Canmore 2017 WPNS World Cup Final Report

awcacademy

TABLE OF CONTENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Final Report Executive Summary 1

Athletes/Teams 3

Volunteers 5

Organizing Committee 7

Sponsor Fulfillment 8

Community Impact 10

Economic Impact 13

Media Coverage 14

Venue 15

Conclusion 16

Appendices Appendix A Report of the Technical Delegates 17

Appendix B Financial Statements 36

Appendix C Economic Impact Assessment 43

Appendix D Media Coverage 44

Appendix E Organizational Committee 46

WWW.ALBERTAWORLDCUP.COM


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Canmore 2017 World Para Nordic Skiing (WPNS) World Cup was a resounding success. The event

featured world-class race course conditions (even in the face of challenging weather conditions and a lack of

natural snow). An unprecedented level of engagement with schools across the Bow Valley created an

electric atmosphere of spectators at the races and drew awareness to the power of adaptive sport. New

community partners were engaged as race day sponsors and value-in-kind donors, and received high levels

of exposure as a result of their investments. A strong network of over 200 volunteers from across Alberta,

Canada, and international destinations came together to support this event, and volunteers from Prince

George, Red Deer, and Pyeonchang Organizing Committees were able to shadow Chief volunteers at the

Canmore races to gain experience and knowledge for their events. The event generated high media attention

and economic impact, and the presence of so many athletes with disabilities in town brought an important

awareness of accessibility and any barriers that may exist. Based on these successes and all of the feedback

received, the Alberta World Cup Society is proud to have continued its strong legacy and foundation for

hosting future events in Canada, and in Canmore.

As the first World Cup of the season leading into the Pyeongchang 2018 Paralympic Games, the Canmore

2017 WPNS World Cup was a crucial opportunity for many of the athletes, and the opportunity for

Canadian athletes to start their season racing at home was instrumental for their development and success.

Initial participation estimates were 100 athletes from 11 nations; instead, the event nearly doubled

expectations, with 177 athletes from 18 nations participating. This indicates that Canmore is a desired race

destination for athletes across the world, and the success of this event allowed Canmore to maintain its

reputation of excellence as a welcoming host community and world-class venue.

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT 1


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Government of Alberta’s support for this event was crucial to its success in many ways. Despite a

challenging lack of natural snow and warm weather conditions in the preceding three weeks, the Canmore

Nordic Centre Provincial Park snowmaking and grooming staff were able to use the established base of

snow from the Frozen Thunder snowfarming initiative to help the Organizing Committee create a worldclass

sit ski and standing race course for the competitors. This required excellent communication and

planning between Canmore Nordic Centre Provincial Park staff, WPNS officials, and Organizing

Committee Chiefs, as well as ongoing innovative daily solutions in course design to adapt to the evolving

snow conditions.

For these reasons and many more, this event would not have been possible without the Canmore Nordic

Centre Provincial Park and the support of its staff. This venue, a legacy site of the 1988 Calgary Winter

Olympics that has since been renovated to meet top international standards, is regarded as one of the best

Nordic facilities in the world. Furthermore, Canmore and Alberta are viewed as top-notch hosts with a

welcoming community spirit.

Financial and advisory support from the Town of Canmore, the Province of Alberta, and the Government of

Canada was integral to the success of this event. The Alberta World Cup Society is extremely grateful for

the support and values its strong relationships with representatives at each level of government. The

Organizing Committee made every effort to ensure that these Governments received appropriate exposure

for their contributions. According to an economic impact survey by the Canadian Sport Tourism Alliance,

the return on investment for government funders was high. The total net economic activity (total spending

or total output) generated from the event was $1.1 million for Canada as a whole, $1 million for the

province of Alberta, and just over $808,000 for Canmore.

2 CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

WWW.ALBERTAWORLDCUP.COM


ATHLETES/TEAMS

Initial participation estimates were 100 athletes from 11 nations; instead, the event nearly doubled

expectations, with 177 athletes from 18 nations participating. This indicates that Canmore is a desired race

destination for athletes across the world, and the success of this event allowed Canmore to maintain its

reputation of excellence as a welcoming host community and world-class venue.

Hosting an event in Canada allows Canadian athletes an important chance to race at home, with the support

of their hometown and the familiarity of their home race courses. Emily Young is quoted in the event video

as saying, “To be able to be home, and to have my family able to be here to watch…it’s been great to have

the support from everyone.”

A Para Nordic World Cup event in Canada is a crucial step for the development of Canadian Para athletes

and ski programs, and inspires Canada’s next generation of athletes to compete. Furthermore, this particular

event was the first World Cup in a Paralympic season, and therefore provided our Canadian athletes with an

unprecedented opportunity to gain momentum for the Paralympic Games in Pyeongchang in February.

As the first World Cup of the season, the pre-event classification of ability levels is an important component.

Classification was conducted in the two days before the event started, and was one of the reasons the

number of countries attending the races was so high, especially in light of the upcoming Paralympics.

Professional classifiers from around the world were brought to Canmore by the IPC, and local professional

clinics were kind enough to donate the use of their facilities when required.

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

WWW.ALBERTAWORLDCUP.COM

3


ATHLETES/TEAMS

One of the successes for the event was the number of Canadian medals earned at the World Cup – 6 medals

total (4 bronze, 2 silver). Emily Young earned a silver medal in the women’s Cross Country Long Distance

race, as well as a bronze medal in the women’s Cross Country Sprint, Cross Country Middle Distance, and

Biathlon Pursuit Races. Brittany Hudak earned a bronze medal in the women’s Biathlon Long Distance race,

and Mark Arendz achieved silver in the men’s Biathlon Long Distance.

The number of Canadian athletes and coaches that were able to participate was much higher as a result of

hosting the event at home. In total, Canada registered 12 men, 9 women, and 4 guides. This included nine

carded athletes (7 men and 2 women), and 12 non-carded development level athletes (5 men and 7 women).

These non-carded development athletes participated directly as a result of the specific resources allocated to

supporting and hosting the event in Canada. The athletes were led by a total of seven coaches, including

developing coaches.

Cross Country Canada also held a national para camp in conjunction with the World Cup. The camp was

held immediately prior to the World Cup, in order to get the athletes ready for the event, and allow them to

learn from the camp and other athletes around them. 21 athletes registered for the para camp, and 16 of them

participated in the World Cup.

The Organizing Committee also asked the teams to complete short surveys which were used for economic

impact survey information as well as event feedback. Fourteen of the 18 national teams completed the

survey. Team satisfaction rates were high, responding with an average of 8.6/10 when asked about their

overall satisfaction with the event.

4 CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

WWW.ALBERTAWORLDCUP.COM


VOLUNTEERS

The Organizing Committee was made up of 28 volunteer Chiefs, who were involved in the planning stages

in the lead-up to the event and were responsible for key areas in the event production. A few Chiefs were

involved as early as a year prior to the event; most joined three to six months in advance. These volunteer

Chiefs gave so much of their personal time and were crucial to the success of the WPNS World Cup, and

their total contributed hours are countless. The following numbers do not account for their contributions

prior to the event dates.

201 volunteers contributed 4,959 volunteer hours from December 8-18, 2017. These volunteer hours

included roles such as course marshals, stadium set up, range recorders, spectator services, medical, and

media/race office/volunteer office staff. Many of these volunteers were scheduled for multiple shifts during

the event and gave an average of four to eight hours of their time per shift. Each volunteer gave an average

of 25 hours of time over the event. It is also important to note that 4,959 hours is a conservative estimate of

contributed hours, as some volunteer hours were not recorded if they occurred off-site (i.e. ceremonies,

transportation/accommodation logistics, etc.).

Volunteer requirements were high for this event, both in numbers and in time commitments. The WPNS

World Cup involved six race days (with varying course setups each day) over ten days. These race days

required varying course setups according to discipline (sit ski, standing, and visually impaired) and gender

(male/female). Furthermore, the non-race days (official training days) still required course setup and

management, and therefore volunteer manpower. Due to the specific nature of the competition, more than

the “usual” number of volunteers were required and obtained to manage competitions’ use of the biathlon

range. This time and energy commitment is considerably larger than FIS World Cups; the days are longer,

and the event period is also longer. Fortunately, the Alberta World Cup Society has a large base of

volunteers who are consistently treated well at our events and are keen to return. Volunteer registration

reached capacity two weeks before the beginning of the event, and many were placed on a “wait list” for oncall

needs.

Other volunteer challenges at this event were presented by the unique requirements of a para event. For

example, sit ski courses (and in particular, corners) must be graded differently than standing courses; this

meant that two different courses needed to be designed for each of the races during the event. Furthermore,

many of the volunteers had not worked on para events before, and were therefore unfamiliar with the

operations of the IPC, the unique requirements of course and stadium setup, and/or the specific needs of

teams and athletes. Despite a steep learning curve, we now have 201 volunteers who are more familiar with

IPC requirements, and are now comfortable learning and adapting to new disciplines during an event. This is

invaluable for future events hosted by the Alberta World Cup Society.

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

5


VOLUNTEERS

The Alberta World Cup Society is proud to recruit volunteers from within and outside Canmore. The

following list details where the registered volunteers reside.

Bow Valley 141

Calgary 26

Red Deer 3

Lethbridge 1

Drumheller 1

Edmonton 3

Prince George 11

British Columbia (other areas) 2

Saskatchewan 2

Yellowknife 2

Manitoba 1

Europe 12

Korea 3

It is important to note that the volunteers from Prince George, Red Deer, and Korea were attending the event

both as volunteers and as observers for their own upcoming para events. This is an important way to share

knowledge and improve the hosting capacity of other host venues. The Prince George volunteers were

paired with the Organizing Committee Chiefs in a job shadow capacity, in order to share relevant

knowledge and experience. Prince George will host the 2019 World Para Nordic Skiing Championships;

Red Deer will host the 2019 Canada Winter Games, and Korea is host to the Pyeongchang 2018 Paralympic

Winter Games.

In order to calculate the monetary value of the volunteers’ contributions, we used the Government of

Alberta’s standard of $20/hr for unskilled labour and $35/hr for skilled labour. See table below for the

estimated monetary value of the WPNS World Cup volunteers’ contribution.

Volunteer appreciation efforts included a welcome orientation (including pizza and beverages), a custom

designed toque and branded Le Chocolatier bar, and a wrap up celebration with the athletes at the

Cornerstone Theatre (complete with a live band, appetizers and two free drink tickets). Snacks, beverages

and lunches were included on site for all volunteers each day.

6 CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT


ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

The Alberta World Cup Society is a volunteer-led, non-profit organization. Founded in 2004, the Society’s

mission is to develop and grow cross country skiing in Alberta through hosting world cup races and by

providing resources for officials, athlete and coach development. In addition to five FIS World Cup events,

the AWCS has also hosted the 2013 IPC World Cup and now, the 2017 WPNS World Cup.

The Organizing Committee Chair was the only paid staff member for the WPNS World Cup; together with

the volunteer Event Chair and volunteer Chief of Competition, this core staff led the execution of the event.

The technical side of the WPNS World Cup races was primarily handled through the consultation and work

of the Competition Committee.

The Organizing and Competition Committees were formed primarily in September 2017, although some key

Chief roles were filled in the earlier planning stages. Most of the 28 Chiefs joined the team three to six

months in advance of the event, and contributed countless hours and boundless energy to ensure the success

of the WPNS World Cup. See Appendix E for an Organization Chart of the Chief roles.

The makeup of the Organizing Committee itself, and the volunteerism that supported this event, was a

milestone success for this event. Because the WPNS World Cup involves both cross country and biathlon

races, this created an opportunity for volunteers from both disciplines to work together, sometimes with new

and unfamiliar race formats and requirements. While the learning curve was sometimes challenging, this

event created new relationships between disciplines and attracted new volunteers that will likely be retained

for future events. The volunteer Chiefs were asked for their feedback on the event and most indicated that

they felt valued by their team and would consider volunteering for World Cup events in the future.

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

WWW.ALBERTAWORLDCUP.COM

7


SPONSOR FULFILLMENT – GOVERNMENT

Government of Alberta

Government of Alberta

The Canmore 2017 WPNS World Cup could not have succeeded without the support of the Government of

Alberta. The Alberta World Cup Society is extremely grateful for the support (both financial and advisory)

and made every effort to ensure that each department received appropriate exposure for their contributions

and return on their investments. The following opportunities were offered to the Government of Alberta:

• Government of Alberta banner placed in finish chute on every race day – total of 2000 spectators plus

201 volunteers and 329 event participants

• Regular PA announcements – to spectators of 2,000 over six race days

• Logos on all printed event materials and signage

• Logos and link on event websites, social media shout-outs (see media coverage pg.15 for estimated

reach)

• Logo on event video (circulated to various event partners, volunteers, and on all social media channels)

• Invitation to Alberta Premier, Alberta Minister of Culture and Tourism and Alberta Minister of

Environment and Parks (or designates) to speak, attend, or present awards at any races, ceremonies,

affiliated events

• Official letter of welcome and photo from Premier of Alberta included in the event program

• Invitation to key Government staff in Ministry of Culture & Tourism and Ministry of Environment &

Parks to attend races, ceremonies, and welcome/closing receptions

• VIP Try-It event invitation to Government of Alberta staff in Ministry of Culture & Tourism and

Ministry of Environment & Parks

The same benefits were offered to Sport Canada and the Town of Canmore, as important government

funders and supporters of the Canmore 2017 WPNS World Cup.

8 CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT


SPONSOR FULFILLMENT - PRIVATE

Private Sponsors

In addition to government funding, this event required funding from private sponsors as well. Without

television exposure, the sponsorship properties are valued much lower than a FIS World Cup. Initially, the

Organizing Committee explored title sponsorship for the entire event through WPNS and Cross Country

Canada, but found little interest. As a result, the private sponsorship strategy was altered to find smaller

properties at lower costs, and to focus on local Canmore sponsors who wanted to increase their visibility in

the community or among the athletes. This proved to be a much more successful recruitment strategy for this

event.

Three “race day sponsor” properties, which included two races each, were sold to the following

organizations: Tourism Prince George, who will host the 2019 World Para Nordic Skiing World

Championships, Trail Sports, an outdoor sport equipment rental and retailer on site at Canmore Nordic

Centre, and Crossway Community Thrift, a local thrift store looking to increase its presence in the

community. In addition, many sponsors were engaged with value-in-kind donations. For example, Peter

Collins Photography produced a video to summarize the event and be used as a promotional tool at a 65%

discount; a local marketing company, Carmella Consulting covered the race day social media; and newsprint

advertisements were discounted at 50% by the local newspaper, Rocky Mountain Outlook. These sponsors

were granted exposure above and beyond the promised exposure, in order to create a positive relationship

that will hopefully extend to future events hosted by the Alberta World Cup Society.

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

WWW.ALBERTAWORLDCUP.COM

9


COMMUNITY IMPACT

The Canmore WPNS World Cup created significant direct and indirect benefits for Canmore residents.

Public engagement was strong for this event, through various school programs and marketing campaigns.

Celebrity athlete presentations at schools, the Adopt-A-Nation program, and subsidized transportation to the

races, were all positive ways to engage and inspire the youth of Canmore and expose them to the challenges

that persons with disabilities face and overcome in all arenas of life. This event also allowed Canmore to

embrace the “para-sport” or “disabled” community and show residents and visitors that Canmore is a safe

and welcoming community for all, and strengthened Canmore’s sense of pride as a winter sport town and an

exceptional international host community.

The Organizing Committee hosted the Opening Ceremonies for the WPNS World Cup downtown on

December 8 th , in order to make the event more visible and accessible for the residents of Canmore. This

event was well attended, with an audience of nearly 200 people, and included many youth/students. The

Canadian team athletes were introduced, and the crowd was treated to cultural entertainment from a First

Nations dance group and local singer/songwriter Phill Nugent. The Opening Ceremonies also provided the

Mayor, MLA and MP a chance to welcome the athletes to Canmore and encourage Canmore residents to

embrace the event wholeheartedly, as they did.

The presence of so many athletes with disabilities in town brought an important awareness of accessibility

and any barriers that may exist. Hotel rooms, restaurants, transportation, and retail stores were adaptable in

accommodating athletes with wheelchairs, prostheses, or mobility and/or visual impairment issues. Some

businesses commented that they improved accessibility to their stores (i.e. temporary ramps), and hotels

attempted to accommodate the needs of

athletes/teams with accessibility needs.

The Canmore Nordic Centre and Bill Warren

Training Centre also needed to be aware of

accessibility needs for the athletes and any

spectators with impairments.

10

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT


COMMUNITY IMPACT

One of the most significant areas of positive benefits to the community was through engagement with

schools. Based on previous engagement with schools for FIS events, the Organizing Committee expected a

certain level of support and enthusiasm from schools, but nowhere near the overwhelming response we

received. In total, nearly 1400 students from eight schools across the Bow Valley (including Canmore,

Morley, Exshaw, and Banff schools) attended the World Cup races. The Organizing Committee provided

funding to the schools for bus transportation.

World Cup events always have the aim to inspire Canada’s future athletes, and show them the power of

following their dreams. The WPNS World Cup was able to enhance this message with an additional

message of overcoming challenges and pursuing dreams in the face of adversity. Countless comments from

students could be overhead at the races in regards to the amazing ability of these athletes to ski at an elite

level with missing limbs, impaired vision, etc. Importantly, there were some students with visual or physical

impairments who were able to attend the races and see that their disabilities do not have to prevent them

from achieving athletic success.

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

WWW.ALBERTAWORLDCUP.COM

11


COMMUNITY IMPACT

In order to create enthusiasm for the races, the Organizing Committee engaged Josh Dueck, a Paralympic

alpine sit-skier, and Mike Shaw, a former para-freestyle skier and current coach, to present to schools in the

Bow Valley about the challenges they have faced through their life-altering injuries, and the adversity they

have overcome in their lives (similar to many of the athletes competing at the WPNS World Cup). The

uptake from schools on these presentations was unexpected and enormous. Josh and Mike presented to

seven schools in three days, including Canmore, Banff, Exshaw and Morley schools. The response was

equally as inspiring as the presentations; students and teachers were often moved to tears by their stories,

and left inspired to overcome their own challenges in life.

At the assemblies, Josh and Mike also introduced a Canadian athlete who was competing at the WPNS

World Cup and encouraged the students to cheer those athletes on at the races. As a result, the students were

excited to attend the races and connected on a deeper level with the athletes who were competing. This was

evident in the pure excitement and unending cheers from students for the entire length of the races they

attended. We received countless positive comments and feedback from teachers and students about this

program; this has set a precedent for how future World Cup events will engage with schools in the future.

In addition to these school engagement programs, the Organizing Committee also continued its successful

Adopt-A-Nation program for this event, where classes are paired with businesses and then assigned one of

the competing nations. Students create posters and drawings for that nation that are then posted in the

windows of local businesses. Not only is this exciting for the athletes, but it creates awareness for the event

among Canmore public, and emphasizes Canmore’s welcoming host community spirit.

The people of Canmore were treated to an international world-class Para Nordic event in their own

backyard, but in many ways the residents themselves were the highlight of the event. Many athletes

commented on the storefront posters/flags decorated by schools through our Adopt-A-Nation program, and

enjoyed the cheering from students at the races immensely. The cheering youth, the support from local

businesses in town, and the volunteerism from residents in Canmore and beyond showcased the inclusive

and welcoming nature of our mountain town.

12 CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT


ECONOMIC IMPACT

The Organizing Committee engaged the Canadian Sport Tourism Alliance to conduct an economic impact

assessment (EIA) of the WPNS World Cup event for Canmore and the Province of Alberta (See Appendix

C). Results show a positive impact and return to the Town of Canmore, Province of Alberta, and to Canada.

The combined spending of out-of-town athletes, family members, spectators and other visitors to the

Canmore 2017 WPNS World Cup, in combination with the expenditures made by event organizers, totaled

$617,428 in direct spending. This, in turn, generated the total net economic activity (total spending or total

output) of $1.1 million for Canada as a whole, $1 million for the province of Alberta, and just over $808,000

for Canmore. These expenditures supported $170,000 in wages and salaries in Alberta through the

equivalent of four full-year jobs. Of these, three jobs, and the majority of the household income ($206,000)

stayed in the Canmore area. Canada-wide, the event supported five full-year jobs.

Visitors to the event, including spectators, volunteers, and event participants, came primarily from Canmore

or within 40kms of the site (42.4%); a further 16.5% were from Calgary and other areas within 200kms of

Canmore. 16% of spectators were from other parts of Canada, and 15% from international locations. This is

a notable diversity of spectators, and shows that marketing efforts in Calgary and surrounding areas were

effective in attracting spectators (particularly print advertising, as the EIA survey indicates). It is also

notable that 37% of visitors to the Canmore 2017 WPNS World Cup were attending their first adaptive

event of any kind, and many were affiliated with adaptive organizations. Overall, visitor satisfaction with the

event was very high; the average rating for overall experience at the event was over 90%, and nearly 53% of

respondents ranked the event experience a 10/10.

Lack of natural snow at the Canmore Nordic Centre meant that snowmaking was focused almost exclusively

on the race course; as a result, there was little to no public skiing during the event. As a result, this

discouraged many potential spectators from coming to the Nordic Centre and limited our spectator numbers.

This has encouraged the Organizing Committee to consider further opportunities for spectator engagement

on site at future events.

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

13


MEDIA COVERAGE

As the first World Cup of a Paralympic season, this event generated an unanticipated amount of media

coverage from local and international outlets. Twenty journalists and photographers attended the event,

including international press from Japan, Germany, Scotland and the United States. Press coverage extended

beyond these outlets to international coverage (see Appendix D).

Based on viewership and circulation numbers from the publications who covered the event, the event

reached millions of people internationally: The Calgary Herald reaches 107,000 readers per day in print

alone - they wrote three stories; Daily Record, which reaches 136,000 in print readership, wrote 1 story; and

USA Today, whose total reach is 4.1 million readers, wrote one story. Global Television reports their online

viewership is 5 million; CTV and CBC also produced features on Canadian Natalie Wilkie and report

similar numbers.

In the period of November 22 – December 19, the event Facebook page reached nearly 50,000 people and

generated nearly 14,000 post engagements; the event Instagram page received over 1000 likes. In the same

period, the event website (a portal on the Alberta World Cup Society home page) saw over 5,000 sessions;

this represents a dramatic increase from regular traffic on all channels. The IPC provided access to their

WPNS channels as well, which added 6,466 Facebook followers and 2,286 twitter followers to the Canmore

event. The IPC shared two stories and several photos a day about the Canmore event. This boosted the

online reach significantly.

14

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

WWW.ALBERTAWORLDCUP.COM


VENUE

As a legacy site of the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics, the Canmore Nordic Centre is widely regarded as

one of the best Nordic facilities in the world. The successes of this event, and the ability of the venue to

accommodate the needs of a Para Nordic event, further support this reputation.

The Canmore Nordic Centre facilities are crucial to the success of any World Cup, and the Alberta World

Cup Society is grateful for the significant contribution and support from CNC staff. Collaboration efforts

began with the annual snowmaking/grooming plan and the use of meeting rooms throughout the planning

stages. During the WPNS World Cup, the event used some rooms in the Day Lodge for classification and

media, and collaboration was strong regarding the grooming of the competition trails and any on-site

logistical challenges.

For this event, the AWCS installed concrete target bases in 14 of the shooting lanes, and these will continue

to be available for all users of the biathlon range. The Canmore Nordic Centre staff assisted in supervising

this project so that it was completed in keeping with their facility management priorities. The target bases

were a legacy project stemming from the 2013 para-nordic world cup hosted by the AWCS.

Weather and snow (or lack thereof) conditions presented significant challenges in the weeks immediately

preceding the WPNS World Cup. Up to ten days before the event, there was little to no snow on sections of

the proposed race courses. Organizers, IPC officials, and the Canmore Nordic Centre staff were forced to

redesign courses, create contingency plans, and adapt to changing weather conditions on an almost hourly

basis. Without the established base of Frozen Thunder snow, this event would not have been successful. In

addition, the world-class snowmaking capacity of the Canmore Nordic Centre allowed the Organizing

Committee to create exceptional sit ski and standing courses at an international standard with minimal

natural snow.

The relationship with WinSport, primarily through the Bill Warren Training Centre staff, is also important

for the success of the World Cup. The BWTC Manager acted as Chief of Timing for the event, and the

BWTC front-line staff were invaluable for communicating with athletes, staff and public. The event made

use of the entire BWTC facility during the Canmore race week for athlete and volunteer lounges, and

BWTC meeting rooms were made readily available for planning stages.

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

15


CONCLUSION

The success of this WPNS World Cup will continue the Alberta World Cup Society’s strong legacy and

foundation for hosting events at the Canmore Nordic Centre. This report outlines the athletic, economic,

community and hosting capacity legacies created by hosting the Canmore 2017 World Para Nordic Skiing

World Cup.

The legacy funds produced by this event will be included in the AWCS’ board-approved multi-year legacy

investment plan. We will consult with our sport partners (Cross Country Canada, Cross Country Alberta,

Biathlon Canada, Biathlon Alberta, Canmore Nordic Centre Provincial Park, Winsport) to determine

potential projects that will enhance Para Nordic sport in Alberta and Canada. We will also seek out other

funding partners for legacy projects in order to leverage the funds generated by this World Cup event.

Excellent race conditions provided Canadian athletes the opportunity to succeed at home, crucial to their

development as they head into a Paralympic season. Six Canadian medals were won, long-term development

opportunities were created, and countless youth were inspired to pursue their athletic dreams. Beyond the

sport and youth/community impact, the economic impact and return on investment to government funders

and event sponsors was high. The total net economic activity (total spending or total output) generated from

the event was $1.1 million for Canada as a whole, $1 million for the province of Alberta, and just over

$808,000 for Canmore.

School engagement programs created an unprecedented level of awareness for Para Nordic sport in

Canmore and led to an electric atmosphere of youth spectators at the races. More spectators from across

Alberta and Canada attended the races and experienced Canmore’s world-class host community spirit.

Overall, visitor satisfaction with the event was very high; the average rating for overall experience at the

event was over 90%, and nearly 53% of respondents ranked the event experience a 10/10. Media coverage

was high, and volunteers continually expressed their enthusiasm and pride for being involved with the event.

In total, 4,959 volunteer hours were accumulated during this event, with volunteers coming from across

Alberta, Canada, and international locations. These volunteers continue to be an invaluable resource to the

Alberta World Cup Society and its ability to host future events.

The Organizing Committee believes that hosting World Cup events helps to strengthen Canmore’s sense of

pride as a winter sport town and an exceptional international host community, and is proud to have hosted

the successful Canmore 2017 World Para Nordic Skiing World Cup.

16 CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT


APPENDIX A

REPORT OF THE TECHNICAL DELEGATE

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

17


APPENDIX A

REPORT OF THE TECHNICAL DELEGATE

18 CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT


APPENDIX A

REPORT OF THE TECHNICAL DELEGATE

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

19


APPENDIX A

REPORT OF THE TECHNICAL DELEGATE

20 CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT


APPENDIX A

REPORT OF THE TECHNICAL DELEGATE

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

21


APPENDIX A

REPORT OF THE TECHNICAL DELEGATE

22

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT


APPENDIX A

REPORT OF THE TECHNICAL DELEGATE

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

23


APPENDIX A

REPORT OF THE TECHNICAL DELEGATE

24

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT


APPENDIX A

REPORT OF THE TECHNICAL DELEGATE

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

25


APPENDIX A

REPORT OF THE TECHNICAL DELEGATE

26

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT


APPENDIX A

REPORT OF THE TECHNICAL DELEGATE

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

27


APPENDIX A

REPORT OF THE TECHNICAL DELEGATE

28 CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT


APPENDIX A

REPORT OF THE TECHNICAL DELEGATE

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

29


APPENDIX A

REPORT OF THE TECHNICAL DELEGATE

30 CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT


APPENDIX A

REPORT OF THE TECHNICAL DELEGATE

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

31


APPENDIX A

REPORT OF THE TECHNICAL DELEGATE

32 CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT


APPENDIX A

REPORT OF THE TECHNICAL DELEGATE

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

33


APPENDIX A

REPORT OF THE TECHNICAL DELEGATE

34 CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT


APPENDIX A

REPORT OF THE TECHNICAL DELEGATE

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

35


APPENDIX B

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

36

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT


APPENDIX B

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

37


APPENDIX B

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

38

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT


APPENDIX B

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

39


APPENDIX B

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

40

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT


APPENDIX B

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

41


APPENDIX B

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

42 CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT


APPENDIX C

ECONOMIC IMPACT ASSESSMENT SUMMARY

Economic Impact Assessment Report | Key Findings

Prepared by Thomas McGuire, EI Consultant, CSTA | February 17, 2017

CANMORE 2017 WORLD PARA NORDIC SKIING WORLD CUP | DECEMBER 8 TO 17, 2017

Canmore played host to the CANMORE 2017 WORLD PARA

NORDIC SKIING WORLD CUP which attracted more than 170

participants from 17 countries and 2,000 (estimated)

spectators. The 10-day event ran between December 8th

and 17th, 2017.

As an international world-class event, the CANMORE 2017

WORLD PARA NORDIC SKIING WORLD CUP drew the

majority of its fans from the local area, including groups of

students who watched the competitions.

Organized by the Alberta World Cup Society, in partnership

with Cross Country Canada and World Para Nordic Skiing,

this event drew the world’s best para-athletes and took

place at the Canmore Nordic Centre.

Para-Nordic skiing, a sport for participants with a physical

disability, saw most of the elite athletes compete in both

cross-country skiing and biathlon races.

By the Numbers

The combined spending of out–of-town athletes, family

members, spectators and other visitors to the CANMORE 2017

WORLD PARA NORDIC SKIING WORLD CUP, in combination with

the expenditures made by event organizers, totaled $617,428 in

direct spending.

These expenditures supported $170,000 in wages and salaries in

Alberta through the equivalent of 4 full-year jobs. Of these, 3

jobs, and the majority of the household income ($206,000)

stayed in the Canmore area. Canada-wide, the event supported

5 full-year jobs.

The total net economic activity (total spending or total output)

generated by the CANMORE 2017 WORLD PARA NORDIC SKIING

WORLD CUP was: $1.1 million for Canada as a whole, $1 million

for the province of Alberta, and just over $808,000 for Canmore.

This event supported tax revenues totaling just under $155,000

across Canada. The event supported federal government tax

revenues of $84,000 and contributed $33,000 in taxes for the

Province of Alberta.

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

43


APPENDIX D

MEDIA COVERAGE

2017 Canmore WPNS World Cup Media Coverage

Twenty journalists and photographers attended the event, including international press from

Japan, Germany, Scotland and the United States. Press coverage extended beyond these outlets

to international coverage (see links below). Based on viewership and circulation numbers from

the publications who covered the event, the WPNS World Cup event reached millions of people

internationally: The Calgary Herald reaches 107,000 readers per day in print alone - they wrote

three stories; Daily Record, which reaches 136,000 in print readership, wrote 1 story; and USA

Today, whose total reach is 4.1 million readers, wrote one story. Global Television reports their

online viewership is 5 million; CTV and CBC also produced features on Canadian Natalie Wilkie

and report similar numbers.

http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/sports/other-sports/arendz-focused-on-the-process-

168528/

http://www.kenoradailyminerandnews.com/2017/11/29/kenora-para-nordic-skier-jessebachinsky-ready-for-international-debut-in-canmore

http://nationalpost.com/sports/olympics/how-emily-young-poured-her-injury-rage-intotraining-and-became-a-paralympian

http://nationalpost.com/sports/olympics/i-should-contact-this-lady-how-a-chanceconversation-at-canadian-tire-sent-brittany-hudak-onto-para-nordic-sport-success

http://www.thecragandcanyon.ca/2017/12/06/world-cup-para-nordic-skiing-takes-overcanmore

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/uk-world-news/hero-who-legs-blown-afghanistan-

11646460

http://panow.com/article/728483/hudak-picks-medal-world-cup

http://www.rmoutlook.com/article/ParaNordic-skiing-world-cup-kicks-off-at-CNC-

20171207

https://globalnews.ca/news/3888764/cross-country-ski-canada-reacts-to-russianathletes-competing-in-canmore-world-cup-amidst-doping-scandal/

https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/olympics/2018/01/22/oksana-masters-eyesmore-gold-cross-country-biathlon-paralympics/1054860001/

http://www.cbc.ca/sports/paralympics/emily-young-para-nordic-world-cup-silver-

1.4445925

https://www.saobserver.net/sports/lovely-skiing-at-larch-hills/

https://www.bclocalnews.com/sports/wilkie-committed-to-paralympic-dreams/

http://www.ledauphine.com/skichrono/2017/12/10/ski-de-fond-coupe-du-monde-parabenjamin-daviet-s-impose-a-canmore

44 CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT


APPENDIX D

MEDIA COVERAGE

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

45


APPENDIX E

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

Organizing Commi9ee

Canmore 2017 World Para

Nordic Skiing World Cup

December 8-18, 2017

Final Version

Volunteers

(Linda Dunbar/

Tara Spenrath)

Canmore 2017 WPNS World Cup

Norbert Meier (AWCS President)

Carly Lewis (OC Chair)

Blair Dunbar (Chief of CompeAAon)

Treasurer/Financial

Management

(Larry Greer/Ken HewiX)

AdministraAve

Support

(Nancy Richard)

Advisory Board

(Len Apedaile,

IPC TD)

CCC Liaison

(Mike Edwards)

CNC Liaison

(Briony Williamson)

Town Liaison

(Sally Caudill)

Team

Services

Team Services/

Accessibility

(Nancy Lopez)

ClassificaAon

(Bjorn Taylor/

Silvia SteXler)

AnA-Doping

(Katharine

Armitage)

Medical

(Jim/Wendy

Hendry)

IPC VIP

Management

(Karen Guidos)

Event

OperaAons

Expo

(n/a)

Downtown

Ceremonies

(Andrea

Murphy)

Closing

Banquet

(Andrea

Murphy)

Flower Ceremonies

(CCC MarAne Zilligen/

Susan Gudwer)

Race

Announcer

(Hugh Burton)

MarkeAng

AdverAsing/

PromoAons

(Carly Lewis/JusAn

Brisbane)

Sponsor

Fulfilment

(Leslie Sellers)

Media Liaison

(JusAn Brisbane/

Megan Imrie)

Schools

Engagement

(Sara Renner)

Venue

Services

Food Services

(Linda

Dunbar)

Security/

Parking

(Brad Freer)

Spectator

Services/Waste

Management

(Megan Smith)

Economic Impact

Assessment

(Megan Smith)

Chief of CompeAAon

(Blair Dunbar/Greg

Thompson)

CompeAAon Secretary

(Garth Jenkins/Harri Ulmer)

Chief of Course

(Lyle McLeod/Andy Harris)

Chief of Stadium

(Kirsten Kaarsoo/Gerry Hurley)

Chief of Range

(Ken Davies)

Chief of Timing

(Cindy Low)

Chief of Start

(Mike Norton)

Chief of CompeAAon Control

(John Reeves)

Adopt-A-NaAon

(Misty Kendall/

Kristy Sing)

Official Languages/

TranslaAon

(Louise

Letourneau)

46

CANMORE 2017 WPNS - FINAL REPORT

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines