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UJ #17 - Traditional Peru

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TRADITIONAL

PERU

A COLOURFUL JOURNEY INTO PERU’S FOLKLORE AND

MAIN FESTIVITIES

1


2


Living legacy on the platforms of Moray, the Inca agricultural laboratory.

3


INDEX

JANUARY

ANNIVERSARY OF LIMA / 10

FEBRUARY

FESTIVITY OF THE VIRGIN OF

CANDELARIA / 16

MAY

PILGRIMAGE TO THE SANCTUARY OF

THE LORD OF QOYLLORITI / 34

JUNE

INTI RAYMI / 40

SEPTEMBER

INTERNATIONAL SPRING

FESTIVAL / 58

OCTOBER

MONTH OF THE LORD OF THE

MIRACLES / 64

This edition of Ultimate

Journeys - Travel in Peru was

produced by LimaTours’

marketing team.

UJ GENERAL DIRECTOR

Gerardo Sugay

CONTENT DIRECTOR

Gerardo Sugay

Ana Paula Albín

Ximena Arrieta

GENERAL EDITOR

Ximena Arrieta

COORDINATION

Karla Huertas

ART DIRECTOR

LimaTours


MARCH

INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF

THE VENDIMIA / 22

APRIL

HOLY WEEK / 28

JULY

FESTIVITY OF THE VIRGEN DEL

CARMEN OF PAUCARTAMBO / 46

NOVEMBER

DAY OF THE DEATH / 70

AUGUST

ANNIVERSARY OF AREQUIPA / 52

DECEMBER

CHRISTMAS TRADITIONS / 76

MORE

CELEBRATIONS / 82

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Sergio Salazar

ILLUSTRATIONS

Juan Diego León

EDITORIAL STAFF

Ximena Arrieta

PHOTOGRAPHS

LimaTours Archive

PromPerú Archive

Diego del Río

Diego Oliver

Diego Nishiyama

COVER PAGE PHOTO

CREDIT

Renzo Giraldo / PromPerú


EDITORIAL

Private sailing on Lake Titicaca, the world’s highest navigable lake.

DEAR READER:

This edition of Ultimate Journeys – Travel in Peru is a special one. It explores the festive and legendary spirit that

encompasses Peru’s essence. Unlike our previous editions, this magazine pays homage to present-day Peru,

celebrating what makes it so rich: its people and their traditions.

The best way to fully experience and appreciate Peru’s cultural heritage in all its splendour is through its various

festivities. Each region, city, and small town has its own series of rites and rituals that set them apart from neighbours

near and far; and each celebration is infused with the distinct personality of these individual places and their proud

inhabitants.

Peruvians always seem to be celebrating something. Many of these fiestas are rooted in legacies that have been

inherited across generations, legacies that reflect the syncretism between the Inca and Colonial histories. Whether

it is an anniversary or a religious ceremony, every celebration is executed with the same mystic devotion.

Discover the stories behind each festivity: its origin, the fiesta itself, and what it represents. This edition features a

basic, chronological guide of the various celebrations held across the country – perfect for those looking to make

the most of their time in Peru.

Revel in an unforgettable adventure through Peru’s cities, traditions and delicious dishes. Get to know the country

through its worship rituals and celebrations – from the pay to the Pachamama to the procession of the Lord of the

Miracles, from Inti Raymi to the marvellous Grape Harvest or Vendimia. Despite the encroaching modernity and the

global attention that has come with it, Peru remains a place of mysteries, honouring its rich past full of un-answered

questions and undeniable devotion.

Happy reading and enjoy!

Your friends at LimaTours.

Design and management of tour programmes, in all areas of the company

(quotation, product design, suppliers management, Lima operations, billing

and collection)


CURRENT ISSUES

Media

CURRENT ISSUES

Mistura, one of the biggest gastronomic events in Latin America, is

returning to its original location this year: Lima’s Costa Verde in the

district of Magdalena. From the last week of August throughout

the first week of September, dozens of stands showcasing the

incredible variety and wealth of Peruvian products and local

edible delights will be visited by hundreds of people. LimaTours

will be offering a special programme to our passengers who look

to make the most of this mouth-watering event.

CUSCO AND

SANTIAGO,

CLOSER THAN

EVER

THE DAKAR RALLY

WILL BE 100% PERU

Apega

For the first time in history, the Dakar Rally will be held in only

one country: Peru. The 2019 edition of the Off-Road Race – the

most important car race in the world – will take place from the

6th to the 17th of January. Beginning and ending in Lima, the 10

legs of the race will traverse through exciting Peruvian territory.

Thanks to Dakar’s importance and following, Peru will not only

experience better international exposure, but will also receive

an increase in visitors as fans make their way to witness this

automobile spectacle.

Apega

MISTURA

BY THE SEA

Starting the 15th of August, Latam Airlines will begin operating

direct flights between Cusco and Santiago, Chile. The flights

will be available three times per week (Tuesdays, Wednesdays,

and Saturdays), departing from Cusco in the morning and from

Santiago in the afternoons. Flights will be chartered on Airbus

A319 planes, which can carry up to 144 passengers. This new

service looks to better connect the two cities and reduce the

amount of flight traffic through Lima.

8

LimaTours


LimaTours

Inkaterra La Casona

The prestigious National Geographic magazine included Inkaterra

La Casona Hotel on its list of the most iconic hotels in the world.

Located in a XVI Century mansion where Peruvian icons Simon

Bolivar and Diego de Almagro spent time, the Casona was the

first boutique hotel in the city of Cusco. The establishment was

recognized for its superior Peruvian-influenced cuisine, and its

luxury spa that uses local botanicals, amongst other outstanding

qualities. “These hotels are guaranteed to enrich any travel

experience,” assures the magazine.

PERU, THE THIRD

BEST DESTINATION

FOR INCENTIVES

INKATERRA LA CASONA

AMONGST THE MOST

ICONIC HOTELS

Peru proudly houses two of the top restaurants chosen within the ranking

of the ‘World’s 50 Best Restaurants’, an award ceremony that takes place

in Spain. Chef Virgilio Martinez’ Central was ranked as number six, while

Mitsuharu Tsumura’s Maido came in at number seven. Additionally, chef

Gaston Acurio’s career trajectory and the role he played in Peru’s relatively

recent gastronomic revolution was honoured and celebrated, as he was

awarded the Diner’s Club Lifetime Achievement Award. His restaurant,

Astrid and Gaston, claimed the 39th spot on the prestigious list.

Central

CENTRAL AND

MAIDO MAKE THE

WORLD’S TOP 10

The Creative Group multinational corporation included Peru

in its list of best countries in the world for incentive trips. Our

country occupied third place after Portugal and Croatia. “The

listed destinations were chosen because of the quantity of

activities and different landscapes you can get from one single

place,” the company explained. Peru shines because of the

interesting combination of history and urban architecture

found in Lima, as well as the opportunity to experience the

unforgettable Machu Picchu.

9


JANUARY | ANNIVERSARY OF LIMA

JANUARY

LIMA

A CITY OF ROYALS

AND MESTIZOS

LimaTours

10


SINCE ITS FOUNDATION

OVER 400 YEARS AGO,

LIMA HAS UNDERGONE

CONSTANT URBAN

TRANSFORMATIONS.

NONETHELESS, THIS

CAPITAL CITY MAINTAINS

AND HONOURS MUCH

OF ITS PRE-INCAN

AND COLONIAL PASTS,

AS WELL AS THE RICH

URBAN CULTURAL MIX

THAT MAKES IT SO

UNIQUE.

January 18th

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

11


JANUARY | ANNIVERSARY OF LIMA

Lima is the capital of Peru, and its biggest city, with

more than 9 million inhabitants. As the central hub

of the country, it contains government and business

headquarters, and emulates modernity while consciously

respecting its history.

A little over 483 years ago, on January 18th 1535, a

Spanish explorer by the name of Francisco Pizarro

founded Lima, The City of Kings. Since then, the calm city

originally established next to the Rimac River – the main

river during the Viceroyalty – has transformed into one

of the main metropolis in South America.

Lima is more than just tall buildings and transited

streets, however. Lima is the Pacific Ocean, the Historic

Centre – a UNESCO World Heritage Site -; it is good food,

bohemian culture, and so much more. Thus, each year,

on the city’s anniversary, we celebrate this unparalleled

combination of history and modernity, of ceviche and

pisco sour.

When honouring Lima, one must return to where it all

began: the Historic Centre. Before the Spanish even set

foot on our coast, Lima was part of different cultures and

empires – from the Ischma to the Inca. What is now the

main plaza, the Main Square, was originally the site of an

ancient government centre with impressive ceremonial

structures. The area also formed part of the famed Qhapaq

Ñan: a network of roads and paths over 60,000 kilometres

long that unified the entire Inca Empire.

It was upon these huacas that the Spanish conquistadors

decided to build their own constructions. The palace

of chief Taulichusco became the Government Palace

the temple of Puma-Inti became the main Cathedral,

and what was the ‘town hall’ became the Municipality.

Meanwhile, the central corrals, where animals were kept,

were replaced with a bronze fountain. The beautiful

Gothic churches, bull-fighting plazas, and numerous

other constructions became testaments to the

importance of this thriving city.

IN 1991 LIMA’S HISTORIC CENTRE WAS

DECLARED A WORLD HERITAGE SITE BY

UNESCO THANKS TO THE DEDICATION

OF THE PATRONATO DE LIMA, CREATED

BY EDUARDO R. ARRARTE, FOUNDER OF

LIMATOURS.

Following the independence, the economic crisis, and

the War of the Pacific, however, Lima was left devastated

and desolated. Soon there after, the city experienced a

renaissance; the walls that surrounded the city to protect

Rafael Cornejo / PromPerú

LimaTours

12

The many churches within Lima’s Colonial

Centre showcase colonial architecture.

The parades are part of the city’s anniversary

celebrations, in which all participate – big and small.


Lima is a perfect mix

of past and present.

Pictured, the Huaca

Pucllana.

LimaTours

it from pirate attacks were torn down, and Lima began to

expand. The neighbourhoods of Miraflores, Barranco, and

Chorrillos were established, quickly becoming favourites

amongst well-to-do Limeños, and mansions, wide avenues,

trains, and trollies appeared as the city started to take a

new, exciting shape. Today, modern areas continue to

coexist with pre-Hispanic architecture – like the Huaca

Pucllana – and parks full of history, like the Olivar.

Besides the incredible aesthetic transformation Lima

has undergone, the city’s essence has also changed

considerably. Since the 1940’s, Lima was synonymous

with progress for many of those living in the rural parts

of Peru. Around this time, people began to migrate to

the capital in search of economic opportunities, better

education and healthcare. Over the years, millions of

people have emigrated, bringing with them not only their

physical baggage, but also, their substantial and important

cultural loads.

The result? An eccentric, diverse, and multicultural city.

Lima’s gorgeous marinera dance now coexists with the

traditionally Andean huayno; street signs have become

bright and colourful – emblems of the urban chicha

culture; ceviche is as recognized as quinua; it is not

uncommon to hear cumbia on the radio, nor is it odd to

hear Quechua spoken in the streets. All these things that

once seemed so distant from the capital have become a

part of it, enhancing the culture and adding more flavour

into the local melting pot.

LimaTours

Lima is the only

coastal capital in

South America.

Colour and tradition

fill the city’s artisanal

markets.

For all these reasons, Lima’s anniversary is celebrated

many different ways: with prayer, songs, dances, and

fireworks that light up the sky. Big and small, we come

together to celebrate our city: the historic, the modern,

and the future Lima. A city that – while at times may

seem noisy and chaotic – we are proud to call home.

LIMEÑOS HAVE THEIR OWN

DIALECT: ESPAÑOL RIBEREÑO, OR

COASTAL SPANISH. INFLUENCED BY

CASTILIAN SPANISH, THIS DIALECT

IS CHARACTERIZED BY ITS LACK

OF STRONG INTONATIONS. IT IS

CURRENTLY SPOKEN THROUGHOUT

THE COAST OF PERU.

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14


PROGRAMME

DAY 1 - January 16th

Transfer from the airport to your hotel.

In the afternoon, be part of the Creole

Gala in the Municipal Theatre in the city

centre.

DAY 2 - January 17th

Lima

Average

temperature

Max 22° C

Min 16° C

Altitude

154

m.a.s.l.

Relax in your hotel during the morning.

In the afternoon, visit the Larco Museum

- one of the most important in the

country - and the city centre. Finish your

tour in the Main Square to enjoy the

Anniversary serenade and the fireworks.

DAY 3 - January 18th

In the morning, the official activities

to celebrate the anniversary of Lima

are held in the Main Square. By the

afternoon, go to the Magic Circuit of

Water to see the fountains. After that,

enjoy a dinner with a folklore show and

return to the hotel.

LimaTours Larco Museum

DAY 4 - January 19th

Transfer to the airport

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16

FEBRUARY | FESTIVITY OF THE VIRGIN OF CANDELARIA


THE

‘MAMACHA

CANDELARIA’

FEBRUARY

EVERY YEAR, PUNO

BURSTS WITH

COLOUR AND JOY

IN HONOUR OF THE

BELOVED VIRGIN OF

CANDELARIA. THIS

ICONIC FESTIVITY

– CONSIDERED

INTANGIBLE

CULTURAL HERITAGE

BY UNESCO – BRINGS

THOUSANDS OF

PEOPLE TOGETHER

IN CELEBRATION.

January

February 1st

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Renzo Giraldo / PromPerú

17


FEBRUARY | FESTIVITY OF THE VIRGIN OF CANDELARIA

Renzo Giraldo / PromPerú

The heavens and the underworld come together once

a year in Puno during one of the most important folkloric

celebrations in Peru. Decorated in colourful outfits and

terrifying masks, angels and devils take over the streets and

dance for the Mamacha Candelaria during the internationally

recognized festivity of the VirgIn of Candelaria.

Throughout the first week of February, the streets of

Puno are overcome with colour, music, and excitement.

Thousands of people arrive from all over Peru to witness

and partake in this celebration that highlights the

harmonious coexistence of two of the most important

cultural groups in southern Peru: the Quechua and

the Aymara. These people are the beating heart of

the celebration, sharing their customs, traditions, and

energy with each other and the masses.

The devotion for Puno’s Virgin of Candelaria dates back

to the Spanish Viceroyalty. When the conquistadors

arrived to Peru, they brought with them a new religion

that was imposed on native communities. Nonetheless,

most natives secretly maintained their beliefs and

rituals – keeping the Andean worldviews alive. It is these

IN 2014, UNESCO NAMED THE FIESTA

OF THE VIRGEN DE CANDELARIA AN

INTANGIBLE CULTURAL HERITAGE EVENT.

Renzo Giraldo / PromPerú

symbolic elements from ancient Andean beliefs that are

highlighted and celebrated during this festivity.

The ten-day celebration begins with an early morning

‘dawn mass’ on the first day of February. That same night,

a fire is lit in front of the church in order to ‘purify’ the

attendees, while fireworks illuminate the sky. The next day,

after morning mass, the image of the Virgin is taken out

for a procession through the city, guided by her devotees.

Two days later, one of the most popular and anticipated

activities takes place as the thousands of dancers and

musicians who have gathered in Puno have the chance

to parade through the streets, showing off their best

garments. Over 300 dance troops represent different

dances, which include the caporales, the yapurichis, and

the chacareros, among others.

One of the most emblematic dances performed in

honour of the Mamacha Candelaria, however, is the

famous Diablada. Dressed in huge masks and elaborated

The Enrique Torres

Belón Stadium fills with

people year after year.

18

Each dance troupes’ delicately

elaborated mask tells a different story.


LimaTours

outfits, the angels and the devils come face to face in a

stunning choreography that depicts the confrontation of

good and evil, of the Andean and the mestizo. The cast

of the celebration can amount up to 500 people, among

which there are the caporales or diablos mayores, the

arcángeles, the chinas diablas, the diablezas, the diablos

menores, and the musicians.

LimaTours

Musicians posing

while waiting for

the parade to

begin. Thousands

of them flock to

Puno.

LimaTours

The Friday after the parade, music fills the city as the

rest of the bands arrive, coming together to play songs

throughout the night. On Saturday, the Virgin is once

again celebrated in a morning mass, and around 3pm,

the dance troops congregate in the main square and

prepare for the final evening celebration. Dressed in

their wonderful outfits, participants dance the night

away, and fireworks light up the sky until dawn.

Sunday brings with it the Grand National Dance Troop

Competition. After months of practice, thousands of

THERE ARE 300 DIFFERENT DANCES

IN THE CITY OF PUNO, WHICH IS

CONSIDERED THE “CAPITAL OF

PERUVIAN FOLKLORE.” OVER 40

THOUSAND DANCERS AND 9 THOUSAND

MUSICIANS ARRIVE TO THE CITY EACH

YEAR DURING THE CELEBRATION OF THE

VIRGIN OF CANDELARIA.

dancers take the stage in the Enrique Torres Belon

Stadium, competing for honour and recognition. Locals

and tourists come together to enjoy a day dedicated to

art, and revel in the glory of one of the most culturally

significant representations in the country – a tradition

that has been passed down through generations.

The Fiesta de la Candelaria is an expression of our faith

and essence as Peruvians. Many people travel to Puno not

for the festivities, but rather, because of their devotion to

the Virgin, which they manifest through their art.

The Waka

Waka, a dance

performed in

honour of the

Virgen de la

Candelaria.

The dancer’s movements embellish

the festival’s performances.

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20


PROGRAMME

DAY 1

Transfer to the hotel in Puno, with a stop

in the Sillustani archaeological centre to

see its impressive conical tombs.

DAY 2

Juliaca

Puno

Average

temperature

Max 15° C

Min 1° C

Altitude

3,827

m.a.s.l.

Travel time

from Lima

1:40 hours by plane

to Juliaca and 1

hour to Puno by bus

In the morning, be part of the mass

in honour of the Virgin of Candelaria

in Puno’s cathedral. Then, follow the

procession of the Virgin and enjoy the

traditional dances.

LimaTours

Renzo Giraldo / PromPerú

DAY 3

Have fun at the festival with music and

dancers.

DAY 4

Full Day at Uros island and Taquile. Visit

this artificial floating islands made with

totora; then go to Taquile, famous for

the expertise of its residents in the art

of knitting and their Inca legacy.

DAY 5

DAY 6

DAY 7

FESTIVAL DAY Get closer to Peruvian

folklore in this night full of dance and

music in the Sunrise festivity.

FESTIVAL DAY Have a seat in the stadium

to see the main event: the Dancing

Contest. Then, come back to meet with

the Virgin in the procession.

Transfer to the airport

21


MARCH | INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF THE VENDIMIA

MARCH

VENDIMIA

A CELEBRATION OF THE GRAPE

22


DURING THE FIRST

WEEK OF MARCH,

THE REGION OF

ICA CELEBRATES

ITS MOST BELOVED

FRUIT: THE GRAPE.

GROWN FOR WINE

AND PISCO, THESE

FRUITS THRIVE IN

THE SUNNY AND

DRY ENVIRONMENT

OF THE AREA. THE

VENDIMIA – OR

GRAPE HARVEST

- IS A MIXTURE OF

TRADITION AND

FINE FLAVOURS.

January

February

First

days of

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Daniel Silva / PromPerú

23


MARCH | INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF THE VENDIMIA

Pisco has become synonymous with Peru. The city of

Pisco, from where the spirit gets its name, is located

in the department of Ica, on Peru’s southern coast. Ica

is known for housing the proliferating wine and pisco

industry, boasting dozens of vineyards that thrive in the

dry climate and rich soil.

BESIDES WINE AND PISCO, THE

CHINGUERITO IS ANOTHER POPULAR

BEVERAGE DURING THE HARVEST

FESTIVITIES. THIS CLASSIC DRINK IS

MADE WITH FRESH GRAPE JUICE, PISCO,

LIME, CINNAMON, AND CLOVE.

LimaTours

Each year, in honour of our famous grapes and the

products they render, the month of March is dedicated

to the International Vendimia Festival. It is during this

time that we re-visit some of the glorious traditions

behind the delicious pisco sour that has become our

international calling card.

After all the hard work, what better than to enjoy the final

product? The Ruta de los Lagares - or wine press route

– takes visitors on a tour through the main wineries in

the area, many of which continue to produce wine and

pisco in the same, traditional ways. As guests make their

way, they learn about the elaboration process. Each day,

a different winery prepares a series of activities for the

visitors, and at the very end of all the events, everyone

is invited to indulge in a series of tastings that showcase

the flavours of our earth.

The last day of the party, people head to the final event:

the yunza, a lively tradition unique to Peru. Participants

take turns trying to cut down a young tree decorated

with balloons and gifts, one axe whack at a time. The tool

– along with the wine – is passed from person to person,

to the rhythm of the music, until the tree falls. Upon its

fall, participants rush to pick up the gifts, and as tradition

has it, the person who struck the last blow is in charge of

organizing the next year’s yunza event.

Traditional

clay pisco jugs

conserve our

national spirit.

The celebrations that surround planting and harvesting

have taken place since pre-Inca times. Over the years,

these customs have managed to survive, adapting to the

many social changes that the country experienced, and

transforming along way. In 1958, the first Fiesta de la

Vendimia took place, and was so successful, that in 1965

it began receiving international recognition.

Great weather and an even better assortment of

activities make Ica and its surroundings a wonderful

place to visit any time of year. Cheers to that!

Adrián Portugal / PromPerú

All activities during the exciting harvest week revolve

around the star crop: the grape. Bunches are cut and

placed in baskets, before taking them to the designated

press. It is here that the famous pigeage takes place,

where men and women make their way into the press

and stomp on the grapes with their bare feet, to the beat

of Peruvian cajones.

24

The treading of the grapes” cambiar por

“the pigeage of the grapes.


25


26


PROGRAMME

DAY 1

Visit Paracas Reserve and have a boat

ride to Ballestas Islands to wonder with

its natural richness. After that, go for a

glass of wine at sunset in a vineyard.

DAY 2

Ica

Average

temperature

Max 25° C

Min 12° C

Altitude

406

m.a.s.l.

Travel time

from Lima

4 hours

Begin your tour through different

wineries to see the process to make

wine and pisco. Then delight your

palate with lunch surrounded by the

countryside.

Pisco 1615

Pisco 1615

DAY 3

Learn about our pisco in a class of

tasting and pairing. Continue touring

the wineries.

DAY 4

Free morning to enjoy a pleasant walk

through Paracas. In the afternoon,

return to Lima.

LimaTours

27


APRIL | HOLY WEEK

APRIL

AYACUCHO

A CELEBRATION

OF LIFE

28


EASTER WEEK

CELEBRATION IS

AYACUCHO’S MOST

REVERED FESTIVITY.

PROCESSIONS AND

CELEBRATIONS

FILL THE CITY,

WHICH DESPITE

TAKING A HARD

HIT DURING TIMES

OF INTERNAL

CONFLICT, HAS

MANAGED TO RISE

FROM THE ASHES

AND HONOUR ITS

HISTORY.

January

February

March

First

week of

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Gihan Tubbeh / PromPerú

29


APRIL | HOLY WEEK

Gihan Tubbeh / PromPerú

Easter week is one of the catholic religion’s most

important and representative traditions. Despite being

celebrated across the globe, each area of the world has

its own way of partaking in the festivities.

In Peru, where 70% of the population is thought to be

Catholic, Easter Week is widely honoured. Nonetheless,

there is a part of the country in which this holiday is

not only celebrated for its significance, but also for the

tradition and fervour that accompany its rituals.

Gihan Tubbeh / PromPerú

In Ayacucho, located in Peru’s Sothern Andes, a church

door opens in the pre-dawn darkness, letting out a

brilliant gleam of light. The city’s main plaza is packed

with people – from tourists to believers – all waiting,

watching. The glow moves closer to the street and all of a

sudden, a marvellous plinth over 10 meters high comes

into view, holding a resurrected Jesus illuminated from

head to foot with shining candles.

AYACUCHO IS KNOWN AS THE ‘CITY OF

CHURCHES.’ THERE ARE 33 TEMPLES

IN THE CITY, MANY OF WHICH WERE

BUILT DURING COLONIAL TIMES. THE

FIRST EVER CHURCH IN THIS CITY

WAS THE TEMPLE OF SAN CRISTOBAL,

WHICH DATES BACK TO 1540.

In Ayacucho, Easter Week lasts 10 days, beginning on the

Friday before Palm Sunday. This day is marked by the

procession of the Señor de Agonia, the Virgen Dolorosa,

Saint John, and Veronica.

The plinth of

the Señor de la

Resurrección

illuminating the

dawn sky in

Ayacucho on a

Sunday.

Hundreds of

flower ‘rugs’

adorn the

procession

path.

This fascinating and moving ritual dates back to the time

of the Viceroyalty. The Spanish arrived in Peru with many

traditions, including the celebration of the Holy Week.

The conquistadors, inspired by the way this date was

celebrated in Seville, adopted the tradition. Today, the

Holy Week fiesta held in Ayacucho is considered the

second most important celebration of its kind in the

world, after the one held in Seville.

On Palm Sunday, Jesus enters the city as he did

Jerusalem: riding a donkey, and surrounded by his

apostles – 12 men dressed in traditional garments from

the time. Meanwhile, the townspeople praise him with

palm fronds in hand. Dry logs and palms are taken into

the main plaza beforehand, where they will be used to

light a grand fire on the last day of the celebration.

On Wednesday, the moving ‘Procession of the Encounter’

paralyzes the city as Jesus of Nazareth is taken through the

streets until reaching the plinth holding Veronica. Upon

reaching this point, Jesus is inclined, and his face is washed.

Veronica then departs in search of Saint John and Mary.

The Virgin Mary is subsequently brought into the main

plaza where she watches as her son approaches the cross.

All of a sudden, both figures halt, their faces illuminated

30


Gihan Tubbeh / PromPerú

Gihan Tubbeh / PromPerú

fair takes over the Acuchimay hillside, featuring local

products, crafts, and food. Meanwhile, in Huamanga,

the Pascuatoro takes place, and a bull is released in

the streets as spectators flee to avoid getting trampled

– much in the same style of what is done in San Fermin,

Spain. As evening descends, Ayacucho’s main plaza fills

with people singing and dancing in celebration.

The worshipers

cloak themselves

in candlelight

during the

processions.

The eloquence of

Ayacucho’s Holy

Week images as

reflected on the

face of the Virgen

Dolorosa.

only by the candles held by faithful devotees. In Ayacucho,

every procession has a reason of being and a story to tell.

On Maundy Thursday the processions cease and the

townspeople spend the day touring the city’s churches.

Then, on the eve of Good Friday, silence descends and

the streets of the city fill with dozens of women dressed

in black, who accompany the Virgen Dolorosa as she

weeps and mourns before the Holy Tomb.

It is not until Saturday morning that the atmosphere turns

festive, as church bells ring throughout the city, marking

the beginning of the celebration. A grand, traditional

Then, back where we started: Easter Sunday, at the foot

of Jesus’ plinth. Each detail on it has a specific significance

that seamlessly ties in with the Andean worldview.

Its triangular shape represents the mountains, the

Apus; the wax figures that adorn it are in the shape of

flowers and corn – offerings typically used to request

a good harvest. As the plinth slowly advances through

the crowds, making its way to the plaza, hundreds of

people take turns carrying it on their shoulders. Here,

it is not about an exclusive brotherhood. It is the very

townspeople who give life to one of the most important

cultural expressions in Peru and the world.

THE ‘APUYAYA JESUCRISTO’ (POWERFUL

LORD JESUS CHRIST) IS THE MOST

REPRESENTATIVE SONG FEATURED IN

AYACUCHO’S HOLY WEEK CELEBRATION.

IT WAS COMPOSED IN QUECHUA

DURING THE COLONIAL TIMES BY FRAY

LUIS JERONIMO DE ORE, A FRANCISCAN

PRIEST FROM HUAMANGA.

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32


PROGRAMME

DAY 1

Arrival at Ayacucho and overnight at hotel.

DAY 2

Discover Ayacucho, known as the city of

churches. Follow the tradition and visit

the seven churches for the Eucharistic

Adoration.

DAY 3

Ayacucho

Average

temperature

Max 27° C

Min 9° C

Altitude

3,399

m.a.s.l.

Travel time

from Lima

1 hours

10 minutes

Gihan Tubbeh / PromPerú

In the morning, go to the Saint Francis

church to listen to the Seven-Words

sermon in Spanish and Quechua. By

the afternoon, visit the cathedral and

be part of the Passion ceremony and

the procession of the Holy Sepulchre in

Saint Dominic church.

DAY 4

Walk around the city and spend some

time with artisans in their workshops.

Then visit the Pampa de la Quinua site

to see the monument in honour of the

Ayacucho Battle.

DAY 5

DAY 6

Go to mass and follow the plinth of Jesus

Resurrected. In the afternoon, be part

of the popular party in the Main Square.

Transfer to airport.

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34

MAY | PILGRIMAGE TO THE SANCTUARY OF THE LORD OF QOYLLORITI


QOYLLORITI

WHEN THE VILLAGE

MOVES TO THE

MOUNTAIN

MAY

WHEN IT COMES TO

LOCAL SYNCRETISM,

THIS CELEBRATION

IS ONE OF THE

MOST IMPORTANT.

SACRIFICE AND

FAITH ARE LIVED

AND WITNESSED

IN ABUNDANCE AS

THOUSANDS OF

DEVOTEES HIKE AND

DANCE FOR HOURS

ON END, MAKING A

PILGRIMAGE UP A

SACRED ANDEAN

‘APU’ IN THE NAME

OF THE LORD OF

QOYLLORITI.

January

February

March

April

Last

week of

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Diego Oliver

35


MAY | PILGRIMAGE TO THE SANCTUARY OF

THE LORD OF QOYLLORITI

Diego Oliver

Peru is known for both its natural and cultural wealth.

The traditions and festivities that we celebrate today

are the culmination of many different customs from all

over the country, some native and others brought in by

View of the

sanctuary of the

Señor de Qoylloriti

amongst the

mountains. The

pilgrims camp

in the nearby

surrounding areas.

immigrants and slaves who looked to maintain ties with

their own, personal stories.

Local syncretism can be seen in religious traditions

that bring together Andean beliefs with those that

were imported and imposed by the Spanish. Looking to

eradicate idolism and to evangelize the natives, Spanish

conquistadors and priests forebade “pagan” celebrations

upon their arrival. Nonetheless, locals managed to adapt

their beliefs, replacing deities and gods of nature with

the religious characters brought from Europe. Their

worship continued disguised under a different name.

Each ‘nation’

shares its

traditional

dances.

The celebration of the Lord of Qoylloriti in Cusco is a clear

example of this union between the original native beliefs,

with those later imposed and eventually adopted. What

was originally done in honour of fertility in pre-Hispanic

times is now considered one of the most feverous

religious pilgrimages in the country, as over 10 thousand

people hike up the sacred Ausangate Mountain carrying

Diego Oliver

crosses and dressed in extravagant, colourful outfits.

The legend of its origin dates back to 1780, when the

government decided to ‘christianize’ the ritual in attempts

to neutralize the indigenous revolutionary uprising. It was

then that the story of Marianito was born. Marianito was

a young boy, son of local peasants, who was herding his

sheeps near Sinakara when a mysterious, light-skinned

boy appeared, to whom Marianito offered food and

shelter. One day, this strange boy re-appeared with

tattered clothing. Marianito, wanting to help, offered to go

to Cusco and search for a similar cloth in order to repair

the broken clothes. Upon arriving and inquiring about

The grand

procession

to the foot

of the Apus.

Diego Oliver

Corn, fruit, and

bread are some of

the offerings made

during ceremonies.

An example of

Andean syncretism.

IN 2004, THE CELEBRATION AND THE

SANCTUARY WERE DECLARED NATIONAL

CULTURAL HERITAGE OF PERU. THEN, IN

2011, UNESCO NAMED IT AN INTANGIBLE

CULTURAL HERITAGE.

36

Diego Oliver


Diego Oliver

the cloth, he learned that it is a special kind only used

to fashion garments used by bishops. Finding it strange

that a young peasant boy was searching for such cloth,

the church decided to go after him. When they fount the

boys, however, the mystery boy turned into an image of

Christ on a stone, leaving everyone in awe. This image is

known today at the Lord of Qoylloriti, or the Star of snow.

The date of the celebration varies depending on the date

of Holy Week, as it is generally held 58 days after Easter

highest point of the mountain, where they spend the

night. Traditionally, each Ukuku was to return back down

the mountain with a big block of ice for their respective

nations, however, due to climate change, this symbolic

custom has been reduced to a single jar of water.

Upon their descent, the Ukukus are received by a

‘blessings’ mass, before beginning the last, farewell

procession for the Lord of Qoylloriti, an event that lasts

24 hours. This celebration is not just about devotion,

rather, it also provides the opportunity for members

of different high-Andean towns to come together and

establish important relationships that will benefit

community members.

Due to the physical demands of this pilgrimage, as well

as the deep significance and devotion behind it, this

festivity is not performed for tourists. This is an authentic

tradition that continues to honour its Andean essence

while respectfully incorporating Spanish beliefs.

There are no

distractions during

the communal

mass. Everyone

participates with

the same fervour,

no matter his or

her origins.

Sunday. Thus, sometime between the months of May

and June, the pilgrimage begins, departing from the town

of Mahuayani. The thousands of devotees are divided

into eight “nations” depending on their place of origin,

and together they walk eight kilometres from the starting

point, to the Sinakara sanctuary, located at the foot of

the Apu Ausangate. From here, surrounded by rock and

snow, participants make their way up the mountainside

towards the peak, dancing and singing Quechua songs

along the way. Every nation is represented in these

expressions of faith, and together over 100 songs and

dances are performed. Before arriving at the peak,

pilgrims make a stop at ’14 crosses,’ which represent the

Stations of the Cross.

THE APU AUSANGATE IS THE MOST

IMPORTANT SACRED MOUNTAIN

IN THE CUSCO REGION, AS WELL

AS THE HIGHEST, REACHING 6,372

METERS ABOVE SEA LEVEL.

Diego Oliver

The main characters in this ritual are the Ukukus. These

participants are in charge of maintaining order and

punishing those who break the rules. In addition, they

are the only ones permitted to make the journey to the

At night, candles illuminate the

crosses belonging to each nation.

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38


PROGRAMME

DAY 1

Transfer from Cusco to Mahuayani and

overnight.

Cusco

Average

temperature

Altitude

Travel time

from Lima

DAY 2

Begin the walk from Mahuayani to the

Sanctuary of Qoylloriti to be part of the

mass. Then, get ready for dinner and to

spend the night.

Mahuayani

Max 14° C

Min -2° C

4,600

m.a.s.l.

1:15 hours by

plane to Cusco

and 2:30 hours to

Mahuayani by bus

Diego Oliver

DAY 3

Visit the ‘alasitas’ market, where you will

find miniature figures of houses, cars

and money to attract good luck. Then,

follow the procession and attend mass.

DAY 4

See how the devotees prepare for

the last procession. After that, have

lunch and get ready to walk down to

Mahuayani and then go back to Cusco.

Diego Oliver

39


JUNE | INTI RAYMI

JUNE

INTI RAYMI

A CELEBRATION OF THE SUN

40


EACH 24TH OF

JUNE, THE SUN

RISES DIFFERENTLY

IN CUSCO AS THE

CITY PREPARES TO

CELEBRATE INTI, THE

SUN GOD. DURING

THE INTI RAYMI

FESTIVITIES, MILLIONS

OF PEOPLE FROM ALL

OVER THE WORLD

COME TOGETHER

TO WITNESS AS THIS

IMPORTANT PART

OF INCA LEGACY IS

REIGNITED.

January

February

March

April

May

June 24th

July

August

September

October

November

December

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41


JUNE | INTI RAYMI

Hundreds of actors

dance during the

presentation.

Taking a walk through the streets of Cusco is to journey

into Peru’s past. The marvels and mystery’s of our Inca

heritage are present every step of the way - not only

in the language and culture, but also in the impressive

stone architecture, where every giant rock seems to fit

seamlessly into the other and structures remain sound

and awe-inspiring 500 years later.

Interestingly, the same can be said for our Colonial

legacy, with the numerous, breath taking churches,

convents, and all the incredible art pieces from the

Cusco School of Art that decorate the walls of hotels,

temples, and buildings to this day. Both these fascinating

and equally important aspects of our past come together

in the imperial city of Cusco, making it one of the most

unique and magical places in the world.

Much like our Inca and Spanish cultural heritage come

together, so do local traditions and celebrations. While each

small, native community might uphold specific festivities

exclusive to them, there is one regional celebration

that is honoured by all in the same way it was during

Tahuantinsuyo: Inti Raymi, the celebration of the Sun.

Each 24th of June, the day of the winter solstice, Cusco

comes to a halt. The Main Square fills with locals and

tourists alike who gather to witness and enjoy a

recreation of the most important celebration held

during the Inca reign. Traditionally on this day, the Inca

– as a son of the Sun – would praise and thank this deity

for all it provides, requesting its continued protection

and favour. With this God on their side, the Incas could

confidently begin an auspicious New Year.

Huacaypata – where the current Main Square is located

– was the original setting for this celebration, receiving

all the highest ranking members of the Inca Empire:

the chiefs and military and administrative leaders from

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The Sacsayhuaman

esplanade is full

of people during

the Inti Raymi

celebration.

THE RE-ENACTMENT OF THE INTI RAYMI

FESTIVAL HAS BEEN CONSIDERED

A “NATIONAL CULTURAL HERITAGE

AND A MAIN NATIONAL IDENTITY

CEREMONIAL RITUAL” BY THE PERUVIAN

GOVERNMENT SINCE 2001.

the four suyos, or corners of the empire. Thousands of

people would make the pilgrimage to Cusco, preparing

both physically and spiritually for this important event.

Some historic accounts claim that attendees would fast

for days before the ceremony, purifying their bodies

before the 9-15 day celebration.

The Inca arrives

at the Plaza de

Armas on his

plinth. Around

him, soldiers

and servants

kneel.

42


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THE ORIGINAL INTI RAYMI SCRIPT

WAS WRITTEN IN QUECHUA

AND MEANT TO BE PERFORMED

BY 600 PEOPLE. THERE ARE

CURRENTLY AROUND 800

ACTORS FROM CUSCO WHO

PARTICIPATE IN THE EVENT.

In 1572, however, Viceroy Francisco de Toledo put an

end to all Inti Raymi festivities, claiming that the pagan

celebration interfered with Catholicism. It was not until

1944 that the government decided to recuperate the

ancient tradition, turning it in to an amazing spectacle

full of colour and symbolism. The event’s current script

is based on the description found in Inca Garcilaso de la

Vega’s book, Comentarios Reales, and thus, the modernday

Inti Raymi began in Coricancha. During the Inca

Empire, Coricancha was the most important Sun Temple

in Tahuantinsuyo, where the Inca and the nobles would

leave their offerings and partake in private worship.

After invoking the Sun, the Inca and his entourage make

their way to the Main Square atop a wagon. The women,

adorned in colourful outfits, sing sweet songs in Quechua

and leave a trail of petals as they walk, marking the path

of the royal and his crew. Then, once arriving in the plaza,

the “meeting of two epochs” takes place between the

Inca and the actual mayor of Cusco, symbolizing the evereternal

presence of the Inca legacy in the city.

Finally, the hundreds of actors arrive at Sacsayhuaman,

a stunning archaeological site with an impressive view

overlooking the city of Cusco. The priest stands on

the ushnu – or central ceremonial platform, awaiting

the arrival of the Inca himself, upon which the main

ceremony will begin. Surrounded by the people of the

four suyos, dressed in the typical clothes and dancing

their traditional dances, the Inca toasts to the Sun,

simulates the sacrifice of a llama in gratitude to the

gods, and then lights a new fire that will accompany the

community for the year to come.

If you are looking to visit Cusco, Inti Raymi is one of the

most special dates to do so. It is during this unique and

unforgettable time that the city’s Inca spirit is more alive

than ever.

43


44


PROGRAMME

DAY 1

Pick up and transfer to Coricancha to

see the first part of the Inti Raymi: the

appareance of the Inca. Then, follow the

entourage to the Main Square to witness

the ceremony with the local authorities.

Finally, continue to Sacsayhuaman

to enjoy the representation of the

Inti Raymi in the esplanade of the

archaeolofical site. After the show,

return to Cusco.

Cusco

Average

temperature

Max 21° C

Min -5° C

Altitude

3,399

m.a.s.l.

Travel time

from Lima

1 hours

15 minutes

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DAY 2

Have breakfast at the hotel before

going out to discover the beauty of

the Sacred Valley of the Incas. Visit

the archaeological site and the church

of Chinchero, the Living Museum of

Yucay and Ollantaytambo, a town that

maintains its Inca planning and an

impressive fortress.

DAY 3

Marvel at Machu Picchu, a masterpiece

of engineering, one of the Seven

Wonders of the World and a World

Heritage Site. Walk through passages,

buildings and special places like the

Intihuatana. Then, return to Cusco to

rest at your hotel.

Heinz Plenge Pardo / PromPerú

DAY 4

Transfer to airport.

45


JULY | FESTIVITY OF THE VIRGEN DEL CARMEN OF PAUCARTAMBO

JULY

PAUCARTAMBO

BETWEEN DEVILS AND VIRGINS

46


LOCALS AND TOURISTS

COME TOGETHER IN

FERVOUR BENEATH

THE PLINTH OF THE

VIRGEN DEL CARMEN

IN THIS SMALL ANDEAN

TOWN. A FESTIVAL THAT

BRINGS TOGETHER THE

ANDEAN WORLD WITH

SPANISH BELIEFS, THE

CELEBRATION OF THE

‘MAMACHA’ CARMEN IS

A PLACE WHERE DEVILS

RUN THROUGH THE

STREETS, AND DANCERS

GIVE THEIR ALL.

January

February

March

April

May

June

July 15th - 18th

August

September

October

November

December

Shutterstock

47


JULY | FESTIVITY OF THE VIRGEN DEL

CARMEN OF PAUCARTAMBO

Diego del Río

Peru’s religious festivities are one of a kind. Formally

honouring the people’s devotion in a jubilant affair,

these events bring thousands of devotees together to

rejoice in their shared faith and pay homage to their

patron saints.

The fiesta of the Virgen del Carmen, held in Paucartambo, is

one of Cusco’s biggest celebrations. Unlike the pilgrimage

of the Lord of Qoylloriti, where mysticism and physical

demands prevail, this celebration brings the colonial town

of Paucartambo to a joyous halt for four days.

Diego del Río

There are two stories behind the origin of the devotion

for the Virgen del Carmen, both of which hail from the XVII

IN 1985, PAUCARTAMBO’S VIRGEN DEL

CARMEN TRAVELLED TO CUSCO DURING

THE VISIT OF POPE JOHN PAUL II. THE

IMAGE WAS CROWNED BY THE VERY

POPE IN A CEREMONY PERFORMED

IN THE ESPLANADE OF THE RUINS OF

SACSAYHUAMAN.

The small town

of Paucartambo

surrenders itself

to the ‘Mamacha.’

On the 15th of July, the town bells ring, marking the

beginning of the festivities. That same night, during the

qonoyo bonfire, the dancers from the Q’olqa, Chunchu, and

Maqta dance troupes – who together represent purgatory –

show off their dancing and acrobatic skills. Then, the other

Diego del Río

The anxious

devotees

eagerly wait

for the Virgen

del Carmen’s

plinth to exit

the church.

Century. The first version recounts that an effigy of the

Virgin was sent from Spain to the district of Kosñipata,

so that the people of this area could adopt her as their

patron. As it made its way, however, the effigy was set

down in the town of Paucartambo, upon which the

local landowners gathered with prayers and offerings,

enticing her to stay. In the other version, the qollas or

traders who traversed the route between Paucartambo

and Kosñipata discovered the Virgin’s face in bas-relief

within a clay pot. The image was then sculpted by local

artists in remembrance of the discovery.

48

A saqra hiding

out on a rooftop.


Masks are decorated with

metals and feathers, bringing

together elegance and colour.

Diego del Río

troupes begin to arrive, presenting the Virgin with a joyous

serenade that lasts throughout the night.

The 16th is the day of the main celebration. At 5 am, devotees

gather in the church for the Aurora mass, followed by the

fiesta mass, which is given at 10 am. After the liturgy, the

followers are invited to approach the Mamacha Carmen

and hang their intention charms – requests written on

metal plaques – on her dress, and/or light a candle: red for

love, green for money, and purple for success.

In the afternoon the Virgin, adorned in beautiful

garments and set atop her plinth that resembles the sky,

is taken out for a procession through the streets of the

village. Suddenly, colourful Saqras – or devils – invade

the rooftops that surround the plaza in attempts to

hide from the Mamacha. Meanwhile, dance troupes

fill the plaza preparing to perform their characteristic

dance, each of which represents a different aspect of

local history: the black slaves, the Spanish landowners,

the Inca warriors, the Chilean invaders, and bullfighters,

among others. The entire town and its visitors gather in

the plaza and the surrounding balconies to witness the

spectacle, tossing flower petals as the Virgin passes by,

and paying special attention to the colour of her cheeks:

pink cheeks signify good times, while pale cheeks suggest

that the future will not be so auspicious.

Diego del Río

The 17th is the day of blessings. It begins in the local

cemetery where deceased dancers are honoured with

song and celebration, before moving on to bless the four

suyos – or cardinal points – from the Carlos III Bridge, a

colonial construction made of stone. In the evening, the

people join their patron in the main plaza for the ‘battle’,

during which the Qollas and the Antis come face to face.

The 18th is dedicated to the children, who are taken to

the church for the ocarikuy, and to be blessed by the

Virgin and the local priest. Then, the final day brings with

it the most emotional ritual of all. The Virgin is placed on

her plinth and changed by the current fiesta hosts along

with those chosen to organize the celebration in the year

to come, in this symbolic ‘passing of the baton’ ritual. It

is with this important gesture that the festivities come

to an end, closing days of joy, devotion, and incredible

cultural expressions that live on like treasures hidden in

the small towns of Peru’s Andes Mountains.

THE CELEBRATION OF THE VIRGEN

DEL CARMEN WAS DECLARED

INTANGIBLE NATIONAL CULTURAL

HERITAGE IN 2006.

Despite the

weather,

celebrations and

dances in honour

of the Virgin do

not cease.

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50


PROGRAMME

DAY 1

Be part of the fireworks marking the

beginning of the celebration. After that,

see the representation of the Purgatory

done by the local troupes and attend

the serenade for the Virgin of Carmen.

DAY 2

Diego del Río

Paucartambo

Cusco

Average

temperature

Max 20° C

Min 5° C

Diego del Río

Altitude

2,906

m.a.s.l.

Travel time

from Lima

1:15 hours by plane to

Cusco and 3 hours to

Paucartambo by bus

After mass, celebrate with the local

people with songs and dances.

DAY 3

Start your day in the procession of

the ‘Mamacha Carmen’. Walk with the

dancers on their way to the cemetery to

honour their dead colleagues.

DAY 4

Diego del Río

In the morning, participate of the

Ocarikuy or the blessing of the priest.

DAY 5

The last day, the butlers change the

clothes of the Virgin before she’s out for

her last procession.

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52

AUGUST | ANNIVERSARY OF AREQUIPA


AREQUIPA

A JOURNEY BACK

IN TIME

AUGUST

THE GORGEOUS

COLONIAL

MANSIONS THAT

ADORN THE

STREETS OF ITS

HISTORIC CENTRE,

THE RICH GREEN

VALLEYS, AND THE

ASSORTMENT OF

MOUTH-WATERING

GASTRONOMIC

TREATS ARE ONLY

THREE OF THE

MANY REASONS

TO FEEL PRIDE IN

AREQUIPA, THE

SECOND MOST

IMPORTANT CITY IN

PERU.

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August 15th

September

October

November

December

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53


AUGUST | ANNIVERSARY OF AREQUIPA

The Misti Volcano,

measuring over

5,000 meters high,

watches over the

city of Arequipa.

To walk through the streets of Arequipa is to take a trip

into the past. It is to retrace the steps the Spanish took

upon their arrival and their subsequent trek into the valley

of the Chili River, where they settled on this generous

land. It is to experience the imposing surrounding nature,

reflected in the Misti Volcano that silently watches over

the city. And to discover the gorgeous architecture and

small streets of the Historic Centre, without forgetting to

stop and enjoy some of the celebrated local gastronomy

along the way.

Arequipa has the unique advantage of featuring mountains

and coast, a luxury that has been taken advantage of since

pre-Inca times, in which residents built roads connecting the

areas and providing better supply routes. As per tradition,

the Incas arrived far after the area was already inhabited.

Nonetheless, upon noting the optimal living conditions of

the valley, they decided to make it their home, naming it

“Ari quepay” or “Lets stay here,” as was supposedly stated by

Inca leader Mayta Capac.

On the 15th of August 1540, the Villa de la Asunción

de Nuestra Señora del Valle Hermoso de Arequipa

was founded by orders of Francisco Pizarro. Since its

establishment, its inhabitants were primarily Spaniards

who demonstrated fierce loyally to the Crown. Because

of this, Arequipa earned the title “fidelisima” – or faithful,

as well as obtaining the city “many honours” given by King

Felipe II.

The undeniable Iberian influence is reflected in the

city’s outstanding architectural beauty. In the Historic

Centre alone, one can see 23 different architectural

styles represented – including renaissance, baroque, art

deco, and 1980’s brutalism -, and of these, 500 buildings

have been declared National Heritage. A gem for any

architectural enthusiast, Arequipa is worth the visit.

Besides wandering through the city streets and

discovering the assortment of interesting buildings,

visitors can experience Arequipa’s notoriously delicious

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The arches of

the Yanahuara

lookout point are

made from sillar

rock and have

quotes from

local celebrities

carved on them.

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THE HISTORIC CENTRE OF AREQUIPA

WAS DECLARED A WORLD HERITAGE

SITE IN 2000. UNESCO HIGHLIGHTED

THE INTERESTING FUSION IN EUROPEAN

AND INDIGENOUS ARCHITECTURAL

BUILDING TECHNIQUES.

The Santa Catalina

Monastery, founded

on the 10th of

September 1579, is one

of Arequipa’s many

architectural gems.

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CHICHA Restaurant, Arequipa

CHICHA Restaurant, Arequipa

Arequipa’s gastronomy

is one of its main

attractions. Shrimp is a

star ingredient in many

of the favourite dishes.

AREQUIPA IS KNOWN AS

THE ‘WHITE CITY’ DUE TO THE

WHITE SILLAR ROCK USED IN

ITS CONSTRUCTIONS. THIS

VOLCANIC ROCK COMES FROM

COMPACTED VOLCANIC ASH.

local cuisine. Food lovers revel in the flavours of the

amazing ingredients used to prepare the over 190 typical

dishes of the area, which are traditionally cooked in clay

pots over fires, and served in lively picanterias. The ‘chupe

de camaron’ - a soup made with shrimp - rocoto relleno,

ocopa, and adobo are some of the many favourites.

Before its impressive architecture was built, and its

glorious cuisine established, however, it was Arequipa’s

stunning natural scenery that made it a favourite. Blessed

by Mother Nature, the city is protected by three, breathtaking

volcanoes (the Misti, the Chachani, and the Pichu

Pichu), and surrounded by a rich countryside. A bit further

outside of the city, the Colca Canyon and its surrounding

valley attracts thousands of tourists each year thanks to

its impressive mountainous scenery and the presence of

its most mystical and elegant inhabitant: the condor.

to the city of Arequipa, performed the evening before the

main day of the fiesta. The main avenues are flooded with

colour and excitement as parades pass by and typical

dances, like the wititi, are performed by talented dance

troupes. Simultaneously, artisanal fairs showcase the

variety of handmade creations crafted by local artists.

Arequipa is a unique and unforgettable amalgam of history,

nature, and cultural legacy. Make sure not to miss it.

The impressive

Colca Canyon is

one of the deepest

in the world.

Arequipa’s cultural identity is captured in its joyous

anniversary celebration, which takes place at the beginning

of August each year. Music invades the city as the popular

Tuna – or Student Music Group – Competition takes place,

along with a series of concerts and the famous serenata

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Créditos créditos

Perú’s main cities gourmet guide

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8 9

The guide for all who love fine dining

CONTACT US: ventas@creandoidea.com C. 981419945 - 981299956

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PROGRAMME

DAY 1 - august 14th

Transfer to the hotel. At night, attend

the Anniversary serenade.

Average

temperature

Altitude

Travel time

from Lima

DAY 2 - august 15th

Arequipa

Max 23° C

Min 10° C

2,335

m.a.s.l.

1 hours

30 minutes

Recharge your batteries with the joy of

the Friendship Parade. In the afternoon,

delight your palate with the best of the

gastronomy with a tour to the traditional

picanterias.

LimaTours

DAY 3 - august 16th

Surprise yourself with the beauty of

Arequipa in a city tour and visit a jewel

of Colonial architecture: Santa Catalina’s

Monastery. In the night, get closer to

local culture in a dancing contest.

DAY 4 - august 17th

LimaTours

Transfer to airport.

57


SEPTEMBER | INTERNATIONAL SPRING FESTIVAL

SEPTEMBER

A CELEBRATION

IN HONOUR OF

SPRING

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IN THE CITY OF

TRUJILLO, THE

LAST WEEK OF

SEPTEMBER IS

DEDICATED TO THE

INTERNATIONAL

SPRING FESTIVAL,

COMPLETE WITH

INTERNATIONAL

BEAUTY QUEENS,

TALENTED BATON

TWIRLERS, THEMED

PARADE FLOATS,

AND THE JOYOUS

MARINERA DANCE

PERFORMANCES.

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Marco Garro / PromPerú

59


SEPTEMBER | INTERNATIONAL SPRING FESTIVAL

Peru has white cities, cities of kings and the navel

of the world. ide of the Sun. The northern part of the

country, on the other hand, is blessed with eternal

spring. Thus, each year, there is a festival to celebrate

this phenomenon,

ON SEPTEMBER 28TH 1965, CONGRESS

DECLARED TRUJILLO THE “CAPITAL OF

SPRING.”

Media

Trujillo, the third most important city in Peru, established

its importance before Inca times, as it was the centre

of development for the seminal Mochica and Chimu

cultures. The Villa de Trujillo was founded by Francisco

Pizarro on the 5th of March 1535. Today, Trujillo offers

a wealth of history, interesting architecture, and unique

customs, all of which are generously shared with the

world by its inhabitants.

the most exciting and highly anticipated of the festival.

In 1960, the parade finally got international recognition

thanks to the participation of foreign beauty queens who

share the stage with the local Queen of the Festival, a

young woman who is elected in a special ceremony

days before the activities begin. These days, the visiting

beauty queens spend their time between events touring

the main city sites and participating in charity work

Renzo Tasso / PromPerú

The decorated

themed floats

add fun and flair

to the parade.

Every September, Trujillo celebrates the International

Spring Festival; a 60 year-old tradition that remains one

of the city’s most anticipated. The event was originally

organized by the city’s Club de Leones – or Lion’s Club

– as means to raise funds and carry out philanthropic

activities. Nonetheless, today this festivity brings together

thousands of people – both local and international – to

enjoy a celebration that has come to represent the city.

Inspired by the United States’ Thanksgiving Day Parade,

on August 21st of 1950, the festival began to incorporate

a parade that transits the city’s main streets, and that

same year, the first themes float was debuted. Since

then, businesses have come to compete over who has

the best float, and these features have become some of

60

The Queen of

the Festival

on her float.


Renzo Tasso / PromPerú

Peru’s navy – since 1879, when Abelardo Gamarra

Rondo decided to change it from the already existing

name, chilenas.

Different

communities

come together

to form part

of the event.

Pictured, a

Chinese dragon

making its way

through the

streets.

organized by the club committee.

Over the course of the festival, this representative dance

is celebrated and the best dance couples in the country

come together in Trujillo – ‘the capital of the marinera –

to compete for recognition. Another traditional activity

that comes into the spotlight during the festival is that

of the Peruvian paso horse, when hundreds of people

gather to watch these graceful creatures glide across

fields, showing off their unique gait.

In Trujillo, there is something for everyone: history,

dance, beaches, and tradition. You wont regret visiting

this incredible city, experiencing its glorious culture, and

exploring its endless opportunities.

Besides the decorated floats and the gorgeous beauty

queens, there is another feature of this festival that gets

a lot of attention: the talented baton twirlers. These

women come each year from the United States, to delight

the audience with their choreography and acrobatic

movements – a tradition that began back in 1965.

Renzo Tasso / PromPerú

Beyond festivities, however, the International Spring

Festival is also a chance for people to connect with the

local culture. There are many activities that are offered

parallel to the parade, which include: conferences,

meetings with authors, painting and signing competitions,

art exhibitions, film festivals, fashion shows, and much

more.

One cannot speak of Trujillo, however, without mentioning

its most representative dance: the marinera. Couples

come together in an elegant, flirtatious choreography

with notably agile footwork, using a handkerchief and a

hat to mark their moves. This captivating and cheerful

dance has gone by the name marinera – inspired on

TRUJILLO IS ALSO KNOWN FOR ITS

WONDERFUL CUISINE. CEVICHE,

SHAMBAR, AND ‘THEOLOGICAL’ SOUP ARE

SOME OF ITS MOST POPULAR DISHES.

The indispensable Marinera dancers

showing off their elegant moves.

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PROGRAMME

DAY 1

Rest at your hotel in the morning. By the

afternoon, be part of cultural events like

conferences, encounters with writers,

choir concerts, etc.

DAY 2

Trujillo

Average

temperature

Max 21° C

Min 16° C

Altitude

34

m.a.s.l.

Travel time

from Lima

1 hours

10 minutes

In the morning, walk around a local

fair to learn about the goods of the

region. Then, delight yourself with the

elegance of our national dance in a

show of marinera. Finally, attend the

presentation of the international Spring

Queens.

LimaTours

DAY 3

Visit the main attractions of Trujillo in

a city tour. Discover the imposing Chan

Chan, the biggest city made of mud in

the world; the ‘huacas’ of the sun and

the moon; and finish with a relaxing

walk by the ocean in the famous

Huanchaco.

LimaTours

DAY 4

Get a seat to see the official presentation

of the Queen of the Spring Festival and

be part of the activities of the last day of

the festival.

DAY 5

Transfer to the airport.

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OCTOBER | MONTH OF THE LORD OF THE MIRACLES


THE PROCESSION

FOR THE LORD OF

THE MIRACLES IS

AN ICON OF THE

CITY OF LIMA.

THOUSANDS OF

PEOPLE TAKE TO

THE STREETS TO

CELEBRATE AND

WORSHIP THE IDOL,

TRAILING BEHIND

THE PLINTH OF

THE ‘CHRIST OF

PACHACAMILLA,’

AND IMAGE THAT

WAS ORIGINALLY

BORN FROM THE

HANDS OF A SLAVE,

ONLY TO EARN

THE ADORATION

AND GLORY OF THE

ENTIRE COUNTRY.

January

February

March

April

THE LORD OF

THE MIRACLES

THE ‘MORENO’ OF LIMA

OCTOBER

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Walter Silvera / PromPerú

65


OCTOBER | MONTH OF THE LORD OF THE MIRACLES

Lima is in constant growth, offering visitors more exciting

adventures as each day passes; from gorgeous views of

the Pacific Ocean, to luxury restaurants considered some

of the best in the world. It is amidst this modern whirlwind

that the city manages to maintain some of its oldest

traditions that date back to Colonial times. Today, many

of these traditions have turned into cultural symbols that

identify the city and those who live within it.

In October of each year, the streets of Lima turn purple. The

city slows down, as coloured balloons begin to appear in the

plazas, the aroma of anticuchos fills the air, and the sweet

taste of the ‘turron de Doña Pepa’ reappears. Meanwhile,

church incense burners emit their white, pungent smoke

and the choirs sing hymns that reach the soul. Each October,

the Lord of the Miracles is taken out into the streets followed

by thousands of devotees from all over the world.

The story of the Lord of the Miracles dates back to 1651,

when black slaves were being brought into Peru to work

as peons, guards, or servants in affluent homes. Looking

for a place to convene and connect after work hours, the

Angolan slaves formed a brotherhood, and would come

together in an abandoned warehouse in Pachacamilla,

outside of what is now the Historic Centre of Lima. At

some point during these meetings, one of the attendees

painted an image of Christ crucified on the cross on one

of the adobe walls of this space.

What could have been passed off as a simple depiction

soon became the object of worship, after an earthquake

devastated Lima and Callao in 1655. Thousands of

people were affected and hundreds of homes destroyed,

including the warehouse. However, in its case, all but one

wall collapsed, leaving the image of Christ standing and

intact. The word soon spread, and people quickly began

to come and see the wall that had been protected by Jesus

Christ, bringing with them their prayers and offerings.

BESIDES THE MAIN BROTHERHOOD

IN PERU, SUB GROUPS HAVE

ESTABLISHED THEMSELVES IN 260

OTHER CITIES ACROSS THE WORLD,

AND PROCESSIONS ARE HELD IN THE

UNITED STATES, ITALY, GERMANY, CHILE,

FRANCE, SWITZERLAND, SPAIN, ETC.

The Lord of

the Miracles

procession

accompanied by

incense burners, in

Lima’s Plaza Mayor.

Walter Silvera / PromPerú

66


People spread through

various blocks of the city

centre as they follow the

plinth through the streets.

DURING THE PROCESSIONS, THE

PLINTH OF THE LORD OF THE

MIRACLES TRAVERSES OVER 13

KILOMETRES ON AVERAGE. SOME

YEARS, THE LENGTH VARIES

DEPENDING ON THE ROUTE THE

BROTHERHOOD HAS CHOSEN.

As the ‘Christ of Pachacamilla’ gained notoriety, church

officials became increasingly displeased. In 1671, in

response to the pressure put on him by Churches,

Viceroy Pedro Antonio Fernandez de Castro Andrade

gave the order to erase the image. Nonetheless, despite

various attempts, this task was never seen through. It

seemed that each time anyone went to remove it, they

would feel the earth quake beneath them, or be plagued

with chills throughout their bodies, while others would

just flee without reason.

In 1687, Lima was struck by another sizable earthquake,

and once again, the wall remained intact. After this

second miracle, everyone was talking about the image,

and a replica was made for a celebratory procession that

same year. This established the official recognition and

importance of the Lord of the Miracles by the authorities,

and started a tradition that is maintained to this day.

Walter Silvera / PromPerú

Now, there are five different processions for the Lord

of the Miracles, which take place on the 1st, 18th, 19th,

and 28th of October, and the 1st of November. The

image is taken from the Nazarenas Monastery in the

Centre of Lima, and the two-ton plinth decorated with

gold, silver, and precious stones is walked through the

city streets. The processions are organized by the Lord

of the Miracles Brotherhood, a group of men dressed in

purple habits in charge of carrying the heavy plinth on

their shoulders.

Thousands of devotees follow Lima’s patron through

the streets trying to get close to him. Many of them

take rosaries, holy cards, and books in hopes of getting

them blessed, while others dress in purple habits to

demonstrate their adoration. All of them are bonded,

however, by their shared desire to experience the

The devotees throw balloons, petals,

and confetti from the balconies to

demonstrate their joy for his arrival.

Walter Silvera / PromPerú

‘miracle’ of the ‘Cristo Moreno.’

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PROGRAMME

DAY 1

Enjoy a night tour through Barranco,

Lima’s bohemian neighbourhood. End

up with a dinner and a folklore show.

Average

temperature

Altitude

DAY 2

Lima

Max 22° C

Min 16° C

154

m.a.s.l.

Eat breakfast at your hotel before getting

to the Historical Centre of Lima. Visit

five of its main churches: the Cathedral,

Saint Francis, Saint Dominic, Saint Peter,

and Nazarenas. Finish your route in the

museum dedicated to the Lord of the

Miracles, and then have lunch.

LimaTours

DAY 3

Walk in the procession of the Lord of

the Miracles and be part of this unique

experience.

DAY 4

LimaTours

Transfer to the airport.

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NOVEMBER | DAY OF THE DEATH

NOVEMBER

THE JOURNEY TO THE

NEXT LIFE

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THE DAY OF

THE DEAD

RECONFIRMS THE

BOND BETWEEN

THE LIVING AND

THOSE WHO HAVE

CROSSED OVER.

THIS CONNECTION

IS CELEBRATED

IN DIFFERENT

WAYS ACROSS

THE WORLD. IN

PERU, WHILE EACH

REGION HAS ITS

OWN UNIQUE

TRADITION, THE

UNDERLYING TIE

IS TO REMEMBER

AND HONOUR

THOSE WE LOVE.

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November 2th

December

Diego Oliver

71


NOVEMBER | DAY OF THE DEATH

Diego Oliver

Death is not always synonymous with sadness. In fact,

many cultures – including ancient Peruvians like the

Moche and Incas – see death as a rite of passage into

the “next life.” Proof of this is that many ancient peoples

were buried with their belongings and sometimes even

with other people in order to make sure that these things

would accompany them in their journey to the next world.

Mexico’s infamous festivities are generally what come

to mind when thinking about the Day of the Dead.

Nonetheless, each country has its own customs to

commemorate those no longer with us, and Peru is no

exception. In the Andes, guaguas replace Mexico’s sugar

skeletons, and altars are modified in accordance to local

Andean traditions.

During the Spanish rule, people were buried in catacombs

close to the churches in order to be “closer to God.” In

1808, Lima’s first cemetery – the Presbiterio Maestro –

was inaugurated, and became the last stop for the city’s

aristocrats. Today, over 200 years and countless cultural

and urban changes later, there is a new Lima cemetery

that is getting the attention: Nueva Esperanza, located in

Diego Oliver

the peripheral district of Villa Maria del Triunfo.

Since 1961, over one million people – many of them

descendants of migrants who came from the country’s

rural areas – have been buried in the cemetery’s 60

hectares. Hundreds of small houses and colourful

niches decorate the sandy landscape that spans across

the hillsides. To enter this cemetery on the 1st or 2nd

of November is to enter another dimension. Beyond

the customary flowers and balloons, people arrive to

celebrate their loved ones with musicians, bottles of their

favourite liquors, and typical dishes from their places of

origin, gradually turning this small city of the dead into

one huge party.

For many, the

Nueva Esperanza

Cemetery is like a

small city. There

are even some

peculiar “buildings,”

like this one.

Provinces like Cajamarca and Arequipa celebrate the day

with the popular guagua breads. These sweet breads are

made from a special recipe, and decorated with sugar

THE FIRST CHRISTIANS CELEBRATED

THE DEAD FOR ONE WEEK DURING

THE MONTH OF FEBRUARY. IT WAS

NOT UNTIL THE X CENTURY THAT THE

2ND OF NOVEMBER WAS CHOSEN AS

THE OFFICIAL COMMEMORATIVE DATE.

72

Entire families congregate to

spend the Day of the Dead with

their deceased family member.


Music is a key part of the celebration,

especially the favourite songs of those no

longer present.

IN TAHUANTINSUYO, NOVEMBER WAS

ALSO CONSIDERED THE MONTH OF THE

DEAD. DURING THIS TIME, BODIES WERE

TAKEN OUT OF THEIR TOMBS, DRESSED

IN THEIR BEST CLOTHES, FED BY THEIR

FAMILY MEMBERS, AND PARADED

THROUGH THE STREETS ON PLINTHS.

Diego Oliver

and meringue to depict a tiny baby body, upon which

one places a small baby face made from plaster. Each

family makes or purchases a bread and is meant to

‘baptize’ it as if it were a real child, choosing its parents

and godparents.

Further south, in Puno, the tombolas are considered a

way to receive a visit from the soul of departed loved

ones. These altars – similar to those made in Mexico –

hold an assortment of offerings: from toasted maize

and coca leaves, to fruits and guaguas made by family

members. Neighbours gather at night to accompany the

visiting soul, and the next day everyone heads to the

cemetery and reassembles the altar next to the grave

of the deceased.

Apega

Diego Oliver

In the district of Chongos, near Huancayo, the tradition

of offerings is known as trulakuy. Besides food, flowers,

and candles, the table is also decorated with the skills of

deceased family members, which are thought to bring

protection. The celebration ends on the 3rd of November

with the tullapampay, during which skeletons are dressed

with chullos – woollen caps – so that they do not get

cold, before being taken to the cemetery to be blessed

by a priest. This ritual depicts the syncretism between

Andean beliefs and the Christian religion, as it asks for the

protection from God as well as from ancestors.

Guaguas, the

traditional Day of

the Dead bread.

On the Day of the Dead it does not matter

where you come from, all that matters is faith.

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PROGRAMME

DAY 1

Transfer to the hotel. After some time

to rest, participate in the preparation of

the guaguas. After that experience, visit

the Colonial churches of Ayacucho.

Ayacucho

Average

temperature

Max 27° C

Min 9° C

Altitude

3,399

m.a.s.l.

Travel time

from Lima

1 hours

10 minutes

DAY 2

Attend mass in the morning. Then visit

the local fair to see the exchange of the

traditional guaguas as an offer to the

deceased. In the afternoon, see a folklore

show and learn about our typical dances.

Apega

DAY 3

Walk around the city and spend some

time with artisans in their workshops.

Then visit the Pampa de la Quinua site

to see the monument in honour of the

Ayacucho Battle.

DAY 4

Transfer to airport.

Renzo Tasso / PromPerú

75


DECEMBER | CHRISTMAS TRADITIONS

DECEMBER

CHRISTMAS

IN

PERU

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THANKS TO

OUR MUSIC,

OUR CULTURAL

DIVERSITY, AND

OUR DELICIOUS

GASTRONOMY,

PERUVIANS ARE

CAPABLE OF

TURNING A GLOBAL

EVENT INTO A

CELEBRATION THAT

REFLECTS OUR

ESSENCE.

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Diego Nishiyama

77


DECEMBER | CHRISTMAS TRADITIONS

Diego Nishiyama

Millions of people across the globe come together over

the Christmas holidays to enjoy a special time with their

loved ones. Despite this being a worldwide event, each

country’s essence is reflected in the unique way they

celebrate this festivity.

In Peru there is a great amount of syncretism between the

original, regional rituals, and the later imposed Catholic

religion. Thus, it is common for each area of the country

to incorporate their unique customs into celebrations,

some of which reflect traditions and characteristics that

range from the weather to the general temperament of

the population.

In Cusco’s Main Square, December 24th brings with it

hundreds of artisans who line the sidewalks with their

handmade products. Known as Santuranticuy, this is the

city’s most important Christmas tradition, dating back to

Herbs, incense,

and other

elements come

together to

complement

traditional

nativity scenes.

viceroyal times, when artisans gathered from near and far

in hopes to make money.

At the fair, shoppers can purchase a variety of figurines

made from clay or carved from wood in order to assemble

their own nativity scenes. The Niño Manuelito is the main

figure sold here, an interesting representation of a young

Jesus with white skin, light eyes, and Andean garments.

Over in Ayacucho, however, there is a different nativity

representation of equal importance: the retablo. Rather

than collecting various pieces to create a composition,

like in the Cusco nativity scenes, the retablos are one,

Walking the

Santiranticuy, one

can appreciate

history-infused

art from many

Andean towns.

LimaTours

Diego Nishiyama

THE WORD SANTIRANTICUY COMES

FROM A COMBINATION OF QUECHUA

WORDS: ‘SANTU,’ WHICH MEANS SAINT,

AND ‘TICUY,’ WHICH MEANS SALE.

THUS, SANTIRANTICUY MEANS ‘SALE OF

SAINTS.’

78

The retablos from Ayacucho stand out for their

colors and fine craftsmanship.


Diego Nishiyama

THERE ARE CERTAIN DANCES THAT ARE

SPECIFICALLY PERFORMED DURING

CHRISTMAS CELEBRATIONS, LIKE THE

‘LOS NEGRITOS’ FROM HUÁNUCO, THE

‘HATAJO DE NEGRITOS’ FROM CHINCHA,

AND THE ‘NAVIDAD DE CHIHUA’ FROM

AYACUCHO.

Some of the

figures sold

by artisans

represent Cusco’s

typical dances.

complete, beautiful and detailed piece. These creations

are Andean adaptations of the San Marcos boxes, which

were made during Colonial times with images of the

saints, and used by priests in attempts to convert the local

indigenous population. It wasn’t until the 1940’s however

that inhabitants of the town of Quinua started to create

retablos inspired by these boxes, representing day to day

events (dances, agricultural labour), as well as important

religious moments (Christ’s Crucifixion, the birth of Jesus).

The retablos are made from cedar wood in order to ensure

the best finishes, and feature two beautiful doors, usually

decorated with colourful flowers. Behind the doors, the

people are carved and arranged, painted with detailed

faced and specific clothing. Each detail is carefully thought

out and worked, and the faces and garments depicted

reflect their Andean origin.

Then, there is the jungle and its traditions. In the Amazon,

‘jungle style’ mangers are decorated with straw and

wood, as well as banana leaves, flowers, and fruits. Here,

children are the protagonists of local traditions, as they

spend the days previous to Christmas dressing up as little

shepherds and making their way from house to house in

order to appreciate their neighbours nativity decorations.

With each visit, children are given bags full of candy or a

sweet corn beverage upon their departure. When they

are finished inspecting each home, they come together

with a committee of adults and decide which home has

the best decorations, presenting a prize to the winners.

The famous nativity processions are also typical in some

regions of the jungle where neighbours organize amongst

themselves to dress up as the characters of the nativity

scene and the bible, and walk through the streets towards

the star of Bethlehem. As they walk, musicians play local

songs, creating a festive ambiance for both participants

and spectators.

And what would Christmas be without the ever-anticipated

Christmas Eve meal? Peru’s plethora of ingredients provides

a rich banquet of options. In the jungle, the traditional

meal stars chicken rather than turkey, while in the Andes

suckling pig takes the spotlight. In the north of the country,

Chicha – traditional fermented corn beer – is consumed

in the place of champagne, and paneton is replaced by

guaguas – breads with filling, shaped like babies.

Celebrating Christmas in Peru is an interesting way to

learn more about local culture and customs, and to

understand the driving force behind the festivities: family

and reflection.

79


80


PROGRAMME

DAY 1

After leaving your luggage at the hotel,

participate in the mass of Christmas Eve.

See the beginning of the Santuranticuy,

while the artisans prepare their stalls

in the Main Square. At night, enjoy a

Christmas dinner.

Cusco

Average

temperature

Max 21° C

Min -5° C

Altitude

3,399

m.a.s.l.

Travel time

from Lima

1 hours

15 minutes

DAY 2

LimaTours

Have breakfast at the hotel before

going out to discover the beauty of

the Sacred Valley of the Incas. Visit

the archaeological site and the church

of Chinchero, the Living Museum of

Yucay and Ollantaytambo, a town that

maintains its Inca planning and an

impressive fortress.

DAY 3

Marvel at Machu Picchu, a masterpiece

of engineering, one of the Seven

Wonders of the World and a World

Heritage Site. Walk through passages,

buildings and special places like the

Intihuatana. Then, return to Cusco to

rest at your hotel.

Diego Nishiyama

DAY 4

Transfer to airport.

81


MORE CELEBRATIONS

JANUARY

Marinera Contest

Hundreds of dance partners from all over

the world come together in the Grand

Chimu Coliseum during the last week of

January to celebrate this elegant traditional

dance in one of the most popular events

in Trujillo. This amazing festivity has been

held each year for the last six decades,

infusing it with history and pride.

LimaTours

FEBRUARY

Carnival

While carnival is celebrated throughout the

country, the city of Cajamarca is considered

“the capital of carnival.” The festivities begin

with the entrance of the doll known as Ño

Carnavalón, followed by a paint fight, and

lots of fun.

Media

MAY

Corpus Christi

This is one of the most important festivities

in Cusco, dating back to Inca times.

Originally, mummies were taken out in

procession by their family members.

However, when the Spanish arrived, this

ritual was altered, replacing the mummies

with Saints and Virgins carried on plinths

through the Main Square.

LimaTours

AUGUST

The Procession of the Flag

Each 28th of August the inhabitants of the city

of Tacna celebrate their reincorporation into

Peru after being occupied by Chile, subsequent

to the Pacific War. Since 1929, a flag measuring

over 15 meters has been paraded though

the main avenues of the city and to the Main

Square held by dozens of local women.

Media

24 OF JUNE

Fiesta de San Juan

This celebration honours Saint John the

Baptist, who is considered the patron saint

of the Amazon due to his relationship with

water. During this festivity, each Amazonian

city hosts a big party with music, colour,

and traditional concoctions.

Paolo López / PromPerú

JUNE

Raymi Llaqta

Over 60 communities from the Amazonas

region come together in the city of Chachapoyas

to celebrate their cultural wealth. Dance

troupes dressed in their best outfits tour the

streets while performing their typical dances,

and community members prepare their most

representative dishes to share.

Miguel Mejía / PromPerú

82


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BELMOND MIRAFLORES PARK LIMA | BELMOND PALACIO NAZARENAS CUSCO | BELMOND HOTELMONASTERIO CUSCO | BELMOND LAS CASITAS COLCA 83

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84

Huancaya, natural beauty a few hours away from Lima.

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