Operating Engineer - Summer 2018

jledererdc

The quarterly magazine of the International Union of Operating Engineers

Operating Engineer

i n t e r n at i o n a l

WWW.IUOE.ORG • SUMMER 2018


i n t e r n at i o n a l

Operating Engineer

Summer 2018 • Volume 161, No. 3

Brian E. Hickey, Editor

Jay C. Lederer, Managing Editor

06 NTF Job Corps Expands in Georgia

More offerings to train the next generation

08 Feds Move Water Infrastructure

Job creating bill gets closer to passage

14 Trapped!

Operator credits training for saving his life

20 Scholarship Winners Announced

Union Plus awards deserving IUOE families

Departments

05 From the General President

06 Training & Education

08 Politics & Legislation

12 Canadian News

18 Local Spotlight

22 GEB Minutes

28 Union Death Benefit

[cover] New equipment stands ready for course work at the

International Training & Conference Center in Crosby, Texas.

[photo] Jay C. Lederer, IUOE

[right] Local 115 member Chelsea French enjoys the annual

Heavy Equipment Rodeo and Open House, hosted at the

IUOE Training Association site in Maple Ridge, British

Columbia.

[photo] IUOE Local 115

2

INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

SUMMER 2018 3


International Operating Engineer

(ISSN 0020-8159) is published by the:

International Union of

Operating Engineers, AFL-CIO

1125 17 th Street, NW

Washington, DC 20036

Subscription Terms - $5 per year

Change of Address - Requests must

be submitted in writing to the IUOE

Membership Department (address

above). Include your new address,

registration and local union number.

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Printed in the U.S.A.

International Union of Operating Engineers

AFL-CIO

general officers

James T. Callahan, General President

Brian E. Hickey, General Secretary-Treasurer

Russell E. Burns, First Vice President

James M. Sweeney, Second Vice President

Robert T. Heenan, Third Vice President

Daniel J. McGraw, Fourth Vice President

Daren Konopaski, Fifth Vice President

Michael Gallagher, Sixth Vice President

Greg Lalevee, Seventh Vice President

Terrance E. McGowan, Eighth Vice President

Mark Maierle, Ninth Vice President

Randy Griffin, Tenth Vice President

Douglas W. Stockwell, Eleventh Vice President

Ronald J. Sikorski, Twelfth Vice President

James T. Kunz, Jr., Thirteenth Vice President

Edward J. Curly, Fourteenth Vice President

Got Big

News

?

from Your

Local

We want to

hear about it.

trustees

Kuba J. Brown, Chairman

Brian Cochrane, Trustee

William Lynn, Trustee

Joshua VanDyke, Trustee

Barton Florence, Trustee

International Operating Engineer

appreciates the stories and

photos we receive from

local affiliates throughout

North America. Send us your

submissions or ideas for stories

you would like us to consider.

Send your submissions, plus

photos (digital images are

preferred), to Jay Lederer

at jlederer@iuoe.org, or mail

1125 Seventeenth Street, N.W.,

Washington, D.C., 20036

From the General President

A WHIRLWIND OF spring activity

for our union has eased into a steady

and productive summer construction

season. A few weeks after adjourning

a very successful and energizing 39th

General Convention, we welcomed

hundreds of people to the new

International Training & Conference

Center for the official Grand Opening.

Brothers and sisters from around

the International joined busloads

of contractors, industry leaders and

equipment reps for a morning of

presentations, facility tours and an oldfashioned

Texas barbecue. Already,

the Training Center is buzzing with

activity, hosting an array of classes in

various H&P, Stationary and Pipeline

disciplines. New equipment keeps

being added and course offerings are

expanding. Members should look over

the class schedules at www.iuoe.org/

training and consult with their local

Training Directors to take advantage of

this world-class facility.

Our emphasis and expansion of

training opportunities is coming at the

perfect time for our union. Reports

from around the International say that

this will be one of the best years for

Operating Engineer man-hours this

decade and the federal government

figures are backing that up. According

to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, jobs

in the construction industry have

come roaring back, adding about 2

million since 2010. This past June, the

unemployment rate in construction

fell to 4.7% from a high of 27.1% in the

worst year of the recession.

To be sure, these are good times for

the Operating Engineers who build and

maintain North America. Our skills are

in high demand, but we still face serious

threats to our lives and livelihoods.

The enemies of unions and unionized

workers are pushing even harder as

some of their attacks on prevailing

wages, collective bargaining and safety

standards have found success recently.

Politics has become a four-letter

word in our hyper-partisan society

today. Most folks are so sickened by

all of the noise that they would rather

just tune out and not talk about it. That

is understandable, but dangerous. We

ignore it at our own peril. This struggle

has many fronts and we need to be

engaged because we all have a stake in

it.

As we go to print, our brothers and

sisters in Missouri are fighting to repeal

a so-called “right-to-work” law pushed

by corporate-financed, national antiunion

lobby groups. Our in-state

Locals have been heavily engaged, first

in gathering the signatures to put the

repeal on the ballot, and now knocking

on doors and making phone calls to

get every union member and every

member of their family out to vote. It is

hard, but necessary work if we are to be

successful. I know our members there

are fighting for every vote and leaving it

all out on the field of battle.

That level of activism is needed

in many more states and provinces

where we live, work and raise our

families. Local, state and federal

elections have a profound impact on

our profession. In the United States,

we have seen a systematic roll back of

labor and workplace safety standards

as the balance of power has shifted

to more conservative, managementfriendly

appointments at places like

the National Labor Relations Board

(NLRB) and the Occupational Safety &

Health Administration (OSHA).

The most glaring recent example

was the Supreme Court decision in

Janus v. AFSCME. The appointment of

Justice Gorsuch after the last election

tilted the court decidedly right and

pro-business. Therefore, it was not

surprising that the ruling favored the

corporate “right-to-work” position,

forcing unions who bargain for public

employees to represent a worker at the

bargaining table or in a grievance even

[James T. Callahan]

if that employee does not pay dues or

agency fees.

The creation of a class of free

riders—those who benefit from union

contracts, but who don’t contribute

anything—is old-fashioned union

busting. The only way to turn this

around is to elect labor candidates

and create pro-labor majorities in

state legislatures and the Congress to

enshrine workers’ rights into law.

This takes time and commitment,

but most of all it takes engagement by

each one of us. Some will volunteer on

a campaign and others may even run

for office. But all of must participate in

our democracy and vote. And when we

do, we should prioritize our livelihoods

and workplace safety above all else. It

is our collective strength as one union,

spanning two countries, that creates

prosperity for all.

Enjoy the summer. Work safe.

4

INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

SUMMER 2018 5


Training & Education

NTF Job Corps Expands Offerings at Turner Center

Georgia training site gives more young people a chance at career path

providing students the experience to

work in an industry that parallels their

training. Students participating in

work-based learning do not displace

local union members.

THE IUOE National Training Fund

(NTF) Job Corps program has expanded

at the Turner Job Corps Center in

Albany, Georgia. The center will now be

home to three NTF trade offerings and

five NTF Job Corps instructors. Along

with the Anaconda Job Corps Center

in Anaconda, Montana, the Turner

site has become the second location

to house five programs, creating the

largest presence the NTF has at any Job

Corps training facility.

Keith Taylor, Heavy Equipment

Mechanics Instructor at Turner, has

been instrumental in advancing the

program to better equip his students to

enter the workforce.

The latest improvements include

a state-of-the-art TUXCO hydraulic

cylinder repair table, electronic

diagnostic equipment, access to online

databases for repair specifications

and manuals, and several workbased-learning

agreements with local

mechanic shops at Flint Equipment

Company and Dougherty County

Department of Public Works. The

student work-based component in

Job Corps is a temporary assignment

Turner Job Corps also houses a

double Heavy Equipment Operations

program, instructed by IUOE Local 474

members Bobby Barwick and Chad

Gonzalez. Working with a class size

of 12 students, the Heavy Equipment

Operations programs utilizes a 30%

classroom and 70% hands-on teaching

approach, along with an updated

equipment fleet, to prepare trainees

to begin a career as an IUOE Local

Union Apprentice or entry-level heavy

equipment operator.

Lastly, Turner Job Corps is home

to the only NTF operated Advanced

Asphalt Paving Program in the country.

The Advanced program, a class of 10

full-time students and instructed by

IUOE Local 474 member Courtney

Turner, requires a more rigorous

training and evaluation platform than

any other heavy equipment-training

program in Job Corps. Students

enrolled in this program are required

to complete performance testing on

a minimum of three different types

of heavy equipment, as well as earn

a Georgia state-accredited Class B

Commercial Drivers’ License prior

to graduation. Over the past two

years, the Advanced Asphalt Paving

program has been able to place nine

graduates into five different IUOE

Local Apprenticeship Programs across

the country.

Job Corps is a voluntary program

that prepares young people ages 16–24

with education and hands-on career

training for entry-level positions that

lead to careers in today’s job market.

If you are interested in pursuing

training with Job Corps, please contact:

Zach Dixon, Coordinator – IUOE NTF

Job Corps at zdixon@iuoe.org

The expansion at Turner has

doubled the Heavy Equipment

Mechanics Program, from a class size

of 8 to 16 students. The expansion is

a direct result of maintaining training

standards, building relationships,

and placing graduates in registered

apprenticeships. In turn, those

Apprentices have found sustainable

careers within the industry, increasing

the overall performance of the Job

Corps programs.

NTF Job Corps continuously

improves and updates equipment,

tools, and curriculum in order to

meet the training needs of the everchanging

construction and mechanic

industries. IUOE Local 474 member

6

INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

SUMMER 2018 7


Politics & Legislation

Water Infrastructure Bill Likely to Pass Congress, Create Jobs

Construction Employment Reaches 10-Year High in June

THE U.S. SENATE is poised

to consider America’s Water

Infrastructure Act, S. 2800, legislation

that guides policy for the nation’s

ports and waterways, as well as

flood prevention and conservation

projects. The legislation passed

out of the Environment and Public

Works Committee unanimously,

demonstrating that, at least on

infrastructure, bipartisanship still

exists in Congress.

General President Callahan called

for swift passage of the legislation,

saying, “Senators should pass this

legislation right away and begin

negotiations with House leaders to

send it to the President’s desk.”

The House passed its version of

the water resources legislation in

June on an overwhelming vote, 408-

2. House and Senate leaders will have

to reconcile differences between their

bills in a “conference committee.” This

legislation appears to be the only major

infrastructure legislation likely to pass

in the 115th Congress, leaving the

President’s signature commitment to

begin rebuilding America unfulfilled.

The senate bill incorporates a

separate piece of legislation related to

drinking water and wastewater that has

also been endorsed by the IUOE. The

Securing Required Funding for Water

Infrastructure Now (SRF-WIN)

Act extends low-interest loans to

public water providers to finance

their infrastructure. It also requires

the payment of prevailing wages to

IUOE members and other construction

workers, and it requires that all the

manufactured components be made

in the U.S.A. under Buy American

requirements.

The IUOE worked with Senators

John Boozman (R-AR) and Cory

Booker (D-NJ) to sponsor the bill,

and major industry groups in the

Water Infrastructure Network (WIN)

to develop and advocate for it. The

legislation will finance billions in water

infrastructure and create thousands

of good-paying jobs subject to Davis-

Bacon wage requirements.

Senator Boozman said, “This

legislation is an innovative approach

to helping communities of all

sizes, in every state secure loans so

they can improve their crumbling

infrastructure.” The IUOE agrees, and

appreciate the bipartisan leadership of

Senators Boozman and Booker.

THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY is

bouncing back. In the dark days of the

recession the unemployment rate was

at 27.1 percent and this past June that

rate was at 4.7 percent, making this past

May and June unemployment numbers

the lowest levels in over a decade.

Likewise, the number of individuals

employed in the construction industry

is close to what is was ten years ago.

This is great news considering that back

in January 2010 only 5.4 million people

were employed in the industry and in

June 2018 we have almost 2 million

more people working in the industry

compared to January 2010.

Employment in the Oil and Gas

Pipeline Construction Industry is also

going strong. Last July employment

hit an all-time high with 145,300 folks

working in the industry. Employment

is close to where it was last year, and it

could meet or exceed last year’s historic

high in the July data. After hitting a low

of only 88,900 workers employed in the

industry back in May 2010, the industry

is healthy and there are plenty of job

opportunities for skilled hands.

ENGINEERS

ACTION &

RESPONSE

NETWORK

REGISTER TODAY!

WWW.IUOE.ORG

30.0

25.0

20.0

15.0

10.0

5.0

0.0

10.5%

Feb 2007

160.0

150.0

140.0

130.0

120.0

110.0

100.0

11.4%

Feb 2008

Construction Unemployment Rates

21.4%

Feb 2009

27.1%

Feb 2010

21.8%

Feb 2011

17.1%

Feb 2012

15.7%

Feb 2013

12.8%

Feb 2014

10.6%

Feb 2015 8.7%

Feb 2016 4.7%

June 2018

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Jan-07

Apr…

Jul-07

Oct-07

Jan-08

Apr…

Jul-08

Oct-08

Jan-09

Apr…

Jul-09

Oct-09

Jan-10

Apr…

Jul-10

Oct-10

Jan-11

Apr…

Jul-11

Oct-11

Jan-12

Apr…

Jul-12

Oct-12

Jan-13

Apr…

Jul-13

Oct-13

Jan-14

Apr…

Jul-14

Oct-14

Jan-15

Apr…

Jul-15

Oct-15

Jan-16

Apr…

Jul-16

Oct-16

Jan-17

Apr…

Jul-17

Oct-17

Jan-18

Apr…

90.0

80.0

108.3

December 2007

Oil and Gas Pipeline

Construction Employment

88.9

May 2010

+35.2

143.5

May 2018

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Senator John Boozman (R-AR)

Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ)

8 INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

SUMMER 2018 9


HAZMAT

There’s an App for That: Excavations 101

Fatigue: Serious Safety Hazard in the Workplace

THE NTF NATIONAL HAZMAT Program has released

an Excavation Safety app for handheld devices, available in

Apple (iTunes) and Android (Google Play) versions. Once

downloaded, the Excavations 101 app can be used without

Internet service.

Whether it’s a remote jobsite, in a big city, or at home,

you will be able to use the Excavations 101 app wherever and

whenever you need it.

The app incorporates the OSHA Excavation Standard,

29 CFR 1926 Subpart P, and resources that address issues

concerning Excavation and Trench Safety. These resources

include:

To download the Excavations 101 app, simply go to any

search engine and type “Excavations 101.” For questions

or more information, please call (304) 253-8674 or email

hazmat@iuoehazmat.org.

WORKER FATIGUE, often an overlooked hazard on the

job site, can be a debilitating and deadly problem. So what

exactly is fatigue? According to the National Safety Council,

fatigue describes the feeling of tiredness, sleepiness, reduced

energy and increased effort needed to perform tasks at a

desired level.

A 2012 guidance statement from the American College of

Occupational and Environmental Medicine defines fatigue

as the human body’s response to sleep deprivation or lengthy

physical or mental hard work. One researcher notes that even

dealing with other people can result in fatigue. Going to work

and having poor social interactions with your coworkers can

also be a cause of fatigued.

• Sleep loss – less than 7 hours of sleep a day (43%)

• No rest breaks – lack of short rest break during his/her

shift (10%)

• Quick shift returns – less than 12 hours off between

shifts (14%)

• Long commutes – commute of 30 minutes or more

(31%)

• Work overtime

• Work many days in a row

• Work where they are exposed to harsh environmental

conditions

• Work in noise and/or vibration

• Perform heavy mental task loads for long periods of

time

• Key definitions

• Soil classification and procedures/methods to

determine the soil classification

• Protective systems

• Excavation hazards

Interactive tools include a Slope Calculator that shows

the degree of an existing slope when the device is placed

against the slope, and a Sloping or Shielding Calculator that

compares sloping vs shielding for a proposed excavation.

Enter data into the Slope Calculator for soil classification,

trench depth, width of bottom, and length of trench, and

this tool will configure a drawing of the cross-section with

measurements including the total top width of the trench,

and a tentative yardage of material that would be removed if

sloping were used for the trench. This can be used to assist

the competent person to determine if a protective system

should be used or if the trench should be sloped instead.

Fatigue is cumulative and the result of inter-related

factors. These factors include:

• Sleep loss (lack of sleep)

• Time of day

• Time on task

• Long work hours

• Heavy work load

• Environmental conditions

• Medical conditions

• Job demands

• Shift work—works a non-daytime shift (difficult to get

proper sleep in their time off)

• Rotating shift work—worst for working against our own

biology and putting ourselves at risk for sleep debt

The effects of fatigue can include slower reaction

time, more errors and decreased cognitive ability. David

Lombardi, principal research scientist at the Center for

Injury Epidemiology at the Liberty Mutual Research Institute

for Safety in Hopkinton, MA, is quoted as saying, “Fatigue is

an increasing health and safety problem in our lives due to

the 24-hour society with decreasing emphasis on sleep.”

Research has shown that fatigue can be equated to

the same amount of impairment from alcohol intake and

therefore the same amount of cause for concern.

IUOE National

HAZMAT Program

Phone: (304) 253-8674

Email: hazmat@iuoehazmat.org

www.iuoehazmat.org

Indicators that you work in an industry that may be at

high/highest risk for fatigue include:*

• Shift Work – non-day shift (17%)

• Demanding jobs – work tasks that require sustained

attention for long periods of time, or tasks that are

monotonous, tasks that are repetitive or mentally

demanding (81%)

• Long shifts/Long work hours – as shift duration

increases, safety risks also increase (21% work 10

hours or more each shift)

• Long weeks – weeks of 50 hours or more (22%)

Now that the effects and indicators of fatigue on the job

site has been covered, look in the next issue of International

Operating Engineer magazine for further discussion on

different ways to handle fatigue and be safe on the job.

*Fatigue in the Workplace: Causes & Consequences of Employee

Fatigue; National Safety Council, 2017

10

INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

SUMMER 2018 11


Canadian News

Local 115 Receives Sizeable Federal Government

Training Grant at Annual Open House

Locals Stand Together During Natural Disasters

Members in Alberta and British Columbia pick each other up

IUOE LOCAL 115’s Annual Open

House is a day when members and

their families get to try out the heavy

equipment at its training site. This

year, there was added excitement,

when Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan

announced funding to support training

for apprentices, including women and

indigenous peoples.

“We recognize that labour is at the

heart of our growing economy,” said

Sajjan “and we know that labour is the

reason we have a strong middle class in

Canada.”

The $575,000 grant was matched by

Local 115 to purchase a Manitowoc 8500

mobile crane and a Caterpillar 323 excavator.

“IT WAS PROBABLY one of the scariest days of my life!”

recalls IUOE Local 955 Business Agent Anthony Noseworthy,

remembering the wildfires that swept through Fort McMurray

in May of 2016. “When I drove through town, there must have

been 200 foot flames.”

Earlier in the day, there was no sign of any imminent

danger when Noseworthy went to his job as a cranes manager

at Suncor. Some neighborhoods were on evacuation alerts

and a wildfire was burning near town, but the smoke had

cleared and it was a beautiful clear, sunny day.

With no warning, the winds suddenly shifted and monster

flames began devouring the city.

By the time it was over, 2,600 homes in Fort McMurray

were gutted by fire including some owned by IUOE members.

Local 955 Business Manager Chris Flett’s house was among

them. “There was no warning. I picked up my kid at school

and rushed home to get the dog. We only had a few minutes

to get out.”

The massive blaze forced the largest wildfire evacuation

in Alberta’s history. More than 88,000 people were forced

from their homes. Many escaped with only the shirts on their

backs.

When Flett was allowed to return home, he discovered

only the charred remains of his house. Everything he owned

was lost in the fire. His insurance paid for the cost of rebuilding,

but not everything was covered.

IUOE’s International Disaster Relief Fund provided

$5,000 to Fort McMurray members who lost their homes and

Operating Engineers across the country also made significant

donations. That led to the creation of a Canadian Disaster

Relief Fund.

“When we learned that IUOE members were losing their

homes during the Fort McMurray wildfires, we knew we had

to help,” says Local 115 Business Manager Brian Cochrane.

“Local 115 donated $115,000 to Local 955 to help our brothers

and sisters get through the crisis.”

IUOE Local 115 Business Manager Brian Cochrane

said the grant recognizes the value of trades training.

“This equipment will ensure training focused on safety

and quality, and help us build a skilled and inclusive

workforce for the future.”

More than 1,500 people turned out to enjoy the Open

House – a record for attendance.

The training site spans over 40 acres and has more

than 25 pieces of equipment to give students a realistic

hands-on experience. Three hundred-plus students

access training and upgrading annually. The site is

considered one of Canada’s leading Heavy Equipment

Operator training centres.

Fort McMurray was still rebuilding in the summer of 2017,

when BC was hit by the worst wildfire season in history. At its

peak, 39,000 people were evacuated from their homes and

the Province declared a state of emergency.

Back in Alberta, IUOE members remembered how

Local 115 had supported them during the wildfire crisis. So

Noseworthy spearheaded a campaign to help BC members.

He passed the hat around at worksites and raised $4,500.

Their members also signed a jersey and it was presented to

Local 115 earlier this year.

“We want to thank Local 955 for the donations and the

jersey,” said Cochrane. “IUOE really shows its strength in

times of crisis and I’m so proud to be a member. This is what

our union does -- we’re there for one another when it counts.”

[above] Canadian Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan and Local

115 Business Manager Brian Cochrane. Minister Sajjan was

on hand to announce the awarding of a federal grant that will

help support the Local’s training programs.

[left] Mariana Pope and Goretti Guilbault enjoy the annual

Open House.

Fortunately, Local 115 members did not experience home

losses in the BC fires. The $4,500 from Local 955 was donated

to the Fire Fighter Burn Fund, as some of their members

fought fires in Fort McMurray and one was seriously injured

in a car crash.

[article & photos] IUOE Local 115

[article & photo] IUOE Local 115

12 INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

SUMMER 2018

13


Safety & Health

Trapped!

Operator survives 2.5 hours submerged in dozer cab

“The radio in the dozer wasn’t working so I played songs

on my phone, which I had picked up. I played Frank Sinatra,

‘My Way,’ because I thought I’d like to go out that way. I

watched videos of my kids, of my daughter, Kloe, singing. I

cried.

THINKING HE COULD swim to shore if his arms were

free, Local 139 member Robbie Gunderson hurriedly

removed his safety vest, then his sweatshirt, then a t-shirt,

and readied himself to jump from the sinking Caterpillar D6

dozer.

“I was getting ready to bail. I was thinking I had a little bit

of time,” he said later of his near-death experience shortly

before 8 a.m. May 21.

Fortunately, Gunderson’s mind rejected the thought and

recalled a scene from his MSHA training. His new thought

was, “… them corny videos.” An equipment Operator in

one of the videos Gunderson once had watched at his local

union’s training center had decided to flee a dozer cab in an

emergency situation. The man survived, however, his legs

were drawn under the machine and crushed, leading to a

double amputation.

The takeaway from the videos offered Gunderson a path

to survival in the opposite direction of jumping. The message

was, “Stay in the cab, stay alive.”

Gunderson stuck with his training. He stayed put. He

would remain seated in the cab for the next 2.5 hours while

the 25-ton dozer settled under 12-15 feet of sand, water, silt

and clay in a detention pond at the Hi-Crush Partners LP

sand mine near Whitehall, Wisconsin. That brownish mixture

flowed quickly into the bottom of the cab as soon as the dozer

entered the pond. For reasons unknown, the mix stopped

rising at a level slightly below Gunderson’s knees. Incredibly,

the cab stayed air-tight even though its windshield “spidered”

as soon as the dozer submerged.

Because his cell phone had fallen from its cup-holder

perch in the cab, the Operator reached for a two-way Midland

radio on board and called fellow Local 139er Scott Anderson,

who was on shore.

Foreman Todd Schmidt, also a 139er, remembers an

exchange of words as Anderson quickly reported news of the

accident to Schmidt. “Robbie said: ‘Help! Help! I’m going in

the pond,’” Schmidt said.

“And Scottie told him, ‘Just relax. Save your air. We’ll get

to you.’ ”

processing site, according to media reports.

At about 7:49 a.m., Gunderson was dozing sand toward

the pond when his machine slid forward and would not stop

sliding. He shifted the dozer into reverse, but had no success

in halting the slide. “I thought I was gonna die,” he said.

Gunderson is a personable soul; a jokester. He has

retained a quirky sense of humor despite his ordeal.

He said he does not consider himself a religious person,

yet he said he prayed that the water would stop coming in

and it did.

“I started talking to my grandpas (Gene Sosalla and Eric

Gunderson) who are gone, and to my first wife, Amanda, who

died 13 years ago of cancer. I told them I wanted to join them,

but not this day.

“I told Scottie, ‘Just tell my kids I love them.’ It was best

that I was talking to Scottie. With other guys I would have

been joking around, burning up oxygen.”

To further pass the time, Gunderson scrawled “family”

on the dozer dashboard. Outside the cab, bubbles rose in a

watery mixture Gunderson likened to “chocolate milk.”

Above this murky and claustrophobic world, an army of

rescuers assembled. Divers, firefighters, emergency medical

technicians, and law enforcement officers tried to organize a

rescue plan. A Flight-for-Life helicopter arrived.

A number of those in this gathering knew Gunderson

and the Gunderson family, from nearby Independence. They

were determined to save one of their own, Schmidt said.

As minutes elapsed into hours, a decision was made to

breach a dike separating the pond from a tributary of the

Trempealeau River, and to drain the enclosure, Hi-Crush

Chief Operating Officer Scott J. Preston told the media.

Schmidt and Chad Gerke, another 139er and an owner of

Gerke Excavating, manned Cat model 349 and 390 excavators

to open the dike, Schmidt said. Ultimately, about 10 million

gallons were released, according to published reports.

Meanwhile, news of the accident arrived at Evergreen

Elementary School in Holmen, where Gunderson’s wife,

Lindsay Prokop, teaches second grade. She drove to the mine.

A relative, Randy Niedercorn, who is a former Trempealeau

County sheriff, cautioned that she likely would get there and

be asked to identify her husband’s body.

Anderson and Gunderson had a history of butting heads,

Gunderson said. On this day, the pair set their past differences

aside. “Scottie stayed on the radio, talking to Robbie the

whole two and half hours,” Schmidt said. “At times Scottie

said, ‘Save your air. Just key the mic so we know you’re with

us.’ ”

Gunderson’s assignment had been to push 15 piles

of “reject” sand into the pond. He and other Operating

Engineers there work for Gerke Excavating Inc.

The pond spans an area approximately 100 feet by 600

feet, Schmidt said. It’s part of a 1,447-acre sand mine and

“I told God I’d be a better dad, a better son, a better

husband. But I wasn’t gonna stop drinkin’ …

[left] The dozer in which Local 139 member Robbie Gunderson

was trapped is revealed after a detention pond into which the

machine slid was drained. This photo shows the dozer and a boat

used in the rescue.

[above] Local 139 member Robbie Gunderson.

[article & photos] Dave Backmann, Local 139

At the clay pond, Schmidt finally had reason for hope. He

spotted the dozer’s GPS antenna sticking out of the muddy

water. “I yelled to the guys in a boat,” he said. “They weren’t

really close to Robbie. They were about 30 yards from where

they thought he was.”

The rescuers smashed a window in the cab to free

Gunderson, hauled him aboard a 14-foot, flat-bottom boat,

then ferried him to shore. Gunderson was shaking, a sign that

hypothermia was setting in. His right thumb was bleeding,

cut on the broken window glass.

...Continued page 16

14

INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

SUMMER 2018 15


Safety & Health

Anti-union politicians

want to cut your pay.

“You won’t believe how good fresh air can feel,” Gunderson

recalled.

he said several times during an interview with Wisconsin

News.

Reminiscent of a scene from a movie, the Operator was

greeted by dozens of people shaking his hand, taking his

photo; he in turn offering his gratitude. His father, Robert,

was in the crowd along with his mother, Sandra, and his

sister, Stacie. And of course, his wife. “When she saw me, it

was unbelievable,” Gunderson said.

An EMT on the scene examined Gunderson and, finding

no physical harm, released him. Lindsay Prokop later drove

her husband to Mayo Clinic Health System – Franciscan

Healthcare in La Crosse where he underwent tests to check

oxygen levels in his blood, his lungs, heart, and other

functions. The couple has been meeting weekly with a

counselor to discuss the trauma.

Gunderson said he has not had any post-traumatic

experiences such as nightmares. “I think I left it all in the cab,”

“Robbie surviving is truly a miracle,” Lindsay Prokop said.

“The men digging really believed they were digging for his

body as they frantically tried multiple attempts to find this

dozer.

“At the beginning, when Rob went in, there was no sign of

his dozer. The pond was completely still ... When they finally

broke the dike, there was still no sign of his machine. The

desperate digging where bubbles were was in hopes that was

where he was buried. Even with the water clearing, the muck

completely had pulled the dozer under, still leaving no trace

of him.

“The rescue divers started jumping through the muck

with ropes tied to them, while others in the boat dug with

shovels. Diggers were sliding into the muck as they kept

digging. Finally (when the GPS antenna appeared) the team

realized the dozer was up to 60 feet from where they initially

were digging.

Crony capitalists

and their friends

in Washington

keep attacking

the prevailing

wage laws that

protect Operating

Engineers. We

can’t afford to

let them win.

OE17-010

“The incident has given Robbie a second chance at life.

He has a new appreciation for his family, his friends, Scottie

Anderson, his coworkers, and especially his employer.

Miracles happen everyday, but to be here today because of the

non-stop effort of the rescuers, coworkers, and his employer,

Robbie has a special place in his heart for the word, miracle.”

She said her husband “reluctantly” took off the remainder

of the week to work through his experience. On May 29,

he was back on the job, where another emotional scene

unfolded.

He said, “I will say that I work with basically bad-ass guys.

We run heavy equipment. We don’t cry.

“And then, one week and one day later (after the accident)

we’re hugging. And there were tears.”

[left] Local 139 member Robbie Gunderson spent 2.5 hours

trapped in this dozer after it slid into a detention pond on May 21

in Trempealeau County, Wisconsin. The dozer was revealed after

the pond was drained. Rescuers broke the rear window to permit

Gunderson’s escape.

Taxpayer money should

support skilled workers,

not greedy contractors.

The Davis-Bacon Act requires that

workers on government funded

projects be paid equal to local

prevailing wages for similar work so

tax dollars aren’t used to undercut

workers’ pay.

Repealing Davis-Bacon

means more workplace

injuries and fatalities.

Untrained, low-paid workers mean

unsafe working conditions, which

lead to more injuries and fatalities.

epi.org/publication/bp215

The federal government

sets prevailing wage

rates, not unions.

The prevailing wage rate is

determined by a survey of all local

construction wages conducted by the

US Department of Labor.

Prevailing wage does

not raise the cost of

construction.

Workers paid a decent wage are more

productive. Studies show that cuts in

wages can actually raise the cost of

construction projects.

faircontracting.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Wage

differential-method-critique-Duncan-2016-1.pdf

[article & photos] Dave Backmann, Local 139

Tell your Members of Congress to oppose any efforts to

weaken the Davis-Bacon Act. Call today: (202) 224-3121

16

INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

SUMMER 2018 17


Local Spotlight

Local 158 Hits the Road in Tour de Cure

Maryland Governor Recognizes Training School

IN JUNE, Local 158 was proud to

participate in the 2018 Tour de Cure,

Capital Region, a 100 mile bike ride

held to raise funds for the American

Diabetes Association. It was the fourth

year of participation for Local 158 and

they raised over $4,700.00 this year

alone.

Riding for Team 158 this year were

Business Manager and International

Vice President Dan McGraw, Business

Representative Jeff Kellogg, Jeff’s

daughter in-law Joanne Burns and

Business Representative Mark Mincher.

Tour de Cure is the American

Diabetes Association’s signature

fundraising event. With strong

support from the business community

including sponsorship and corporate

teams, the events raise funds for

research, advocacy, programs and

education.

More than 1,200 participants, 300

volunteers, sponsors and spectators

came together to raise $550,000 to

fund critical research, advocacy efforts,

programs and education to support

all children and adults living with

diabetes.

Local 15 Dedicates Welding

Shop to Deserving Members

LOCAL 15 welding instructor Frank

Papik recently retired after 39 years of

service to the union. Frank was one

of the original pioneers of the Local’s

Apprenticeship School and one of the

first instructors to be certified through

the IUOE National HAZMAT Program.

In appreciation of his service, the Local

15 Welding Shop has been named in

his honor along with fellow Local 15

honoree Edward Feddock.

MARYLAND GOVERNOR Larry

Hogan and Secretary of Labor Kelly

Schulz paid a recent visit to IUOE Local

37’s Training School in Baltimore.

Business Manager Bob Holsey took

them on a tour of the facility and the

Local training staff demonstrated some

of the techniques the school utilizes

in its course offerings. The Local is

celebrating 50 years of operations at

the Training School this year.

The Governor also presented

a special “Governor’s Citation” to

recently retired Local 37 Business

Manager and International Trustee Joe

Shanahan in recognition of his years of

service.

[above, L to R] Retired Local 37 Business Manager and

International Trustee Joe Shanahan, Maryland Governor Larry

Hogan, and Local 37 Business Manager Bob Holsey.

[below] Local 37 Instructor Mike Funk demonstrates egg skills

challenge on an excavator.

[left] Governor Hogan tries his hand at the Excavator

Simulator with help from Local 37 Instructor Garry Khal.

[photos] Local 37

[above, L to R] Local 158 Business

Representative Jeff Kellogg, Local 158

Business Manager and International Vice

President Dan McGraw, and Joanne Burns.

[photo] Local 158

[right] Local 15 Business Manager Tom

Callahan and Welding Instructor Frank

Papik, along with other Local 15 members

and staff, stand in front of the Frank Papik/

Ed Feddock Welding Shop.

[photo] Local 15

18

INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

SUMMER 2018 19


Union Plus Awards 2018 Scholarships

to IUOE Member Families

Winners honored for academic achievement and union values

UNION PLUS RECENTLY awarded $150,000 in scholarships

to 115 students representing 32 unions, including four

winners representing the International Union of Operating

Engineers (IUOE). This year’s group of scholarship recipients

includes university, college, and trade or technical school

students from 36 states.

The Union Plus Scholarship Program, now in its 27th year,

awards scholarships based on outstanding academic

achievement, personal character, financial need, and

commitment to the values of organized labor. The program is

offered through the Union Plus Education Foundation.

Jacob Kingsley

Since starting the program in 1991, Union Plus has awarded

more than $4.3 million in educational funding to more than

2,900 union members, spouses, and dependent children.

Union Plus Scholarship awards are granted to students

attending a two-year college, four-year college, graduate

school, or recognized technical or trade school. The

selection process is very competitive, and this year over 6,000

applications were received from 70 unions and all 50 states,

plus the District of Columbia and two U.S. territories.

Visit UnionPlus.org/Scholarship for applications and

benefit eligibility.

Meet the 2018 IUOE Honorees

IUOE Local 39—Jacob Kingsley

Kingsley, whose mother, Debora Kingsley, is a member of IUOE Local 39, has been

awarded a $500 scholarship. Jacob is a statistics major and economic policy minor

at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). He plans to pursue a law degree following

completion of his bachelor’s degree next year. Jacob graduated sixth in his class from

Cosumnes Oaks High School in Elk Grove, California, and was awarded the school’s

Community Service Cord for more than 500 hours of community service. Kyle C.

Monson, a part-time Sacramento law professor, has known Jacob for over a decade

through the Boy Scouts of America. “Jacob is an outstanding leader, a dedicated servant

to others, and a fine young man of character,”

he said. “I’m certain he will continue to be an

outstanding citizen and leader for our nation in

the future.”

Activities and honors: UNR mock trial team; Phi

Alpha Delta; Boy Scouts of America: Eagle Scout,

Order of the Arrow Vigil Honor, National Youth

Leadership Training (NYLT)

Monique Tate, is a member of the California School Employees Association (CSEA). San Leandro High School counselor Leena

Yee said Anthony is an exceptional student who she believes will excel in college. “In all my interactions with Anthony, I’ve

found him to be mature, inquisitive, level-headed, friendly, intelligent, and motivated,” Yee said. “Anthony is an upstanding

student and is an active participant in school life and his community.”

Activities and honors: President, Black Student Union; African American Achievement Award; varsity cross country; varsity

track

Volunteerism: STEM tutor; event photography and videography

IUOE Local 101—Jolie Welch

Welch, whose father, Bryan Welch, is a member of IUOE Local 101, has been awarded a

$1,000 scholarship. Jolie is a first-year biology and psychology major at the University of

Missouri, where she is a Dean’s List honoree. She aspires to be a pediatrician and serve

as a children’s health advocate in developing nations. Jolie graduated valedictorian

from East Buchanan High School (EBHS) in Gower, Missouri. Her father is a secondgeneration

IUOE member, and she sees her father’s IUOE membership as a gift.

“Because of my dad’s strong work ethic and his union membership, he’s been able to

support a family of six children,” Jolie said. “We feel protected knowing that we have

great health care, and we are comforted knowing that my dad is in an environment

where workplace safety is a priority.”

Activities and honors: President, National Honor Society; EBHS I Dare You Award;

EBHS student council; 2017 Elite Dance Cup Senior National Champion

Volunteerism: Mosaic Life Care at St. Joseph Medical Center

IUOE Local 302—Jess Harris

Harris, who is a member of IUOE Local 302, has been awarded a $500 scholarship. Jess is a first-year student at the University of

Washington, where he was awarded direct admission to the construction management program. He is a member of IUOE Local

302 and plans to follow in his father’s footsteps professionally with a career in the construction industry. Jess graduated from

Snohomish High School (SHS) in Washington state. With multiple members of his immediate and extended family in unions,

Jess is proud of his strong union heritage. “From providing top-of-the-line health insurance to securing me a job that allows

me to make enough money to fund most of my college education, unions have played a vital role in my life,” he said. “IUOE is

a blessing that will continue to provide for my family and so many others for years to come.”

Activities and honors: SHS Associated Student Body (ASB); SHS varsity football; SHS varsity track

Jolie Welch

IUOE Local 3—Anthony Tate

Tate, whose father, also named Anthony Tate, is a member of IUOE Local 3, has been

awarded a $1,000 scholarship. Anthony is a 2018 graduate of San Leandro High School

in California. He plans to major in computer science when he begins college this fall

and hopes to work in the technology field or as an entrepreneur. Anthony’s mother,

Anthony Tate

Volunteerism: Make-A-Wish Foundation; Friends of Lord Hill Park

Union Plus, founded by the AFL-CIO in 1986, uses the collective buying power of America’s 12.5 million union members to deliver

top-quality benefits and services at competitive prices to working families. In addition to the scholarship program, Union Plus

offers the new Free College program which makes it possible for union members and their families to earn an associate degree

completely online at no cost. To learn more, visit unionplus.org.

20

INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

SUMMER 2018 21


Union Death Benefit

Benefits paid

May - June, 2018

WEDNESDAY

January 24, 2018

Executive Session

General President Callahan

called the meeting of the

General Executive Board into

an Executive Session at 7:40

a.m. on Wednesday, January

24, 2018. Also present for

this Executive Session were

Chief of Staff Joseph Giacin,

General Counsel Brian

Powers, Chief Financial

Officer John Loughry,

Associate General Counsel

Matt McGuire and Assistant

to the General Secretary-

Treasurer Hugh Delaney.

General President Callahan

re-introduced Richard

Griffin the General Executive

Board. General Counsel

Powers explained that

following his tenure as the

NLRB General Counsel,

Mr. Griffin joined the law

firm of Bredhoff & Kaiser

in Washington DC. Mr.

Powers stated that the IUOE

has entered into a retainer

agreement with the law firm

allowing for Mr. Griffin to

provide consultation and

advice to the IUOE subject

to any conflict of interest

limitations imposed by

the federal government

for departing employees.

Mr. Griffin noted his deep

appreciation to General

President Callahan to

graciously allow him to

accept his appointment

by President Obama to a

position of NLRB Board

member in 2012 after 28

years with the IUOE legal

department. He stated that

he looks forward to working

with General Counsel Brian

Powers and the IUOE legal

staff to assist the IUOE in

any way he can. President

Callahan welcomed Mr.

Griffin back to the IUOE,

and he noted that requests

to utilize Dick Griffin should

be made through General

Counsel Powers. Mr. Griffin

thanked General President

Callahan and the General

Executive Board and then

excused himself from the

meeting.

General President Callahan

then reminded the General

Executive Board that the

supplemental pension for

former General President

Giblin had to be approved

on an annual basis. He

called on John Loughry to

provide additional details

of the pension, after which

a motion was made, duly

seconded, and unanimously

adopted to approve the

pension for another year.

Call of Meeting

General President Callahan

called the meeting of the

General Executive Board

to order at 7:45 a.m. on

Wednesday, October 24,

2017. General Secretary-

Treasurer Hickey then read

the call of the meeting,

whereupon the roll call was

taken which disclosed all

members of the General

Executive Board were

present. Also present were

Chief of Staff Joseph Giacin,

General Counsel Brian

Powers, Chief Financial

Officer John Loughry,

Associate General Counsel

Matt McGuire and Assistant

to the General Secretary-

Treasurer Hugh Delaney.

General President Callahan

then read a letter from

Joseph Shanahan resigning

his position as International

Trustee. General President

Callahan nominated

Joshua VanDyke, Business

Manager Local 77 to fill

the International Trustee

vacancy created by Brother

Shanahan’s retirement. It

was regularly moved and

unanimously carried to

elect Joshua VanDyke as an

International Trustee.

General

President

Callahan engaged the

General Executive Board

in a discussion about the

possibility of the IUOE

issuing its own credit card

with a low interest rate for

the membership.

Case No. 1

Minutes of the Previous

General Executive Board

Meeting

The minutes of the General

Executive Board meeting

conducted October 5, 2017

were approved and made a

part of the official records

of the Board. Copies of

these minutes had been

distributed previously to all

Board members.

Case No. 2

Expenses and Actions

Taken Since the Last

General Executive Board

Meeting

MAY 2018

LOCAL 002

ST LOUIS, MO

JAMES E BUTLER

LOCAL 003

ALAMEDA, CA

DONALD R

FELLION

J M SPEYER

CLYDE W PITTS

ARNOLD

MACKLIN

DOUG W

CARTER

JOHN

BROTHERTON

JOSEPH A

HENDRIX

LYLE E KIBBE

LOUIS A HALL

C GREEN

MANUEL

CASTILLO

LOCAL 004

MEDWAY, MA

MARIO

COPPOLA

DAVID L

PARSLOW

EUGENE D

TAVARES

LOCAL 012

PASADENA, CA

HENRY VOGT

DAVID E.

RADLEY

GLEN OLINGER

FRANKLIN

THOMAS STEPP

HAROLD E. REED

ROBERT O.

RUSSELL

JOHNSIE R.

MCALESTER

WILLARD G.

SCOTT

WILL E. HAYNES

SAMUEL F.

HORTON

EARL L.

BLESSING

JIM ZAVAS

HERBERT W.

NEWTON

LYLE A. WELLS

HAROLD E.

MILTON

STANLEY W.

SHACKLETT

HARRY R.

BLOOM

LOCAL 014

FLUSHING, NY

WILLIAM G

PRIGGE

LOUIS

VOWVALIDIS

MORRIS M SIER

LOCAL 015

LONG ISLAND

CITY, NY

RONALD D

KNAUST

JOHN C LICONTI

LOCAL 017

LAKEVIEW, NY

WILLIAM A

BENZ JR

LOCAL 018

CLEVELAND, OH

LEON C

MCCAMAN

JAMES R

RUMSEY

JAMES G TAYLOR

EDWARD C

STROHSCHER

RICHARD H

HARDESTY

ALFONZO

SMITH

JAMES C

SWINEFORD

EDWARD J

MARIOTTI

FREDERICK G

LAYTON

KENNETH J

GRIME

ARTHUR R

ROBERTS

EUGENE E

BOLEN

ROBERT

SANDERS

LOCAL 030

RICHMOND

HILL, NY

CHARLES J

REINERS

WHITESTONE,

NY

CHARLES J

REINERS

LOCAL 049

MINNEAPOLIS,

MN

ELWOOD B

DANIELSON

GENE L

RISTVEDT

RICHARD

OLSON

HENRY M

HEINTZ

JOHN PARTYKA

M R CLIFFORD

SWENSON

LOCAL 066

PITTSBURGH, PA

ARTHUR M

ZAMBANINI

RAYMOND H

CURTIS

DAVID J GIRDISH

RALPH A

GERVASIO

JIMMY R

SAUNDERS

PAUL L RESSLAR

GEORGE

YURKANIN

LOCAL 070

WHITE BEAR

LAKE, MN

ALBERT

BRUGGENTHIES

LOCAL 077

SUITLAND, MD

HUSHEL SETTLE

LOCAL 095

PITTSBURGH, PA

NICK DEFALLE

KENNETH W

BERNAUER

LOCAL 098

EAST

LONGMEADOW,

MA

ROBERT H FOISY

LOCAL 103

FORT WAYNE, IN

RICHARD

YEARLING

INDIANAPOLIS,

IN

RICHARD

YEARLING

LOCAL 115

BURNABY, BC

RONALD G

BROWN

DONALD F

DAHLQUIST

KURC ZEVIAR

LOCAL 119

HAYSVILLE, KS

C E WAGGONER

WICHITA, KS

C E WAGGONER

LOCAL 132

CHARLESTON,

WV

F M CHADDOCK

RONALD

GEBHARDT

CARLTON

TRICKETT

LOCAL 138

FARMINGDALE,

NY

EDWARD C

SMITH

DANIEL H SMITH

LOCAL 139

PEWAUKEE, WI

LOWELL

NORRISH

DONALD J

GOEBEL

THOMAS G

COWDY

RICHARD A

HORNUNG

LOCAL 150

COUNTRYSIDE,

IL

WAYNE E

HORTON

CLETUS A

BOZYCH

GEORGE J LUX

JR

WALTER

JEFFERSON

HARVEY W

BRITTON

JOHN F ALLEN

RICHARD G

MILLER

LOCAL 158

GLENMONT, NY

ROBERT L FIENE

EARL L WAITE

DONALD THEW

LOCAL 16B

NULL, NULL

EARL D BRYANT

LOCAL 181

HENDERSON, KY

BILLY W GRIDER

LOCAL 302

BOTHELL, WA

JAMES PAVEL

GAROLD A REID

MELFORD J

MIKKELSEN

ROBERT E

KUERSTEN

LOCAL 310

GREEN BAY, WI

GEORGE LENZ

OCONTO, WI

GEORGE LENZ

LOCAL 317

OAK CREEK, WI

ESKIL A

BERGSTROM

AUREL MOGA

LOCAL 318

MARION, IL

VICTOR BARGER

LOCAL 324

BLOOMFIELD

TOWNSHIP,

ROY J RANCK

JOSEPH T

HAZARD

GEORGE L GEAN

JOHN G BARG JR

BERNARD

THOMPSON

DONALD F

THOMS

FREDERICK A

NEIHARDT

STANLEY J

CHOVANEC

WADE GROUT

CLARENCE E

WUERTH

ALLEN H LAW

CLAUDE D ASH

TED R WYATT

NORMAN

CURTIS

EUGENE D

WHELTON

LOCAL 399

CHICAGO, IL

ANTHONY

MASIARZ

HARVEY E VAN

BUSKIRK

LOCAL 406

NEW ORLEANS,

LA

CHARLES J

NELSON JR

LOCAL 407

LAKE CHARLES,

LA

WILLIAM E DAY

LOCAL 428

PHOENIX, AZ

HARRY

MARCOTT JR

LOCAL 463

RANSOMVILLE,

NY

GLENN L WENDT

LOCAL 478

HAMDEN, CT

FRANK TANUCCI

KENNETH W

DOWDING JR

LOCAL 513

BRIDGETON, MO

VERNON STORIE

EMIL L

WALLACH JR

ALLAN G

ANDERSON

LOCAL 520

GRANITE CITY, IL

MARVIN D ELLIS

LOCAL 542

FORT

WASHINGTON,

PA

DALE C CULLEN

JR

HARRISBURG, PA

DALE C CULLEN

JR

LOCAL 564

LAKE JACKSON,

TX

TRAVIS R

MILLSAP

22 INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

SUMMER 2018 22

23 INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

SUMMER 2018 23


Union Death Benefit

Benefits paid

May - June, 2018

RICHWOOD, TX

TRAVIS R

MILLSAP

LOCAL 649

PEORIA, IL

DELMAR BEAMS

LOCAL 701

GLADSTONE, OR

WYLLYS T.

INSLEY

C. A. JOCK

HALLADAY

LOCAL 793

OAKVILLE, ON

RODNEY

HOLDER

LOCAL 832

ROCHESTER, NY

ELMER W

DODDS

ALVIN R

OSTERHOUT

LOCAL 917

CHATTANOOGA,

TN

HAROLD HALL

LOCAL 965

SPRINGFIELD, IL

DONALD SMITH

JUNE 2018

LOCAL 002

ST LOUIS, MO

EDWARD E

MUICH

LOCAL 003

ALAMEDA, CA

HUGH D

MATTHEWS

JOHN D

WINCHELL

EDWARD

ROGERS

HENRY S

HONGO

JAMES TAKOS

LOCAL 004

MEDWAY, MA

RICHARD A

EVANS

ANTHONY J

MANCUSO

THOMAS J HAJJ

JAMES T GRIFFIN

THOMAS R

MORELLO

LOCAL 009

DENVER, CO

JAMES B

COLGLAZIER

DONALD A

PARKER

LOCAL 012

PASADENA, CA

GEORGE G.

KIRKSEY

H. E. POOL

B. L. MILLER

EUGENE L.

AMUNDSON

J. J. AGUILAR

FELIPE

GUTIERREZ

RICHARD P.

HOLMAN JR

ROBERT L.

OLIVER

FRANK

SENTENO

RUDOLPH

ARELLANO

C. L. BREWER

JIM ZAVAS

CHARLEY J

DAVIS

DANIEL PAVICH

FRED H

GUGLIELMETTI

RAY M. KUNS

HAROLD I.

DAVIS

MARTIN L.

SHIFFRAR

LLOYD SCOTT

EARLING W

SUNDELL-BA

PASQUAL

SALAZAR

HERMAN D.

WADLEY

HERMAN C.

HESSE

LINUS K.

SHELTON

THOMAS G.

MILLS

RUSSELL D.

LYNCH

ERIC PETERSON

HAROLD E. REED

ALFRED M.

GARCIA

RONALD E.

NOVAK

JOSE L. JIMENEZ

LARRY A.

BUENTING

RUDY YBARRA

CAMACHO

JOHN W. REEVES

STEPHEN L.

GOLDEN

LOCAL 015

LONG ISLAND

CITY, NY

JAMES M

NICHOLSON

DONALD A

ROSSILLI

LOCAL 017

LAKEVIEW, NY

THOMAS J

WAGNER

RAYMOND

DEHN

LOCAL 018

CLEVELAND, OH

NEIL H SELINSKY

EUGENE

MAROUS

JOHN N

BENNETT

ROBERT A

WELCH

ALVIN E

RINEHART

GEORGE R

REYNOLDS

JAMES M JONES

FLEETWOOD

MAPLES

DON MAPLES

EDWARD F

BRANDSTETTE

CHARLES E

WILSON

WILLIAM C

MANNING

GEORGE I

FLINCHUM

PHILIP B

KOEWLER

JERRY B ALLEN

JOHN L

DICKERSON

WILLIAM M

ROLF JR

LOCAL 019

ELDON WEIKART

LOCAL 025

MILLSTONE

TOWNSHIP, N

JAMES SMITH

LOCAL 037

BALTIMORE, MD

JOHN T SCOTT

JAMES A

BURRESS

LOCAL 039

SACRAMENTO,

CA

CATARINO A

REDE

LOCAL 049

MINNEAPOLIS,

MN

NORMAN E

NIKKOLA

LOCAL 057

JOHNSTON, RI

ROY FRANCISCO

LOCAL 066

PITTSBURGH, PA

PETER J BALDI

RUSSELL C

MARTIN JR

DWIGHT O

JENNINGS

HARRY C HOWE

ROBERT

BANNER

RAYMOND E

WOLFE

LARRY M

REICHART

GEORGE T SYE

ZANE W

GRAFFIUS

LOCAL 068

WEST

CALDWELL, NJ

JOHN C. DOLAN

LOCAL 077

SUITLAND, MD

ADDISON W

THOMPSON

WILLIAM K

GROOMS

LOCAL 098

EAST

LONGMEADOW,

MA

DAVID C

DUGRENIER

LOCAL 101

KANSAS CITY,

MO

RUBEN W

KUEHN

JAMES J

SHEPHERD

EDWIN C

BONNARENS

DAVID L NAYLOR

LOCAL 106

GLENMONT, NY

JAMES

OPPEDISANO

LOCAL 115

BURNABY, BC

JAMES M

METCALFE

GORDON I

DOUGLAS

JOSEPH JOSEPH

MIRKO SAKIC

CARL A WOOD

ROY

CHRISTENSEN

WILLIAM J

CANN

ALBERT B

COLDWELL

REGINALD L

VICKNER

NORMAN B

MALLABY

LOCAL 132

CHARLESTON,

WV

M E COGAR

ELVIN E PYNE

CHARLES

BOGGESS

IVAN G EHLERS

LOCAL 137

BRIARCLIFF

MANOR, NY

EDWARD A

LUCAS

LOCAL 139

PEWAUKEE, WI

HUBERT H

ROBENHORST

LEROY J

ALTENBURG

HAROLD SEARS

GORDON J

MARKHAM

GERALD G

AXTELL

GARY L

THIELMAN

HILLERY KASTEN

DUWAYNE

STRATTON

LEONARD

JIRIKOVEC

JOHN P WALTER

LOCAL 148

SAINT LOUIS,

MO

ALFRED J ELAM

LOCAL 150

COUNTRYSIDE,

IL

CONRAD

SHELLEY

ROCCO

CHRISTOFANO

H H KOHN

FRANCIS F TATE

MICHAEL

MORETTI

RICHARD L

COOP

DONALD A

AUDINO

J K DIBBLE

WILLIAM R VON

DINKEL

CHARLES T

PUTCHAVEN

ROBERT B

ROMAN

WILLIAM R

MCEVOY

DARREL K NULL

CHARLES D

ROSE

RONALD H

BROWN

WAYNE M

FOGEL

LOREN E KERR

JAMES L

JOHNSON

RICHARD

WILLIAMS

LARRY L VIERS

ROBERT E

EVANS

LOCAL 158

GLENMONT, NY

ROBERT W

YORAN

GERALD

HAMMOND

P CARPENTER

WALTER CROMP

JAMES H

LEONARD JR

LOCAL 181

HENDERSON,

KY

ELBERT R

RUSSELL

DELL H

STEENBERGEN

RODERICK M

CARTER

LOCAL 234

DES MOINES, IA

FRANCIS L FYE

LOCAL 302

BOTHELL, WA

CHARLES

DOOLITTLE

D F LOVE

LYLE SOMA

WILLIAM MC

CULLOUGH

CHARLES E

NICOLET

GERALD J

TRAULSEN

ROGER L

BROWN

LOCAL 318

MARION, IL

GEORGE E

JONES

RICHARD L

WRIGHT

EVERETT L

ESCUE

LOCAL 324

BLOOMFIELD

TOWNSHIP,

EDWIN L

MCNEILLY

CARL YORKS

CARL GILBERT

WILLIAM H

JOHNSON

PAUL H PERRY

WILLIAM A

CLARK

LARRY MISEL

EDWARD L

HAVER

PAUL J

FRANKOVICH

DEWAIN J

SIVYER

RICHARD W

BROOKS

LOCAL 351

BORGER, TX

E T DACUS

LOCAL 381

EL DORADO, AR

UTAH DANIELS

LOCAL 399

CHICAGO, IL

EDWARD H

MORITZ

JAMES

HENNESSY

LOCAL 400

HELENA, MT

RONALD

BANSCHBACH

LOCAL 406

NEW ORLEANS,

LA

FELIX L

JOHNSON

PETER P FORET

GEORGE

LAWRENCE

WALTER B

HUGHES JR

LOCAL 428

PHOENIX, AZ

ROBERT F

WAMSLEY

JAMES R

SANSOM

LOCAL 450

MONT BELVIEU,

TX

RAFEL E

LAMPIN

LOCAL 478

HAMDEN, CT

KENNETH W

DOWDING JR

VICTOR

MALICKI

RALPH

PATERNOSTER

LOCAL 501

LOS ANGELES,

CA

RUPERT F ROSE

LOCAL 513

BRIDGETON,

MO

KENNETH

SCHWALBERT

CALMON

GRANNEMANN

RICHARD A

SCHWANE

LINCOLN A

SIEG

JAMES VANLOO

LOCAL 542

FORT

WASHINGTON,

PA

KENNETH E

SMALL

ROLAND T

DEMOSS

BENJAMIN D

BARTRON

CHARLES J

MIHALITSCH

WILLIAM J

HELLER

LOCAL 612

TACOMA, WA

LEONARD C

WARNOCK

LOCAL 649

PEORIA, IL

CHARLES H

MAAS

LYNN W

WILSON

LOCAL 793

OAKVILLE, ON

ROY

MCMASTER

MURRAY N

MCCLURE

ANTHONY P

SCHALK

LOCAL 825

SPRINGFIELD,

NJ

ARTHUR D

ROSE

RONALD

CARDELL

RICHARD C

MITCHELL

WILLIAM SEAL

BILLY J SEXTON

ROBERT X

WALSH

ANGELO

VOCATURO

LOCAL 832

ROCHESTER,

NY

RICHARD A

WILCOX

LOCAL 841

TERRE HAUTE,

IN

MERLE D COX

LOCAL 891

BROOKLYN, NY

DENNIS

MITCHELL

LOCAL 912

COLUMBIA, TN

R W FOX

LOCAL 917

CHATTANOOGA

TN

ROY W PICKETT

JR

LOCAL 955

EDMONTON, AB

HERBERT J

SCOTT

24 INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

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