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UJ #13 - Health & Wellness

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SPIRITUALITY AND SYNCRETISM IN PERU

HEALTH AND

WELLNESS

IT’S TIME TO KNOW WHAT WE’RE EATING

Interview with Luis Barboza,

general manager of The Westin Lima Hotel & Convention Center


Gocta Falls, Gocta one Falls, of the one tallest of the and tallest most and beautiful most beautiful in the world, in the explored world, explored only by a only lucky by few, a lucky Amazonas few, Amazonas Region, Peru. Region, Peru.


INDEX

14

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

ULTIMATE J0URNEYS

GERARDO SUGAY / LIMATOURS

CONTENT EDITOR

RODRIGO CABRERA / KM CERO

EDITOR

GERALDYNE LONGORIA / KM CERO

COORDINATION

KARLA HUERTAS / LIMATOURS

KM CERO

ART DIRECTOR

KM CERO

PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

CHRISTIAN DECLERCQ / KM CERO

GRAPHIC DESIGN

MIGUEL SANTAYA

26

INFOGRAPHS

SANDRA FLORIAN

WRITERS

IÑIGO MANEIRO

PAOLA MIGLIO

DIEGO OLIVER

TRANSLATION AND CORRECTION OF TEXT

PETER SPENCE

WELLNESS THROUGHOUT

PERU

Infographic

PHOTOGRAPHERS

RODRIGO CABRERA

NICOLE COATE

CHRISTIAN DECLERCQ

YOLANDA GONZALEZ ORTA

IÑIGO MANEIRO

BELMOND LAS CASITAS

DOUBLETREE RESORT

BY HILTON PARACAS

THE WESTIN LIMA HOTEL &

CONVENTION CENTER

ARCHIVO KM CERO

ARCHIVO LIMATOURS

ARCHIVO PROMPERU

PAGO A LA TIERRA

Infographic

34

46


6/ Editorial

8/ Updates

60

SPIRITUALITY AND

SYNCRETISM IN PERU

We are all human beings

INDEX

14/ Body and soul

Total wellness

24/ Wellness throughout Peru

Infographic

26/ Interview with Luis Barboza

General manager

of the Westin Hotel

34/ The healing spirit of Peru

Spiritual health

44/ Pago a la tierra

Infographic

46/ Medicinal plants from

deepest Peru

Body, spirit... and a touch of

magic

50/ Spirituality and syncretism

in Peru

We are all human beings

58/ Medicinal plants

Infographic

66

60/ It’s time to know

what we’re eating

Where do the ingredients

come from?

66/ Expat

70/ Agenda

70

50

/5


EDITORIAL

Dear reader:

Our rich history, fascinating culture, delicious gastronomy and ancient traditions make Peru the ideal destination

for travellers seeking lifetime experiences. All of these characteristics add up to a well-kept secret in

perfect harmony with the mysticism of our country.

In this edition of Ultimate Journeys - Travel in Peru we are pleased to present a series of alternatives in which to

enjoy a unique connection with health and wellness. Tours that nourish the soul and practices linking you to Pachamama,

our Mother Earth.

From exclusive treatments in the luxurious spas of the best hotels, to yoga sessions under the Peruvian sky, you

will enter the spiritual world and recreate the nexus that the ancient inhabitants of this marvellous land had with

nature. Understand the natural products used in these procedures: plants and herbs with curative properties that

have been used from immemorial time.

Wellness is felt not only in the spirit, but in the body too. You will be surprised at the vast number of Andean cereals,

native potatoes and other typical Peruvian ingredients that provide healthy and delicious food in which traditional

flavours and modern cuisine blend to make dishes as innovative as they are nutritious.

We invite you to immerse yourself in this unique dimension that is Peru and participate in all these activities while

deepening your own self-knowledge.

Enjoy reading and learning!

Your friends at LimaTours


UPDATES

UPDATES

PERU CHOSEN AS THE BEST TOURIST DESTINATION IN THE AMERICAS

Peru has been selected as the best tourist destination in the Americas at

the Shanghai World Travel Fair (SWTF) 2017, an important trade event

held in China, according to the Ministry of Tourism and Foreign Trade. The

award emphasised Peru’s efforts to attract Chinese tourists; it is estimated

that by the end of this year at least 35,000 tourists from that country

will have visited Peru.

Christian Declercq

NEW BRAND IN THE EVENTS SECTOR: MUNAKUY

Tierra de los Yachaqs Association has launched the Munakuy brand

to provide services for events and conventions. The Association is

made up of eight communities located in the Sacred Valley of the

Incas, who see a bright future in rural communitarian tourism. Some

of the services offered in the Ministry of Tourism and Foreign Trade

sector are cultural animations, catering, souvenirs, decoration and

activities before and after events, among others.


RECONSTRUCTION OF THE FACE

OF THE LADY OF CAO

After working for more than ten months, the archaeologists

of El Brujo complex have managed

to reconstruct the face of the Lady of Cao —a

Mochica noblewoman who lived 1700 years ago

in the north — using 3D printing technology. This

has enabled them to also reproduce a replica of

the 1.5 metre tall mummy’s body.

Nicki Lange

MARATHON DES SABLES IN PERU

In November, Peru will host the world’s most extreme

marathon: the Marathon Des Sables (MDS). The race

will take place over six days in the Nasca and Paracas

desert. It is the first time the MDS will be held in Latin

America and will attract more than 300 runners who

will pit themselves against the desert conditions. The

event means an economic boost for hotel, transport

and hospitality services.


UPDATES

UPDATES

BELMOND ACQUIRES LAS CASITAS DEL COLCA HOTEL

The Belmond hotel chain has acquired the Casitas del Colca hotel,

becoming the group’s sixth hotel in Peru. Located in the Colca

Canyon and now called the Belmond Las Casitas Colca Canyon, it

has one of the finest views in the area and guests can see condors

flying in their natural habitat.

Belmond Las Casitas

NEW GALLERY AT HUACA PUCLLANA

On May 10th of 2017, the Huaca Pucllana Museum opened a new

gallery containing more than sixty artefacts found at the site. The exhibition

aims to show visitors with no prior knowledge a little more about

the cultures that occupied the area. The museum is open from 9 a.m.

to 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Wednesday to Monday.


THIS IS MORE THAN A

JACKET

PARACAS TO GET A RADISSON HOTEL IN 2019

Roberto Borda, general manager of real estate

company Sumaré, has confirmed that construction

began on the Radisson Paracas Resort in February;

the resort is expected to open in mid July 2019. The

hotel will have 150 rooms (120 suites and 30 master

suites) and an artificial beach of more than 1500

square metres. 12.5 million dollars will be invested.

LATAM: CUSCO-TRUJILLO DOMESTIC FLIGHT

LATAM Airlines has announced that it will inaugurate domestic

flights between Cusco and Trujillo during the first half of

this year. The Minister of Foreign Trade and Tourism, Eduardo

Ferreyros, said that this flight will help to reduce congestion

in Lima airport and will connect the north and south of Peru,

enabling tourists to visit the north east of the country without

having to return to Lima.

Alex Bryce / PROMPERU

AT HOSEG WE BELIEVE IN RESPONSIBLE

AND CONSEQUENT CONSUMPTION, THAT’S

WHY WE BUILT OUR BRAND AROUND THE

CONCEPT OF SPREADING WARMTH TO

CHILDREN IN NEED.

FOR EVERY JACKET YOU BUY

WE GIVE ONE FOR FREE TO A CHILD IN THE ANDES

@hosegSW/


UPDATES

UPDATES

RESTORATION OF THE QHAPAQ ÑAN OR GREAT INCA TRAIL

The Great Inca Trail project seeks to traverse the Qhapaq Ñan from

Achupallas in Ecuador to Cusco, Peru. The expedition led by Nick

Stanziano, from travel agency SA Expeditions, together with travel

agency LimaTours and consultant Km Cero, is covering the 35,000

km to encourage adventure tourism in Peru by using and caring for

the Qhapaq Ñan.

Christian Declercq

41 NOMINATIONS FOR PERU IN WORLD TRAVEL AWARDS SOUTH

AMERICA 2017

The World Travel Awards South America will be held on September

9th on the Riviera Maya, Mexico. Peru has received 41 nominations,

including leading meetings and conference destination, leading sports

tourism destination, leading culinary destination, leading green destination,

leading cultural destination and leading adventure tourism

destination.


Peru's Gourmet Guide

2

The anual selection of the best restaurants and cafés in 32 cities

LIMATOURS AWARDED BEST PRODUCER

HIRAM BINGHAM AWARD

The last week of June the Belmond hotel chain

presented their awards, and LimaTours was nominated

as Best Producer Hiram Bingham for

providing the best experiences for guests in our

country. LimaTours was also nominated in the

Best Peruvian Tour Operator category of the

World Travel Awards and for the Virtuoso Peerto-Peer

award 2017 in the Best Virtuoso Voyages

Experience category.

The essential companion to discover new restaurants

MACHU PICCHU HOSTS INTERNATIONAL

YOGA DAY 2017

A mass yoga session took place on the June 19th

in the Inca citadel of Machu Picchu, which had

been chosen to host International Yoga Day 2017.

For yoga practitioners, the citadel is one of the

world’s most powerful centres of spiritual energy.

The event was officially supported by the embassy

of India in Peru.

The Red Guide for those who love good eating

Foto internet

DE VENTA EN PRINCIPALES LIBRERÍAS Y TIENDAS GOURMET.

AHORA EN UNA SOLA EDICIÓN MAS COMPLETA: LIMA Y PROVINCIAS JUNTAS

For sale in main bookstores and gourmet stores. Now in a single, more complete edition: Lima and Surrounding Areas.


BODY AND SOUL

Body and soul

LIMA - THE WELLNESS

CITY. IN RECENT YEARS

A SERIES OF SPA TOURS

HAS BEEN DEVELOPED,

CONCENTRATING ON CARE

FOR BOTH BODY AND SOUL

Total wellness

AND COMBINING LOCAL

PRODUCTS AND ANCIENT

PRACTICES FROM ALL

OVER THE WORLD IN THEIR

TREATMENTS.

By

Paola Miglio

Located in the Sacred

Valley of the Incas,

UNNO Spa combines

ancient wisdom

with technology and

alternative medicine.

Christian Declercq


15


BODY AND SOUL

Christian Declercq

UNNO SPA: www.aranwahotels.com

K! CHIC: www.kichic.com

LA HACIENDA PARACAS: www.hoteleslahacienda.com

HILTON PARACAS: www.hiltonhotels.com

LIBERTADOR PARACAS: www.libertador.com.pe

OXIGEN SPA: www.oxigen.com.pe

YAKU SPA: www.hotelcountry.com

ZEST SPA: www.belmond.com

To enter one of the massage cabins in Heavenly Spa by Westin is to

forget everything else for a short while. To be grateful for the silence,

far from the city’s noise and from those daily thoughts that trouble

heart and soul. It is to give yourself up to expert hands in tune with the

rhythm of your body, and waters that relieve aches and refresh ideas. Today

is Tuesday afternoon and our working day will soon be transformed into a

time of pleasure: Aspire, a Heavenly brand experience, seeks to restore us

physically and stabilise our emotions in fifty minutes. From the welcoming

cup of tea to the final rest in a room with a ceiling speckled with twinkling

lights, calm and darkness fuse and the space fills with peace.

Heavenly Spa covers an area of more than 2800 m2, organically arran-


Christian Declercq

ged with rooms for physical training, showers and

bathing, a hydrotherapy suite and personal or shared

cabins including private jacuzzi. It’s like a great wellness

fun park where silence and body worship reign,

though not in a superficial manner as the idea is to

eliminate pain and correct real problems. Our Aspire

massage starts gently, then gathers strength; the

masseur’s hands follow the contours of your body

finding nodes of stress and relaxing tough muscles.

The effect is progressive, aches dissipate and you

finally feel relief. The way it should be. The final sensation

is one of peace and energy.

Angela Ayala, the spa manager, describes how the

treatments have been designed especially around

users’ relaxation and wellness. And the spa is open

both to hotel guests and visitors. The hot suite for

example, includes pools at different temperatures

and showers with various levels of intensity. There

are 17 treatment cabins and more than 100 services

are available, from exfoliation with chocolate, gold

body wraps, treatments with grapes, and even pearl,

Left:

At the Hypnôze Spa in

the Belmond Palacio

Nazarenas you can enjoy

a hot stone massage while

gazing at the Inca walls

through glass in the floor.

Right:

The Spa Kallpa, at the

Tambo del Inka Resort &

Spa Hotel they believes in

the power of water, which

is used in their treatments.

/17


BODY AND SOUL

Left:

A mystical massage on

a bed of natural stone is

a treatment in which the

surface is previously flamed

using aromatic oils (UNNO

Spa by Aranwa Sacred Valley

Hotel & Wellness).

Right:

Body treatments using coca

leaves and utensils from the

area such as earthenware

pots (UNNO Spa by Aranwa

Sacred Valley Hotel &

Wellness).

Following page:

The spas' architecture

incorporates Andean culture

(Hypnôze Spa by Belmond

Palacio Nazarenas).

caviar and collagen facials. Stone massages, Thai

massage, shiatsu and sessions for mothers-to-be

are also available.

LIMA WELLNESS

Heavenly Spa is just one example of the spa

treatments Lima has to offer today. The capital’s

main hotels also explore ancestral local treatments

and Peruvian products that are beneficial to the skin.

These are in addition to centres dedicated exclusively

to body care and keeping you energised and

vibrant. The idea is that, more than just an additional

entertainment, a visit to a spa is to achieve an intimate

connection with our inner selves that will then

be reflected in our daily lives: lower stress, a positive

outlook and better labour and personal relationships.

Another interesting example is Zest Spa at the Belmond

Miraflores Park, which prefers treatments

involving local Peruvian and Amazonian products,

such as coffee, coconut and chocolate body wraps.

It also offers complete packages of stretching, jogging

and yoga with a personal trainer. And for pure

luxury: a strawberry and champagne bath with a

view of the sea. Yaku Spa, at the Country Club Lima

Hotel, also has an innovative approach involving aromatherapy,

reflexology, exfoliants, hydrotherapy and

sessions with hot stones. Let us end this short sample

of Lima spas with Oxigen Spa, which is not part

of a hotel chain, but has an honoured place among

the capital’s places in which to relax. Berthita, one

of the senior masseuses, can induce the deepest

relaxation with her hands. Her sessions combine suggestions

for good skin care and skilled massages

to complete the experience.

INTEGRATED SPACES

The interesting thing about these wellness establishments

is that they have appeared in other parts of

the country, not only combining business and technical

skills but also achieving a close connection

Christian Declercq

Christian Declercq


Christian Declercq

/19


For more information about our routes, contact our

adventure specialists by visiting

PureQuest.com or by writing to diego@PureQuest.com


Christian Declercq


BODY AND SOUL

with the countryside. In Paracas (Ica) for example, at

the end of the bay and almost on the shore, the sea

breeze accompanies treatments at hotels such as

La Hacienda, the Hilton and the Libertador. In northern

Peru, K! Chic in Las Pocitas de Mancora (Piura),

offers three to five day detoxification programmes

including therapeutic massages and hydrotherapy

treatments, nutrition workshops and corporal medicine,

among others.

Unno Spa Sacred Valley in Cusco is another jewel

surrounded by magnificent scenery. Surrounded by

Apus (“mountains” in Quechua) and flanked by green

hills and an imposing river, Aranwa Sacred Valley Hotel

& Wellness is built on 2500 m2 of land that once

belonged to a 17th Century country estate. It offers

a hyperbaric chamber, hydrotherapy, Vichy shower,

treatment and oxygenation rooms and aromatherapy,

among others. There is also a meditation room

for practising yoga and a space for Andean rituals

that include reading coca leaves, Inca cleansing and

sauna with eucalyptus leaves and medicinal herbs.

INTEGRAL BODY CARE IS ESSENTIAL, WE SO

OFTEN NEGLECT IT FOR DAYS AND THEN DO

SOMETHING FOR IT WHEN IT IS ALMOST TOO

LATE. THE IDEA IS TO ENJOY IT, TO MAKE

TIME FOR OUR PERSONAL CURE AND TO

UNDERSTAND THAT WE HAVE TO CONNECT

WITH OUR INNER SELVES EVEN IF IT IS ONLY

FOR A FEW MINUTES EACH DAY.


The hotel's public spaces also combine with nature (DoubleTree Resort by Hilton Paracas, Peru).

DoubleTree Resort by Hilton Paracas

/23


INTERVIEW

IN 2015 LUIS BARBOZA TOOK OVER AS GENERAL

MANAGER OF THE WESTIN LIMA HOTEL & CONVENTION

CENTRE. HIS MAIN AIM IS TO POSITION THE HOTEL AS

THE FIRST CHOICE FOR TOURISTS.

By

Rodrigo Cabrera

The Westin is known as one of the best urban

spas in the region; but in fact health and wellness

is more than just a spa. What do you do in

Westin?

Luis: In this regard the Westin brand is interesting;

its philosophy can be summarised in the phrase “well

beyond”; it is based on a series of pillars: proper rest,

exercise, good food, working meetings in places where

the air is pure and there is no stress, for example.

So the entire Westin philosophy is based on this idea.

Like many hotels, we hold five meetings every week,

the standard meetings, so what do we do? We have

two of these and one day in which the meeting is a

yoga class. We chose yoga as a means of including

wellness as part of our work, because this philosophy

should not just apply to the product we sell, but also

to the hotel itself, to the people who make it work.

Today the subject covers not only bodily care

and physical condition, but mental health as

well; so it includes travel in search of personal

meaning, exploration of destinations with a spiritual

significance, meditation and yoga, as mentioned

earlier. How do you see these trends?

Luis: We are following various trends very successfully.

Every year, the Spa Finder guide contains the latest

trends in this sector, and in 2017 the principal idea is

that the spa should include treatments in the open air

and encourage greater contact with nature. Indeed,

some treatments have changed drastically; for example

there is one in the Sahara desert in which they

bury you in the sand and cool your head with ice. It is

a treatment of contrasting temperatures, to stimulate

the circulation, open the pores, etc. But this happens

in the desert, using the sand directly and the heat generated

by nature.

And what are the current trends for urban spas?

Christian Declercq


Luis Barboza

General manager of the Westin Hotel


INTERVIEW

Christian Vinces / PROMPERU

The Westin Lima

Hotel & Convention

Centre is in Lima's

business district, San

Isidro, close to two

main avenues: Lima

Expressway and

Javier Prado.

Following page:

Hydro massage

tub in the Westin's

Heavenly Spa.

Luis: In fact many changes are being made in urban

installations as well. At the Westin the trend is more

concerned with the line of products. More and more

natural products are being used; for example juices to

detox the body or teas, green or white. The tea served

in the Westin, for example, is white tea, unprocessed

and very natural. The idea is to build the wellness

experience linked to natural products within. It also

implies departing from the traditional body lotions

or creams and moving towards treatments that use

natural products, such as avocado extracts or mud,

products that are neither processed nor packaged but

applied directly in their natural state.

How do you plan to promote the Westin brand in

other properties belonging to the chain that are

in natural settings?

Luis: For example, one of the things we have seen

and we want to implement is the practise of yoga in

the open air, particularly at our Urubamba hotel. We

intend to build a path with pergolas where people can

practise yoga surrounded by the woods contained in

the property’s 11 hectares. Another important idea at

Tambo del Inka, as well as making use of the woods,

is to make a kitchen garden and take advantage of

the experiences we can create in the hotel. That is

the most interesting project for this year: to offer this

lifestyle experience that our guests seek when they

stay with us; it is the property with the most interesting

potential.

The Westin is used principally by business trave-


Daniel Silva / PROMPERU


INTERVIEW

The hotel has 17

treatment rooms, 4 hydro

massage rooms and 1

full services room.

llers. How do you offer this “spirit” of wellness to

those who have come here to work?

Luis: Actually the hotel attends a very diverse public.

One of the things we have found is that more

or less eighty percent of those who use the spa are

from Lima; its main market is the inhabitants of Lima.

For example, what executives look for above all is a

relaxing massage, or water treatments; but in general,

treatments lasting around 45 minutes. We are studying

whether we can introduce a treatment to recover

from jet lag, because an urban hotel that receives travellers

from all over the world should have some sort

of treatment for that.

Another market for the hotel consists of events

and conventions. Do you feel that Lima’s new

convention centre (C.C.) will take business away

from you?

Luis: We haven’t felt any effect up to now. The year

it might have done was 2016, with the APEC meeting,

which was a very important business. Indeed

we operated in the convention centre (C.C.) because

so far the C.C. does not have an operator. In truth,

we have not felt any major disruption, the only client

we thought we were going to lose was the Peruvian

State, for obvious reasons. The C.C. is a positive development

on the one hand and a competitor on the

other. It is positive for bookings because we are the

nearest hotel and also the largest; so when groups

or events use it as a base they are going to have to

use our hotel, and that helps us. It is a competitor for

events involving up to one thousand or two thousand

people, bigger events we would not have been able

to host anyway.

Its proximity is a benefit, then.

Luis: For large events it is an advantage having it so

close. We believe it has a different profile, the C.C.

will attract more city-wide events. Pan-American or

regional events; there will be many regional and provincial

events in Lima. We believe that our market for

events —and we are talking about more or less three

hundred thousand covers per year— will remain fairly

quiet. The Swissôtel, and any other hotel with its own

conference centre, is really our competition.

And how do you see the changes in Lima affec-

Jose Orihuela / PROMPERU


INTERVIEW

The Westin Lima Hotel & Convention Center

The Heavenly Spa by

Westin is designed

to submerge patrons

in the serenity of its

environment.

ting a market as important as that for events and

conferences?

Luis: I think there have been favourable and unfavourable

changes. The favourable changes are urban

growth, as our environment has ever more offices;

and with more offices there is greater demand from

companies and more events. Unfavourable changes:

The traffic. It’s getting worse and worse; the airport

is a bottleneck and, in general, the slow-down in the

economy has had an impact on consumption, such as

parking space rental and certain of the hotel’s outlets. I

believe Lima is improving, but there is still a great deal

to do; which is why we have other hotel projects in

hand. In 2018 we will open two Aloft with 300 rooms.

These new openings will consolidate our presence in

Lima and particularly in the district of Miraflores.

“I feel that the growth of the city is guaranteed. But

we also have to look at the market, because there are

many new hotels and this means that at some point

there will be cannibalisation in certain specific segments”.

What segments do you see as having potential

for the future?

Luis: There is one very interesting segment that is

growing rapidly: all the professional employees of medium-sized

companies who are starting to hold courses

and meetings. Consultants are also an interesting

business; the more the economy grows, the more

consulting services are consumed, and they involve

long stays of three to four months, which is also interesting.


This is the scenario in Peru today; nevertheless

we should also remember that a few months

ago you became part of the world’s largest hotel

group. How do you see this new panorama?

Luis: Well, we’ll have to see how to take advantage of

it and what impact the merger with Starwood will have

on us. It is a world player that could open very interesting

distribution channels for us, and it is a much

bigger company with 5,800 hotels all over the world.

Let’s say that hotel chains have always had a value

proposition; in recent years this has been distribution;

so that is the direction we are going in.

Greater distribution and also a new public, no?

Luis: Well, another challenge is reaching the millennial

generation, as well as the arrival of the digital world in

more clients bypass the intermediaries when looking

for hotels. These are factors we believe we can and

must take advantage of, through digital media marketing,

and a digital sales strategy. But without neglecting

our traditional advantages: a clearly defined

group strategy, a significant corporate contribution,

care for the regular clients who always return to us

and for whom we provide a geographical advantage.

Because the greatest barrier to a client deciding against

a hotel is the geographical one; then comes service,

and after the hotel installations as such.

Can you give us a brief explanation please.

Luis: In other words the first thing you look for in a hotel

is its location; secondly you want quality services,

and thirdly good installations. That is the perception

that exists according to a person’s scale of values. If

you have a hotel next to your office, but its service isn’t

very good and it is not well maintained, you might use

it because of the savings in travel and driving time. But

if there is a hotel close to you with good service, that

makes a higher barrier to entry; it may have problems

with equipment and infrastructure, but the rest is important.

Finally, there are the facilities. With these three

factors we have a clear value proposition that can, as

a strategy, be suited to our target.

Daniel Silva / PROMPERU

The Westin Lima Hotel

& Convention Centre is

also one of Lima's main

convention centres.

/33


THE HEALING SPIRIT

MEDITATION IS A VERY

PERSONAL PRACTICE WITH

AN UNDOUBTED HEALING

CAPACITY, IT CAN BE DONE

IN THE SMALLEST OF ROOMS

BECAUSE WHAT MATTERS

IS WHAT IS INSIDE YOU NOT

WHAT SURROUNDS YOU. BUT IF

YOU HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO

MEDITATE IN A CUSCO VALLEY,

FACING THE GREAT PACIFIC

OCEAN OR IN THE AMAZON

JUNGLE WITH ITS SURGING

LIFE ENERGY, WOULDN'T THAT

BE PERFECT? LET US TAKE A

PEEP AT SOME OF THE PEOPLE

INVOLVED IN DIFFERENT

SPIRITUAL HEALTH ACTIVITIES

IN PERU.

By

Diego Oliver

Activation ceremony of

the 11th Door of Portal

11:11, Ollantaytambo,

Cusco.

Yolanda Gonzalez Orta


The healing

spirit of Peru

/35


THE HEALING SPIRIT

Christian Declercq

When Niki Coate came to Cusco eight years

ago, she had a degree in journalism, a

master’s degree in literature, a backpack

and a ring in her nose. She also had a wide and genuine

smile that enabled her to make friends easily.

With friends we went on a trip out of the city, and we

certainly had a great time at night in the bars of San

Blas. What Niki was certainly in no hurry to do was

go home.

She spent her first three months travelling around

Peru, but would inevitably return to Cusco. She had

to go to the border to put her immigration status to

rights before starting another three months, which is

the time allowed on a tourist visa. Niki felt comfortable

in the streets of Cusco. She felt inspired by the mountains,

the mysticism of the Andes and the energy

that emanates from this city as by few others or none.

Thus meditating, one day she realised she needed

two spaces: one to live in and another to practise reiki.

“I found a house in the end, but it was too expensive.

So I started to rent rooms and people who came were

dedicated to these healing arts. And that is how the

Healing House came to be. A place where we practise

different types of yoga, reiki, ecstatic dance, taichi

and chi gong, among others, and where teachers of

different ancient disciplines come to teach us”, she

says.

Niki defines the Healing House as essentially a “house

of light”, a centre for the study and practise of ancestral

traditions of wisdom. In its seven years of existence,

the Healing House has become famous among

visitors and residents; it offers a place not only for the

communion of mind, spirit and body, but also for promoting

a lucid and holistic lifestyle.

The energy of the city that captivated Niki, did the

same to Jorge Cereceda, a young musician conceived

in Rioja but born in Chiclayo. After a life of travelling

around Peru, learning the mysteries of medicinal

plants and the importance of local sounds and their

close connection with the cosmovision of the Andes,

he settled in the Sacred Valley. At home with his wife

Magaly and children Mayu and Sol, he heads a project

called Healing Sounds (Sonidos que Curan).

Christian Declercq

Above:

Andean culture combined

with oriental cultures.

Below:

Reading the coca leaves

is one of the treatments to

heal the soul performed by

a shaman.

Right:

Treatment at the Healing

House is a team effort

designed to heal, create

and inspire.

Christian Declercq


Christian Declercq

“It is a healing circle in which we use the power of

vibration and sound to give strength to desires such

as harmony, healing, happiness and joy. Sound and

vibration have the power to intensify and manifest these

desires”, he explains. He says that the best thing

is to find a place in the open air, in the countryside or

among ancient ruins. Once there you form a circle,

breathe deeply and meditate, and then receive a series

of sounds - unique tones that evoke an ancestral

past, and together create a special state of peace. “At

the end we work in silence and then describe what we

felt and give thanks if there is a reason to do so. Each

person is a different world”, he adds.

Interest in the art of meditation in Peru has grown

rapidly. Although there are no figures to measure its

popularity by, Monica Paz, a teacher at Lima Yoga

certified since 2011, believes we are seeing a boom

in the practice and in healthier lifestyles. “This fact has

persuaded people to choose yoga and meditation

because they make you feel more relaxed and happier,

with lower levels of anxiety. I remember that when

I started in 2006, in New York, I came to visit Lima

and almost nobody knew anything about the subject.

When I decided to become a teacher there were only

two studios in Lima, including Lima Yoga. Today you

only have to walk around the city to see the words

‘yoga’ or ‘meditation’ somewhere.”

And even though Lima, the capital of Peru, is probably

the city with the largest number of practitioners of this

activity, many want to escape the metropolis and seek

somewhere more suitable for a full and harmonious

life. Daniel Grisolle and Andrea Calderon are two of

Meditation area at the

UNNO Spa by Aranwa

Sacred Valley Hotel &

Wellness.

/37


Christian Declercq


THE HEALING SPIRIT

Stand up paddle yoga practice at Lake Piuray, Cusco.

Christian Declercq


such people, a couple who, with the arrival of their

daughter a year ago decided to leave the capital and

move to Mancora on Peru’s northern coast.

“We love yoga. It became part of my life in 2011 and

Daniel discovered it later” says Andrea. “I love it because

when you think you´ve reached a point of understanding

you realise that in fact you don’t know

anything, that you’ve started again from the beginning

and it’s time to row in another direction and explore

new possibilities. There is no end to yoga, it is delicious,

self-exploratory and above all, it shows things

in their purest and plainest form.”

A normal day for them starts by being woken early by

Emma, their daughter just over a year old, and having

a hearty breakfast. “Then I give yoga classes or practise

yoga. I feel a need to bathe in the sea with Emma

to refresh and recharge ourselves with energy” adds

Daniel. Today the Grisolle Calderon family live where

they can eat fresh fish and fruit juice; they have started

their new restaurant, called Tokuyo -Peruvian and

Japanese fusion cuisine- and are building a healthy

family life together. There is no doubt that it was meditation,

lucidity and a clear mind that led this couple

onto the right road.

The same can be said of Daniel Lerner, born in Lima,

but who found himself in San Roque de Cumbaza,

San Martin, in Peru’s northern jungle. At present he

is managing a tourism project concentrating on rural

communitarian tourism and travellers who, he says

“seek an alternative experience with the community

through its culture, traditions and a deep understanding

of nature and its beautiful resources”. Daniel is

moved by the power of medicinal plants, the nature

that surrounds him, the river murmuring in his ears as

he sleeps, and the peace he has found with his family

in a corner of the Peruvian Amazon.

Then there is Pierina Zlatar who, after studying, travelling

around the world, getting married and experimenting

with healing courses and yoga, decided to

go back to her roots: back to the jungle. Though she

was raised in the village of Quince Mil, in Cusco, she

decided to settle down in Puerto Maldonado, Madre

de Dios, where she founded Kapievi Ecovillage, which

she calls “her dream”. “I bought a piece of land that

was just pasture and worked hard with the help of

my children and friends to make something of it, and

Emanaku

“I LOVE IT BECAUSE WHEN YOU THINK YOU´VE

REACHED A POINT OF UNDERSTANDING YOU

REALISE THAT IN FACT YOU DON’T KNOW

ANYTHING, THAT YOU’VE STARTED AGAIN

FROM THE BEGINNING AND IT’S TIME TO ROW

IN ANOTHER DIRECTION AND EXPLORE NEW

POSSIBILITIES. THERE IS NO END TO YOGA, IT

IS DELICIOUS, SELF-EXPLORATORY AND ABOVE

ALL, IT SHOWS THINGS IN THEIR PUREST AND

PLAINEST FORM.”

started to create my dream. Now we have courses in

permaculture and yoga, orchids, Amazon art, vegetarian

food, land for children and different workshops

depending on who comes to share their experiences.

Now we are five families living permanently in the ecovillage”,

she explains.

Niki tells me, with her 5 month old son Django in her

arms, that according to an Inca legend we are nearing

the Golden Age. “Many people think that in the nineteen

seventies the centre of spiritual energy changed

from the Himalayas to the Andes. The legend of Wiracocha,

creator of the Inca world, tells that he sent

different forms of wisdom to the four corners of the

earth, and that today everyone who makes a pilgrimage

to Cusco, as well as all those who come without realising

that they are on a pilgrimage, are bringing links

to this wisdom back. And these links, this meeting of

the paths of wisdom, are essential for the arrival of the

new era”. Now the question is: Will you be a part of it?

The Heart of An is a small

spiritual centre in the

Sacred Valley, Cusco.

Private retreats and group

visits can be made (www.

anvisible.com).


THE HEALING SPIRIT


Open-air yoga session at Lake Piuray, Cusco.

Christian Declercq

/43


MEDICINAL PLANTS

Body, spirit... and a touch of magic

Medicinal

plants from

deepest

Peru

By

Iñigo Maneiro

The Matsé ethnic group that lives in the border forests

between Peru and Brazil, created the first

encyclopedia of indigenous medicine in 2015.

The book has five hundred pages and was written by

hand by five tribal elders. During its production, the

five Matsé elders met with eleven heads of the different

communities to share their knowledge. The manuscript

exists but the Matsé forbid its reproduction

and translation for fear of plagiarism. And their fear is

entirely justified. Many pharmaceutical companies finance

research projects into the plants used by the

shamans of the Amazon basin, with a view to developing

new drugs. 80% of the medicines used today

have been synthesised in the laboratory but are based

on plant extracts.

Peruvians, even those living in the cities, have a healthy

respect for those who cure illnesses with plants; we

recognise their wisdom and the immense power of

many vegetable species. The art of curing is passed

from one generation to the next. In the hands of strong

and wise men and women, plants, living beings like

us, give their lives to transmit their anti-inflammatory,

relaxing, immunising, haemostatic, digestive, healing,

hallucinogenic and other properties. But they also

transmit the spirit of the plant, not just its stalk and

leaves.

Most markets in Lima and the provinces

have medicinal plant stalls.

Iñigo Maneiro


47


MEDICINAL PLANTS

Fabio Ovalle / PROMPERU

Above:

In the Amazon there are

many names for those who

work with medicinal plants,

one of these is “curanderos”.

Below:

A woman choosing aromatic

and medicinal herbs.

Right:

Various plants that can be

found in the market.

Yayo Lopez / PROMPERU

Flourishing

Pre-Hispanic societies used an enormous variety of

medicinal plants and were the creators of what we

now call traditional medicine. The New World provided

Europe not only with gold, but also plants that

cured all types of illnesses. One emblematic case is

the use of quinine to cure malaria. Today traditional

medicine is known throughout Latin America, but it

originates in Mexico and Peru. The Aztecs and Incas

created vast empires because of their wisdom and

strength, but also because their lands were geographically

and climatically diverse, containing deserts,

coastlines, highlands and jungle. This ancient wisdom

goes back to cultures that preceded the Incas, such

as the Chavin, Moche, Chimu, Nasca and Paracas.

Even today their descendants are curanderos or shamans,

who are sought after to cure illnesses both major

and minor.

Iñigo Maneiro

The descriptions or codes produced by Spanish or

mestizo chroniclers such as Guaman Poma de Ayala

are a valuable record of daily life in the Inca Empire

before the arrival of Pizarro. According to Guaman

Poma, Inca Tupac Yupanqui tried to prevent the curanderos

from performing surgery during his reign,

but they would not obey him; on the contrary, their

power and numbers increased. Chronicler Juan Santa

Cruz Pachacuti tells how Inca Roca, on seeing how

ill his son Yawar Waca was, called curanderos from all

over the empire to find out why the boy was weeping

blood. There were so many that there were insufficient

lodgings for them all in Cusco.

Doctor Fernando Cabieses, a Peruvian neurologist

and expert in traditional pre-Hispanic medicine, takes

the history and cosmovision of each community into

account in understanding their curative arts. In the

cosmovision of the curandero, the human body can


AN ANCIENT AND ETERNAL CUSTOM

Among the mountains surrounding Machu

Picchu, coca leaves are devoutly offered by

a master altomisayoc, to the mountains or

apus to ask for good fortune, abundance and

good health. Coca leaves are also used by

the mountain people to help them to survive

altitudes of up to 5,00 metres above sea level

and fuelled the Incas as they built their mighty

fortresses.

Mario Silva / PROMPERU

Above:

Natural medicine can be

applied in many ways.

Below:

Exhibition about coca in the

Museum of Sacred, Magic

and Medicinal Plants, Cusco.

Christian Declercq

be influenced by spirits, deities or hidden forces.

When changes occur between these spirits and the

human body, that is when illnesses appear. According

to Dr. Cabieses, of the more than 1400 species of medicinal

plants known in Peru, some 900 come from

the jungle. The deeper we penetrate into the Amazon

forest, the more curative leaves, flowers, resins and

fruit we find: matico for conjunctivitis and kidney pain,

llantén for infected wounds, cola de caballo for liver

problems, toronjil for stomach upsets and anxiety,

yarinilla for diarrhoea, chuchuhuasi for rheumatism,

higuerilla for burns, piripiri for pregnancy or abortions,

sachajergon for snakebites and, among thousands of

other plants and remedies, resin from the oje tree to

eliminate parasites.

Sources: Apuntes de medicina tradicional, Fernando Cabieses / Plantas medicinales de América

Latina, Amtex, Mariella Balbi / Revista Peruana de Biología on line version SSN 1727-9933 / Magazine

Rumbos de sol & piedra, La República, December 2015

/49


SPIRITUALITY AND SYNCRETISM

A TOUR OF THE

FASCINATING WORLD

OF PRE-HISPANIC

SPIRITUALITY AND

ITS RELATIONSHIP

WITH THE

COSMOVISIONS

BROUGHT BY THE

CONQUISTADORS.

By

Iñigo Maneiro

Ausangate is the

principal Apu in

Andean culture. It is

here that the Qoyllorit'i

celebration takes

place, one of the main

religious festivals of

the Andean world.

Christian Declercq


Spirituality and

syncretism

in Peru

We are all human beings

/51


SPIRITUALITY AND SYNCRETISM

Cusco Planetarium is located

at kilometre 2 on the road to

Sacsayhuaman.

In August the nights and early mornings in the Andes

are freezing. During the day the sun is burning white

and the fields and pastures yellow and moribund. So

the alpaca herders who live more than four thousand

metres above sea level around Mount Ausangate, pay

their dues to Pachamama (Mother Earth). Pachamama

accepts chicha, cigarettes, spirits, coca leaves,

llama fat and many other useful items, while those who

make the payment pray to the most important apus or

mountains. They also give thanks for the harvest and

ask that she should continue to be generous in the

future. Mother Earth deserves prayers, flirting and festivities.

In this area there is a network of lodges built by

two communities of shepherds associated with a tour

operator in Cusco. By using them, travellers become

immersed in the dramatic scenery of the Andes and in

the lives of the highland communities.

Ice dancers

Ausangate is the highest mountain in the Department

of Cusco. It is the source of the rivers on which the

crops in the valleys depend, before they flow down to

Christian Declercq

the jungle and thus to the sea. The herders’ ancient

folk tales say that the Amazon creates the clouds that

then return to the mountain. They discharge their water

in the form of snow, and a new cycle of life begins. Ausangate

faces Mount Sinakara, which is its tinkuy, an

opposite and complementary mountain, with which it

joins to form a new entity. This opposition is like female

and male; light and darkness; black and white; or two

rivers that join to form one: tinkuy.

At the end of May or beginning of June every year,

thousands of people arrive from all over the region and

congregate for several days on the plain of Sinakara,

more than 4500 metres above sea level, where there

is a small Jesuit church. The pilgrims, in plastic tents,

sing and dance day and night dressed in coloured

costumes, and chew coca leaves —that great and

much sought after Andean plant—, but are prohibited

from drinking alcohol. On the main day of the festival

they climb to the top of the mountain in groups called

“nations”, to touch the snow. They also pray and kiss

the water; until recently they cut blocks of ice that they


would take back home —this has now been prohibited

by the locals “because of climate change”, according

to the masked “pabluchos” guardians of the festival—.

The extreme weather begins in May and intensifies in

August. On Qoyllorit’i, the community revives the water

cycle, and the desire and need for the melted snow to

reach their homes in the form of a river. There is also

dancing and veneration for Our Lord of the Snows,

who appeared to a group of herdsmen and whose

image can be seen on a rock inside the Jesuit chapel.

The next festival after Qoyllorit’i is Corpus Christi. There

are several facets to this fiesta: on the one hand it

is a Catholic festival in which images of saints and the

Virgin Mary are paraded through the streets of Cusco

and which was superimposed upon an older festival

dating from the time of the Incas. This in turn derived

from an even more ancient ritual: that of the June solstice

that marked the beginning of the Andean year.

Songs that cure and stars that teach

To the water, the moon, the sun, lightning, the seas,

the snake and the jaguar, ayahuasca, cotton and tobacco.

To the caves and the mountains. To the rivers

and lake. Temples have been built to honour all of these,

symbols designed, walls painted and rocks carved

to explain traditional myths and folk tales that survive

to this day.

Several of the most emblematic and visited parts of

Cusco draw upon this relationship with nature. Tipon

is a temple dedicated to water and shows the Incas’

extensive understanding of hydraulic engineering; Kylla,

the moon, is venerated at Quillarumiyoq and the

circular terraces of Moray were used for agricultural

Juan Puelles / PROMPERU

Handicrafts from Lamas.


SPIRITUALITY AND SYNCRETISM


Andres Allain / PROMPERU

experiments with crops brought from other

places. The walls of the churches in Huaro and

Andahuaylillas -part of the Andean Baroque

Trail- bear Catholic catechisms in the form of

opulent murals fused with pre-Hispanic iconography.

These and many other churches in the

southern Andes contain paintings of the Virgin

Mary having a triangular design that resembles

the mountains, the apus of pre-Hispanic cosmology.

In addition to nature as a whole, the heavens

are a source of essential information for agriculture,

animal husbandry, health, warfare

and forestry. The constellation of the Pleiades,

known as the Seven Sisters or Qollqa provides

information on the weather during the year, depending

on the intensity and clarity of its stars.

If they are large and brilliant there will be plenty

of water; if not, the people and their crops will

suffer. The Aimara people of Lake Titicaca predict

the weather from the height that the kaiñola

bird builds its nest in the totora reeds: if it is

high up, there will be rain and the level of the

lake will rise. When the Huambisas or Shuares

of the Peruvian and Ecuadoran jungle die, they

travel along the rainbow to the land of their ancestors,

and they give it the same name as the

boa: pagki. Chanquillo, the oldest astronomical

observatory in the Americas, lies in the Ancash

desert near to the San Rafael Valley, consisting

of a hill with three towers aligned from north to

south, which predict the equinoxes, solstices

and movements of the sun throughout the year.

This ancient cosmology complements western

astronomy to provide a better understanding

of the cosmos and to reveal more of its beauty.

Several planetariums in Colca, the Sacred

Valley, Cusco and Nasca offer this experience:

knowledge of the constellations and mythologies

of the highlands and desert together with

occidental astronomy.

The Corpus Christi

celebration is held in June

and is one of Cusco's most

important religious festivals.


SPIRITUALITY AND SYNCRETISM

Left:

The Chanquillo site in the

department of Ancash is

considered to be the oldest

solar observatory in America.

Right:

The Tipon archaeological

complex in Cusco is notable

for its perfectly functioning

Inca irrigation channel.

In Alto Marañon, near the border with Ecuador, the

Aguaruna women sing icaros —a style of chant that

makes those who listen to it want to change— when

they go out to their fields of cassava. In those anem,

a term that also refers to the heart and mind, the women

plead with Nunkui, the deity of the earth, to be

generous and to let the cassava grow plentiful and

disease free. Meanwhile their menfolk sing ícaros to

the “mother” of the Huanganas asking for permission

to hunt the wild boar and requesting that there be no

accidents. The animals and plants have their “mother”,

who is the spiritual entity or collective essence of the

species. In turn, the old wachiperis, in the jungle of the

Amarakaeri Communal Reserve, sing eshuva, songs

that cure disease and have been recognised as world

intangible cultural heritage by UNESCO.

The faith healers of Chiclayo and Huancabamba (Piura),

two of the major centres of shamanism in Peru,

perform elaborate ceremonies that make use of a

wide range of products. Some are from the ancient

traditions of cultures that once lived there. Others are

clearly influenced by Catholicism, as can be seen from

the images of saints and the Virgin Mary, prayers, crucifixes

and a variety of other religious regalia.

Near Chiclayo is Ventarron, where archaeologist Ignacio

Alva discovered some of the oldest polychromatic

wall paintings in the Americas (2600 B.C.) One of

them shows a deer trapped in a net. The painting is

located in a ceremonial setting containing seats and

ritual hearths. These ancient and pioneering Peruvian

farmers would pray to their gods to protect their small

fields of cotton, pumpkin or beans from attack by deer.

Humanity is shared

We are all human beings. Plants, animals, waterfalls,

caves and mountains all share a humanity that us not

exclusive to the human race. We live in an animist universe

in which the beings that populate it have different

degrees of humanity and enjoy intent and will. Being

human is normal and differences arise from appearances

and how we see each other and relate to the

world. In western thought, nature is “something” that is

Rodrigo Cabrera

Carlos Sala / PROMPERU


Fernando Criollo / PROMPERU

there to be used by us; but for other ways of viewing

the world, such as those of the coast, highlands and

jungle of Peru, culture and nature are two sides of the

same coin: the vital force that makes us human.

Men and women living in such a world must therefore

know how to relate to all such beings. It is no longer

possible to simply manage and use nature indiscriminately

as if it were a simple object. It has humanity

and so we must negotiate and ask permission from

everything that is a part of it, to ensure success in the

fields or the hunt, to ensure health and a happy family,

to be a great warrior or to understand the origin of

illness.

This requires an extensive knowledge of the environment,

which favours harmony between such societies

and nature. This has nothing to do with the “noble

savage” having an idyllic relationship with the environment,

rather knowledge of the requirements that must

be met to ensure preservation and respect for nature

while obtaining what we need from her. This knowledge

is passed from parents to children through myths

and legends. Such legends are as schools of thought

that share knowledge, techniques for managing the

environment, codes of behaviour and values that make

us human...

This way of living and seeing the world, this certainty

that humanity is shared and not exclusive to us, is not

only alive and well but is very relevant today, given the

ecological and ideological crises afflicting the world in

which we live.

AUSANGATE AND SINAKARA: Km. 65 of IIRSA Sur, stretch 2

THE ANDEAN BAROQUE TRAIL: www.rutadelbarrocoandino.com

PLANETARIUMS: www.planetariumcusco.com

CHANQUILLO: Km. 361 on the Northern Pan-American Highway

MORAY: Between Cusco and the Sacred Valley

AMARAKAERI COMMUNITY RESERVE: Km. 303 of IIRSA Sur, stretch 3

VENTARRON: 40 kilometres from Chiclayo

The Ventarron temple in the

department of Lambayeque;

this archaeological site is 4500

years old.

/57


WHAT WE’RE EATING

It’s time

to know what

we’re eating

By

Paola Miglio

“ARTISANAL”, “SUSTAINABILITY”, “TRACEABILITY”, “HEALTHY”… WORDS THAT ARE LATELY ON EVERYONE'S

LIPS AND THAT HAVE BECOME PART OF PERU'S RESTAURANT INDUSTRY. THIS IS WHAT WE NEED NOW: TO

TRY TO CLEAN UP OUR FOOD AND TO UNDERSTAND MORE ABOUT IT. TO VALUE THE INGREDIENTS AND KNOW

WHERE THEY COME FROM. THE WRITING IS ON THE WALL, WE JUST HAVE TO KNOW HOW TO DO IT.

The Nunay

restaurant of IFK

Lodge is on the

Pisac-Urubamba

road in the Sacred

Valley, Cusco.

Following page:

Greens Organic

is a restaurant

characterised by

careful preparation

of dishes using

organic and

ecological products.

Matias Cilloniz goes once a week to buy produce

from market gardens in Huampani. He

chooses carefully from what is available and

from products that are in season. He complements

his choices with special orders for cheese, ham and

artisanal bread. In Mó Café + Bistró, vegetables and

a little of what the season has to offer predominate.

Karissa Becerra created La Revolución as a concept

that aims to teach children from the youngest age

what we eat by bringing them into contact with the

ingredients. She also runs cooking workshops and

private dinners for adults, but always with the same

Christian Declercq

emphasis: good food, knowledge and understanding

of what we eat. Virgilio Martinez has decided to move

Mater Iniciativa to Cusco. His trips around Peru with

his team help him with this investigation project into

traditional local ingredients that have been in use

since ancient times. The results of his research then

appear in his tasting menus that are continually under

development.

Cilloniz, Becerra and Martinez have something

in common: they work in harmony with their

environment, and this is tasty, responsible and healthy.

Like them, several Peruvian cooks and entrepreneurs

have decided to ignore luxury and extravagance to

concentrate on a more honest form of cooking and

research based on what is sustainable, on respect

for producers and farmers, on traceability and on

a balanced diet. Everything can be used -indeed

everything must be used.

This attitude is a trend that we hope it will be more

than just another fad and will become the norm for

new generations of cooks. An understanding that

if we do not work with the environment and accept

the farmer and producer as protagonists of the


Christian Declercq

AYASQA: The new restaurant by Cusco chef Jose Lujan Vargas, whose aim

is to rescue the finest flavours of traditional Cusco cooking as well as its

local produce. A fresh look at the traditional repertoire Portal de Harinas 191,

second floor, city of Cusco.

IFK LODGE: A place to stay and eat well in the Sacred Valley. Its restaurant,

Nunay, works with local produce and is the only one in the area with a taster

menu.

www.facebook.com/ifklodge

FUNDO ORCCOCOCHA: A bio-dynamic farm in the Sacred Valley. A must-visit.

www.facebook.com/fundoorccococha/?fref=ts

EL ALBERGUE DE OLLANTAYTAMBO: You can stay there but it is also ground

zero for good food and drink. It has an artisanal distillery and projects

involving coffee, baking and cooking, and there is a beautiful kitchen garden.

www.elalbergue.com

Christian Declercq

/61


WHAT WE’RE EATING

Left:

Ayasqa restaurant

offers a new take

on traditional Cusco

cuisine for tourists.

Right:

Colour, texture and

the combination of

flavours from the

ingredients are the

characteristics when

creating or serving

any dish.

gastronomic supply chain, then all is in vain. In recent

years chefs have been fêted as much as rock stars,

and that is not sustainable. Cooks are messengers,

through which the earth speaks to us, as do the

farmers, custodians of ancestral techniques who

know how to work it. They transform the produce

with their hands on its way to our dining tables.

And in Peru, this process is not short. Starting

with organic and farmers markets full of artisanal

and home-made products. At weekends people

from all over Lima are out looking for healthy and

intelligent options. They can be found in Miraflores,

La Molina, Barranco and Surquillo. There are also

many restaurants that, while not being necessarily

vegan or vegetarian, provide dishes that meet the

requirements of good eating. Barra Verde, inside a

store called Morphology that also includes a butterfly

nursery, gets produce from its own market garden

in Pachacamac; and IK, a fine dining establishment

that has won international awards, works directly with

market gardens on the outskirts of the city and its

taster menu contains only products in their purest

form.

Pan de la Chola has become a classic "breakfast bar”.

Its extracts, bread made fresh daily, sandwiches made

from the best produce and good coffee make it one

of the best of this new trend. Deneumostier Alquimia

Culinaria owned by chef Brisa Denemoustier, also,

offers a complete conscience cuisine experience

involving adults and children, and interspersed with

ceramic classes, excursions and learning; there are

also private lessons, dinners and lunches that come

under the umbrella title of wellness and a return to our

roots. And that is what this is all about, going back

to and accepting what we have. Getting rid of the

artificial and embracing the real things that keep us

well fed, that taste good and that we can recognise.

Christian Declercq

Christian Declercq


Killa Wasi and Wayra restaurants in the Sol y Luna Hotel combine gastronomic tradition

with local products in contemporary Peruvian cuisine.

Christian Declercq

/63


WHAT WE’RE EATING

Christian Declercq

Above:

A variety of flour and

cereals can be found at

the Inti Raymi restaurant

in the Palacio del Inka

Hotel.

Left:

Details of the decoration

of a delicious dish (Sol y

Luna Hotel).

Right:

A good dinner should

always be accompanied

by a magnificent

pudding.

ECO AND ORGANIC FAIRS: Miraflores: Saturday mornings in Reducto Park; Surquillo: Sunday

mornings at the corner of Via Expresa and Av. Ricardo Palma; Barranco: Sunday mornings on

Av. El Sol; La Molina: Saturdays and Sundays on block 5 of Av. Del Corregidor.

BARRA VERDE Y MORPHOLOGY. www.morphology.com.pe.

EL PAN DE LA CHOLA: Av. Mariscal La Mar 918, Miraflores.

FLORA AND FAUNA: Gourmet store with healthy, organic and artisanal products. Av. Mariscal La

Mar 1110, Miraflores.

PUNTO ORGÁNICO: Organic store-cum-market that offers local and artisanal products.

www.puntoorganico.com

MÓ CAFÉ + BISTRÓ: Av. San Martín 131, Barranco.

1087 BISTRO: Restaurant run by Palmiro Ocampo, that offers one traditional dish each day.

www.1087.pe

IK: www.ivankisic.pe.

CENTRAL:www.centralrestaurante.com.pe.

BRISA ALQUIMIA CULINARIA: www.brisaculinaria.com.

LA REVOLUCIÓN: sangucherialarevolucion@gmail.com

Christian Declercq

Christian Declercq


EXPAT

By

Rodrigo Cabrera

I WAS ONLY TRYING TO ESCAPE FROM MY OLD LIFE,

I SAID I WAS GOING TO STAY A COUPLE OF YEARS IN

THE MOUNTAINS.

So tell us, when and how did you come to Peru?

Nicole: In June 2017 I’ll have been here for eight

years. I was a backpacker like so many others and

I stayed. I was playing music, which I enjoyed until I

found that there were other things happening that I

hadn’t known about at first; it was all a mystery to me

but something attracted me. Things started happening

that made me stay.

And these mysterious things you started discovering,

are they related to what you’re doing

now?

Nicole: Yes. I was really in transition, like everyone

who comes to Cusco. Everyone comes because

they’ve just graduated, or got divorced, or because

they’re recovering from some illness. I was also going

through a big transition and I got here without knowing

anything; I just knew that I had to find a room and offer

these things.

Nicole

Coate

Things that you saw in the United States, or you

were doing something different here?

Nicole: Yes, a little. But it wasn’t my profession. When

I came here I played music for a time, then I decided

to travel and afterwards came back to Cusco to live

here. The only thing I knew was that I had to have a

room to be able to offer reiki, meditation and yoga; not

as a yoga studio, just a room. That’s how everything

started.

“So I found a room, but it was in a house. I was with

my partner and we couldn’t afford to rent the house;

but we had said that we were going to invite others

to come and share the space. The people who came

were involved with the Healing Arts; that’s how the

Healing House started”.

What was it like at the beginning?

Nicole: We had nothing, not even a sign, but people

began to come and we couldn’t understand why. How

did they know what we were doing here? It grew very

quickly and we started offering free meditation to the

public every Monday. The first place was opposite the

current Healing House. We started doing yoga in the

patio and the balcony, but there wasn’t much space.


Nicole Coate

/67


EXPAT

Friendly spaces in the

Healing House in which

to find yourself.

That’s how we got where we are today. We have two

houses because the new one has a large room and

we started to give workshops. Then we founded a

non-profit-making association because I realised that

we were here for the long term and should put the

project on a proper legal footing.

And that was how the Healing House began…

Nicole: Healing House started as a centre for wellbeing

and yoga. The more we did the more the house

evolved and we began to understand its mission

better; as a guiding light to which Cusqueños and

people from all over the world could come and discover

something that would help them to find their

inner selves. Our philosophy is to fuse traditions from

all over the world so that people who come here can

discover their own way to listen to their hearts and

find their inner selves; which was what happened to

me when I found the house. Giving people who come

here more confidence in themselves. So it opened,

and people began to come from every corner of the

world. The Cusqueño locals who visit us are leaders

in their own fields, they experience us and go home

to form other associations, other great projects, and

Christian Declercq

to try to help the world in their own ways. That is the

Healing House.

Has it always been called that?

Nicole: You know, at one time I didn’t like the word

healing, because I thought it was from an older paradigm:

“we are broken and we have to be mended”;

but the house always wanted to be the Healing House.

It’s as if it were in the first phase, putting itself

right.

Nicole: Yes. Little by little the house itself has taught

me a great deal, and it is still teaching me. So I came

to be at peace with the word healing and I realised that

what we are doing in the Healing House is redefining

the word. In the old paradigm it means that you have

to help me because I’m a victim; but what we do here

is empowering people with their own tools; that’s why

we do a lot of training, such as reiki, massages, all

sorts of activities, to train them, so that they can say “I

am responsible for my own reality”.

And how did this café start?

Nicole: I thought for a long time that we were changing

the image of Healing House, more towards the

atmosphere that this café has; that’s why we were able

to change the name. I use this phrase a lot: “the new

age of grace”. Here the Incas saw this same concept

as: “The golden age”, or something like that, in Quechua

it’s taripay pacha, the age in which we remember

ourselves again. That’s what The Healing House was,

and in the search for a new name we hit upon the idea

of imasmari, a Quechua word that means “guess” in

the context of riddles. So, what is the café? We don’t

know yet; but that’s the funny thing, because not even

I know what it is, we are in the middle of a process.

We are concentrating on the concept of magic; not

magic as it was previously defined, but a new definition,

in which we use these ideas to continually remind

ourselves that this is not everything that exists; there is

much more than this that we cannot see.

“I always say that there are different realities for each

person. What you believe is real and what I believe is

real; in other words, we can choose. I chose a world

in which we can wake up completely happy, put on a

disguise, paint without rules, dance in the streets and

by doing so we can achieve our mission, which is to

help the world and be very happy at the same time.


Rodrigo Cabrera

We have the magic store, we have this café and we

are working to dedicate everything we offer, because

we meditate with everything we do; we have spent

hours meditating about every object. That is what we

are doing here: different people sell their things in the

store and everything goes to benefit Healing House;

there are things from all over the world and many artisanal

products as well. The store is all about ‘tools

and toys’; everything passes through this magical process,

to awaken and to connect.

Nicole: I was only trying to escape from my old life, I

said I was going to stay a couple of years in the mountains.

I don’t know exactly what’s happening; but what

I do know is people from all over the world are hearing

a call. I’ve had thousands of conversations; for example,

a person came and said: “I don’t know why I’m

here but I just had to come”, and he stayed for longer.

Many think they are coming to see Machu Picchu, but

there is more, something special is happening here.

Main entrance

of the Healing

House.

And why here in Cusco?

/69


AGENDA

AGENDA

Qhapaq Ñan - Ministerio de Cultura / PROMPERU

WORLD FOLKLORE DAY

On August 22nd, UNESCO World Folklore

Day takes place to celebrate traditions and

culture. Folklore is the authentic expression

of a people and includes its legends,

customs, music and dances, etc. These

peculiarities are what distinguish one culture

from another.

MAROON 5 IN PERU

On September 19th, Maroon 5 will present their “V”, their

new release in a concert at Lima’s National Stadium. Incubus

returns to Peru as the guest band. A percentage of

the takings will be donated to victims of the disasters that

occured early this year in Peru.

BRUNO MARS

On November 30th Bruno Mars will

make his first appearance in Lima as

part of his 24k Magic World tour. He will

be singing at the National Stadium and

tickets are on sale from Teleticket.


“Morro El Encanto” (Enchanted Rock), on Peru’s Off the North beaten Coast, track has by the been old a Inca source bridge, of local in the legends Machu since Picchu ancient Sanctuary. times.

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