq / KM Cero

Inca wall in the

Huanuco Pampa

archaeological

site, an important

administrative center

of the Tahuantinsuyo.

25


REDISCOVERING THE FOOTSTEPS OF THE INCAS

Walking is a daily activity we take for granted, but

when we are used to paved city roads we forget

the huge pleasure of going from one place to

another, moving the legs, perceiving the wind and

feeling free.

Let us take a mental journey to the White

Mountain Range of the Andes. The sky changed

from a gray to a luminous sky blue color, the dark

sidewalks became a cobblestone road among the

rugged mountains, cars are replaced by llamas

and buildings are impressive structures made of

rock. That was the Qhapaq Ñan more than 500

years ago, when the Tahuantinsuyo at its height

was connected by this incredible road network.

In the high Andean areas, the Great Inca Trail

maintains its traditional mystique: the connection

with nature and the service to the community. A

team of adventure seekers were willing to travel

3,200 km along it for five months, from Tomebamba

(Ecuador) to Cusco (Peru), to rediscover this Inca

heritage, give it new value and revive the footsteps

of the ancient inhabitants of the empire.

But it is not worth conveying such a fascinating

story from the comfort of a desk. As a partner,

LimaTours was present from the beginning, taking

care of the logistics for ‘The Great Inca Trail’, but it

was time to wear the boots, carry the backpacks

and experience the Qhapaq Ñan together with the

expeditionary group.

Rodrigo Cabrera / KM Cero

Imposing

landscapes

such as this

accompanied

the members

of the

expedition.

26


DAY 1

PREPARING

THE BODY

Llamas drawing the attention

of adults and children.

We reached the Cajay community (Ancash) to

meet the members of the expedition. Our day 1

was day 73 for them, and the positive attitude of

the residents energized us in those first steps of

the 75 km we had ahead of us.

The river flowed like music while we walked down

the road to Pomachaca, a small town where the

Inca trail began. As we would see along the route,

stretches of the Qhapaq Ñan have disappeared,

either due to the construction of other roads or

lack of conservation.

The Qhapaq Ñan received us with amazing

stairways that got lost behind the mountain.

This hard test implied fighting heat, altitude and

fatigue. If we passed the first exam, we would

be prepared for the other four days of the trek.

Each step was worth it: while we climbed, we

could see beautiful valleys in the distance and we

found ancient Inca settlements in the middle of

the mountain. It was remarkable to see how the

steps seemed to be part of the landscape.

installed. After visiting the Pincos ceremonial

ushnu and enjoying a hearty meal, there is

nothing better than lying on the pasture for a

few minutes and relax under the Milky Way. The

breathtaking starry sky of the Andes accompanied

us every night.

Kevin Floerke

The Andean

pampas made

the trek lighter.

The road to

Huarautambo in

Cerro de Pasco.

We arrived in Castillo, a town with a water

fountain decorated with a chasqui (a messenger

of the Tahuantinsuyo), a symbol of belonging to

the Inca trail. Building back our energy with the

fresh water from the main fountain was a present

of the Apus. The llamas were the great show and

drew the attention of the residents while they

crossed the streets. Watching a large number

of these animals beside a group of gringos

(foreigners) aroused the curiosity, especially in

children.

After a light lunch we continued to ascend to

Soledad de Tambo, where the camp was already

Rodrigo Cabrera / KM Cero

27


The sky of the

Andes gleams

every

28

night with

the shine of

thousands of stars.


Christian Declercq / KM Cero

29


REDISCOVERING THE FOOTSTEPS OF THE INCAS

Ximena Arrieta

After attending an interesting history lesson,

we returned to the walled road on the way to

Quenhuajirca. The landscape changes as we ascend

from 3,000 m.a.s.l., showing how skillfully the Inca

builders adapted to the Andean geography. The

trees begin to disappear, the green pastures are

replaced by ichu and flowers become thorny plants

fit to live in the cold puna region. But not all changes

are pleasant, as the route also shows how the snowcapped

peaks are losing their white summits, as

silent victims of climate change.

Stairways are

common in high

highland areas,

to facilitate

the climbing of

mountains.

DAY 2

THANKING THE

PACHAMAMA

(MOTHER EARTH)

The Qhapaq Ñan is almost intact in the high areas.

We ascended to the Wagapunta mountain pass, with

wonderfully preserved steps that bring you back in

time with their loftiness. At the highest point, nearly

4,500 m.a.s.l., an apacheta – a pile of stones with

religious purposes– marks the place to thank the

Pachamama for the opportunity of getting in touch

with nature, far for the city and totally disconnected.

At our destination, we camped at the foot of the

ushnu of the Quenhuajirca tambo. Temperature

Walking with John Leivers, an Australian adventurous

expeditionary, is like walking with a book under the

arm. Aged 65, he is not only able to walk thousands of

kilometers without faltering, but he has a prodigious

memory and remembers every inch of the Qhapaq

Ñan he has traveled more than once.

Leaving behind the camp in Soledad de Tambo, John

departed from the trail and it was inevitable not

to follow him. We headed for the colcas located in

the upper part of a deep ravine, the ideal place to

build this type of storages: far from the animals, with

plenty of ventilation and dry air that prevented the

food from spoiling.

30

In some stretches, the road is only bound

by stones, blending in with the landscape.


The apachetas marked the places of

worship along the Qhapaq Ñan.

Enjoy

the best

images

of the

Qhapaq

Ñan on

this video.

“QHAPAQ ÑAN IS NOT ONLY A

ROAD; IT IS ALSO A SYNONYM OF

LIVING CULTURE AND ANCESTRAL

PRACTICES PASSED ON FROM

GENERATION TO GENERATION”.

Kevin Floerke

began to descend, but our friendly neighbors,

the Araujo family, weave woolen garments with a

traditional loom they keep at home, and we could

not help buying a warm poncho to fight the cold. The

Qhapaq Ñan is not only a road; it is also a synonym

of living culture and ancestral practices passed on

from generation to generation, broadening the

experience of the travelers.

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

Christian Declercq / KM Cero

Residents making daily use of

the trail in Huamanin, Huanuco.

31


REDISCOVERING THE FOOTSTEPS OF THE INCAS

A welldeserved

rest after

a day of

intensive

trekking

together

with the

mule drivers.

Christian Declercq / KM Cero

DAY 3

NEAR THE SUN GOD

We bade farewell to the Araujos and set off for

our first stop: Ayash. The landscape filled with

color as we descended to the valley of the river

bearing the same name. “A Sublime town,” said

the leaders of the trekkers, John and Nick, a

singular way of describing towns with shops that

sell extra goodies.

Ascents never seemed to end on our journey

along the Qhapaq Ñan, but the mule drivers kept

us company. This cheerful group of men led by the

chef, Rolando, made our trek more bearable, as

tents were put up and food was ready each time

we arrived at a new camp. Their contagious good

humor and high spirits helped us overcome the

ascent on an amazingly well preserved road.

We left Ancash at 4,500 m.a.s.l. and entered the

department of Huanuco. The camp awaited us

installed, surrounded by rock formations and a

stream. After a three-day trek, it was fantastic to

soak the feet in the water to relax and rest. At

night, the stars seemed to shine more intensely

than ever.

32


DAY 4

BREATHLESS

We knew that the day 4 would be the longest one,

with five kilometers more than we usually covered

in seven hours, but we did not anticipate the

surprises the Qhapaq Ñan had in store for us.

Kevin Floerke

Wild

rabbits

have taken

over Tambo

Grande, on

the way to

Huanuco

Pampa.

The first one was Tambo Grande, an Inca

construction that currently is a livestock pen. John

referred to it many times as ‘Tambo conejo’ (‘Tambo

rabbit’), but we did not understand very well why

until we arrived: tenths of these animals appeared

among the stones and ran everywhere when they

heard our footsteps. A white one, looking very

similar to that in the Alice in Wonderland tale, hid

in a deep hole.

The second surprise came next. The small stream

we found the day before has led us to the Taparaco

River, creating a valley that seems to have been

taken out of a painting. Beautiful waterfalls and

splendid queñua trees run parallel to the Qhapaq

Ñan, which is not bound by rocks anymore and is

now flanked by impressive walls.

The road continued among pampas and wetlands,

perfectly blending in with the surrounding

landscape. Bound by rocks, it can appear and

disappear at times amidst the vegetation. Breathing

became easier, which meant we are descending to

Taparaco, a village built beside a wrecked Inca site.

The valley continues to San Francisco de Isco, a

small community where we spent the last evening.

We had mixed feelings over dinner: happiness for

what we have already admired and few people are

lucky to appreciate, and the sadness of realizing

that the adventure is coming to an end.

Taparaco

river valley.

The Inca

walls mark

the road

following

its bed.

Kevin Floerke

33


REDISCOVERING THE FOOTSTEPS OF THE INCAS

DAY 5

MISSION

ACCOMPLISHED

Inca trapezoid doors with feline motifs on the

upper part, Huanuco Pampa.

It was encouraging to think that we were only half a

day away from our destination. We started trekking

in the early morning, and met children from several

towns who were using the Qhapaq Ñan to go to

school. For those people who live in remote areas,

the road continues to be the only way to connect with

each other. They are heirs to a legacy that remains

through time, remaining valid thanks to them.

After an easy descent, we see the asphalt of

the highway once again after almost three days.

The same as at the beginning, calm gives way to

challenges. To reach Huanuco Pampa, the Qhapaq

Ñan climbs a ravine with a rugged terrain due to

the landslides caused by rainfall.

We perspired profusely, but we made it. When we

walked to the administrative center, its formidable

ushu emerged surrounded by Apus (mountains).

It is easy to understand why the Inca used this

place as stage for important ceremonies.

Christian Declercq / KM Cero

To close with a perfect end, we were received by

the residents of the Huanuco Pampa village with

their typical dances and a delicious pachamanca

to break the diet.

Some people do not know this huge road system

or believe that the stretch to Machu Picchu is

the only existing trail. Seeing the other face of

the Qhapaq Ñan, which maintains its ties with

the native community, is a different way of

experiencing it. With no tourists, no pressures, in

connection with the Inca essence of the trail that

has managed to survive until today.

Christian Declercq / KM Cero

Christian Declercq / KM Cero

34

The pyramidal ushnu in Huanuco

Pampa is ten meters high.

Residents of the Huanuco Pampa village performing

the Ruku de Aguamiro dance for the visitors.


HUANUCO PAMPA

THE CENTER OF THE CHINCHAYSUYO

This is the most imposing archaeological site

in the department of Huanuco.

Christian Declercq / KM Cero

Huanuco Pampa is located at a plateau at 3,600 m.a.s.l. It

is one of the most important administrative centers of the

Inca Empire, which marked half of the way between the

current Tomebamba (Quito, Ecuador) and Cusco (Peru), in

the Chinchaysuyo region.

The constructions occupied up to 800 hectares, but only

some buildings impressive enough to show their relevance

in the Tahuantinsuyo have been left due to the neglect and

little conservation work performed in the past. The exquisite

carved stone work is a sign of it.

The ushnu is the main building, a ceremonial platform

on which the Inca performed official rites before the

residents gathered on the main square. The complex also

has kallankas, large rooms used for meetings or to lodge

high officials of the empire; the Inca baths and the colcas

to store products.

Archaeologist Luis Enrique Paredes, Director of the Huanuco

Pampa Comprehensive Project, ensures that this complex

“can be considered one of the most imposing complexes of the

Tahuantinsuyo,” and compares favorably to similar complexes

in Cusco. Due to the enhancement and conservation since

the beginning of the comprehensive project in 2007, the

number of visitors quadrupled reaching 9,900 last year.

The work of the archaeologists goes hand in hand with

that of the community, seeking a common goal: to attract

more interest from the tourists in Huanuco Pampa, both

for its historical importance and for the ancestral traditions

maintained by the neighboring communities.

35


36

Christian Declercq / KM Cero


At a special event held in Huanuco Pampa, LimaTours welcomed the members of the

expedition, reasserting its commitment to communicate the heritage and promote

the development of the communities. Hosëg, the apparel brand, also participated and

donated jackets to 73 children of the neighboring communities.

37


40

INTERVIEW


Sergio Salazar

FRANÇOIS

MORIN

BUSINESS

DEVELOPMENT

DIRECTOR OF

LIMATOURS

THE EXECUTIVE HIGHLIGHTS THE WORK OF LIMATOURS

IN THE PROMOTION OF NEW DESTINATIONS

What has motivated LimaTours to be part of this

expedition?

François: LimaTours has always been interested in projects that

allow communicating, protecting and bringing Peru’s heritage

closer to passengers from all over the world who are curious to

get to know it. However, it is difficult to reach some places due

to the lack of infrastructure, because there are in remote areas

or because the communities are not prepared to receive visitors

due to delicate social issues that are important to consider when

developing a destination. We participated in the project because

the Qhapaq Ñan is going to put Peru in the eyes of the mainstream

media and lead those people who had never before considered

Peru as an adventure destination, to do so.

There are examples from other countries such as Canada, United

States or Spain that offer this type of long treks. The idea of

creating such a route in South America was very interesting, and

that people begin to use the trail more will also help to preserve it.

41


INTERVIEW

What was our role in the project?

François: LimaTours made a commitment to

the expedition and made the company resources

available to organize the logistics, strengthen the

relations with local authorities and coordinate the

operability during the course of the trek.

Most adventure tourism visitors focus

on Cusco. Do you intend to put northern

Peru on the map with this project?

François: A great part of the volume is in Cusco,

for the tradition it has, the appropriate accessibility

and its availability of hotel infrastructure. The treks

there are interesting for people whose main goal

is getting to know Machu Picchu, because they can

incorporate them to their travel program.

Going to other regions of Peru for adventure

tourism takes more time and that is complicated

for the tourists because it involves spending more

money. Huaraz is an example of an area with a large

number of products, with unparalleled adventure

activities or even more attractions that Cusco itself.

Then, LimaTours would be “pioneering” in

this type of projects in northern Peru?

François: National operators are not very

interested in promoting adventure tourism in the

north, as they do not have the expertise or the

resources to operate routes there. Since we have

strong ties with adventure tourism clients worldwide,

it is essential for us to create our own products in

the north and establish partnerships to operate

them with the quality we are characterized by, to

increase the volume of people who visit that area.

What tourism potential do you see in the

Qhapaq Ñan?

François: It has an extremely high potential.

Currently, an important number of people are

trekking on the traditional Inca Trail in Cusco, but the

route is so crowded that we have reached a point of

having to restrict its use in order to protect it.

It is interesting for LimaTours to promote other

sections of the road system, to make them more

accessible, to offer a different experience to the

42

Explorers and the LimaTours team during The

Great Inca Trail expedition.

Christian Declercq / KM Cero


KM Cero

passengers and promote tourism in different parts

of Peru. The stretch of the Qhapaq Ñan that crosses

Ancash, on which we are working now, joins the

Inca legacy to the attraction of natural landscapes

that accompany the route. If we add cultural and

experience tourism aspects to this, we will give it an

added value.

This is in addition to the participation of the

communities and the willingness of LimaTours to

continue to invest in the Inca Trail until the goals it

has set have been achieved.

Steps on the Inca

Trail to Machu Picchu

(Cusco).

What is the key factor for the success of

this project?

François: There have been previous plans to

prepare these areas and promote tourism through

partnerships between the communities and local

operators. These plans did not succeed because

an appropriate training program that enabled the

residents to offer logistical services at the required

level was not implemented, and they did not have

the desired exposure either.

We think that we can succeed because the

international operators that have followed the

project and have created expectations in their

markets are interested in this. We have established

partnerships with national operators that allow

for the corresponding coordination, and with local

operators who are better acquainted with the

social and logistical reality of their area.

The LimaTours team with the members of the

Ally Puricheg Entrepreneurship Association

from Huanuco Pampa.

Sergio Salazar

43


INTERVIEW

What makes Peru one of the most

important adventure destinations in the

world?

François: Peru offers a diversity of experiences

that no other South American country has. There

are high mountain routes such as the treks on the

White Mountain Range or Huayhuash, rated as the

most beautiful ones in the world; it has places in

the subtropical forest such as Chachapoyas that

combines natural landscapes with archaeology; it

has a trekking offer, via ferrata (trekking route with

cables), rafting, cycling and even canyoneering in a

crucial point such as Cusco; there is the desert to

carry out motor activities such as riding buggies; it

has the coast for surfers with one of the best waves

in the world in Chicama, and where its own capital

city is a hotspot that combines sports, culture and

gastronomy.

take a selfie in Machu Picchu, but they will also

return to their country with something different to

tell, something other people have not done.

Let us go back to the project LimaTours is

currently handling. What is the next stage?

François: To continue to improve the product

based on the criteria we handle, seeking integration

and respect for the social and economic reality of

each area; and training the guides and mule drivers

so they can share their knowledge about the Inca

Trail in the future. We are also going to work with

the communities so that this project becomes an

experience tourism activity through their meetings

with the trekkers.

KM Cero

These options, added to one of the best hotel

markets in the region, make it a very attractive

country. A large number of adventure tourists

seek a certain level of comfort and are going to

find it in Peru, either at high-end hotels or at semipermanent

camps or glamping, where they sleep

in the nature but they have their own bathroom,

heating and a bed. Currently, Peru offers nearly all

the levels of comfort that can be imagined.

How much or less acceptance adventure

tourism has against conventional tourism?

François: Adventure tourism is growing

faster and new generations of travelers want

something different. They look for experiences

that involve physical activity and interaction with

the communities, which enable them to get a

deep knowledge of a destination. Several markets,

such as Asia, for example, regard Peru as an exotic

country per se, and young people want to live things

their parents do not care about. They are going to

Nature and adventure mix on the trek to Mount

Salcantay, one of the most popular activities in Cusco.

44


PUREQUEST

ADVENTURES,

OUR

ADVENTURE

DIVISION

Sergio Salazar

François with the PureQuest

Adventures team in Lima. Standing

from left to right: Patricia Roncal

(Head), Sandra Barrios (Regional

Manager) and Gabriela Montero

(Supervisor). Sitting from left to right:

Lourdes Olivares, Erika Regalado and

Paloma Prevost (Specialists).

Diego Nishiyama

The PureQuest Adventures team in

Cusco. Center: Pilar Ballón (Head of

Cusco Office). From left to right: Edwin

Pancorbo, Cirilo Huamán, Yussara Quispe,

Koecling Pumayalli and Fernando Araoz

(Specialists). Absent: Víctor Olarte.Olarte.

What is PureQuest Adventures?

François: These are LimaTours’ adventure experts, a

commercial team with knowledge on the line of business

that provides more specialized advice to our clients abroad

and to the rest of the company. PureQuest Adventures

is also a brand present in other countries, with which we

work under a common operational standard to provide

a homogeneous service, with good practices and a joint

commercial approach to the clients.

What is its standard?

François: PureQuest Adventures was created to offer

high-quality tourism, with programs that offer a high level

of comfort. We are not trying to position ourselves in the

low-cost segment of tourism, but to offer an experience

that differs from that of our competitors, but at competitive

prices. We provide one of the best services in Peru, with

high-quality equipment and a trained staff. This gives us the

certainty that the passenger is going to be safe throughout

the trip and will go home with good memories.

45


TREKKING

PRODUCTS

Enjoy our

audiovisual

material.

KM Cero

INCA TRAIL

Private and shared service

2 DAYS / 1 NIGHT & 4 DAYS / 3 NIGHTS

Many publications rate the Inca Trail to Machu Picchu as one

of the best treks in the world. Touring Cusco’s exotic geography,

and exploring well-preserved archaeological remains is a

world-class experience. This is the ultimate adventure and

the best way of reaching one of the most magical places on

the planet: Machu Picchu.

KM Cero

SALKANTAY

Private and shared service

4 DAYS / 3 NIGHTS & 5 DAYS / 4 NIGHTS

The renowned Salkantay (or Salcantay) route was ranked

among the best 25 treks in the world by the National

Geographic Adventure Travel magazine. This trek is open to

the public, without limitation of spaces or permits. This trek

covers an ancient and remote path where huge snow-capped

peaks clash with lush tropical forests.

KM Cero

CHOQUEQUIRAO

Private service

4 DAYS / 3 NIGHTS

Ancient Inca citadel compared to Machu Picchu for its

majestic ruins. Its little fame turns this into an almost

customized trekking experience. Known as “the cradle of gold”

for its undisturbed beauty, it resisted the passing of centuries

among the mountains and wild vegetation that covers almost

80% of its area.

The trek

includes

Head

Lamps

Pillows

Sleeping

Bags

Inflatable

Mats

Camping

Equipment

First Aid Kit


FULL DAY / Balcon del Diablo

Level: Moderate / Duration: 8 hours

Maximum altitude: 3,680 m.a.s.l.

At a 20-minute distance from Sacsayhuaman, it is an ideal tour to

relax and explore the nearby archaeological remains.

Colectivo Intu

FULL DAY / Huilloc - Pumamarca

Level: Moderate / Duration: approximately 6 - 7 hours

Maximum altitude: Huilloc (3,540 m.a.s.l.)

Visit the Huilloc community, whose residents maintain the

Inca way of living until today.

Colectivo Intu

FULL DAY / Huchuy Qosqo

Level: Demanding / Duration: 8 hours

Maximum altitude: 4,394 m.a.s.l.

Visit his ancient administrative and military center located in

front of the Urubamba mountain range.

Colectivo Intu

FULL DAY / Choquechaca

Level: Demanding / Duration: 7 - 8 hours

Maximum altitude: Choquechaca (3,825 m.a.s.l.)

It is ideal to know more about the traditions of Andean towns.

Colectivo Intu

FULL DAY / Moray - Maras

Level: Moderate / Duration: 7 - 8 hours

Maximum altitude: Moray (3,500 m.a.s.l.)

Visit Moray, an experimental Inca agricultural station and the

Maras salt mines that have more than 3,000 wells on the hillside

of the Qaqawiñay Mountain.

Colectivo Intu

FULL DAY / Chinchero - Urquillos

Level: Moderate / Duration: 6 - 7 hours

Maximum altitude: Chinchero (3,762 m.a.s.l.)

The road to Urquillos through the Sacred Valley has

breathtaking views.

Colectivo Intu


LOOKING FOR THE LEGACY FAR FROM THE ASPHALT

LOOKING FOR

THE LEGACY

FAR FROM THE ASPHALT

48


WE CAN ALSO FIND

STRETCHES OF THE

QHAPAQ ÑAN VERY

CLOSE TO LIMA. HUAYCAN

DE CIENEGUILLA, AS WELL

AS PACHACAMAC, IS ONE

OF THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL

CENTERS ASSOCIATED

TO THE ROAD SYSTEM.

IT EXEMPLIFIES THE

HEGEMONY OF THE

TAHUANTINSUYO OVER

THE LOCAL CULTURES.

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

From the lookout,

one can clearly see

the corridors and

squares inside the

archeological site.

49


LOOKING FOR THE LEGACY FAR FROM THE ASPHALT

The first image we have when we talk about the

Qhapaq Ñan is of a cobblestone, imposing road

that extends at the foot of the mountains in the

middle of the South American Andes. However,

part of its extension spanned less wild terrains

such as coastal deserts and valleys.

Turned into a modern city that continues to

grow, Lima was once part of this system. The

roads crossed the great avenues of what used to

be the route to Pachacamac, the most important

pre-Hispanic sanctuary on the central coast. All

these roads have disappeared amidst cement

and asphalt, but we can still perceive history and

connect with the past at the archaeological sites.

The wonderful Inca constructions are distributed

across Peru, from Aypate in Piura to Racchi

in Puno, and Lima is no exception. Although

Pachacamac is one of its maximum examples,

the Huaycan de Cieneguilla administrative center

is located in the middle valley of the Lurin River.

It is connected to the Qhapaq Ñan through the

Xauxa-Pachacamac transversal road.

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

UNITY, NOT

IMPOSITION

The work of

conservation

and restoration

is important

because of the

fragility of the

adobe walls.

Huaycan de Cieneguilla is part of the 27

archaeological sites found in the Cieneguilla

district in Lima, at the foot of a ravine at 449

m.a.s.l. “This place has special relevance because

it has characteristics of the Ychsma culture and

has been enhanced by the Inca architecture.

This makes it more important in relation to

50


Some studies

mention that the

bas-relief friezes

are related to the

supernatural world.

CIENEGUILLA

DISTRICT IS

30 MINUTES

AWAY FROM

LIMA. ITS

VARIED

GASTRONOMY,

RECREATION

CENTERS,

MILD

WEATHER

AND NATURAL

BEAUTY

MAKE IT THE

RECREATION

CORNER OF

THE LIMA

RESIDENTS.

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

the route of the Qhapaq Ñan,” said Fernando

Mackie, Director of the Huaycan de Cieneguilla

Comprehensive Project.

Before the arrival of the Incas, the area was

occupied by the Ychsma Lordship, which

spanned the valleys of the Lima and Lurin rivers.

It was one of the largest and more complex

buildings in the area. Archaeologists think it was

a ceremonial center with rural characteristics

between the Pachacamacac and Hatun-Xauxa

(Junin) provincial capital cities.

When the Ychsma people were annexed to

the Tahuantinsuyo, the Incas commenced the

reforms using the existing buildings in the area.

Then, the Huaycan de Cieneguilla site became a

control point of the wayfarers who traveled from

the highlands to the coast or vice versa.

51


LOOKING FOR THE LEGACY FAR FROM THE ASPHALT

LIMA’S INCA

HERITAGE

The 16 hectares of Huaycan de Cieneguilla’s builtup

area are divided into three zones that cannot

be visibly noted. To discern their actual scope,

one must climb to the lookout where the tours

start: the nuclear area, the most important one,

is divided into twelve architectural complexes

connected by six streets as a small city. It is easy

to imagine the people gathered on the main yard

just in the center of the complex, with a ramp that

enables important figures to access the platform,

a characteristic of the Ychsma buildings.

Walking by the narrow corridors of the place,

one can note the symbiosis between the Inca

and Ychsma architecture. Leaving its adobe

walls behind, one reaches the space known as

the ‘window complex’, with trapezoid spans and

stone lintels on the doors that are clearly Incan

construction elements. From that point, it is

possible to see the whole valley, reasserting the

connection with nature and the function of control

center this archaeological site used to have.

The decorated friezes are a typical Ychsma detail

and are associated with ceremonial or funeral

spaces. Circular bas-relief designs may be noted

in some areas which, according to the research,

could be interpreted as a lunar calendar or are

related to astronomic observations.

But without a doubt, the most important finding

is the tomb of a member of the Inca elite: the

quipukamayok. A wooden kero (a ceremonial

drinking vessel), a symbol of power; a spondylus

shell, one of the most valued materials during the

empire; and a group of bound quipus (recording

device), which show the status of this person, were

found together with the skeletal remains.

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

The square is

an example

of the

convergence

of the Ychsma

and Inca

cultures: a

large space

with a ramp

beside a

trapezoid door.

52


Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

The decorated friezes determine the

category of the buildings inside the

archeological site.

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

The Incan

windows are

the only ones

that remain

in this area

of the Lurin

river valley.

CIENEGUILLA AND ITS

COMMUNITY IN ACTION

The Huaycan de Cieneguilla Comprehensive

Project started its activities in 2007, to enhance

the value of the Inca settlement. The research

work is supplemented with a socio-cultural work

aimed to integrate the neighboring areas to the

planning and conservation programs, so that they

have a positive vision of their heritage and learn to

appreciate it.

53


Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

The visits that include

performances portray the

way of living of the ancient

residents of the place.

Nevertheless, the population did not turn

their back on their legacy before the arrival of

the specialists. Since the 1960s, the residents

committed to look after the archaeological site

and protect it from latent dangers in the area such

as land invasions. “Our vision is to work hand in

hand with the community so that they can take

over the entire project and improve their quality

of life”, highlighted Mackie.

Their eagerness for creating a new experience for

the tourists who arrive at Huaycan de Cieneguilla

generated groups of cultural advisors formed by

the residents, who are trained to tell the story of

the place from a local perspective. These teams

also lead the night tours, supplementing history

and archaeology with traditional legends and

tales; and the interpretive visits in Quechua with

characters dressed as the ancient Inca residents.

Last year, Huaycan de Cieneguilla received about

8,500 visitors, and expects to exceed this figure

in 2017, thanks to the further advertising on the

Qhapaq Ñan. The ties with local entrepreneurs

and businesses from the area help establish the

archaeological zone within the touristic circuit of

the district, renowned for its gastronomic corridor

and ecological value.

54


XAUXA-PACHACAMAC,

THE ROUTE OF THE GODS

Apu Pariacaca in Yauyos (Lima) is one of the

most revered deities of the empire.

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

Between the departments of Junin and Lima lies one of the

most amazing stretches of the Qhapaq Ñan. The Xauxa-

Pachacamac stretch connects the Longitudinal Highland

Highway with the Longitudinal Coastal Highway, passing

from the arid and hot desert to the cold puna region along

its 223-km route.

This section of the road was vitally important for the

Incas, as its relevance was not only logistical but also

religious. The road connected two important places of the

Chinchaysuyo: the Hatun-Xauxa administrative center in

the central highlands and Pachacamac, the most important

administrative and ceremonial complex on the central coast.

The road was considered a pilgrimage route to Apu Pariacaca,

a snow-capped peak in the Yauyos region considered one of

the most important deities of the Tahuantinsuyo.

The wayfarers who traveled from the highlands to the

coast descended from 4,800 to 50 m.a.s.l., surrounded by

beautiful natural landscapes and fabulous architectural

constructions such as tambos and stairways that have up to

1,800 perfectly aligned stone steps.

In 2014, this stretch was included on the UNESCO World

Heritage List, due to its importance within the organization

and distribution of the Inca road system.

55


56 Front view of the pyramid with the

ramp. Pachacamac Archaeological

Sanctuary (Lima).


Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

57


LOOKING FOR THE LEGACY FAR FROM THE ASPHALT

Lima is characterized by having

huacas inside the city.

MATEO SALADO,

A JEWEL IN THE CITY

Pedro Espinoza Pajuelo / Complejo Arqueológico Mateo Salado

The Mateo Salado archaeological complex is located at the

heart of Lima, between Breña and Pueblo Libre districts.

Its constructions made of ‘tapia’ (rammed earth), emerge

among the high-rise buildings, creating a unique landscape

where history coexists with modernity.

Mateo Salado was an administrative-ceremonial center

that belonged to the Ychsma Lordship which, the same as

Huaycan de Cieneguilla, was reoccupied when the Incas

annexed it to the empire. The complex has five walled

pyramids. The Longitudinal Coastal Highway of the Qhapaq

Ñan came from the north, just beside pyramid A, which was

used as main temple of the complex.

The 18-m high pyramids were also used as houses for the

Ychsma and Inca elites. With the arrival of the Spaniards to

Lima, the place was plundered, began to deteriorate and

its area was reduced with the emergence of farmlands,

companies and squatters.

This process of neglect ended in 2000, when researchers

started to recover Mateo Salado and it was listed as a

National Cultural Heritage Site in the following year. In 2007,

the Ministry of Culture started to work on its enhancement,

and the National Office of the Qhapaq Ñan implemented

a new comprehensive project focused on the area in

2016. This project is concerned with working on the huaca,

recovering it and bringing it closer to the neighbors as a

space to be publicly used.

Mateo Salado, together with the Larco Museum located a

few blocks away in Pueblo Libre district, is one of the most

important tourist attractions of the city of Lima.

58


PROGRAMME

LIMA’S INCA

HERITAGE

MATEO SALADO - HUAYCAN DE CIENEGUILLA - PACHACAMAC

DAY 1 - LIMA

Arrival in Lima. Transfer from the airport to your selected hotel in

the city.

DAY 2 - VISIT TO MATEO SALADO

Today you will visit the Mateo Salado archaeological complex. Then, you

will be transferred to Cieneguilla, where you will have lunch at a typical

restaurant and will tour the Huaycan de Cieneguilla archaeological

complex. You will participate in a workshop for the preparation of

adobe friezes and will overnight in the area.

DAY 3 - HUAYCAN DE CIENEGUILLA - PACHACAMAC

You will participate in a trek from Huaycan de Cieneguilla to the

Pachacamac archaeological site. Upon your arrival, you will have lunch

at a country-style restaurant and will enjoy a Peruvian Paso horse

show. Return to Lima.

KM Cero

Sergio Salazar

DAY 4 - LIMA

Transfer from your hotel to the airport. International flight.

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office


PERU’S

GREAT RICHES

IN ADDITION TO THE QHAPAQ ÑAN, PERU HAS ELEVEN WORLD HERITAGE SITES

BETWEEN ARCHAEOLOGICAL HERITAGE SITES AND NATURAL BEAUTIES. THE

WONDERFUL DESTINATIONS OFFERED BY THE COUNTRY GO FROM THE ARID DESERT IN

THE NORTH TO THE LUSH FOREST IN THE SOUTHEAST.

1

CHAVIN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE

It was listed as a Heritage Site in 1985.

It is a jewel of the Chavin Culture, built between

1,500 and 300 B.C. at 72 km from Huaraz (Ancash).

It stands out for its terraces, squares and internal

galleries that housed treasures such as the

Monolithic Lanzon (Giant Spear) and the Tello

Obelisk.

2 SACRED CITY OF CARAL

It was listed as a Heritage

Site in 2009.

The remains of this 5,000-years-old

city, the oldest in America, are located

182 km north of Lima. Caral is a unique

civilization given its architectural

design and socio-political complexity.

HUASCARAN NATIONAL PARK

It was listed as a Heritage

Site in 1985.

Located on the White Mountain Range

(Huaraz), its greatest attraction is

Mount Huascaran of 6,768 m.a.s.l. Its

glaciers and lagoons make it one of the

most attractive destinations for

adventurous travelers.

3

HISTORIC CENTER OF LIMA

It was listed as a Heritage

Site en 1991.

Lima, the capital city of Peru, was also

the most important city of the Spanish

Viceroyalty until the 18th century. Its

beauty lies in the Colonial buildings,

squares and convents that show the

work of Peruvian and European artists.

PACIFIC

OCEAN

4

10

3

1

6

2

4

THE ROLE OF

LIMATOURS

As part of its mission to communicate the wonders of Peru to the

world, LimaTours was and continues to be part of the enhancement

and research of some World Heritage Sites.

1991

HISTORIC CENTER OF LIMA

In 1989, the founder of LimaTours, Eduardo R. Arrarte, created the Lima Foundation.

He was the Chairman when the Foundation started the paperwork to list the

Historic Center as a World Heritage Site.

2009

SACRED CITY OF CARAL

After facing mishaps, the Caral-Supe Archaeological Project had no place to work in

2002. LimaTours offered a space in its office for the project members, to relocate and

continue with its research work.

11

2014

QHAPAQ ÑAN

As part of ‘The Great Inca Trail’ expedition, LimaTours intends to raise awareness

about the country’s historical legacy, to communicate our heritage and obtain the

information necessary to develop sustainable tourism activities on some of its stretches.


5 MANU NATIONAL PARK

It was listed as a Heritage Site in 1997.

With an area of more than 1 million hectares that go from

Cusco to Madre de Dios, it is considered one of the most

biodiverse parks on Earth. It is home to more than 200 species

of mammals, 800 species of birds, 68 species de reptiles, 77

species of amphibians and thousands of trees and flowers

distributed across tenths of ecosystems.

RIO ABISEO NATIONAL PARK

It was listed as a Heritage Site in 1992.

The park, located in the department of San Martin in

northern Peru, is not only home to thousands of endemic

species of animals and plants. It also protects

archaeological complexes such as Gran Pajaten, attributed

to the Chachapoyas Culture.

6

7 HISTORIC SANCTUARY OF MACHU PICCHU

It was listed as a Heritage Site in 1983.

The citadel is considered a masterpiece of the Inca

architecture. It blends in with nature exceptionally amidst

a complex terrain. UNESCO also highlights its scenic

beauty, flora and fauna.

CITY OF CUSCO

It was listed as a Heritage

Site in 1983.

Touring its streets is to enjoy the

convergence of the Inca and

Colonial architecture, creating a

unique urban structure in the

world. It is a testimony of the

Andean cultural development lived

more than 3,000 years ago.

8

HISTORIC CENTER OF AREQUIPA

It was listed as a Heritage Site in

2000.

Its typical construction made with sillar, a

type of volcanic rock, shows the fusion

between the Colonial architecture and the

indigenous tradition. Its stately mansions

and Baroque churches stand out.

9

10 CHAN CHAN ARCHAEOLOGICAL ZONE

It was listed as a Heritage Site in 1986.

The ancient city made of adobe is an example of

urban planning of the Chimu Culture in the middle

of the desert. It is located at a distance of 5 km

from the city of Trujillo in northern Peru.

11 LINES AND GEOGLYPHS OF

NASCA AND PAMPAS DE

JUMANA

They were listed as a Heritage

Site in 1994.

The figures of animals drawn on the

sand of the desert in southern Peru are

a testimony of the religious beliefs of

the Nasca Culture. These geoglyphs

have survived for more than 2,000 years

thanks to the dry weather of the area.

INTANGIBLE HERITAGE

7

5

UNESCO also recognizes the practices, knowledge and artistic expressions of the communities around the world.

They are called the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, inherited for generations as a cultural legacy: oral

traditions, dances, rituals, festive events, and cultural spaces, among others.

8

Ten of Peru’s intangible heritages have been listed: the textile art of Taquile (Puno), the cultural

manifestations of the Zapara people (shared with Ecuador), the cultural heritage of Aymara communities (shared

with Chile and Bolivia), The Huaconada dance (Junin), the Scissors dance (Ayacucho), the pilgrimage to the

sanctuary of the Lord of Qoyllurit’i (Cusco), the Eshuva or sung prayers of the Huachipaeri people (jungle of

Cusco and Madre de Dios), the rituals related to the annual renewal of the Q’eswachaka bridge (Cusco), the

festivity of the Virgen de la Candelaria (Puno), and the Wititi dance (Arequipa).

9

WINGS OVER PERU

To celebrate its 50th anniversary, in 2006, LimaTours created an ambitious product for the most exclusive

passengers who want to know Peru. With ‘Wings over Peru’, the tourists will visit Peru for nine days on a private

airplane, with luxury activities to have a unique experience.

The itinerary of ‘Wings over Peru’ includes visits to nine world heritage sites. The trip starts with two days in

Lima; on day 3, they travel to Trujillo, where they will visit Chan Chan and the Temple of the Sun and the Moon; in

the afternoon, they will go to the Museum of the Lord of Sipan in Chiclayo. On day 4, they head for Arequipa and

Cusco in the south. On days 5 and 6, they will visit the Sacred Valley and Machu Picchu, respectively; ending with

a city tour on day 7. Nasca is the last destination, reserved for day 8, with a unique flight over the Nasca Lines.


THE ROAD OF ALL OF US

THE ROAD OF

ALL OF US

62


WALKING ON THE

QHAPAQ ÑAN IS LIKE

MAKING A DISCOVERY.

IT IS LIKE OPENING THE

EYES TO A SUBLIME

ARCHITECTURAL

HERITAGE, AND TO A

CULTURAL RICHNESS

REFLECTED IN THE

POPULATIONS

LOCATED VERY CLOSE

TO THE ROUTE. THESE

COMMUNITIES ARE

THE LEADING STARS

OF HISTORY, WITH

THE ANCESTRAL

TRADITIONS THEY HAVE

KEPT ALIVE AND MAKE

THE ROAD SYSTEM A

LIVING SPACE.

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

The colors of

the garments of

the Las Fallas

dance vary in

accordance with

the community

to which they

belong.

63


THE ROAD OF ALL OF US

Since it has the category of a ‘cultural route’, the

relevance of the Qhapaq Ñan goes far beyond

the monumental character of its construction.

The traditions and heritage of the communities

located near the road, and the relation they have

with it and with their ancestors give continuity and

a more humane sense to the heritage.

The work with the populations is one of the

strengths of the people entrusted with the

management, preservation and research of the

road system. After all, as it has been built with a

utilitarian purpose, the essence of Qhapaq Ñan is

to be at the service of the people, facilitating their

communication and daily work.

“The greatest richness of our intangible heritage

lies in the route of the Qhapaq Ñan, in the people it

interconnects,” assured Rodrigo Ruiz, coordinator

of the Community Involvement area of the Qhapaq

Ñan Project’s National Office. Establishing a good

relationship with the residents of the areas along

the route is essential for its preservation.

Residents of Soledad de Tambo (Ancash) on

their way to performing road cleaning tasks.

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

TEAMWORK

Nearly 50% of the 60,000 km of the Qhapaq Ñan

is located in Peru. 250 km have been granted

the category of World Heritage together with 82

archaeological sites. How can we protect such a

broad asset that spans the entire country? This is

where the role of the communities becomes vitally

important, as they have become the right hand of

government entities.

To work with the population it is necessary to

build the trust. The objective of the Community

Involvement area is to establish a commitment

for performing joint work with the people who

live in the areas crossed by Inca roads through

64

Regional treks enhance the Qhapaq Ñan

for the new generations.


Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

a sign of respect to the communities that will

influence their open-mindedness to the action

plan.

A great part of the road system crosses the

properties of the farmers; therefore, the first step

is to contact the assemblies, which manage each

area. These meetings are used to tell them the

plan to be followed and what the Inca trail that

crosses their territory requires. This approach

opens a window on dialogue between both parties.

Years ago, these people were regarded as an agent

that destroyed the heritage and were a threat for

its conservation. This perception was related to

the relationship the entities had with respect to

the local residents, applying restrictions to the

use of archaeological sites. In this case, as farmers

and livestock breeders travel on the Qhapaq Ñan

every day, it was necessary to take other measures

to provide information to the users, ask for their

opinions and seek agreements that do not affect

their way of living.

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

THE ‘MEETING OF THE INDIGENOUS

CULTURE OF THE CHINCHAYSUYO’ IS AN

EVENT HELD IN HUANUCO PAMPA IN

JUNE OF EACH YEAR AND IT GATHERS

ALL THE TOWNS OF DOS DE MAYO

PROVINCE TO RECOVER, ENHANCE AND

PROTECT THEIR CULTURAL TRADITIONS.

dialogue processes. It is not an imposition, but a

shared mission in favor of a common good: the

preservation of heritage.

“UNESCO’s viewpoint on work requires this

collaboration. It is one of the guidelines they have

established,” said Ruiz. Although there is no legal

obligation to make these approaches, the teams

of the Qhapaq Ñan Project understand them as

Puchkakuy is the yarn spinning

contest, an ancestral tradition

that remains alive.

65


Stretch of road near

the Soledad 66 de Tambo

archaeological site

(Ancash).


Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

67


THE ROAD OF ALL OF US

GIVING RENEWED

VALUE TO THE

TRAIL

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

Raising awareness of the Qhapaq Ñan’s potential

for development in favor of the community is the

basis for the subsequent work of the team of

specialists. When they are aware of the benefits

they can obtain and the importance of the trail for

the world, the residents become the protectors of

their own heritage.

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

Tourism is one of the requests of these areas; it is

recognized as a source of direct income through

the asset they handle. This more progressive

vision of the Qhapaq Ñan generates a dynamic of

interest and gains a new functionality. It is not only

useful for transport, it is also profitable.

Community men participating in the Shuyunakuy, the act

of turning the land for the sowing.

Although the trail is a magnificent engineering

work, its value does not lie in the stones that make

it up. The traditions that revolve around it are

an “added value” to the tourism experience and

enable the residents to design work plans in line

with their needs.

Papa Munday (potato peeling)

is a daily activity with a rich

history.

Let us take Huanuco Pampa as an example. This

is one of the most important archaeological

sites of what used to be the Chinchaysuyo. Part

of the duties of the Comprehensive Project that

operates in the area have led to the creation of

an association with the members of the local

village, to give them opportunities for employment

and development. Through this association, the

residents carry out a number of activities such

as folk dances, ceremonies for Paying Tribute to

Mother Earth or the preparation of typical dishes

that show the intangible heritage of the area

and, at the same time, generate income for their

families.

“It is important that people become aware of value

and achieve social and cultural development. But

if that does not lead to an economic growth, it

68


Archaeologists working with the residents on the zoning

of the land crossed by the Qhapaq Ñan.

is not possible to progress, as they also have to

meet their needs. We cannot sell culture alone,

there has to be a benefit for the population,”

commented Luis Enrique Paredes, Director of the

Huanuco Pampa Comprehensive Project.

INCLUSIVE

HERITAGE

“Heritage belongs to all.” Indeed, both the local

population and the visitors have the opportunity

of enjoying wonderful destinations such as Machu

Picchu or the Qhapaq Ñan in Peru. However, the

accessibility of some places is limited by their

geographic location or by the lack of an appropriate

infrastructure.

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

According to the results of the First National

Specialized Survey on Disability conducted by the

National Council for the Integration of People with

Disabilities (CONADIS) published in 2016, Peru

has 1,575,402 people with some type of disability

who account for 5.2% of the total population. It is

important to generate inclusive tourism programs

for people that enable them to have an equitable

approach to culture.

In the cities or in remote towns, the Community

Involvement area is carrying out actions to integrate

people with disabilities to culture and tourism.

Working with associations of blind and deaf people,

they obtain first-hand information on their needs to

prepare a project that fits out certain archaeological

centers to be visited this group of the population.

Another way of achieving inclusion when working

with Andean communities is to hold meetings with

them in their mother tongue, either Quechua or

Aymara. By approaching them with this assertive

instruction, the communication becomes more

effective, enhancing the diversity of languages

spoken in our country.

“The Qhapaq Ñan is becoming a symbol of unity,

of the convergence of people, the interrelation

with the Tahuantinsuyo of the past and today’s

populations. It represents the link of an entire

country,” said Ruiz. As legacy that connected an

empire and has the potential to connect a nation

and make it feel proud of its past.

The new

generations

learn the

importance of

their cultural

legacy since

their childhood.

Sergio Salazar

69


THE ROAD OF ALL OF US

THE COMPREHENSIVE

PROJECTS

The community is involved in heritage

conservation work.

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

By being a living heritage, there are communities that

depend on the Qhapaq Ñan at various levels and use it

in an unregulated way that can cause damages.

In their eagerness to use the resources, the residents

offered tourism visits and used resources in their

traditional rituals. But their lack of knowledge led them

to carry out harmful activities such as illegal excavations,

extraction of stones to build houses, invasions, or used

the sites as waste dumps.

Given this situation, the National Office of the Qhapaq

Ñan began to implement the Comprehensive Projects

aimed to the social implementation of the material

and intangible cultural heritage. This involves joint

work that includes the conservation, research and

joint management with the populations based on the

creation of awareness about the use of archaeological

sites to improve their quality of life.

Determining the places to establish a Comprehensive

Project involves evaluating criteria such as the

archaeological, scenic and ethnographic importance of

the asset; the conditions of poverty of the neighboring

populations, the potential for economic development,

the accessibility to the site, the territorial balance and

the open-mindedness of the communities to establish

partnerships.

Five Comprehensive Projects have been established:

Huanuco Pampa (Huanuco), Huaycan de Cieneguilla

(Lima), Cabeza de Vaca (Tumbes), Aypate (Piura) and

Mateo Salado (Lima).

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

School children learning about the

Inca Trail and its importance.

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

Meetings allow the interaction between

the residents and the experts.

70


71


72

QHAPAQ CAMP, A UNIQUE TRIP


QHAPAQ

CAMP

A UNIQUE TRIP

IN ITS QUEST FOR

OFFERING NEW

EXPERIENCES TO ITS

CLIENTS, LIMATOURS

PRESENTS THE

‘QHAPAQ CAMP’ AS A

RETURN TO THE PAST

BACK TO THE INCA

TIMES, WHERE THE

PASSENGER WILL GET

IN CONTACT WITH

NATIVE TRADITIONS,

WALKING ALONG A

ROUTE THAT REMAINS

ALIVE FOR MORE THAN

FIVE CENTURIES.

Rodrigo Cabrera / KM Cero

‘Qhapaq Camp’

is a return to

ancient times,

where culture

and nature join.

73


QHAPAQ CAMP, A UNIQUE TRIP

THE EXPERIENCE

‘Qhapaq Camp’ intends to give renewed value

to the ancestral traditions of Andean towns, the

communities that have coexisted with history for

decades and made it part of their daily life. This is

an opportunity to get to know deepest Peru, with all

the comfort and service quality that we have always

been characterized by.

Travelers will be part

of the daily life of

communities that use

the road.

Qhapaq Ñan Project’s National Office

The Qhapaq Ñan was not only a means of

communication, but also a way of experiencing

what it represented to be part of the Inca Empire.

Each minimum detail has been taken into account

under this concept, from the operability to the

activities the visitor will enjoy. Camping near

archaeological centers such as ushnus and tambos,

trekking on well preserved routes with Inca walls

that are more than 500-years-old or using llamas

KM Cero

The residents could use this imposing, thoroughly

controlled and organized construction that crossed

their community. They could also see the chasquis

(messengers) passing very close to them, the

pilgrims on religious trips, groups of llamas carrying

groceries, large troops of soldiers and even the top

representatives of power. All this happened amidst

an impressive natural landscape in the highlands

and the coast, with the Apus (mountains) protecting

them at every step.

Native

potatoes

are one of

the main

ingredients

of the

Andean

diet.

Today, 500 years later, one may not see armies or

authorities traveling along the Qhapaq Ñan, but the

image of unity, mysticism and tradition remains. In

its eagerness for conveying the unique essence of

this huge road network, LimaTours has created

‘Qhapaq Camp’, a cultural and experience tourism

concept that intends to bring the passenger as

close as possible to what used to be the life in the

Tahuantinsuyo.

74

‘Qhapaq Camp’ is an approach to

Andean traditions.

Kevin Floerke


as cargo-bearing animals – an Andean custom

that is about to disappear – are some of the

characteristics that make ‘Qhapaq Camp’ a unique

experience.

The soft feet of the llamas prevent the

deterioration of the road compared to

horseshoes.

Christian Declercq / KM Cero

But no approach to ancient Peru would be

complete without the connection with the great

leading star: the community. The passengers may

enjoy wonderful stories passed on from generation

to generation told by the residents themselves,

participate in traditional ceremonies such as the

Tribute to Mother Earth, learn more about their

customs such as knitting, and delight their palate

with typical dishes from every place prepared with

traditional ingredients.

The ‘Qhapaq Camp’ concept is part of the new

‘Explore the Inca Trail’ program, a seven-day trek

between Ancash and Huanuco, traveling more

than 60 km of the route on the Huanuco Pampa

– Huamachuco stretch. In the future it will be

implemented, to the extent possible, in experiences

that cover sections of the Qhapaq Ñan, so that it

can be an example of work for other treks.

Kevin Floerke

Overnight near

wonderful

archaeological sites.

Rodrigo Cabrera / KM Cero

Walking with a

group of llamas

is one of the

differential

elements of

this experience.

75


COLOMBIA

To see more details of the

Castillo-Huanuco Pampa route,

go to page 38

ECUADOR

PERU

Aypate

Cajamarca

Trujillo

Marcahuamachuco

BRASIL

In this map, you can see the route of

our programme ‘Explore the Great

Inca Trail’ and other walks to work

under the concept ‘Qhapaq Camp.’

Huaraz

Castillo

Colpa

Huanuco Pampa

Huarautambo

OCÉANO

PACÍFICO

LIMA

Pachacamac

Apu

Pariacaca

Hatun Xauxa

Vitcos

Tambo

Colorado

Huaytara

Vilcashuaman

Choquequirao

CUSCO

BOLIVIA

Caracoto

MAP KEY

Sillustani

PUNO

Chucuito

The Great Inca Trail Expedition route

‘Explore The Great Inca Trail’ programme

Archaeological sites

Next ‘Qhapaq Camp’ products

Future sections to explore

REGIONS OF TAHUANTINSUYO

Chinchaysuyo

Antisuyo

Contisuyo

Collasuyo

CHILE


BELMOND HOTEL RIO SAGRADO, SACRED VALLEY

YOUR PERSONAL ESCAPE

HOTELS | TRAINS | RIVER CRUISES | JOURNEYS

OUR OTHER EXCEPTIONAL PERUVIAN EXPERIENCES

BELMOND MIRAFLORES PARK LIMA | BELMOND PALACIO NAZARENAS CUSCO | BELMOND HOTEL MONASTERIO CUSCO | BELMOND LAS CASITAS COLCA

BELMOND SANCTUARY LODGE MACHU PICCHU | BELMOND ANDEAN EXPLORER CUSCO - PUNO - AREQUIPA | BELMOND HIRAM BINGHAM CUSCO - MACHU PICCHU

BELMOND.COM

© 2017 Belmond Management Ltd. Belmond is a registered trademark.


EXPATRIATE

NICK STANZIANO

& JOHN LEIVERS

78


NICK STANZIANO AND JOHN LEIVERS

HAVE A SPECIAL CONNECTION WITH

THE ANDES. THAT PASSION FOR

THE PERUVIAN SIERRA AND THE

QHAPAQ ÑAN LED THEM TO START AN

EXPEDITION OF ALMOST FIVE MONTHS

THROUGH THIS MAGNIFICENT JEWEL OF

INCA ARCHITECTURE AND ENGINEERING.

What brought you to Peru?

Nick: I am from California, and people there have

a notion about Peru, the Andes, Machu Picchu

and the Incas; with stories like Hiram Bingham

or Indiana Jones. In 2005, I travelled to Cusco to

study Spanish, and in March of that year, I went

to work in Ollantaytambo. I was there for four

months, but I returned in 2009. My father always

had many concepts about Peru since his youth,

but he could never come. I did it for him to start

a life, a family.

John: I have been here for 26 years. I used to be

part of a very large British travel company, and I

was in charge of destinations in Africa, Asia, and

South America. I arrived at the beginning of 1991

and hiked through Manu, Iquitos and Cusco. After

the company went bankrupt, I became more

interested in what the expeditions were. I worked

as a tour guide to earn money, but at the same

time, I was exploring other remote parts of Peru

to learn the culture of those little-documented

places.

Nick, you once mentioned that Qhapaq

Ñan is a ‘physical experience’ of history,

what do you mean by that?

Nick: History and archeology consist of looking

back and interpreting what people thought and

did. What we have today are static experiences:

buildings or archaeological sites that you can only

Christian Declercq / KM Cero

79


John was

Nick’s

right hand

throughout

the

expedition.

Rodrigo Cabrera / KM Cero

Kevin Floerke

see, not hear or feel. The Qhapaq Ñan is different:

it allows you to move through an Inca construction

and feel its effect on the whole body. You are

experiencing the culture at a much deeper level.

You walked five months along the Qhapaq

Ñan in this expedition, what is the best

you saw?

John: I worked as an engineer for a while, so

what I appreciate the most is how difficult it

must have been to build it. The Qhapaq Ñan is

a masterpiece of engineering; it is a great way

made under the most challenging circumstances

and in the most complicated terrain of the planet.

Basically, the Inca empire became powerful and

expanded due to the quality of this road system.

John’s knowledge of the Andean world comes

from both books and personal experience.

What is the main potential of this

expedition?

Nick: Create awareness. The more aware society

is of what their assets represent, the more they

will know about their origins. That’s what history

does; it connects you with your past. And the

Qhapaq Ñan is a central part of what Peru is. If we

do not honour it or understand it, we will have a

limited vision about it.

John: I see it as a great opportunity to

develop tourism for the Qhapaq Ñan and, most

importantly, for its conservation. Behind this,

there were two objectives: one is to draw the

attention of the people so that they know it,

recognize its value, and that motivates them to

protect it. The other is to encourage the use of

the road through walks so that it does not get

lost in oblivion. Both go hand in hand.

Nick, what is the main lesson you

learned from this experience?

Nick: Taking one day at a time. When you’re

walking, you can only plan an hour ahead. I

have also learned that life is more peaceful than

it seems. If you think that trekking through the

Andes is a dangerous activity, I assure you that it

is more peaceful than you think.

80


You describe yourself as an “explorer”,

what do you need to be one?

John: You have to be crazy (laughs). You need an

adventurous spirit, be willing to make sacrifices

and have a ‘strong mind’. People say that the most

important thing is to have water and a tent, but

the most important thing is mental. If you have a

strong mind, you will be able to survive anywhere,

under any condition, surrounded by anyone,

without water, without food or shelter. You need

to find a way to resist all that pressure on your

shoulders, and it’s not easy at all.

Do you think that this experience has

helped you understand more of Peru?

Nick: It’s more about being able to see ancient

Peru. 100 years ago this road system was there.

These are roads that endure from generation to

generation and, to understand each town, we must

understand the Qhapaq Ñan. Somehow I started

travelling because of that desire to investigate,

and Peru is a place to let loose those instincts of

exploration. Once you know the language, you

can integrate into society, and that allows you to

appreciate everything in a much deeper level.

With so many years travelling through

Peru, do you still feel like a foreigner?

John: I never feel like a foreigner, because

nationality means nothing to me. We are all

different, and we need to educate ourselves to

get along well with each other. I always try to

work with local people, go to food festivals, show

respect towards the communities so that they also

respect others. When I travel, I solely see myself as

another human being walking a path.

Kevin Floerke

The primary

objective of

the expedition

was to create

awareness

about the

importance of

this heritage.

81


CALENDAR

Diffusion

RALLY

DAKAR

After four years of absence, the Dakar Rally

will be held in Peru from January 6th to

11th, 2018, departing from Lima. The event

will pass through the cities of Pisco and San

Juan de Marcona in Ica, Arequipa and Puno,

and then continue its route through Bolivia

and Argentina. Ask your specialist about the

programme for Dakar fans.

Diffusion

CALENDAR

Pope Francis will visit Peru from January 18th

to 21st, 2018, in a journey that includes the

cities of Lima, Puerto Maldonado and Trujillo.

This is the first visit of a Supreme Pontiff in 30

years since John Paul II arrived in the country in

1988. Consult with your representative about

the LimaTours programme created especially

for this extraordinary event.

NATIONAL

MARINERA

COMPETITION

Crystal Cruises

The Celebration in honour of the Candelaria

Virgin is the largest cultural event in Peru,

declared an Intangible Cultural Heritage of

Humanity in 2014. The central day is February

2nd when the Mestizo Dance Contest takes

place, and several dances such as Morenada,

Diablada, Caporales and Wacawaca are

displayed.

POPE

FRANCIS IN

PERU

During the last week of January, the northern

city of Trujillo dresses up for the National

Marinera Contest that brings together

hundreds of dancers and attendees from

around the world. Marinera is one of the most

popular dances in the country, where mischief

and flirtation shine in the dancers’ pair.

CANDELARIA

PARTY

LimaTours

82


83


84

Hooray! Your file is uploaded and ready to be published.

Saved successfully!

Ooh no, something went wrong!