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UJ #8 - Arequipa

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PHOTOGRAPHIC REPORT

AREQUIPA: CITY OF CONTRASTS

WORLD HERITAGE SITE

AREQUIPA

SPECIAL: FAMILY TRAVEL IN PERU

Interview with Alonso Burgos,

Executive director of Colca Lodge Spa & Hot Springs

/1


INDEX

EXECUTIVE EDITOR ULTIMATE JOURNEYS

GERARDO SUGAY

12

6/

58

INDEX

Editorial

8/ News

CONTENT EDITOR

MARÍA EUGENIA DE ALIAGA / KM CERO

DIEGO GUERRERO / LIMA TOURS

EDITOR

RODRIGO CABRERA / KM CERO

EDITION ASSISTANT

CAROLINA SAN ROMÁN / KM CERO

COORDINATOR

GERALDYNE LONGORIA / KM CERO

ART DIRECTOR

KM CERO

PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

CHRISTIAN DECLERCQ / KM CERO

50

FAMILY TRAVEL IN PERU

Special

12/ Photographic Report /

City of Contrasts

Arequipa: World Heritage Site

24/ Arequipa: The centre of

everything

I am Peru

26/ Region of valleys, volcanoes

and history

Arequipa is a region where you

can experience the Andean

highlands, where contact with

nature is unusually intense.

38/ Exploring the south

Info graph

40/ Mountains rising from the sea

The Arequipa coast is a new

destination rich in natural

attractions and activities for

travellers of all types.

GRAPHIC DESIGN

MIGUEL SANTAYA / SONIA ARAUJO

INFOGRAPHS

SANDRA FLORIÁN

26

AREQUIPA: WORLD

HERITAGE SITE

50/ Arequipa: eating well

A look at gastronomy and culture

in the White City.

58/ The sillar route

Sillar quarries: a new attraction

near to the city centre.

REDACTORES

IÑIGO MANEIRO

PAOLA MIGLIO

DIEGO OLIVER

62/ Interview with Alonso Burgos

Executive Director of Colca

Lodge Spa & Hot Springs

“I wanted to build something that

did not jar with its surroundings”.

TRANSLATION AND CORRECTION OF TEXT

PETER SPENCE

PHOTOGRAPHERS

ALEX BRYCE

RODRIGO CABRERA

CHRISTIAN DECLERCQ

MARINA GARCÍA BURGOS

IÑIGO MANEIRO

ARCHIVO KM CERO

ARCHIVO LIMA TOURS

ARCHIVO PROMPERÚ

EXPLORING THE SOUTH

Info graph

44

74

62

74/ Family travel in Peru

On the desert coast, in the

mountains and in the Amazon

jungle, families interact with local

people; learning about their

culture and about nature.

86/ What you will eat in Peru

Info graph

88/ Expat

90/ Agenda

/5


EDITORIAL

Dear reader:

Throughout Peru there are towns and cities that enchant you, which contain incomparable diversity and

style, creating a special attraction. But there is one with a particular personality with which visitors fall in

love; dormant volcanoes stand like guardians around it. A special destination that combines gastronomy,

scenery, natural attractions, first-class hotels and warm and friendly people to ensure the perfect environment

for a family visit.

In this new edition of ULTIMATE JOURNEYS - Travel in Peru, our featured destination is Arequipa, better known

as the White City because of the volcanic stone called sillar, used to build it. We reveal many of the attractions

and attributes of Peru’s second largest city, whose colonial style fills its streets with history. Furthermore, we have

an interesting interview with the owner of the exclusive Colca Lodge Spa & Hot Springs, Alonso Burgos, a tourism

pioneer who many years ago had a dream that he has managed to bring to life in the form of a magnificent

yet different hotel.

Misti is the first volcano you see on arrival in Arequipa, but it is not the only one; there are two more as well:

Chachani and Pichu Pichu, and together the three give an incomparable character to the city. A modern destination

whose streets preserve their original colonial style, its beautiful Main Square contains a surprising cathedral

dating from the 17th Century and the city has many fine churches full of art, mysticism and devotion. Essential

places to visit include Santa Catalina convent, the Jesuit church and the vantage points of Carmen Alto and

Yanahuara, not to mention the famous Colca Canyon, renowned for its beauty and the condors that soar majestically

above it.

The other subject of this issue is travelling with the family, and Peru is the ideal country to explore with your loved

ones. Its three regions give it a fascinating range of diversity, from stand-up paddle in the River Urubamba in

Cusco to the Chocolate Museum, where you can learn to make chocolates, to the archaeological sanctuary of

Machu Picchu. Perhaps you prefer trip on a sailing boat to the Ballestas Islands followed by a flight over the Nasca

Lines in the Paracas desert. If your passion is the jungle, the Tambopata Amazon Reserve has many options,

such as the Inkaterra canopy walk, walks in the jungle, lakes or the butterfly sanctuary at Puerto Maldonado,

while the little ones have fun on a treasure hunt. The variety of activities available in Peru, plus its delicious food

and interesting history and culture make it an excellent place to enjoy with the family and for the children to learn

about the marvels our country has to offer.

Enjoy a happy reading and a good learning experience!

Your friends from Lima Tours

OHSAS 18001

BUREAU VERITAS

Certification


UPDATES

UPDATES

NEW ROUTES IN MACHU PICCHU HISTORIC SANCTUARY

The management of Peru’s principal tourist attraction has proposed opening other monuments

in the sanctuary: Intipunku, 50 Grados, Incaraccay, Wiñayhuayna, Machu Picchu mountain, the

Temple of the Moon and others. The idea is to organise routes around the area more efficiently

and to diversify the available offer.

Christian Declercq

Ministry of Housing, Construction and Sanitation

TWO LARGE PROJECTS TO BENEFIT TOURISM

The Peruvian Government has announced that it will implement

two projects that will benefit tourism in Lima. One of

these is the Lima Convention Centre in the district of San Borja,

which will be ready in 2015 and have seating for 10,000

people. The other project is the National Archaeological Museum

in Pachacamac, Lurin. Due to open in early 2016, this

new building seeks to emphasise the magnitude and importance

of the cultural heritage of this site, the largest on the

Peruvian coast.

UN Climate Change Conference - Lima

AGREEMENT BETWEEN WYNDHAM HOTEL GROUP AND

THE PERUVIAN COSTA DEL SOL CHAIN

Wyndham Hotel Group and the Costa del Sol chain have signed a franchise agreement

for the inauguration of seven hotels in Peru. In 2016 there will be an extra one thousand

rooms available. The new hotels will be in Lima, Tumbes, Chiclayo, Trujillo, Cajamarca

and Piura. At the end of the agreement the Peruvian group will own and operate eight

hotels under the Wyndham Hotel Group brand, one Ramada hotel in Cusco and the

seven hotels covered by the recently signed agreement.

PERU IN 39TH PLACE IN THE 2014 ICCA RANKING

Peru occupied 39th place in the global ranking of convention

hosts for 2014, four positions higher than in 2013, according

to the International Congress and Convention Association –

ICCA. During 2014 Peru hosted a total of 84 congresses,

growth of 41% compared with the previous year. 64 were

held in Lima, making it the fourth most important city in the

region for conventions, after Buenos Aires, Santiago de

Chile and Sao Paulo.


UPDATES

NUMBER ONE FOR BIRD WATCHERS

The 19th of May was International Bird Day and

Peru was in first place for bird sightings during a

single day, with a total of 1,182 species throughout

the country, followed by Brazil in second

place with 1,102 species sighted. Places with

the highest density included Cusco and Madre

de Dios with 441 species reported, followed by

Loreto, Amazonas, Piura and San Martin. The

Franklin’s Gull was the most sighted species and

five endemic species were reported in Junin Nacional

Reserve.

ATSA PERU

ATSA PERU CELEBRATES ANNIVERSARY

ATSA Peru celebrated its 35th anniversary on Friday the 27th

of March. The company inaugurated its modern hangar on

the southern apron of Jorge Chavez International Airport in the

presence of all of its employees. Carlos Cueva, CEO of ATSA

Peru, said that the hangar will enable the company to continue

carrying out maintenance of aircraft, engines and propellers,

as well as offering specialist components and services such as

calibration, installation, dismantling and others, always with a

view to continual improvement. This year ATSA renewed its

commitment to providing integrated aeronautical services to

the highest standards of safety and quality, in order to meet its

clients’ needs and exceed their expectations.

PERUMODA

The seventh PeruModa was held from the 27th

to the 29th of May, bringing together the best of

Peru’s jewellery, footwear and clothing production.

This year the aim was to make Peruvian brands international,

and the brand designer with the best

catwalk display was awarded a sales stand in wellknown

US store chain Macy’s.

PERUVIAN PRE-HISPANIC ART IN 3D

The Museum of America in Madrid exhibited 3D reproductions

of four outstanding items in its collection, including an Inca

vessel and a funerary bundle from the Paracas Culture. The

exhibitions were made using photogrammetry, by which

each object was photographed from different points in the

greatest detail and with the highest accuracy possible.

Peru Moda

DIRECT FLIGHTS BETWEEN LIMA AND TORONTO

Air Canada rouge is now operating direct flights

between Lima and Toronto, Canada. Lima is the

first Latin American capital to be added to this lowcost

airline’s list of destinations.

Museum of America

Ernesto Benavides

Peter Polgan


CITY OF CONTRASTS

Christian Declercq

AREQUIPA IS A CITY OF

CLEAR BLUE SKIES, IMPOSING

BUILDINGS MADE FROM

SILLAR THAT CONTRAST

WITH MODERN STYLES AND

COLOURS. AREQUIPA IS ALSO

A CITY OF ART AND CULTURE,

WHERE TRACES OF THE EARLY

COMMERCIAL ACTIVITY THAT

GAVE BIRTH TO THE CITY CAN

STILL BE FELT, AS CAN THAT

ORIGINAL COSMOPOLITAN

SOCIETY THAT IS STILL

STRUGGLING TO SURVIVE.

By

Paola Miglio

Santa Catalina convent, built in the 16th

Century in the style of a small colonial town,

was home to more than three hundred nuns

at the height of its importance.

CITY OF

CONTRASTS

World Heritage Site

/13


CITY OF CONTRASTS

Rodrigo Cabrera

Rodrigo Cabrera

AREQUIPA HAS HAD TO CHANGE OVER THE YEARS. MIGRATION, GLOBALISATION, MODERNITY AND MODERN TRANSPORT

HAVE CONVERTED IT INTO ONE OF PERU’S MOST VIBRANT CITIES, AND ALSO ONE THAT HAS SEEN THE MOST NEW

BUILDING. NEVERTHELESS, AREQUIPA MAINTAINS ITS IDENTITY AND EVERY TIME WE GO THERE WE CAN FEEL ITS SPIRIT

SEETHING UNDER THE CLEAR BLUE AND VERY PHOTOGENIC SKY.

Historian Eusebio Quiroz Paz Soldan explains: “Arequipa’s

cultural identity is nothing of not a mixture of elements

both occidental and Andean. This identity forms part of

the awareness of our people and makes sense of the sense

of regionalism of which we are so proud. We feel we are different

because we know we have these complex values that

are different to those of other people”. And this is reflected

in each cultural manifestation: literature, music, gastronomy,

architecture, etc.

That is why exploring Arequipa means discovering secrets; so

the first piece of advice for visitors is “go on foot”. Each street

has its secrets and you have to keep your eyes open so as

not to miss them: old houses where sepia photos of the city’s

old inhabitants are kept in shoe boxes; old bookshops that still

jealously hold onto valuable collections; galleries where some

young artist displays his creativity. And the picanterias! Great

restaurants that were and are meeting places for politicians,

poets, writers and lovers of food and have given the country

an important part of its gastronomic tradition.

In the countryside surrounding the city, on which the urban

sprawl is beginning to encroach, you can still find that intense

green pasture and villages where the afternoon people gather

in the main square to eat buñuelos and talk about the day’s

doings – that eternal village atmosphere untouched by the

passage of time. The shared experiences of a large town, that

living contrast that makes Arequipa unforgettable.

Christian Declercq

Above:

Sillar, a soft volcanic stone, is very easy to carve.

Below:

Facade of the church of the Company of Jesus. This church

is considered the finest example of the so-called baroque

mestizo style.

Following page:

View of the Chachani volcano (6,057 m.a.s.l.) and the

Arequipa countryside.

AREQUIPA HAS

1’287,205

INHABITANTS

Rodrigo Cabrera

/15


CITY OF CONTRASTS

Christian Declercq

Christian Declercq

Right:

The cathedral was built in 1650,

although it has had to be rebuilt

several times after earthquakes

or fires. The current building

was erected in 1844 and is

striking for its immense facade,

columns, colonnades and lofty

bell towers.

Below:

Sillar quarries at Añashuayco,

source of the principal

construction material used in

the city since the 16th Century.

Left and below:

The centre of Arequipa is

laid out in a checkerboard

pattern, like most cities

founded by the Spanish.

The large Main Square

contains the cathedral and

municipality, as well as the

famous sillar colonnades

that today house bars,

shops and restaurants.

Left below:

High altar of the church of

San Francisco

AREQUIPA

CATHEDRAL IS

CONSIDERED

THE MOST

IMPORTANT

NEOCLASSICAL

RELIGIOUS

BUILDING IN

PERU

THE HISTORIC CENTRE

CONTAINS

14 CHURCHES,

5 CONVENTS,

3 MONASTERIES AND

26 HECTARES

OF PARKS AND OPEN

SPACES

Christian Declercq

IN

2000,

THE YEAR IN WHICH THE HISTORIC

CENTRE OF AREQUIPA BECAME A

WORLD HERITAGE SITE,

IT HAD 1,500

OF WHICH

250

WERE CONSIDERED

HISTORIC MONUMENTS

TOWN HOUSES,

Christian Declercq

Christian Declercq

THE CONVENT OF SANTA CATALINA

COVERS AN AREA OF

OF 2 mil SQUARE METRES

AND CONTAINS BUILDINGS IN

THE ARCHITECTURAL STYLES OF

THE 16TH, 17TH, 18TH AND 19TH

CENTURIES

/17


CITY OF CONTRASTS

Altars in the church of San Francisco.

Christian Declercq

/19


CITY OF CONTRASTS

The cathedral and the volcano Misti (5,822 metres high) guardian of the city since its foundation in 1540.

Christian Declercq

/21


CITY OF CONTRASTS

Christian Declercq

THE ARCHES OF

YANAHUARA

VANTAGE POINT

HAVE BEEN

INSCRIBED WITH

SAYINGS BY

CELEBRATED

AREQUIPA

RESIDENTS

Rodrigo Cabrera

Rodrigo Cabrera

Above, right and below:

The church in Yanahuara,

finely detailed in the

baroque style.

Left:

The vantage point at

Yanahuara has a fine

view of the volcanoes

surrounding the city:

Chacahani, Pichu Pichu

and Misti

/23


CHRONICLE / CRÓNICA

/25


AREQUIPA: A REGION OF VALLEYS, VOLCANOES AND HISTORY

DURING THE SPANISH VICEROYALTY OF

PERU, AREQUIPA WAS ONE OF THE MOST

IMPORTANT REGIONS OF THE TERRITORY.

ITS VIGOROUS MINING AND TRADING

ACTIVITY ENABLED IT TO BUILD A WEALTHY

AND OSTENTATIOUS CAPITAL, VISIBLE

TODAY IN THE CITY’S MANY MAGNIFICENT

BUILDINGS. WALKING AROUND THE CITY

AND VISITING THE NEARBY SCENIC

VALLEYS SUCH AS COLCA SHOWS US THE

IMPORTANCE OF THIS SOUTHERN REGION IN

PERU’S HISTORY.

By

Diego Oliver

Arequipa is a unique region whichever

way you look at it. Its capital is a colonial-era

city built at the foot of a volcano

that was worshipped for centuries by the indigenous

cultures. It is built from sillar, a white,

porous volcanic stone that gives a unique

beauty to the city’s architecture. Baroque, rococo

and neoclassical convents exist side by

side with traditional eating places or ‘picanterias’,

wide fertile valleys and a geography that

includes snow-capped mountains, highland

plateau and extraordinarily deep canyons.

Our trip starts in the city of Arequipa, at 2,400

metres above sea level but only four hours

from the coast. This proximity has always

had a strategic value. The western section of

the Qhapaq Ñan that ran along the Arequipa

coast and its easy access to the highlands

enabled the Inca in Cusco to obtain news of

the coastal peoples very quickly. Later, after

the arrival of the Spanish, the existing city

was founded in 1540 on the left bank of the

River Chili.

The city centre is full of spectacular old

buildings, all built from sillar obtained from

quarries on the sides of the volcanoes that

The Colca Valley combines hidden treasures with famous

destinations. Colonial bridge over the River Colca, on the

road between Chivay and Cruz del Condor.

Arequipa: a region of

valleys, volcanoes

and history

Destination with exceptional scenery

Christian Declercq

/27


AREQUIPA: A REGION OF VALLEYS, VOLCANOES AND HISTORY

Christian Declercq

Gihan Tubbeh

Christian Declercq

Above, left:

Santa Catalina convent

shows the daily life of an

enclosed order of nuns

during the colonial period.

Today this space is used as

the laundry.

Above, right:

Detail of the ceiling in the

Jesuit church. The vaulted

roof of the chapel of San

Ignacio was painted by

indigenous artists and gives

a tropical feeling, inspired

by the Jesuit missions in the

jungle.

surround the city and which gives it a magical appearance.

One of the most outstanding of these buildings is the

Church of the Company of Jesus, built in 1698, which

has a fine carved facade and interior decoration that

includes work by the Italian Bernardo Bitti as well

as images of plants, animals and scenes from the

Andean cosmovision by unknown artists. The Santa

Catalina Convent is also worth mentioning; it is built

like a small town with streets named after Spanish

cities, where you can see the cells once occupied

by nuns since approximately 1575. Its cloisters, lanes,

gardens, vegetable plots, chapels, cells, kitchens and

its magnificent collection of religious art were opened

to the public in 1970.

The many opulent town houses and other buildings

were not erected by chance. During the 17th and

18th Centuries Arequipa was one of the trade centres

of the Spanish Empire thanks to its textiles and

manufacturing, and above all its minerals, making

a route linking the city to Cusco, Puno and Bolivia.

And although the mining crisis resulting from the

struggle for independence destroyed its economy,

it recovered quickly with the development of the

alpaca fibre trade and the demand for wool from

factories in England.

Arequipa’s most important resources were not in

the city itself, but in the surrounding countryside,

the ancient lands of the Collaguas and Cabanas

(the original inhabitants of the zone), later occupied

by the Incas. A visit to the Colca valley is essential

to understand that other Arequipa; it lies 140

kilometres away across the Andean plains of the

Salinas y Aguada Blanca National Reserve, where

thousands of vicunas live wild.

The Colca valley has some exceptional scenery,

from a canyon 3,400 metres deep to the plains of

Pampa Cañahuas, surrounded by volcanoes up to

6,400 metres in height. The Andean traditions of its

inhabitants and the remains of pre-Hispanic cultures

make Colca an almost surreal destination.

A day in the Colca Valley starts with a visit to Cruz

del Condor, a viewpoint from which you can see

wild condors overflying a vast open space stretching

as far as the river. From there you can go to

A CANYON

3,400 metres

deep and plains

SURROUNDED BY VOLVANOES

UP TO 6,400 metres

Christian Declercq

IN HEIGHT

Above and below:

The plains between the city of Arequipa and the Colca Valley are

inhabited by alpaca herders who supply many of the region's

textile companies with fibre.

/29


AREQUIPA: A REGION OF VALLEYS, VOLCANOES AND HISTORY

Andean landscape. View of the Chachani volcano.

Following page:

Imposing view of the Colca Canyon (3, 400 metres deep). The eponymous river can be seen as

well as terraced fields that are still in use.

Rodrigo Cabrera

/31


CHRONICLE / CRÓNICA

Christian Declercq

/33


AREQUIPA: A REGION OF VALLEYS, VOLCANOES AND HISTORY

Christian Declercq

Christian Declercq

THE MISSIONS

WERE CREATED TO

FACILITATE RELIGIOUS

INDOCTRINATION,

TAX COLLECTION AND

OBLIGATORY LABOUR

IN THE MINES

Above, left:

Dancer ready to dance the

wititi. Village of Yanque.

Above, right:

Interior of the church at Chivay.

Religious syncretism can be

seen in the altars as well as in

the traditional costumes of the

people of the valley.

Below:

Maca church

the ancient farming communities of Chivay, Yanque,

Maca, Cabanaconde and Coporaque, where

Catholicism made its mark in the form of churches

far larger and more ostentatious that the size of the

villages would seem to warrant; demonstrating the

economic importance of the area and the need to

indoctrinate the local people.

These churches were built on the order of Vicerroy

Toledo at the end of the 16th Century to organise

the communities in a manner that made religious

indoctrination, tax collection and compulsory labour

in the mines (firstly in Potosi and later in Caylloma)

easier to organise. Except for the extensive and ancient

terraced fields, little is left of pre-Hispanic cultures

anywhere near these villages, although some

vestiges can still be seen such as the stone citadel

of Uyo Uyo in the district of Yanque. This complex

of 45 structures covering an area of some 10,000

square metres was built by the pre-Inca Collagua

ethnic group, which lived in the upper part of the

valley while the Cabanas lived in the valley floor.

The two groups not only spoke different languages

but also wore different clothing and in earlier times

performed cranial deformation. The former forced

their heads to grow upwards and the latter bound

the heads of newborn infants in order to flatten their

faces. The two groups not only spoke different languages

but also wore different clothing and in earlier

Christian Declercq

/35


AREQUIPA: A REGION OF VALLEYS, VOLCANOES AND HISTORY

Above:

The Colca Canyon is

the home of the Andean

condor (Vultur gryphus),

the largest land bird in the

world. The females are

brown and smaller than the

males.

Below, right:

A male condor can reach a

height of 1.42 metres with

a wingspan of up to 3.7

metres.

Below, left:

The Mirador del Condor,

a system of paths and

balconies from which you

can get a close view of the

birds in flight.

times performed cranial deformation. The former

forced their heads to grow upwards and the latter

bound the heads of newborn infants in order to

flatten their faces. Their descendants still live here,

and the Collagua women can be distinguished by

their white cylindrical hats with appliqué decoration

while the Cabana women wear oval felt hats and

clothes embroidered in dark colours.

The land in which these people live is impressive:

thousands of terraced fields cover the hillsides from

the river to the highest slopes. The terrain provides

visitors with many options, from gentle walks to

challenging hikes and climbs. The little-used paths

are ideal for cyclists who want to experience a little

adrenalin, while the river’s rapids are suitable for kayaking

and rafting amid magical scenery.

Arequipa provides the opportunity not only to discover

a vibrant city with an interesting history, but

also exuberant highland scenery where nature is at

its most intense. Get going and see for yourself.

Christian Declercq

Christian Declercq

/37


AREQUIPA: A REGION OF VALLEYS, VOLCANOES AND HISTORY

Aranwa

AREQUIPA AND

COLCA PROGRAM

4D/3N

DAY 1 LIMA-AREQUIPA

- Transport to your hotel from Arequipa airport

- City tour in the afternoon

- Dinner at your hotel

DAY 2 AREQUIPA-COLCA

- Breakfast at your hotel

- Visit the Pampa Cañahuas Reserve and the volcanoes

surrounding the city of Arequipa.

- Visit to Vizcachani, Pampa de Toccra, skirting the

crater of the Chucura volcano to get to the Los Andes

vantage point in Patapampa

- Lunch in the legendary village of Chivay

- An afternoon of rest in your chosen hotel and a visit to

the thermal springs at La Calera

- Dinner at your hotel

DAY 3 COLCA-AREQUIPA

- Breakfast at your hotel

- Visit to Cruz del Condor and an excursion to Colca

- Visit to the villages of Pinchollo, Maca, Achoma and

Yanque and the vantage points of Antahuilque and

Choquetico

- Return to Arequipa after lunch

- Dinner at your hotel

DAY 4 AREQUIPA-LIMA

- Breakfast at your hotel

- Return flight to Lima for your connection and/or

extension

O x y g e n E n h a n c e d T o u r i n g

Alleviates altitude sickness symptoms including shortness of breath, headaches, fatigue and nausea.

Alivia los síntomas de altitud como la dificultad en la respiración, dolores de cabeza, fatiga y náuseas.

Oxygen Cylinders

Cilindros de Oxígeno

“The oxygen enriched cabin is effective in preventing altitude sickness.

Passengers will feel great cruising even this high across the highplateau”.

A higher concentration of oxygen will provide a more relaxing journey.

Una mayor concentración de oxigeno ayudará al pasajero en tener un viaje más placentero

Oxygen departure valve

Válvulas de salida de oxígeno

says onboard medical advisor Dr. Dante Valdivia

Cima Clinic in Cuzco

"La cabina enriquecida con oxígeno es eficaz para prevenir el mal de altura. Los pasajeros

pueden estar seguros de sentirse bien incluso en las zonas más altas del Altiplano".

comentó el médico asesor a bordo Dr. Dante Valdivia

Clínica Cima en Cuzco

Driver Panel

12v o 24v Solenoid Valve

Válvulas de 12v o 24v

40sch Flowmeter

Flujometro de 40sch

Christian Declercq

Christian Declercq

40psi Pressure regulator

Regulador de presión de 40psi

Low pressure Oxygen line under bus

Línea de Oxigeno de baja presión debajo del bus

Above: Hotel Pueblito

Encantado in Colca-

Aranwa

Below, left: Hotel Las

Casitas in Colca

Below, right: Hotel

Libertador Arequipa

The additional Oxygen in BusO2, creates a special

environment 1000m / 3280 ft lower than the actual altitude

El oxígeno adicional en el Bus, crea un ambiente

especial 1000m más abajo que la altura real.

For more information, please contact your Lima Tours

Specialist or write us to: inbound@limatours.com.pe

www.limatours.com.pe

Para más información, favor contáctese con su especialista

de Lima Tours o escribanos a: inbound@limatours.com.pe

/39


41


MOUNTAINS RISING FROM THE SEA

THE LONGEST COASTLINE

OF ANY OF PERU'S

COASTAL DEPARTMENTS

HAS SOME GEOGRAPHICAL

PECULIARITIES THAT MAKE

IT UNIQUE. THE MOUNTAINS

PLUNGE LITERALLY INTO

THE SEA, CREATING A

NUMBER OF GEOGRAPHICAL

FEATURES AND PLACES OF

GREAT NATURAL BEAUTY.

SEVERAL TOUR OPERATORS

OFFERS NOVEL EXPERIENCES

AMONG AREQUIPA'S HILLS,

DUNES, DESERTS, VALLEYS,

MOUNTAINS AND OCEAN.

Mountains rising

from the sea

The unknown coast of Arequipa

By

Iñigo Maneiro

Caleta San Jose, for those

who want to get away

from it all. It can only be

reached by boat.

Caleta San Jose

/43


MOUNTAINS RISING FROM THE SEA

Iñigo Maneiro

Ernesto Benavides

CLIMATE

• SUMMER (SUNNY

DAYS): FROM

DECEMBER TO MARCH

• WINTER (CLOUDY

DAYS): FROM APRIL TO

NOVEMBER

• THE COLDEST MONTHS:

FROM JUNE TO

SEPTEMBER

Iñigo Maneiro

Left:

Flock of cinnamon teal

(Anascyanoptera) in the

Lagunas de Mejía National

Sanctuary, a coastal wildlife

refuge.

Right:

Restored railway carriage at

Mollendo, an important piece

of the city's industrial heritage.

The famous Southern Railway

started here in the 19th Century

and ran to Puno via Cusco.

A coast for

everyone

James Posso

Above, left:

Long walks on Jihuay beach, 604

kilometres out on the Southern

Pan-American Highway.

Above, right:

Prehistoric teeth. The desert

at Sacaco contains valuable

paleontological remains, many of

them unfortunately exposed to the

risk of being pillaged.

Below:

The archaeological remains of

Puerto Inca show how pre-Hispanic

fishermen lived on this coast.

The sky seen from Jihuay beach is a riot of

stars and constellations. In the background

is the sea, wild and cold, breaking on a

beach hemmed in by rocks, mountains and ancient

Inca terraces. The hills are full of tombs and

human bones, showing that it was once inhabited

by a much larger population than at present.

These same hills are ideal for walking and mountain

biking, with routes that vary in length and

difficulty.

Puerto Inca is just a few kilometres from Jihuay

and is where fish was caught for the imperial

ruler’s table. This beach also possesses unbeatable

geographical characteristics that are ideal

for adventure sports that can be combined, as in

Jihuay, with great relaxation in comfortable rustic

lodges, which offer swimming pools, hammocks,

Iñigo Maneiro

barbecues and night time bonfires round which to

observe the extraordinary evening sky.

Further south, the Lagunas de Mejia National

Sanctuary is one of the largest areas of coastal

wetlands in Peru; This is a destination of great interest

to wildlife lovers, in this case bird watchers.

The wealth of Arequipa’s most famous resort is

reason it was included on the list of world Ramsar

sites because of its importance as a resting place

for migratory birds.

In the north of the department, in contrast, in the

desert adjoining Ica and the longest part of the

Arequipa coast, there is an extensive paleontological

zone starting in Ocucaje, where prehistoric

whale and shark fossils are found and can be

seen in the museum at Sacaco. This is the start of

a road bounded by the mountains on one side and

the Pacific Ocean on the other.

These are the contrasting aspects of a long coastline

that is fundamentally rough and desert. Some

of the ravines and valleys that penetrate the mountain

range enable life in its various forms to flourish,

thus forming a contrast with an otherwise relentlessly

barren and solitary landscape.

KAYAKS AND RAILWAYS

Much of the more than 500 kilometres of coastline

in the Department of Arequipa -the longest of any

of Peru’s departments- is different from the coastal

strip in the rest of the country: The imposing mountain

geography of the Andes reaches literally to the

shoreline. The Arequipa coast —wild, little-known

and an impressive palette of colours from the blue

and turquoise of the sea to the ochre, white, yellow,

red and black of the coast— is practically squeezed

against the Andes mountains. Mountains rising

from the sea.

This intricate geography also forms beautiful beaches

and bays protected by hills and rocky outcrops.

Some of them, such as the bay of San José,

can only reached from the sea; they are areas of

calm water, ideal for activities such as sea kayaking,

diving and rowing with the family and give

the zone an advantage in the ecotourism market.

In other cases, such as Atiquipa, the moisture and

sea mist form a unique ecosystem: that of the lomas.

This life zone is unique in the world, it blooms

during the months of May and October and can be

found in certain parts of the coast between northern

Chile and the city of Trujillo in Peru. These

carpets of life among the sands of Atiquipa are formed

by a wealth of vegetation that contrasts with

the dunes and desert of which a large part of the

Arequipa coastline consists; they are home to spe-

Activities available on the

Arequipa coast:

• Mountain biking: Jihuay

and Puerto Inca

• Walking: Jihuay,

Atiquipa, Puerto Inca

and the Bay of San

Jose

• Fishing and diving: Bay

of San Jose

• History tourism:

Sacaco, Jihuay, Puerto

Inca and Mollendo

• Family, rest and

relaxation: Jihuay,

Puerto Inca, the bay of

San Jose, Mollendo,

Chala and the Lagunas

de Mejia National

Sanctuary

• Flora and fauna: Lomas

de Atiquipa, the Bay

of San Jose, Lagunas

de Mejia National

Sanctuary and the

Tambo Valley

• Kayaking and rowing:

Bay of San Jose

• Protected areas: Lomas

de Atiquipa and the

Lagunas de Mejia

National Sanctuary

/45


MOUNTAINS RISING FROM THE SEA

OTHER PLACES

• LOMAS: KM 533

• SACACO: KM 546

• SIGUAS VALLEY: KM 644

• ATICO: KM 709

• OCOÑA: KM 784

• MEJIA: KM 1071

Left:

In Atiquipa, the community preserves some

of the few seasonal ecosystems or 'lomas'

still surviving in Peru. The ideal time to visit

them is between June and October.

Right:

Water sports such as kayaking and boat

trips are available at Caleta San José.

cies such as, the wild tobacco, tara, falcons,

owls, foxes, harriers and hummingbirds.

People living near the lomas erect

netting to capture water droplets from the

mist, for their own consumption and for irrigation,

as there is no rainfall.

The lomas are an ecosystem that, in one

way or the other, has allowed humans to

live in the area for thousands of years. This

would explain the petroglyphs, the terraced

fields, the burial sites and the small

settlements at Puerto Inca and Jihuay, the

beaches closest to the lomas at Atiquipa.

These places are at the ends of the ancient

roads that link the highlands with the coast,

designed as trade routes for the people of

the Andes to get to the cold and generous

ocean to collect shells for their rituals and

fish and seaweed to eat. Some of these

routes, like those that link the communities

of the upper Colca with the Arequipa

coast, are still used by caravans of llamas

and herders to this day. They also enable

archaeological tourism and walks to see

the only remaining Inca ruins on the Peruvian

coast.

But there are other ways of travelling when

you get to Mollendo. This town in the Tambo

Valley, famous for its Forga castle, is the

terminus of the railway that dominated trade

in southern Peru and northern Bolivia

and Argentina towards the end of the 19th

Century. Opera companies visited the town

and ships from Europe served its port,

through which Peru’s first motor vehicle

entered the country. The splendour of this

era is reflected in the town houses built of

Oregon pine, which still survive in the town

and which house the consulates of more

than twenty countries. Today, its beaches

such as those at Camana and Chala, are

the sought by travellers from all over the

southern Andes, as well as from Chile, Argentina,

Brazil and Bolivia, not to mention

cruise ships of many nationalities.

THE DESERT IS GENEROUS

This coast is affected by the Humboldt Current

flowing from the south, cooling the

sea and enriching its biodiversity, making it

ideal for fishermen and wildlife enthusiasts.

Quilca, the bay of San Jose and the lakes

at Mejia are perfect destinations for this.

Penguins, pelicans, boobies, cormorants

and seals can be seen resting in the sun

on its reefs and islets. With wildlife in mind,

ecotourism lodges offer a variety of routes

and activities by which to enjoy this natural

world and the solitude of some of Peru’s

most beautiful beaches, such as those to

the south of Quilca.

Iñigo Maneiro

Life on the coast combined with the valleys formed

by the main rivers of the Department of Arequipa.

Yauca, Majes, Siguas, Vitor and Tambo

contain extensive plantations of olives, grapes,

vegetables and fruit trees, whose produce is then

sold in Peru’s principal markets. The Southern

Pan-American Highway runs through this section

of the Peruvian coast.

A journey of discovery Immerse yourself in places

of great beauty, whose personality is determined

by the wild and rugged geology.

Marina García Burgos

Above:

The road along the Arequipa coast

runs through a rugged terrain of

ravines, desert and valleys.

Below:

Crayfish fisherman in the River

Majes.

THE LOMAS ARE AN

ECOSYSTEM THAT,

IN ONE WAY OR THE

OTHER, HAS ALLOWED

HUMANS TO LIVE IN THE

AREA FOR THOUSANDS

OF YEARS

Alex Bryce

Caleta San José

Opposite page:

Tranquil landscape in the coastal

Tambo valley, known as Arequipa's

bread basket for its fertile land and the

variety of products grown there.

/47


LAS MONTAÑAS NADAN EN EL MAR

Alex Bryce

/49


AREQUIPA: EATING WELL

Arequipa:

eating well

Gastronomy and culture in the White City

Christian Declercq

AREQUIPA IS ONE OF THE BEST

REGIONS IN PERU FOR GOOD FOOD

AND RELAXATION. ITS GASTRONOMY

IS TRADITIONAL AND BASED ON THE

ABUNDANCE AND QUALITY OF LOCAL

INGREDIENTS, AND GREAT FLAVOURS.

IT IS ALSO A CITY FOR ART LOVERS,

WITH A NUMBER OF GALLERIES,

THEATRES AND BARS. ITS STREETS

ARE FILLED WITH ANTIQUARIES, BOOK

SELLERS, SECOND-HAND DEALERS AND

DESIGNER BOUTIQUES SELLING THE

FINEST ALPACA CLOTHES AND SILVER

JEWELLERY. IT'S IMPOSSIBLE TO BE

BORED.

By

Paola Miglio

Gastronomy critic María Elena Cornejo says

that the food of her native , region owes

much to the ‘picanteria’ that Isabel Álvarez

called “the places all Arequipeños go back to”.

“And at home, —adds María Elena—, , except

for cuy chactado, people eat basically the same

food. I’m talking in the past tense because the

young people of today are more practical, if not

impatient and can’t spend all day making sauces.

Where I was born the picanterias are all run by

women. Strong, kind - hearted women, women

with character who didn’t suffer fools lightly.).

They weren’t born in the shadow of a volcano for

nothing”. According to Enrique Ramírez Angulo

(historian), there is written evidence of the existence

of picanterias from the 17th Century. They

arose because itinerant mule drivers needed refreshment

and food during their daily work. That

was the start of Arequipa’s many picanterias, where

people from all walks of life meet to share great

food at reasonable prices. And afterwards: we

continue exploring the treasures of this coquettish

and enchanting city.

Tradition and good taste. La Lucila picanteria

in the district of Tiabaya, has retained the

flavours of traditional Arequipa cooking for

many generations.

/51


AREQUIPA: EATING WELL

Christian Declercq

THE TASTE OF THE WHITE CITY

The first destination is La Nueva Palomino owned

by —Mónica Huerta , creator of Sociedad Picantera

de Arequipa , which includes around — 30 such restaurants.

Try a delicious and aromatic home-made chicha

de guiñapo. Try broad beans and a 'revuelto de

habas', quinua leaf salad, ocopa, crayfish chowder

with quinua, 'chaque de tripas' (a broth made from potatoes,

vegetables, tripe and meat) and the restaurant's

classic 'escribano': white potato, rocoto pepper, tomato

and small crayfish stir-fried in chicha vinegar. “Stuffed

rocoto isn't a classic picanteria dish —remembers

María Elena— it's an extra that started being served in

the 1950s and is now three or four times the size it was

then, to the horror of traditionalists”.

'solterito de queso' , as well as ' aji de calabaza'

and 'estofado de chicha'. We will end with La Lucila in

Sachaca, another traditional restaurant where the food

is cooked over wood. Its ocopa is famous, but so are

its guinea pigs, ribs 'a la piedra' and crayfish chowder.

Ask for the puddings, made the old traditional way.

NIGHT TIME

It was this comforting, home-cooked food that inspired

new entrepreneurs to open more contemporary restaurants:

the respect for the ingredients and tradition

remains, but the dishes have been reinvented. Because

the picanterias are only open during the day, let us recommend

that you visit at the end of the afternoon, as

the perfect start to a night of cocktails and good music.

Christian Declercq

Above left and right:

La Trattoria del

Monasterio offers

dishes based on a

fusion of Italian cooking

and local produce and

flavours.

Below, right:

The restaurant Chicha

is located inside a

colonial-era mansion.

Its style includes

the main flavours

of southern Andean

gastronomy combined

with contemporary

techniques.

Above:

Classic complement: great

crayfish chowder with a glass

of chicha de jora.

Below:

The 'batan' is an ancient

tool in Peru. It is essential

in Arequipa's picanterias,

particularly when preparing

sauces.

La Capitana is another small eatery where the food is

cooked on wood fires and is famous for its rich stews

such as 'patita con maní', 'pastel de tallarin' and 'aji de

calabaza'. On Mondays it serves its famous 'chaque'

—a hearty mutton or beef broth with vegetables and

wheat, often also made from tripe— and customers

queue to try it. La Benita de Characato is another

worthy name for this short list. Ramírez notes that

the recipe used in this restaurant to make chicha

has not changed since 1829 and it is fermented

in large earthenware jars . It also serves chowders,

vegetable ' torrejitas' , ' zarza de patitas' and

One of these is Gastón Acurio’s Chicha with its tasty

Peking guinea pig; or try Paladar 1900, which serves

an excellent and tender puruncu (fish encased in clay

and cooked in an earthenware pot), and stir-fried pork,

beef and ostrich. Finally we have ZigZag which has a

great atmosphere and offers a trilogy of alpaca, beef

and ostrich meat; and La Trattoria del Monasterio,

with its delicious pastas, pizzas and a powerful ossobuco.

All of them serve creative cocktails and an excellent

wines and spirits list. Afterwards, a visit to one

of the city’s main discos, such as Forum, Istambul or

Aura.

Christian Declercq

Christian Declercq

FIND CHEESE AND

OLIVES AT MERCADO

SAN CAMILO, AND

COOKED MEATS

AND SAUSAGES

AT SALCHICHERIA

ALEMANA (CALLE

SAN FRANCISCO 137,

CERCADO)

Christian Declercq

Below, left:

Dining room of

Paladar 1900,

which specialises

in a combination

of Arequipa and

Turkish traditions.

An experience not

to be missed.

Christian Declercq

FOR AN EARLY EVENING

MEAL, EL TURCO. TASTY

AND AMPLE KEBABS,

SHAWARMAS AND

FALAFELS. FIND IT AT

CALLE SAN FRANCISCO

216-A, CERCADO; IT IS

OPEN ROUND THE CLOCK

Paladar 1900

El Turko

/53


AREQUIPA: EATING WELL

Shopping in Arequipa

Strolling through Arequipa you will

find all sorts of shops selling typical

products from the region, and even

small antiques and book shops.

Calle Santa Catalina contains the main

antique shops. There are some great

pieces but they are not cheap. But

it is still worth going in and looking.

Furthermore, several designers offer

beautifully made alpaca textiles, silver

jewellery and high-quality handicrafts.

Here are some data so that you do not

miss anything.

Alex Bryce

Asociación Cultural Fénix

AREQUIPA CULTURE

The cultural life of Arequipa has always been vigorous. The inauguration

of the Museum of Contemporary Art (MAC) in 2003

gave a boost to the art scene. It now holds some interesting collections

and has a permanent gallery of contemporary Peruvian

painting. Exhibitions are always being organised in galleries such

as the Centro Cultural Peruano Norteamericano or Alianza

Francesa. There are also some interesting antiquaries near to

Santa Catalina convent and exhibitions in the Instituto Cultural

Peruano Aleman and the Museo Virreinal Santa Teresa.

Theatre and music are also celebrated at locations such as the

Teatro Fenix. It is advisable to check performances regularly on

the theatre’s website (see under useful data). Also look out for

Siete Esquinas, which displays various activities programmes

(www.sieteesquinas.com), an entertainment and cultural bulletin

that is continually being updated. You will never be bored in Arequipa.

And just strolling in the Main Square in the moonlight, with

that clear, star-filled sky overhead is enough to tempt you back

time and time again.

Renzo Tasso

Above:

The antiquaries of

Calle Santa Catalina

have some unique

items. You can

browse among them

for hours.

Below:

Sweet history. La

Iberica has been

making chocolates

for more than one

hundred years and are

a favourite choice for

gifts.

Right:

Entrance to the

Fenix Theatre, which

opened in 1825. Very

well preserved, it is

still a good place to

see plays, dance and

music.

Mundo Alpaca:

www.mundoalpaca.com.pe

Kuna:

www.kuna.com.pe

Casona Santa Catalina:

www.santacatalina-sa.com.pe

Patio El Ekeko Artesanias:

www.elekeko.pe

Ilaria Joyeria:

www.ilariainternational.com

El Anticuario:

Santa Catalina 300 y Ugarte 213, Cercado

(see its Facebook page)

Arte Colonial:

Santa Catalina 312, Int. I-2, Cercado

GALLERIES AND THEATRES

La Galería and Teatro El Cultural: www.icpna.edu.pe

Alianza Francesa: www.afarequipa.org.pe

Instituto Cultural Peruano Aleman: www.icpa.org.pe

Instituto Nacional de Cultura, cultural activities: Bolívar 215, Cercado

Casona Editora Peru, museum and gallery: Calle Consuelo 202 /

www.editoraperu.com.pe.

Museo Virreinal Santa Teresa: Melgar 303, Arequipa

Cine Teatro Fenix: General Morán 104, Cercado /

www.cineteatrofenix.com

Christian Declercq

/55


AREQUIPA: EATING WELL

Chicha

RESTAURANTS

La Nueva Palomino: Leoncio Prado 122,

Yanahuara / every day from 12:00 to 17:30 / cash

only

La Capitana: Calle Los Arces 209, Cayma / every

day from 12:00 to 17:00 / cash only

La Lucila: Calle Grau 147, Sachaca / every day

from 12:00 to 17:00 / cash only /

www.picanterialalucila.com

La Benita: Main Square 114, Characato / every

day from 12:00 to 17:00 / cash only /

www.labenitadecharacato.blogspot.com

La Trattoria del Monasterio: Santa Catalina

309, Cercado / every day, lunch and dinner;

Sunday: lunch only /

www.latrattoriadelmonasterio.com

Gihan Tubbeh

NIGHT TIME ENTERTAINMENT

Istambul: Bar and canapés. Calle San Francisco 231, Cercado

Aura Arequipa: www.aura.com.pe

B52: www.b52restobar.com

Casona Forum: A large entertainment complex that includes Chill

Out, Terrasse, Zero, Retro and Forum zones / www.casonaforum.com.

Irish Pub Farrens: Pasaje Catedral 107, Cercado

Montreal Le Café Art: Live music Calle Ugarte 210, Cercado

Paladar 1900: San Francisco 227, Cercado /

www.paladar1900.com.pe

Chicha de Gastón Acurio: Santa Catalina 210

Int. 105, Cercado / www.chicha.com.pe

ZigZag: Calle Zela 210, Cercado /

www.zigzagrestaurant.com

Above:

The city is especially enchanting by

night. The streets are always busy.

There are cafes, restaurants, bars and

discos to suit all tastes.

/57


THE SILLAR ROUTE

Impressive size of natural blocks of sillar. These outcrops are 32 metres high.

THE SILLAR ROUTE

New tourism product

Christian Declercq

/59


THE SILLAR ROUTE

cobarsi

quarry

culebrillas

quarry

seÑor de la

caÑa quarry

the road to colca

av. aviacion

paccha

quarry

Virgen

quarries

km 10.8

airport

cortadores

quarry

Sillar Route

entry

km 9

arequipa

THIS PROJECT IS ONE OF THE WINNERS OF THE FIRST NATIONAL COMPETITION

FOR PROJECTS TO PRESERVE AND PROMOTE PERU'S CULTURAL HERITAGE BY

THE PERUVIAN ASSOCIATION TURISMO CUIDA IN ASSOCIATION WITH TOURISM

CARES (A FOUNDATION THAT ENCOURAGES RESPONSIBLE TOURISM AND

ENCOMPASSES MEMBERS OF THE MOST RELEVANT SECTORS OF THE TOURISM

INDUSTRY IN THE UNITED STATES)

LOCATION AND ACCESS: AÑASHUAYCO RAVINE IS LOCATED IN THE

DISTRICTS OF YURA, UCHUMAYO AND CERRO COLORADO, APPROXIMATELY

20 MINUTES FROM THE CENTRE OF THE CITY.

THE NAME SILLAR WAS USED IN COLONIAL TIMES FOR THE BRICK-LIKE

BLOCKS OF STONE USED AS THE PRINCIPAL CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL AT

THAT TIME.

la chavelita

quarry

THERE IS EVIDENCE THAT SILLAR WAS USED AS A CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL

AS EARLY AS THE WARI PERIOD

Sillar Route circuit

Quarry

Christian Declercq

Tourist vantage point

n

Unpaved road

Asphalted road

"SILLAR” IS A PYROCLASTIC ROCK FORMED

FROM VOLCANIC ASH PRODUCED MILLIONS

OF YEARS AGO IN FISSURES IN THE EARTH

IN THE FOOTHILLS OF THE CHACHANI

VOLCANO

A NEW TOURISM PRODUCT SHOWS VISITORS THE TRADITION SURROUNDING THE MAIN BUILDING

By

Carolina San Román

MATERIAL USED IN AREQUIPA, ON THE SILLAR ROUTE. THIS PRIVATE INITIATIVE SEEKS TO INCREASE

TOURISM IN THE AREA AROUND THE CITY AND ADD VALUE BY GIVING DETAILS OF THE ORIGIN OF ONE OF

ITS MOST SINGULAR FEATURES.

Sillar is a volcanic rock used in the finest buildings in the city of Arequipa. Churches, houses, bridges and

irrigation canals have been built from stone taken from Añashuayco, to the north west of the city since

colonial times. The oldest building made of sillar is the Jesuit church, just off the Main Square.

The Sillar route is more than 50 kilometres long and includes quarries in the districts of Cerro Colorado, Uchumayo

and Yura.

On the route you visit 7 of the 17 active quarries in the city as well as different workshops where the sillar

masons themselves describe the techniques and traditions involved in working the blocks that make up the

celebrated “White City”.

You also visit unused quarries and outcrops of the white stone that have been worked but not removed.

Alfredo Benavides

THE KNOWLEDGE AND TECHNIQUES

for extracting and

working sillar

WERE DECLARED PART OF PERU'S

INTANGIBLE CULTURAL HERITAGE

IN 2014

ONCE QUARRIED, THE SILLAR IS ARRANGED

IN PACKAGES OF 200 UNITS; EACH ONE IS 55

CENTIMETRES LONG, 30 HIGH AND 20 THICK AND

WEIGHS APPROXIMATELY 25 KILOS

Christian Declercq

Alfredo Benavides

Alfredo Benavides

The quarries are worked by men using

traditional techniques.

/61


INTERVIEW

Christian Declercq

Alonso Burgos

Executive director of Colca Lodge Spa & Hot Springs

By

Rodrigo Cabrera

DISCOVER THE HISTORY OF TOURISM IN THE COLCA VALLEY FROM ONE OF ITS PIONEERS, ALONSO BURGOS

HARTLEY, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF COLCA LODGE SPA & HOT SPRINGS.

Christian Declercq

You know the history of tourism in the Colca

Valley from its beginnings, can you tell

us a little about how it started?

During the seventies it was decided to build an irrigation

scheme to take water to the coast, and that

was when Colca was discovered; though I should

say rediscovered, because this area has a long and

interesting history that goes back to the Collagua

and Cabana peoples who lived there before the Incas.

Then the Spanish arrived, a long time before

they settled in Arequipa, created the sixteen villages

or settlements and started to exploit the mines of

Caylloma, which they thought would be wealthier

than those of Potosi. In 1621 they realised that Caylloma

was not going to be as important as Potosi

and decided to abandon Colca and move to what

is now Arequipa. Life in the Colca became a mixture

of Hispanic religion and Andean beliefs, and

has stayed that way for almost three hundred years.

News of Peru’s independence reached the Colca

nearly one hundred years after the event, because

many of the villages were completely isolated from

the outside world.

“The Incas came first, the Spanish second and the

Majes irrigation project was third, and that changed

the Colca. The camp that was used as the base

for the whole of the irrigation project was converted

into the first tourist lodge in the area. That was how

/63


INTERVIEW

Previous page: A place

to rest. Thermal springs

that blend into the

surroundings.

Below, left: The thermal

springs are rich in minerals

and are used not only for

rest and relaxation but also

for therapeutic purposes.

Below, right: The hotel's

spa is built on the cliff

edge. Privileged view of the

River Colca and terraced

fields.

"AS FAR AS I WAS

CONCERNED, THE

LOCATION HAD TO MEET

THREE CONDITIONS.

FIRSTLY: THERMAL

SPRINGS; THEN IT HAD

TO BE NEXT TO THE

RIVER AND THIRDLY

IT HAD TO BE CLOSE

TO THE ROAD, WITH

ACCESS TO NEARBY

SPRING WATER"

people started to discover the sixteen villages, the

depth of the canyon was measured, the volcanoes

and condors were rediscovered and the Colca Reserve

was created. It was the beginning of tourism

promotion in the zone”.

When did you become involved in this new stage

of the Colca Valley’s history?

The first time I came to the Colca Valley I had just

come back from studying abroad and joined forces

with a friend who was involved in the early days

of tourism in the zone. We put the old camp site

back in operation and the first tourists arrived. There

would be one or two buses a day and occasionally

people would come to see the condors before

going back to Arequipa. The lodge was prefabricated

and didn’t have everything we needed.

That made you think about the possibility of

open-ing your own hotel...

Yes, after the first year I thought it could grow so I

decided to buy some land to build a small hotel. At

the time I was the only one doing anything like that.

Your hotel is in a very special location. How

did you find it?

As far as I was concerned, the location had to meet

three conditions. Firstly: thermal springs; then it had

to be next to the river and thirdly it had to be close

to the road, with access to nearby spring water. I

spent a month on a motorbike visiting everywhere

that had thermal springs and also met the other two

requirements, before I finally found this parcel that

belonged to the local baker. After meeting her and

convincing her, she sold us all the land in 1985 and

in 1986 we started building.

Where did your guests come from at that time?

Europe at first. We were the first; there was no

other hotel in the area. Today most of our clients

are British; everything is cheap for them, they enjoy

the trip very much and they are always highly

satisfied. Americans are next followed by French,

Italians, Spanish, Belgians, Dutch, Russians, etc. It

would be nice if the Japanese would start to come,

they value places like this but their standards are

very high, they’re not like other tourists.

You can see that the infrastructure harmonises

with the natural surroundings.

From the very start we wanted to build something

that wouldn’t contrast badly with the environment; it

was difficult finding anyone with the right style but I

was lucky, in that a friend of mine was in the city, an

architect, who shared my style –he was a bit of a hippy–

so we started building. We were careful about

every detail so as not to alter the surroundings.

One of the most important achievements for me,

Colca Lodge

Christian Declercq

/65


INTERVIEW

Christian Declercq

Christian Declercq

Event and reception area

designed to mimic a

traditional Andean square.

Following page: Fields of

quinua —an Andean plant

native to Peru— provide

one of the characteristic

views around the hotel.

“WE OPENED THE HOTEL IN

1995, BUT WE HAVE BEEN

HERE SINCE 1986. THAT WAS

THE YEAR WHEN WE BUILT THE

FIRST PART OF WHAT WOULD

LATER BECOME THE LODGE.

WHEN WE STARTED THERE

WAS NO ELECTRICITY, NO

COMMUNICATIONS, NO FRESH

WATER AND NO DRAINS; NOT

EVEN THE BRIDGE HAD BEEN

BUILT YET"

apart from the spa, which has won prizes for

its architecture in Peru, was the thermal pool. I

wanted to make as few alterations as possible

during construction so that when you’re in the

water you feel as if you’re surrounded by nature.

You have to provides services as well, like

changing rooms, somewhere to eat and drink,

and so it grew until we built this barbecue area,

but the premise is always that the buildings

don’t jar with the environment.

Providing thermal pools also involves a

logistic complexity that we, the visitors,

don’t see.

When we were thinking about how to handle

the thermal springs, the problem was how

to pass the water between them. One pool is

fed by the hottest water at more than eighty

degrees centigrade, which is too hot to bathe

in. The idea was to mix it with the spring water

to cool it, but we didn’t know how build

the channels for the water. We decided that

the system of terraced fields, so prevalent in

the zone, was the clue, and so we built the

channels with help from local people. Today we

have made so many innovations to our thermal

spring system that we even have the water circulating

below the floors of the rooms; a sort of

clean and sustainable central heating system

that costs no more than periodic maintenance.

What’s the latest thing you’ve built?

/67


INTERVIEW

Christian Declercq

/69


INTERVIEW

"IF, APART FROM THE

CONDOR VIEWPOINT,

WE CAN SHOW THEM

SOMETHING ABOUT

WHAT THEY CAN

FIND IN THE ZONE,

VISITORS WILL GO

BACK MUCH MORE

CONTENTED"

Below: Luxury relaxation.

All rooms have heating

provided by the naturally

hot spring water.

The new condor room. The condor is the main

thing people come to the Colca for. But the authorities

in the valley –despite having plenty of money–

have made no attempt to provide information on

this attraction. Tourists to the valley arrive at about

two o’clock in the afternoon and the following day

they go to the condor look-out and then go back to

Arequipa; but they return with no further information

about the condors, how they live, or indeed information

about any other species living in the zone.

“With this in mind, we decided to create an interpretation

centre to enrich visitors’ experiences, a place

where they can learn about emblematic species

such as the condor or alpaca or talk about the humming

birds of the Colca Valley... This is the home

of the largest humming bird in the world. We also

want to show off the native and medicinal plants

that grow here. If, apart from the condor viewpoint,

we can show them something about what they can

find in the zone, visitors will go back much more

contented. This is a place where young and old

alike can interact with nature, and can even choose

a plant and take it to the barbecue area and learn

what dishes can be made with it”.

“Our visitors are longing to learn, not just the adults

but the children as well. The idea is that children

from local schools should come to learn more about

their own environment, and thus be more aware and

respectful of what they have. It’s important that local

people appreciate what they have”.

How is the family experience in your hotel?

The families who come here are Peruvians. Europeans

are older, between 40 and 60 years old,

retired people. Americans sometimes bring their

families, but not often. The thermal pools and the

barbecue are the biggest attractions for families,

children and particularly the youngest get into the

thermal pools and don’t want to leave – they love it.

They also use the interpretation centre, like to see

the alpacas and learn about native plants. Older

children prefer the spa. We also offer other activities

that are perfect for families, such as horse riding,

cycling or walks to nearby destinations.

“For example, there’s a great short walk to the ruins

at Uyo Uyo the largest in the Colca Valley. It takes

twenty minutes to get there and another twenty to

reach the ruins”.

Colca Lodge

Colca Lodge

THE HOTEL OFFERS

VARIOUS ACTIVITIES

FOR FAMILIES:

FROM HORSE RIDING

AND CYCLING

TO CLASSES ON

NATIVE FAUNA

AND TRADITIONAL

PLANTS

Colca Lodge

So what’s new in the hotel?

We’re building a new area based on an Andean village

square, with a terrace and tables operating as

a mini-bistro or small restaurant. This area will be

excellent for corporate visitors as it’s close to the

conference room; it will be good as a social space.

It can also be used for receptions and events such

as weddings. It’s the last thing we’re going to build

and afterwards we’ll concentrate on continual improvements

to our installations and the quality of

the service.

Colca Lodge

Colca Lodge

Colca Lodge

/71


Hike, Bike & Eat

through Croatia

DAY 1 - ZAGREB

- Hands-on culinary course

DAY 2 - ZAGREB / ZAGORJE

- Fish & food market guided tour

- Štrukli cooking & wine tasting

- Hike through the Zagorje hills

- Traditional Zagorje village meal

DAY 3 - GORSKI KOTAR

- Hands-on foraging tips in Gorski

Kotar

- Tree planting

- Cycling through local villages

- Cooking demonstration of local

surprise specialties

DAY 4 - UČKA

- 2 hour hike of the Učka Nature Park

- ATV tour and wine-tasting in Istria

DAY 5 - OPATIJA

- Exploring Veliki Brijun Island by bike

- Cooking class in Opatija

DAY 6 - PAKLENICA

- Hiking, Paklenica National Park

- Visit Nin Saltworks Park

DAY 7 - ZADAR

- Prosciutto sampling

Hike, bike and kayak the Croatian landscape,

and taste the best local food and wine Croatia

has to offer with a tantalising gastronomy tour!

- Biking through the National Park Krka

DAY 8 - SPLIT

- Split gastro tour

- Pelješac wine & oyster tastings

DAY 9 - DUBROVNIK

- Sea kayaking along the Adriatic coast

- Cooking class & dinner, Konavle

We not only understand but embrace

our destinations’ vibrant cultures, diverse

landscapes, traditions & climates!

For more infomation about how our collection of specialised travel

inbound operators can expertly craft adventure travel services visit us at

PureQuest.com or email at info@PureQuest.com

ACTIVITY LEVEL

CHINA

CROATIA

INDIA

Fan Na // (+86) 10 8519 8851

fanna@purequest.com

Mirela // (+385) 1 4920 678

croatiasales@purequest.com

Lokesh // (+91) 11 4279 5259

lokesh@purequest.com

ACTIVITY LEVEL

ALTITUDE:

max 3200 metres

Explore China’s icons, and yet to be

discovered treasures. Learn traditional Chinese

skills and gain new photography expertise!

China Multi-Sport

from the Great Wall to the Tiger Leaping Gorge

DAY 1 - BEIJING

- Visit Chinese Imperial Palace

- Visit the Hutongs

- Visit local family to learn kite-making

DAY 2 - GREAT WALL

- Hike the Mutianyu section

- Visit the Summer Palace

DAY 3 - XI´AN

- Visit the Terracotta Warriors

- Bike the Xi’an City Wall

- Visit Muslim Quarter

- Dumpling banquet

DAY 4 - JIUZHAIGOU

- Visit a Tibetan family for dinner

DAY 5 - JIUZHAIGOU

- Hike Jiuzhaigou National Park

- Small workshop on landscape

photography

- Visit Tibetan museum

DAY 6 - SONGPAN

- Horseback ride through

Songpan countryside

DAY 7 - CHENGDU

- Visit a local park to sample a

typical Chengdu weekend

- Watch a Sichuan Opera

DAY 8 - CHENGDU

- Volunteer at the Panda

Breeding Centre

- Visit Leshan Mountain

- Walk Jinli Street for a night

photography seminar

DAY 9 - LIJIANG

- Early morning Taichi practice

DAY 10/11

- TIGER LEAPING GORGE TREK

DAY 12 - SHAXI

- Visit Shaxi Ancient Town

- Visit Shibaoshan Grottoes

DAY 13 - DALI

- Visit local Dali villages

- Tour the lakeside by bike

PERU

Diego // (+51) 1 61 96 920

diego@purequest.com

/73


FAMILY TRAVEL IN PERU

Alex Bryce

TWENTY FIRST CENTURY

TRAVELLERS WANT

EXPERIENCES THAT WILL

LEAVE AN IMPRESSION

ON THEM. IT IS NOT JUST

A QUESTION OF GOING

SOMEWHERE OR SEEING AN

ATTRACTION, IT IS DOING

THINGS THAT BRING THEM

INTO CONTACT WITH OTHER

PEOPLE AND THEIR CULTURE,

THEIR FESTIVITIES AND THEIR

HORIZONS, THE NATURE

AND PLACES THEY VISIT.

PERU'S THREE DISTINCTIVE

LANDSCAPES, THE COASTAL

DESERT, THE MOUNTAINS

OF THE HIGHLANDS AND

THE AMAZON JUNGLE ARE

PERFECT FOR THIS. LONG

OR SHORT TRIPS IN WHICH

YOUR CHILDREN ARE MORE

AND MORE, THE MAIN

PROTAGONISTS.

By

Iñigo Maneiro

Family travel

in Peru

Alternatives for adults and children

/75


FAMILY TRAVEL IN PERU

Alex Bryce

PERU HAS MORE THAN THREE THOUSAND

KILOMETRES OF COASTLINE, DEFINED

BY TWO GREAT CURRENTS: THE COLD

HUMBOLDT CURRENT THAT FLOWS

FROM THE SOUTH AND EL NIÑO, WARM

WATER FLOWING FROM THE NORTH. THIS

COAST CONTAINS ISLANDS, PROTECTED

AREAS, SITES WITH ENORMOUS MARINE

BIODIVERSITY, SAND DUNES, BEACHES THAT

ARE MORE OR LESS ACCESSIBLE AND DRY

FORESTS RICH IN ENDEMIC BIRD SPECIES.

PLACES THAT OFFER MORE EXPERIENCES

AND SERVICES IN THE REGION THAT IS THE

MOST VISITED BY JOURNEYING FAMILIES.

ON THE SEA

Peru’s more than three thousand kilometres of coastline contain dozens

of places for surfing and its variants, such as body boarding,

paddle surfing and kite surfing. Not for nothing does Peru have several

world champions in different categories. Both Paracas and Lima have

academies and professionals who in just a few lessons can teach visiting

children to ride their first waves.

/77


FAMILY TRAVEL IN PERU

COOKS OF THE FUTURE

Gastronomy workshops are held in several

of the country’s most important destinations,

such as Lima, Cusco and the Sacred Valley,

which combine traditional recipes with new

culinary trends. These workshops use ingredients

from local market gardens and a wide

variety of products such as those seen in the

markets, many of which are unknown in the

visitors’ places of origin. The result: a lot of fun

and knowledge of the diversity of products to

be found in Peru, as well as dishes to enjoy at

the hotel or in the market.

PARACAS, NASCA

LINES AND

ADVENTURE IN

THE DESERT

3D/2N

DAY 1 LIMA-PARACAS

- Transfer to the town of Paracas from Lima

Airport

- Sandboard and dune buggies on the dunes

- Dinner in your chosen hotel

AMONG THE SAND DUNES

Much of Peru’s coast is desert, crossed by

narrow and fertile valleys. Enjoy the adrenaline

generated by descending the largest dunes in

4x4 sand buggies, in the deserts of Ocucaje,

Usaca and Huaricangana, located in Paracas

and Nasca.

DAY 2 PARACAS-NASCA

- Breakfast at your hotel

- Boat trip to the Ballestas Islands

- Visit to Paracas National Reserve

- Return to the hotel

- Flight over the Nasca lines and desert

- Dinner at your hotel

DAY 3 PARACAS-LIMA

- Breakfast at your hotel

- Return to Lima for your connection and/or

extension

ADVENTURE FOR ALL

Several of the country’s most important destinations

are located amid very special scenery

and geography. They are perfect for a variety

of adventure activities, which are an excellent

way of discovering the destination combining

unconventional means of travel with the

nature of each location and the small communities

living there. Horse riding, mountain

biking, walking, rock climbing and canoeing

are some of the activities available in Cusco,

Arequipa, Tambopata and Lima.

Iñigo Maneiro

Iñigo Maneiro

/79


FAMILY TRAVEL IN PERU

THE ANDES MOUNTAINS RUNS

THROUGH THE WHOLE OF PERU. THE

SOUTH CONTAINS THE COUNTRY’S

PRINCIPAL TOURIST DESTINATIONS,

SUCH AS CUSCO, PUNO AND AREQUIPA.

THE MOST IMPRESSIVE MOUNTAINS

ARE IN THE CENTRE, TOGETHER WITH

COMMUNITIES FAMOUS FOR THEIR

POPULAR ART, AND IN THE NORTH IS

THE LOWEST PART OF THE HIGHLANDS

WITH THE GENTLEST CLIMATE. THE

HIGHLANDS IS PERU’S PREFERRED

DESTINATION FOR ADVENTURE AND

CULTURE.

Christian Declercq

STAR GAZING

Colca, the Sacred Valley and Nasca

have planetariums to introduce visitors

to the stars and constellations of

the Southern Hemisphere, and to the

cosmovision of the ancient cultures

of the Peruvian highlands and coast,

who associated many aspects of

their lives with the movement of the

stars. In addition to projections that

combine ancient knowledge with

modern astronomy, direct observation

is carried out using powerful telescopes.

GETTING TO KNOW A TRADITIONAL COMMUNITY

Huilloc is a community in the Sacred Valley of the Incas that retains its ancient

traditions and beliefs. Visiting it and getting to know its people is an unforgettable

experience for any family, who will learn about life and culture in the Andes.

PADDLE SURF IN THE HIGHLANDS

The highest navigable lake in the world, Titicaca, also attracts paddle surfers.

The same applies to Lake Piuray, half way between Cusco and the Sacred

Valley, near to the weavers’ community of Chinchero. The activity introduces

us to the destination in a pleasant and original manner, enabling us to discover

nature and the lives of local inhabitants.

CERAMIC CLASSES

If you would like your children not only to bring home a souvenir, but also to

introduce them into the world of ceramics, with its techniques, clay deposits,

mineral and vegetable dyes, and the iconography employed in decoration,

the ceramics workshops of Lima, Nasca, Cusco and the Sacred Valley offer

the best opportunity to do so.

Alex Bryce

/81


FAMILY TRAVEL IN PERU

MORE THAN 65% OF PERU’S AREA IS

JUNGLE, INCLUDING THE PRECIOUS

CLOUD FORESTS, WHICH RUN FROM

THE LAST BASTIONS OF THE ANDES

TO THE LOW JUNGLE. THE RIVER

AMAZON, THE WORLD’S LARGEST,

STARTS AT THE CONFLUENCE OF THE

RIVERS MARAÑON AND UCAYALI AND

DEFINES AN ECOSYSTEM IN WHICH

PLANT AND ANIMAL DIVERSITY IS

WORLD-BEATING. FURTHERMORE,

THE PERUVIAN AMAZON IS HOME TO

AROUND FIFTY INDIGENOUS GROUPS

THAT MAINTAIN THEIR LANGUAGES

AND COSMOVISION ALIVE TO THIS

DAY. THE JUNGLE IS AN EXCELLENT

DESTINATION FOR TRAVELLERS

AND IS MOST APPRECIATED BY

CHILDREN, WHO SEE A REGION FULL

OF LIFE, HOME TO THE HAPPIEST AND

MOST WELCOMING PEOPLE IN THE

COUNTRY.

Alex Bryce

Alex Bryce

IN THE HIGHEST FOREST

CANOPIES

The canopy is the upper part of the forest

containing most of the branches and

leaves, and forms a very special ecosystem.

It is full of life in the form of orchids,

lianas, amphibians, small mammals and a

large number of birds. By extension, the

name canopy is also given to the activity

of exploring it, for example, suspended

walkways have been built in several places

in the Amazon, such as Madre de

Dios and Loreto, where you can explore

for long distances more than 30 metres

above the ground.

DISCOVERING NATURE

Peru’s biodiversity favours one of the

most attractive experiences to children:

Discovering wild animals and plants.

These experiences include environmental

interpretation walks, boat trips to see

birds and seals, trips on jungle lakes

or visits to orchid and butterfly sanctuaries.

Paracas, Lima, Los Organos,

Tambopata and Pacaya Samiria are the

best places for this type of activity.

MARKETS AND POPULAR ART

Peru possesses enormous cultural wealth, thanks to its widespread native populations,

principally in the highlands and jungle, as well as the different migratory flows the country

has received throughout its history. One way to discover its idiosyncrasies is to visit its

markets, thematic museums and communities with great artistic traditions. Cusco, the

Sacred Valley, Lima, Tambopata, Iquitos and Colca are ideal locations for this.

/83


FAMILY TRAVEL IN PERU

FAMILY PROGRAMME IN CUSCO

7D/6N

DAY 1 LIMA-CUSCO

- Transport to chosen hotel from Cusco airport

- Traditional weaving demonstration

- Picnic lunch on the way

DAY 2

CUSCO-SACRED VALLEY

- Transfer to the Sacred Valley from your chosen hotel in Cusco

- Morning excursion for stand up paddle in the River Urubamba

- Visit to the Inca city of Ollantaytambo

DAY 3 SACRED VALLEY

- Visit to the Moray ruins

- Lunch at the tourist destination of Moray

- Excursion to the Maras salt pans and a traditional hand-made

hat workshop

DAY 4 SACRED VALLEY-MACHU PICCHU PUEBLO

- Take the Hiram Bingham train to Machu Picchu

- Overnight in your chosen hotel in Machu Picchu village

DAY 5

MACHU PICCHU PUEBLO-SACRED VALLEY

- Second day in Machu Picchu

- Return to the Sacred Valley on the Hiram Bingham train

DAY 6

SACRED VALLEY-CUSCO

- Visit to the market in Pisac and Awanacancha

- Transfer to Cusco from your chosen hotel in the Sacred Valley

- Visit to the Inca fortress of Sacsayhuaman

- Visit to Choco Museo for a chocolate workshop

DAY 7 CUSCO-LIMA

- Transfer from your hotel to the airport for your return flight to Lima

FAMILY PROGRAMME INKATERRA RESERVA

AMAZÓNICA, TAMBOPATA

3D/2N

Alex Bryce

DAY 1 LIMA-PUERTO MALDONADO

- Help at Puerto Maldonado airport and check in

- Transfer by road and river to Inkaterra Reserva Amazónica Lodge

- Lunch in the lodge

- Choice of excursions during the day

- Dinner

DAY 2

PUERTO MALDONADO

- Buffet breakfast

- Choice of private excursions. Choose from the activities offered by

the lodge, such as Inkaterra Canopy, visit to Lake Sandoval, hiking in

the jungle, visit to Gamitana Creek, among others.

- Lunch in the lodge

- Massages

- Treasure Hunt, for children

- Dinner

DAY 3

PUERTO MALDONADO-LIMA

- Buffet breakfast

- Check out

- Visit to butterfly breeder

- Transfer to Puerto Maldonado airport

/85


87


EXPAT

“Paladar 1900 was a result of that and a desire to rescue traditional

home-cooked food. The name comes from Cuba,

where the term ‘paladar’ is given to restaurants operating in

private houses, where the food is one hundred percent home-made

and traditional. We also wanted to add the concept

of good taste, good food. The number 1900 comes

from the house where the first Paladar opened, an old town

house built in that year, which had the number engraved

over the entrance”.

Paladar 1900

By

Carolina San Román

Ibraim Veyssal

“I FEEL AT HOME HERE; IT'S THE PLACE WHERE I HAVE SETTLED WITH MY WIFE, WHERE I'VE ALWAYS BEEN TREATED

WELL AND WITH MUCH AFFECTION. THANKS TO WHAT I DO FOR THE PEOPLE OF AREQUIPA AND THANKS TO THEM I'VE

BEEN SUCCESSFUL IN JUST A SHORT TIME.”

Where were you born and which countries have

you lived in?

I was born in Bulgaria, but I have lived in Turkey since I

was very young; I have also lived in Germany and Russia,

and spent some time in the Czech Republic.

Were you already a chef while you were in those

countries?

I’m a baker by profession, but at first I was a salesman

in the Grand Bazaar, selling cloth, gold, semi-precious

stones, leather goods and things like that.

When did you start to work at what you’re doing

now?

I’m a baker by trade and while I was studying I worked

in the kitchens of several large hotels. The five and a

half years I lived in Germany (Berlin) was when I became

one hundred percent involved in gastronomy, I

was working in different Italian restaurants specialising

in meat dishes, as well as in a fresh pasta factory. For

a time I ran an Italian restaurant for home delivery only,

but it wasn’t a success. Then I went to college to learn

about Italian cooking.

When did you come to Peru?

I came to Peru in1998. I lived in Germany for five and a

half years; after that I went back to Bulgaria and Turkey

to get my papers ready to travel to Peru.

And why did you choose Peru?

Love. I met my wife Mariela in Germany; she is Peruvian

and we decided to come to Peru together to try our

luck.

How did you get on during your first few years in

Peru?

When we arrived I knew nothing about the country, I

hadn’t read anything about its history; what interested

me was finding work so that I could get to know Peruvian

cooking and then I started thinking about my own business.

First of all we lived in Lima, my wife’s home town, but it was

difficult finding work with pay that was commensurate with

my experience; I had too much experience for the jobs on

offer. I was familiar with 7 styles of cuisine and spoke 6 languages…

What made you decide to move to Arequipa?

In Germany we had some friends from Arequipa, we kept in

contact and after we got married we decided to move there.

We saw that it was a big tourist destination, but even so it

didn’t have many good quality places. We moved in 1999

and decided to start with a kebab business.

You’re very well known in Arequipa. What happened at

the beginning, until you created your famous restaurant

Paladar 1900?

We started with El Turko I, in a shop of thirteen square metres

in Calle San Francisco. Then we extended the premises;

that’s when I became known and it is still open to this

day. I opened my first restaurant in 2001, called El Turko II,

aimed at another, more demanding, sector of the public. At

the same time I opened another place called Zíngaro, and a

bar; neither lasted long. Finally, in 2007 we started to build

Paladar 1900. I had already been in Peru for ten years and

knew a lot more about its history and traditions. I understood

that Peruvian cuisine was based on a fusion with Arab

cooking, basically Moroccan, which is much influenced by

Turkish. Hence the use of condiments such as panca chilli

and paprika, and the preservation of ingredients. Then there

was the African influence, which contributed the use of offal.

And that union produced the great majority of the dishes we

know today. Then came the Chinese, Japanese and Italian,

to complete the evolution of modern Peruvian food.

Paladar 1900

How would you describe the Paladar 1900 menu?

We offer a fusion based on the different places I have lived

and worked. We have examples of Arequipa cooking, such

as rocoto relleno and ocopa, as well as dishes with Italian,

Bulgarian and, of course, Turkish influences.

What does Arequipa mean for you?

I feel at home here; it’s the place where I have settled with

my wife, where I’ve always been treated well and with much

affection. Thanks to what I do for the people of Arequipa

and thanks to them I’ve been successful in just a short time.

Also, my character is similar to that of the Arequipans. Furthermore,

the building containing Paladar 1900 makes me

feel as if I were in Turkey, working under a vaulted ceiling.

What about the ingredients?

I’ve found many similarities between the ingredients for Peruvian

cuisine and the country’s traditions (shellfish, sauces,

food sold in the street) and those of my native country. So

for me the change wasn’t enormous, I have always been

familiar with what I found when I came to Peru.

Any new plans, projects?

Not for now, we’re happy the way we are. In the future we

would like to move Paladar 1900 to our own property, where

we can do different things with the menu, revive Arequipa

traditions such as the use of the batan, for example.

Paladar 1900

Sea bass in chira with coconut milk.

/89


AGENDA

AGENDA

FUERZA BRUTA IN LIMA

From the 15th of September to the 6th of October

sees performances at the Pedro de Osma Museum

in Barranco, of an Argentinean show called

Fuerza bruta, which has already visited fifty cities

throughout the world and impressed more than 1.8

million spectators. This visual effects show includes

interactions between the artists and the public; it is

described by its creators as a show of energy.

SAINT ROSE OF LIMA

The 30th of August is the feast day of Saint Rose

of Lima, known as the patron saint of America.

Rosa was born in Lima in 1586 and was the first

woman from America to be made a saint. Today

she is venerated not only in Peru but in other Latin

American countries, in Spain and in the Philippines.

In Lima it is customary to visit the house

where she was born and lived, and to drop a

coin into the popular wishing well.

LIMA FILM FESTIVAL (7TH - 115TH AUGUST)

Lima Film Festival will be held from the 7 to the 17th

of August; it has been organised for nineteen years

by the Cultural Centre of the Catholic University of

Peru. Lima Film Festival has become recognised as

an important event for film buffs throughout Latin

America.

ANNIVERSARY OF AREQUIPA

The anniversary of the city of Arequipa is held

on the 15th of August each year. For a week the

White City is in party mood, with different activities

organised, such as the Arequipa International

Fair (FAI) at which local, national and foreign

bands perform. There is also the Encuentro

Internacional de Tunas, dance festivals, exhibitions

of handicrafts and a street parade through

the main thoroughfares of the city centre. You

should not miss the musical serenade held on

the evening before the anniversary itself.

KATTY PERRY IN LIMA

The popular singer will give a concert in Lima on

the 22nd of September, as part of her Prismatic

World Tour. She will perform at the Jockey Club

of Peru. Tickets are on sale from Teleticket in

Wong and Metro supermarkets and online from

www.teleticket.com.pe.

EXHIBITION BY LIKA MUTAL AT THE MAC

The 7th of October sees the inauguration at Lima Museum

of Contemporary Art of an exhibition by Dutch

sculptor Lika Mutal, including works made from stone

and cast bronze. The exhibition will be open until the

31st of January 2016 at Grau Avenue 1511, Barranco.

For more information go to: www.maclima.pe.

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