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ARE VACCINES SAFE?

KICKBACKS AND CONFLICTS

OF INTEREST ABOUND AMONG

LAWMAKERS, DOCTORS AND

PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANIES

IN THE MULTIBILLION-DOLLAR

MANDATORY CHILD VACCINATION

BUSINESS

FITTING IN

CHILDREN SORT THROUGH

MANY CONFLICTING MESSAGES

ABOUT GETTING ALONG WITH

THEIR PEERS

+DIRECTORY

OF EDUCATIONAL

OPTIONS

THE LONG

GAME

ACQUIRING FINANCIAL AID IS BUT THE

FIRST OF MANY CHALLENGES IN A

FULFILLING COLLEGE EXPERIENCE


2 BACK TO SCHOOL 2018 PASADENA WEEKLY


5 ARE VACCINES SAFE?

KICKBACKS AND CONFLICTS OF INTEREST ABOUND AMONG LAWMAKERS,

DOCTORS AND PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANIES IN THE MULTIBILLION-

DOLLAR MANDATORY CHILD VACCINATION BUSINESS

BY ALAINE LOWELL

11 FITTING IN

CHILDREN SORT THROUGH MANY CONFLICTING MESSAGES ABOUT

GETTING ALONG WITH THEIR PEERS

BY SHEILA MENDES COLEMAN

18 DIRECTORY OF

EDUCATIONAL OPTIONS

28 THE LONG GAME

ACQUIRING FINANCIAL AID IS BUT THE FIRST OF MANY CHALLENGES IN

A FULFILLING COLLEGE EXPERIENCE

BY JANA J. MONJI

EDITOR Kevin Uhrich

DEPUTY EDITOR André Coleman

ART DIRECTOR Stephanie Torres

ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR Richard Garcia

PRODUCTION DESIGNERS Rochelle Bassarear

WRITERS Kevin Uhrich, Michael Cervin, Simone Dupuy

SALES AND MARKETING Brenda Clarke, Leslie Lamm,

Mari Carmen Martinez, Alexandra Valdes,

OFFICE MANAGER Ann Turrietta

HUMAN RESOURCES Andrea E. Baker

BUSINESS MANAGER Linda Lam

CONTROLLER Kacie Cobian

ACCOUNTING Perla Castillo, Yiyang Wang, Jimmy

Weathersbee, Quinton Wright

PUBLISHER Dina Stegon

SOUTHLAND PUBLISHING

V. P. OF OPERATIONS David Comden

PRESIDENT Bruce Bolkin

CONTACT US

PHONE (626) 584-1500

FAX (626) 795-0149

MAILING ADDRESS

50 S. De Lacey Ave.

Suite 200

Pasadena, CA 91105

©2018 Southland

Publishing, Inc.

All rights reserved.

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Are

Vaccines

Safe?

KICKBACKS AND CONFLICTS OF INTEREST ABOUND

AMONG LAWMAKERS, DOCTORS AND PHARMACEUTICAL

COMPANIES IN THE MULTIBILLION-DOLLAR MANDATORY

CHILD VACCINATION BUSINESS

BY ALAINE LOWELL

continued on page 6

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5


continued from page 5

On July 1, 2016, Senate Bill 277 became law in California. It

is the most stringent vaccination mandate in the country,

requiring strict adherence to the Centers for Disease Control

and Prevention (CDC) vaccine schedule for all school children

in order to attend public or private school, while removing all

religious or personal exemptions, and allowing only extremely

limited medical exemptions. While SB277 supporters claim the

science on vaccines is “settled” and vaccines are proven safe and

effective, questions remain.

Strict Adherence

Since vaccines were first introduced in the 1950s, the number

and types of vaccines has gone from a recommendation for polio

and smallpox vaccines to seven recommended vaccines in the

1960s and to 69 mandatory doses of 16 vaccines, from infancy to

18 years of age. These include shots to ward off diphtheria, hepatitis

B, haemophilus influenzae type b, measles, mumps, pertussis

(whooping cough), poliomyelitis, rubella, tetanus and varicella

(chickenpox). SB277 also requires mandatory adherence to any

new vaccinations added to the schedule by the CDC. At last count,

270-plus additional vaccines are in the developmental pipeline.

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A Multibillion-Dollar Industry

Since the 1980s the vaccine division of the pharmaceutical industry

has grown into a $30 billion annual enterprise worldwide.

As noted by The Guardian in 2017, “Pharmaceutical companies

spend far more than any other industry to influence politicians,

and have poured close to $2.5 billion into lobbying and funding

members of Congress over the past decade.” It is also an industry

plagued by lawsuits, with multibillion-dollar payouts to offset le-


gally proven claims of deaths and disabilities, unlawful promotion,

falsifying data to the FDA, overcharging government programs,

kickbacks to doctors and pharmacists, and poor manufacturing

practices, to name a few. As citizens, we depend on government

agencies, such as the FDA and CDC, to keep them honest. Does it

work?

In 2013, a paper published by Harvard’s Center for Ethics in the

Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics titled “Institutional Corruption

of Pharmaceuticals and the Myth of Safe and Effective Drugs”

detailed how the FDA has been neutered in its capacity to protect

the health and welfare of Americans. The culprits: large-scale lobbying

and political contributions that influence legislation contrary

to the FDA mission, and that has led to underfunding of its enforcement

capacities; industry-paid “user fees” to the FDA, $690 million

annually since 1992. As Marcia Angell, former editor-in-chief of the

New England Journal of Medicine, observed, this put the FDA on

the payroll of the industry it regulates. Industry’s influence over

physicians has “undermined their position as independent, trusted

advisers to patients,” she wrote. Doctors receive compensation for

each fully vaccinated patient.

Proof of FDA failure to protect the public comes with the startling

revelation that, “Deaths from prescription drugs — approved

by the FDA and properly prescribed by doctors — tops 128,000

annually.”

VAERS

In 1986 Congress passed the National Childhood Vaccine Injury

Act that relieved vaccine manufacturers and the medical industry

from any liability for vaccine injuries. A Vaccine Court was established

as the only recourse for vaccine injuries with compensation

paid by consumers. Without responsibility for harms caused by their

products, vaccine makers had little incentive to place safety over

profits.

The Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS) is a

continued on page 9

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7


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continued from page 7

voluntary system, mostly unknown to the public and not encouraged

by doctors. About 1,700 of the 11,000 “vaccine adverse events”

reported annually are serious, and result in problems that include

hospitalizations, death or disability. However, The US Department

of Health and Human Services (HHS) reports that only an estimated

1 percent of vaccine injuries are ever reported to VAERS. In spite of

that, $4 billion in federal compensation has been paid to thousands

of vaccine victims over the past three decades. Barbara Loe Fisher,

president of the National Vaccine Information Center, calls the Act

“a historic acknowledgement by the US government” that government

licensed and mandated childhood vaccines can and do cause

injury and death.

Can We Trust the CDC?

The CDC is in charge of the vaccine schedule, but like the FDA,

their independence is also in question. Robert F. Kennedy Jr., whose

website The Mercury Project provides information on thimerosal,

an ethyl mercury preservative in vaccines, points out numerous

studies by Congress, the Senate and HHS that “paint CDC as a cesspool

of corruption, mismanagement and dysfunction with alarming

conflicts of interest suborning its research, regulatory and policymaking

functions.”

In August of 2014, Kennedy writes, “17-year CDC veteran, Dr.

William Thompson, author of the principal study cited by CDC

to exculpate mercury-preserved vaccines from the autism link,

invoked whistleblower protection and turned extensive agency files

over to Congress [revealing] that for the past decade his superiors

have pressured him and his fellow scientists to lie and manipulate

data about the safety of the mercury-based preservative thimerosal

to conceal its causative link to a suite of brain injuries, including

autism.”

The Elephant in the Room

The estimated 1,000 percent increase in neurological disorders

and learning disabilities for American children, and an astronomical

rise of Alzheimer’s disease in adults that appears to correspond

with the increase in childhood vaccinations, remains unstudied

and unexplained by the medical/ pharmaceutical industry and their

partners, the CDC and FDA. Their main focus continues to be providing

proof that vaccines are not responsible. In 1999 thimerosal

was ordered removed from childhood vaccines by the CDC because

of the proven dangers but has been reintroduced in the HepB vaccine,

injected into newborns in their first hours of life and now

recommended for pregnant women and annually for all children and

adults. ■

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Fitting In

CHILDREN SORT THROUGH MANY CONFLICTING MESSAGES ABOUT GETTING ALONG WITH THEIR PEERS

BY SHEILA MENDES COLEMAN

continued on page 13

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continued from page 11

Peer pressure is defined as influence from members

of one’s group of peers, but that deceptively

simple characterization hides a darker

meaning; that what we do — or don’t do — is often

directly tied to the actions, words and opinions of

our friends and those we look up to.

Beginning in pre-school, children learn the importance

of fitting in and assimilation. But as they

grow, they begin to receive conflicting messages. On

one hand, well-meaning parents and teachers tell

kids to “be themselves” and embrace their uniqueness,

but then they constantly remind children of

the importance of conformity in so many aspects of

life.

Peer pressure can take many forms, but generally-speaking

there’s the overt, or explicit form, and

a more subtle form, referred to as implicit pressure.

Children may experience one or the other, or

a combination of the two. In its aggressive, explicit

continued on page 15

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continued from page 13

form, kids learn fairly quickly what sets them apart

negatively from other kids. But, with implicit pressure,

kids develop a sense of what makes them

uncomfortably different from unspoken cues that

can be harder to deduce and process.

When it comes to the emergence of peer pressure

in a child’s life, “It begins as soon as children start

to pay attention to what other children think about

them,” said Brett Laursen, Ph.D., professor of psychology

at Florida Atlantic University and a fellow

at the American Psychological Association (APA,

apa.org).

“We see it over behavior problems where one set

of peers will influence another to act badly. We also

see it over academic achievement where friends do

better when they’re paired with other kids who are

doing better in school. We see this as early as first

grade,” Laursen told APA writer Audrey Hamilton.

A recent survey by the Centers for Disease Control

and Prevention (CDC) labels peer-pressure as

directly responsible for an increase in risky behavior,

such as drinking, smoking, and potentially

t ly

continued on page 16

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dangerous sexual behaviors. Though peer pressure

is definitely a causative factor in drug and alcohol

abuse, it can also be used as an excuse for poor

impulse-control and individual lapses in judgment,

according to the CDC.

Parents must he actively engaged in ways that

may make their child uncomfortable, but inevitably

will lead to a stronger bond and greater awareness

of signs of trouble. Get to know your child’s friends

and, whenever possible, take an active interest in

their likes and habits, too. This is often the best

gauge of what your child’s interests are likely to

lean toward. Encourage your children to come to

you with problems and be the one to initiate dialogue

with them when you sense things are amiss.

Between the ages of 6 and 12, children, experts

say, begin to see themselves and their place in society.

During this time, even children from harmonious,

healthy households learn that the world outside

can be cruel and mean-spirited, and that “going

along to get along” sometimes offers the path of

least resistance.

In my own home, I know firsthand the effects

of peer pressure on a sensitive child. Earlier this

year, my husband and I spent quite a bit of money

on a hairstylist for our 9-year-old daughter. Her hair

needed professional care, and the stylist we found

did a beautiful job, which my daughter also loved.

When I dropped my child off at school the next

day, I reminded her about the pricey hairdo and cautioned

her to leave her hair alone, and not to allow

others to touch it. Upon picking her up after school,


I was met by a nervous child who’d messily undone

$70 worth of hairdressing because, as she put it,

“The other kids didn’t like it.”

After my initial outrage and horror had subsided,

my husband and I decided to use this experience

to address how the influence of others led to her

making a poor decision with nothing but negative

consequences for her, and zero consequences for

her opinionated classmates.

We talked to her about ways to respond to their

criticism that could shut down any further conversation,

or how walking away from negative, critical

talk or expressing pride in her appearance may have

thwarted or ended ridicule. We also talked about

what we expected from her, as our daughter, regardless

of the external forces surrounding her.

But above all, we reminded her that she has the

power over her physical actions, not her classmates

or friends. We reiterated that personal responsibility

will always be a key component to a happy and

successful life.

In the end, she and I worked together to re-do her

beautiful hairstyle as it had originally been done

and we discussed an appropriate punishment to

help her retain the lesson.

My daughter learned that there were consequences

for her disobedience, as well as that there

is power in choosing to ignore the opinion of others.

I learned to be more adept at styling and have more

confidence in my abilities in the absence of a professional,

and her classmates learned to love her as she

is. It was a powerful lesson for us all. ■

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17


DIRECTORY

OF OPTIONS

18

BACK TO SCHOOL 2018 PASADENA WEEKLY


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Alma Fuerte Public School

Alma Fuerte is a free public elementary school in Altadena. Alma Fuerte

has an innovative focus on entrepreneurship and personalized learning,

helping students develop the academic and achievement skills needed

for success in 21st century careers. Alma Fuerte is WASC-accredited and

received its charter authorization from the Los Angeles County Board of

Education.

For a tour and enrollment information, contact Anne Lee, Director of Operations,

at (626) 204-5265.

Altadena Children’s Center

At Altadena Children’s Center, the families of the children in our programs

who range in age from 2 months to prekindergarten fi nd programs that

meet the needs of the whole child within a developmentally appropriate

framework. Our family-centered approach helps to nurture healthy partnerships

between teachers and parents as we all work together to support

the children. We are eager to help families from diverse backgrounds to

discover that Altadena Children’s Center is the best place for their child’s

early education.

Contact Director Toni Boucher at (626) 797-6142 or visit accc-kids.org.

Barnhart School

We believe that education is a lifelong comprehensive human experience;

that social and emotional learning is as important as academic learning.

Accredited by the California Association of Independent Schools and

Western Association of Schools and Colleges, Barnhart is distinguished

through its focus on Early Literacy, Writers’ Workshop, the Virtues

Program, conversational Spanish at all grade levels, daily PE and a stellar

middle school program where students are graduating with acceptance

to their top choice high schools. In addition to a robust and rigorous academic

base of subjects, we provide a full range of co-curricular programs

including music, art, technology, Spanish and PE. In middle school, we

further extend learning to include classes in public speaking, life skills,

woodshop, theater arts, yearbook production, student leadership and

much more. Barnhart is known as a “down to earth”, diverse community.

We invite you to take a tour and talk with our parents and students. Come

meet our dedicated team of professionals, spend some time in our community,

and watch our students in action!

240 W. Colorado Blvd., Arcadia (626)446-5588 barnhartschool.org

Bishop Alemany High School

Founded in 1956, co-ed since 1970, Bishop Alemany is a beautiful,

sprawling campus with a diverse student population over 1,150. Offering

a full Honors and AP curriculum, in addition to college-prep, including Engineering,

Robotics, and Biomedical Science program. We are one of the

few schools in the LA Archdiocese with the AP Capstone distinction. We

maintain the optimum blend of study and athletics, competing in 22 different

sports, many at the Division 1 level. On-site facilities include multiple

athletic fi elds and courts; a swimming pool; gym; a 3,000 sq. ft. dance

studio; a student art gallery; and, coming soon, an advanced manufacturing

machine shop. Our commitment to excellence is built upon all of this

and a community of faith and devotion to service.

11111 N. Alemany Drive, Mission Hills (818) 837-5222, alemany.org, admissions@alemany.org

continued on page 20

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Bosco Tech’s College-Prep STEM Curriculum

Helps Students Thrive

Bosco Tech is an all-male Catholic high school that combines a rigorous

college-preparatory and technology-focused education to qualifi ed young

men of all religious, ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. The innovative

science, engineering, technology and math (STEM) curriculum allows

students to exceed university admission requirements while completing

extensive integrated coursework in one of several applied science and

engineering fi elds. An accelerated honors and Advanced Placement track

is offered. Students have the opportunity to participate in nearly 30 clubs,

honor societies, and civic engagement and leadership programs. A member

of the CIF-Southern Section and CAA, Bosco Tech competes in nine

sports: baseball, basketball, cross country, football, golf, soccer, tennis,

track and fi eld, and volleyball.

Financial aid is available. For more information, call (626) 940-2000 or visit

boscotech.edu.

Burbank Music Academy

Burbank Music Academy opened in 2007 and quickly established itself

as the premier music education destination for students of all ages in the

San Fernando Valley. BMA has grown into a multi-faceted arts facility

and is dedicated to providing the best environment and equipment for

our students. Our programs include private lessons, band coaching, early

childhood classes & more. We work very hard to ensure that our clients

always get the best music education possible. Our students have been

accepted into youth orchestras and to top music colleges including USC,

CalArts, Berklee & Belmont. Our amazing facility; top not teachers with

strong educational backgrounds and real world experience help us achieve

a positive musical atmosphere for all. Parents know the drive is worth it!

4107 W. Burbank Blvd., Burbank (818) 845-ROCK (7625) BurbankMusicAcademy.com

20

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Chandler School

Chandler School is a co-educational, independent school in Pasadena

serving 450 students in grades K-8. Chandler adheres to its mission to

provide each student with the highest quality and most academicallychallenging

education in a nurturing, balanced and diverse environment.

A Chandler education seeks to develop good character, self-reliance and a

commitment to community in students as a foundation for academic and

personal success. Chandler offers engaging classes taught by dedicated

teachers whose average length of service to Chandler is 10 years.

Chandler students benefi t from exceptional educational facilities, as well

as robust arts, athletics and after school programs, all provided on a safe

campus. Chandler families come from 48 different zip codes in the San

Gabriel Valley and beyond.

(626) 795-9314 - chandlerschool.org

Clairbourn School

Admissions season is coming up, and now is a great time to book a tour

for the fall! Clairbourn serves students in preschool through middle

school grades (JPK-8th). We are known for small class sizes, experienced

faculty, a challenging academic program, and a wide array of co-curricular

classes built on a strong foundation of values and community. Clairbourn

also sends its graduates on to top area high schools and is accredited by

CAIS and WASC. Our school has a beautiful 8-acre campus, state-of-theart

security, high-tech classrooms, outdoor learning spaces, expansive

athletic facilities, a swimming pool, daycare, and after-school classes.

Middle School Merit Scholarships are also available for qualifi ed 6-8 grade

students which can be combined with fi nancial aid if needed (see www.

clairbourn.org/merit for more information).

To book a tour call admissions at (626) 286-3108, or email admissions@

clairbourn.org.

The Counter Burger

We want to challenge the way people think about burgers. We’re about

creative construction. We think life is about experiences. Trying Stuff.

Learning. Stretching. Being Inventive. So we’ve searched for ingredients,

chosen meats, created sauces, baked buns, melted cheeses and crafted

shakes that shout fl avor. Take them and create something special.

140 Shoppers Lane, Pasadena (626) 440-1008 thecounterburger.com

Elements Dance

Elements Dance Space is the newest dance and fi tness studio in

Pasadena to serve all artists, educators, and students, providing limitless

opportunities for creation, knowledge, and training to inspire the

advancement of every individual within the space. They offer dance and

fi tness classes from ages 2 to adult as well as provide many opportunities

for youth to train and perform. Classes are available for beginner to

professional level dancers. Their 10,000 square foot facility offers fi ve

different studio spaces and ample complimentary parking to meet all your

needs. The space is also available to rent for classes, rehearsals, video/

photoshoots, or events. EDS will soon be enrolling for their Fall Session

beginning September 4th.

For more information about their dance studio, visit elementsdancespace.com.

continued on page 22

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Emmaus Lutheran School

For 77 years, Emmaus Lutheran School has nurtured children from

Preschool through Eighth grade. Rigorous academic standards and

Christian-based life skills produce well-rounded students. Graduates go

to universities including Johns Hopkins, MIT, West Point, Oxford College,

USC, UCLA and other UC campuses. Before and after school care, sports,

student government, fi eld trips, music, art, Spanish and technology, with

SMALL CLASSES and INDIVIDUALIZED CARE help students achieve.

Several afterschool enrichment classes available on campus. Please call to

tour our campus. Emmaus can issue form I-20 for international students

wishing to study in the US and all our teachers have training in English

Language Learning including one full time dedicated ELL teacher.

Learn more at: emmausalhambra.org or visit 840 S. Almansor St., Alhambra

(626)289-3664

The Gooden School

Located in Sierra Madre, The Gooden School has been offering a strong

educational foundation using both traditional and progressive approaches

since 1975. Since its founding, The Gooden School has been committed to

empowering young people to improve the fabric of society. This is accomplished

by focusing all aspects of the school experience on the school’s

core values of Respect for Self, Respect for Others, Respect for the World.

The school’s administration and faculty are committed to knowing each

child individually, meeting each child where he or she is academically and

emotionally, and offering every student chances to excel every day, whether

that success is in the classroom, onstage, or on the athletic fi eld. As an

independent Episcopal school, students are also given opportunities to

grow ethically and morally through the school’s twice a week chapel and

service learning programs. While immersed in this supportive environment,

students study not only traditional academic subjects but each child

also learns Latin and Spanish and all students play a musical instrument.

Please join us for an open house on Saturday, October 27 from 10:00 a.m.

to 12:00 p.m. and Wednesday, January 16 from 4:00 to 5:30 p.m.

For more information please call (626) 355-2410 or visit our website at

goodenschool.org.

Halstrom Academy

Discover a Better Way to Learn with Halstrom Academy!

Get one-to-one personalized instruction, fl exible class schedules and

more—all while being part of a social, connected community. Halstrom

Academy is an accredited private school for grades 6-12 offering over 170

courses including many innovative electives. Halstrom’s transformational

teachers tailor instruction to each student’s skills, needs, learning style

and pace. Offering an alternative to the traditional classroom, Halstrom

fosters academic achievement and personal development in an atmosphere

where students feel safe, confi dent, and engaged. Halstrom believes

students can reach their full potential with personalized instruction

that instills confi dence, character, and a lifelong love of learning. WASC

& NIPSA Accredited; UC, CSU and NCAA Approved. Open enrollment for

full-time and part-time students.

For more information, visit halstrom4u.com, or call (866) 590-7548. 35 N.

Lake Ave. Suite 250, Pasadena

22

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continued from page 17

High Point Academy

What makes High Point unique? Our mission is dedicated to awakening the

joy of learning and inspiring every student to reach his/her fullest potential

in a collaborative and stimulating community of caring and academic

excellence. Our devoted and talented faculty provides a strong, challenging,

and enriched K-8 curriculum that, in addition to the core academics,

includes Spanish or French, vocal and instrumental music, art, library,

the latest in technology and innovation, and daily physical education. This

grounding of critical thinking and social and emotional skills paves the

way for our students entering high school with the best possible foundation.

Last year, our graduates gained entrance into local independent high

schools and earned over $700,000 in merit scholarships.

Please come and visit during our Open House or tours this fall to see our

diverse and close-knit community and be sure to visit our website to learn

more about our academic programs.

highpointacademy.org

Idyllwild Arts Academy & Summer Program

The forested 205-acre Idyllwild Arts campus is just two hours from Los

Angeles and an hour and one refreshing mile above Palm Springs. The

campus hosts Idyllwild Arts Boarding Arts High School, where talented

teenagers from over 32 countries specialize in their chosen arts disciplines

while studying challenging college-prep academics, and the

Idyllwild Arts Summer Program, offering immersive workshops in every

arts discipline to people of all ages and skill levels. Both the Academy and

the Summer Program accomplish the Idyllwild Arts mission of changing

lives through the transformative power of art. Majors include: Creative

Writing, Dance, Fashion Design, Film & Digital Media, Interarts, Music,

Theatre, Visual Arts.

Idyllwildarts.org

Immaculate Heart High School & Middle School

A private, Catholic, college preparatory school, Immaculate Heart educates

and empowers young women in grades sixth through 12th grades.

Founded in 1906, Immaculate Heart offers a distinguished history, with

more than 10,000 graduates. Its hillside campus, centrally located in Los

Angeles near Griffi th Park, welcomes students of geographic, ethnic and

religious diversity. Virtually 100 percent matriculate to college, including

the most prestigious universities in the country. The high school’s

curriculum offers 14 honors classes and 18 Advanced Placement courses,

including the new two-year AP Capstone course. IH fi elds teams in basketball,

cross country, diving, equestrian, soccer, softball, swimming, tennis,

track & fi eld, and volleyball. Students participate in community service,

retreats and liturgies, theatrical productions, the visual arts, and more

than 30 clubs. Bus transportation serves Pasadena!

5515 Franklin Ave., Los Angeles, immaculateheart.org (323) 461-3651

Justine Sherman & Associates

Justine Sherman & Associates serves the speech-language and educational

needs of individuals throughout the greater San Gabriel Valley

community. We design customized treatment plans with personalized

measurable goals achieved through individual therapy sessions or classes

conducted by our certifi ed and licensed speech-language pathologists and

supervised aids. Our collaborative relationship with families, educators

and health care professionals ensures the best opportunity for client success

and supports our philosophy of holistic treatment.

justineshermanslp.com or (626) 355-1729

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Kids Klub

Kids Klub’s After School Program offers parents piece of mind all-year

round by providing after-school and before-school care and transportation

from local schools. The program includes a scheduled homework

time with the assistance of our teachers. Providing a quiet, comfortable

environment where children can focus on their homework and receive help

when needed is the centerpiece of our afterschool program. Our program

looks to instill children with the study habits necessary to become selfreliant

and academically confi dent. At Kids Klub, children engage in structured

activities including, cooking, science, arts & crafts, and dramatic

play. Plenty of outdoor time and outside games allow your child a chance

to unwind from a busy day.

For more information on our schedule and program please call (626) 945-

0952 kidsklubcdc.com.

La Salle High School

La Salle High School is dedicated to excellent student performance in

academics, arts & athletics. La Salle Summer Academic Institute is for 5th

to 12th graders. Courses provide opportunities to hone skills and to learn

new concepts in the more relaxed environment of summer. Students earn

high school academic credit in some courses, and many courses satisfy

UC standards. Sports Camps are available throughout the summer for

student athletes.

(626) 696-4300 lasallehs.org

Los Angeles Children’s Chorus

First Experiences in Singing

Los Angeles Children’s Chorus’s First Experiences in Singing (FES)

classes introduce children to joyous vocal expression appropriate for the

children’s age and developmental stage. These classes are non-auditioned,

non-performing groups that introduce six- to seven-year-old children to

the fundamentals of singing. No prior musical experience is required.

LACC developed this three-level, sequential course to impart the foundational

elements of musicianship and bel canto choral technique, while

engaging the whole child in fun, interactive musical learning. Classes

prepare children for auditions for LACC’s award-winning core ensembles.

For more information, visit us at lachildrenschorus.org/fes

Mentor Ave Preschool

Located in the heart of Pasadena, Mentor Avenue Preschool students are

engaged in the joy of discovery. Everywhere there is fun and excitement

while learning through art, science, music, cooking, games and other

activities. Our loving staff encourages independence in the younger

students, especially in the area of potty training, along with healthy eating

habits and good table manners. Class projects involve team work in order

to build good social skills. Our innovative approach to the outdoor classroom

inspires a natural learning environment. Mentor Avenue Preschool

is a Christian Preschool dedicated to providing quality early childhood

education, while nurturing Christian Values, to prepare children for kindergarten

and beyond.

308 N. Mentor Ave., Pasadena (626) 396-7008

mentoravenuepreschool.com

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Options for Learning

Free, low cost & high quality full-day & half-day preschool for 3 to 5 year

olds. Head Start Pasadena provides half-day comprehensive early childhood

education, health, nutrition, and parent involvement services to low-income

children and their families. Cost: Free for qualifying families.

Call (626) 204-8900 to enroll.

Full-day Preschool provides full-day, 12 month program to prepare children

for a successful future by meeting and enhancing their intellectual, emotional,

social and physical development in a supportive, developmentally

appropriate manner. Cost: Free, low cost & full cost depending on income

and family size.

Call (626) 858-0527 to enroll.

Pacific Oaks College & Children’s School

Nestled in a campus of Craftsman houses and tree-shaded pathways in

Pasadena, Pacifi c Oaks Children’s School (PO) provides an unparalleled

setting for early childhood education. Through an emergent and play-based

curriculum, PO has inspired a love of learning and confi dence since 1945.

Children learn through active exploration, as our outdoor classrooms spark

inquiry, creativity, and refl ection. Enrichment programs include art, music,

and literature. Most importantly, our close-knit classroom helps children

develop compassion and to value each individual. Part-time and full-day

programs, as well as English/Spanish immersion programs, are available for

children ages 2 to 5. Infant/toddler programs focused on parent/child participation

are also offered. Please contact us for scholarship information.

To learn more about how PO ignites curiosity, creativity, and compassion, visit

pacifi coakschildrensschool.org or call (626) 529-8011.

Pacifica Graduate Institute

Pacifi ca Graduate Institute is an accredited graduate school offering masters

and doctoral degree programs in the traditions of depth psychology.

Our educational environment nourishes respect for cultural diversity and

individual differences, and our students have access to an impressive array

of educational resources on Pacifi ca’s two campuses, both of which are

located a few miles south of Santa Barbara, California. Join us for a One-Day

Introduction to Pacifi ca’s graduate degree programs in Depth Psychology,

Humanities and Mythological Studies. The event offers prospective graduate

students a comprehensive introduction and orientation to the distinctive

educational features of the Institute. This Introduction provides an excellent

opportunity to Experience Pacifi ca’s unique interdisciplinary graduate degree

programs through faculty-led, program-specifi c information sessions and

presentations, hear from Pacifi ca students and alumni about their experiences

and career outcomes, explore the grounds of the Ladera Lane campus

& learn more about the admissions process & fi nancial aid.

Saturday, August 25th from 10:00am-4:00pm. Pacifi ca.edu.

Pasadena City College

Fall Semester at Pasadena City College Offers Something for Everyone

As summer turns to fall at Pasadena City College, area residents are returning

to the San Gabriel Valley’s premier two-year institution. What many don’t

know, though, is PCC serves any student that comes to its doors, no matter

where their educational journey has taken them. While most students arriving

this fall will have recently completed high school, more than one-quarter

of the credit-earning students will be older than 25 years of age. These

students could be folks who took a few years off before returning to college,

or people seeking a change in their career. Many PCC students are mothers

and fathers, balancing the responsibilities of raising families in addition to

school and work duties. The college offers a range of support for students,

no matter their needs. Why not start something new at PCC this fall?

Learn more at pasadena.edu.

Pasadena Waldorf School

Early Childhood through High school

Discover why Waldorf Education looks different. See how robust and rigorous

academics and immersion in the arts work together by taking a tour.

Personal and formal tours are available throughout the year. Offering High

school; grades 1-8; kindergarten; preschool; and a Parent Child program.

Full and half day schedules available for preschool and kindergarten. Tuition

range from $13,330 - $25,980. Tuition assistance is available.

Call the Admissions Offi ce to learn more and schedule a tour.

(626) 794-9564 ext. 209

Piano Play Music

To inspire and create a world that has healthy visions for all people using

music as a tool is the philosophy Sharon Shaheed has emphasize in her

music programs taught at Piano Play Music Systems since 1987. Ms.

Shaheed believes the best way to encourage children to want to learn how

to read, play and compose music is to establish trust, make learning fun in

a nurturing environment. At Piano Play the teachers strive to do this in their

group and private lessons. Our group programs start at 19 months to 9 year

old and children are placed in these classes based on their age and skill level.

The success of our theory-based teaching method has been featured on the

OWN network series “Raising Whitley” and on the Oprah & Friends Radio

talk show with Dr. Robyn Smith. Our fall semester begins on Sunday, August

12th to Saturday, January 19th.

Locations are in Pasadena and Sherman Oaks, pianoplaymusic.com. Call us at

(818) 789-6110 or email us at info@pianoplaymusic.com to reserve your spot!

Polytechnic School

Polytechnic School will begin Wednesday, Aug. 29, when Upper School

students return to campus (Lower and Middle School students follow on

Tuesday, Sept. 4). Founded in 1907, Poly is an independent, coeducational,

college-preparatory school that offers a broad curriculum in the liberal arts

for students in grades K-12. The school enrolls approximately 860 students

from diverse ethnic, racial, religious, and economic backgrounds. The

school’s is to develop the intellect, talents, and character of each student

in a community of learning dedicated to principles of academic excellence

that values the uniqueness and dignity of each member and fosters personal

responsibility and service to others.

Learn more at polytechnic.org

1030 East California Blvd., Pasadena (626) 396-6300

The Pizza Press

The Pizza Press is a unique concept dedicated to elevating the build-yourown

pizza and salad model to an experiential level, by creating an immersive

1920s Americana newspaper theme in which great food, craft beer, ambiance,

and service are combined. Publish you newsworthy pizza and drink

craft beer. Open daily 11:00am to 11:00pm and to midnight on Friday and

Saturday!

1655 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena (626) 818-7335 Thepizzapress.com

continued on page 26

BACK TO SCHOOL 2018 PASADENA WEEKLY 25


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continued from page 25

Realtime Captioning

DIANA BRANDIN REALTIME CAPTIONING & ASL! - Specializing in K-12, colleges,

& university CARTcaptioning. Communication Access Realtime Translation

and American Sign Language. (On-site and remote). ADA Compliance.

Communication access for public/private academic institutions (universities,

colleges, K-12, special events, on-site and online learning), businesses, corporations,

non-profi ts, for-profi ts, corporate meetings, conferences, conference

calls, live-streamed webinars, legal, court, hearings, medical, hospitals, doctor

appointments, social services, weddings, funerals. Realtime captioning

and American Sign Language plus transcription of recorded media, closedcaptioning

or subtitles for videos, webinars, DVDs, YouTube clips, and other

media. Live captions displayed via tablet, smartphone, laptop, fl at-screen TV,

projector-to-screen, jumbotron and more. We hire only seasoned professionals!

Local small business and woman-owned business. FREE DEMOS onsite

and remotely. Now scheduling for 2018! Thank you for all your support in

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OnPointCaptions.com | (818) 279-8136

School of Rock Pasadena

Group and Private Classes, Songwriting, With more than a twenty years of

successful experience teaching music, School of Rock is the national leader in

music education. Our unique performance-based approach get students of all

abilities out rocking on stage! Students learn from professional musicians in

an interactive environment combining weekly private lessons and structured

group rehearsals. Get on the stage TODAY!

Call (626) 508-1818 or visit pasadena.schoolofrock.com.

Southwestern Academy

“Southwestern Academy is a co-ed boarding and day school offering grades

6-12. Founded in 1924, our school is rich in culture and diversity, catering

to the educational needs of both domestic and international students.

Southwestern Academy has two campuses, located in San Marino, California

and Rimrock, Arizona. We provide a peaceful, safe, and beautiful space for

students to thrive in our close-knit community. Our small class settings allow

students to receive the required attention while maximizing their abilities.

Academic programs in both campuses include college preparatory courses,

ESL (English as a Second Language), post graduate curriculums, and extracurricular

activities. We invite you to explore our Southwestern community to

discover what we offer. Our students have found a place to belong. Maybe it’s

your place, too.”

2800 Monterey Road San Marino (626) 799-5010 southwesternacademy.edu

St. Andrew School

St. Andrew Catholic School (PK-8th grade) has been serving the community

since 1897 and is committed to educating the whole child by providing a

strong foundation that balances our academic focus with faith-based service

and leadership experiences. Our Early Childhood Program enrolls students

as young as 3 years 6 months for our PK program. 4-5 years old for our TK

program and 5-6 years old for our Kindergarten program. St. Andrew is a

highly respected educational institution in Pasadena, a foundation for Christian

values, and a place with a strong sense of community. If you have not

looked at St Andrew Catholic School for your family, now is the perfect time to

schedule your private tour!

To learn more about how you can join our Tiger family, visit our website at

saspasadena.com or contact our school offi ce at (626) 796-7697

Saint Elizabeth of Hungary Parish School

Since 1919, Saint Elizabeth has served the diverse communities of Altadena

and Pasadena for 100 years in the spirit of “goodness and excellence.” As

a Catholic school, we teach the values of the Gospel and also welcome all

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faiths to our campus. We offer educational opportunities from Transitional

Kindergarten (four-year-olds) through Eighth Grade. The faculty, staff, and

parents have fostered a collaborative learning environment that prepares

students to be scholars and responsible citizens in their community.

The after-school program offers activities in the areas of sports, theater,

dance, and academic enrichment as well as day care.

1840 N. Lake Avenue in Altadena, (626) 797-7727, saint-elizabeth.org

St. Phillip Apostle

St. Philip the Apostle School Opens Transitional Kindergarten (TK)

St. Philip the Apostle School is thrilled to open a new TK program for 4

year-old students this fall. The TK will be housed in two newly renovated

classrooms, with new, dedicated restrooms and an outdoor playground.

Founded in 1927, we are a TK-8 Catholic, parish school with two classes

per grade serving 570 students. We are dedicated to teaching, inspiring

and nurturing children through rigorous academic training and strong

faith formation. The school’s modern, urban campus features an advanced

technology platform that supports a broad range of web-based research

and instructional resources, dedicated classrooms for art, music and

Spanish and a multi-purposed facility that functions as a gymnasium and

theatre.

For more information or to schedule a tour go to stphiliptheapostle.org/

school or contact Colleen Welsh, Development Director at (626) 795-9691

ext. 449 1363 Cordova Street, Pasadena

Stratford Schools

Stratford School provides an unparalleled education where children are

inspired to be creative problem solvers, innovators, and leaders. These

21st century qualities provide children with the knowledge, confi dence,

and ingenuity to help them excel in future careers! Stratford’s accelerated

curriculum from preschool through eighth grade emphasizes STEAM (Science,

Technology, Engineering, Arts, Mathematics) while incorporating

music, physical education, foreign language, and social skills development.

By combining a safe and nurturing learning environment, Stratford

teachers ensure a stimulating and balanced curriculum while cultivating

a child’s natural joy of learning. Evident at all its schools is the Stratford

motto, “Summa spes, summa res,” meaning “Highest hopes, highest

things.” Grades: Preschool-8th.

2046 Allen Ave., Altadena (626) 794-1000 stratfordschools.com

Walden School

Walk through the hallways and yards of Walden School and you’ll see

something magical: children of all ages and backgrounds engaged in

learning. You’ll see artists at work, writers drafting a story, musicians

practicing a song, scientists verifying principles and mathematicians solving

problems. You’ll see students who respect themselves and their environment.

You’ll see active, inquisitive learners who are thriving in a safe,

community-oriented place. You’ll see teachers, parents and administrators

encouraging curiosity, nurturing talents and promoting creativity. Walden

is a small environment where big things happen: questions are posed, solutions

are explored and answers are discovered by our youngest learners

to our 6th graders preparing for their next challenge in middle school. Our

forward-thinking program helps children develop the foundation that will

support them for a lifetime, understanding that we all have stewardship for

the world in which we live.

75 South San Gabriel Blvd., Pasadena (626) 792-6166 waldenschool.net. ■

BACK TO SCHOOL 2018 PASADENA WEEKLY 27


The Long

Game

ACQUIRING FINANCIAL AID IS BUT THE FIRST

OF MANY CHALLENGES IN A FULFILLING

COLLEGE EXPERIENCE

BY JANA J. MONJI

College isn’t for everyone, but if higher education

is a life goal then it’s never too early to

start investigating the possibilities, just as it’s

never too late to try.

Students in Pasadena Unified School District who

are headed for college can easily get help on financial

28 BACK TO SCHOOL 2018 PASADENA WEEKLY


aid applications through any number of workshops offered by the

district, according to Dr. Marisa Sarian, PUSD’s assistant superintendent

of instruction.

“Community partners help students with their applications, but

students have to take the initiative to participate,” Sarian urges.

A student’s relationship with her or his financial aid office,

however, shouldn’t end once their classes are funded, says Ray Quirolgico,

associate provost for student affairs and dean of students

at ArtCenter College of Design in Pasadena.

“Students tend to forget other new opportunities,” says Quirolgico.

“There might be a scholarship that wasn’t available to

you when you first applied” and currently is, “now that

you’ve achieved some milestone,” such as completing x-

number of semesters or getting a certain GPA.

As far as Patty Hernandez,

director of academic advising

at ArtCenter, is

concerned, once

students are accepted, and money needed to continue is not an

immediate priority, they must focus and organize their schedules,

thoughts and time.

“Any student considering coming to ArtCenter must learn how

to manage their time.” Hernandez advises. “If they can start practicing

early on that, they will become self-aware of how they are using

their time,” and thus, “make better plans for school and life.”

At the fast-paced and art-focused environs of ArtCenter,

Hernandez believes one should particularly prepare by practicing

expressing themselves through presentation skills — “how to describe

what it is you’re working on and what message you’re trying

to convey.”

For other colleges with less-focused curriculums and more

diverse programs, Cal State LA Associated Vice President of

Undergraduate Studies Michelle Hawley feels “college is tough, but

doable.” In college, you may have too many choices.” That’s why she

says, “Students should choose the major they feel passionate about

and they can do many things with.” But, Hawley points out, “Many

college students don’t graduate in four years because more than 50

continued on page 30

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29


continued from page 29

percent of students change their majors.” And sometimes not just

once or twice, but three times.

Such was the case with Kaitlan Ragland of La Crescenta, who

starts her fourth year at Cal State LA this fall as a television and

film media studies major. With a father who is the manager of the

digital sound department at Walt Disney Studios and a mother who

freelances as a manager on TV reality shows, her major might seem

a natural choice.

“They definitely had an influence on my aspirations,” Ragland

says.

But, she adds, her original major was art history. Midway

through her second year, Ragland got a wakeup call during a lecture.

The professor told her class that “If you’re not going to study

three different languages, not willing to travel all over the world,

and not willing to do a master’s program or a doctoral program,

then art history was not the right field.”

Ragland already knew from high school that languages were

never her strong suit, but she had a backup plan, and this fall she

has a technical sound internship at the Alex Theater.

Hawley says students should start working with the campus

career center from the beginning of their first year. If like most

students they wait until junior or senior year, Hawley said, “You have

missed some wonderful opportunities.”

Ragland said her mother changed her major three times and attended

three different colleges, but that was a different time. PUSD’s

Sarian notes students today have to be “truly mindful,” because if

they change majors too many times, they can run out of financial

aid. She agreed that internships and volunteer work can help students

focus on career goals.

Kaitlin Terpstra-Sweeney, manager of prospective student engagement

at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, also agreed.

“Take a minute before college and grad school,” Terpstra-Sweeney

says. Fuller accepts graduate students in theology, psychology

and intercultural studies. “Try out an internship or a job in the

context that you think you might work in. It can be helpful and

surprising.”

Because Ragland is a local, she isn’t troubled by homesickness

like students who find themselves in a different city, state or country.

Such students need to hit the ground running, joining clubs or

volunteering, all of the college representatives agreed.

Terpstra-Sweeney mentioned one relatively new avenue for

learning: online courses. Fuller, Cal State LA, Pasadena City College

and USC (graduate level only) all have online courses. All of the

institutions, including ArtCenter, have study abroad programs.

Terpstra-Sweeney found her study abroad in Italy “an incredibly

shaping and a really rich experience.” Plus, study or working abroad

is a good way to “get out of our own heads and out of our own social

spheres,” she says.

The college reps urged all students to take advantage of orientation

programs — even at the graduate level. All of those interviewed

also felt that, as Hawley put it, “Learning takes place inside the

classroom and outside the classroom.” ■

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31

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