Hey Music Mag - Issue 1 - August 2018

HeyMusicOfficial

Welcome to Hey Mag! Here’s a treat for all music lovers – a free magazine featuring all the latest music and pop culture trends from around the world. This inaugural issue includes UK singer-songwriting sensation RAYE; news about the richest hip-hop rappers; a profile of A.R Rahman – the Mozart of Madras; an interview with British DJ & production duo Hollaphonic and much more. Enjoy!

AUGUST 2018

ISSUE 01

UK’S HOTTEST RISING

SINGER-SONGWRITER

HOLLAPHONIC’S

GLOBAL TAKE OVER

A.R RAHMAN

THE MOZART OF MADRAS

PETER EDWARDS

THE JAZZ STAR

LMYW HITS

LONDON

LAUNCH

ISSUE


EDITOR’S NOTE

Welcome to the first

edition of Hey Mag!

Aimed at music

lovers and music

makers, of all genres,

we will be tapping

into the latest music

and pop culture

trends from around

the world, including

news, reviews and

interviews with

artists and emerging

talent.

For our first issue, we speak to RAYE, who is

conquering the pop world, with hit after hit

infused with a blend of Afrobeat and soul sounds,

she is making her mark this year. Hey Mag finds

out how RAYE has become an accomplished

songwriter and singer and how she is using her

Ghanaian roots to create change in today’s music

scene.

Hey Mag turns to beat-matching, mixing and

scratching masters Hollaphonic to find out what

the British DJ duo have planned for 2018, and we

catch up with Dan Greenpeace to find out how he

became a renowned radio presenter.

Following the success of LMYW in Dubai, we

kicked off the first series of LMYW LDN earlier this

year, and it’s been a whirlwind. LMYW LDN has

offered the ideal hub for all music fans and music

creatives to come together for a great night.

Check out page 14 to see Liam Bailey, Black Josh,

Laura Roy, and more.

AASHA BODHANI

PUBLISHER

Hey Music

EDITOR

Aasha Bodhani

aasha@heymusic.com

MARKETING DIRECTOR

Darren Haynes

darren@heymusic.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Aiez Mirza Ahmed

aiez@heymusic.com

Daniella Millership

daniella@heymusic.com

Sophia Nyananyo

sophia@heymusic.com

Seham Kably

seham@heymusic.com

Nick Stephenson

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Nathan Evans

nathan@heymusic.com

Darren Haynes

Justin Higuchi

Adam Scull

Rose Hartman

Pieter-Jannick Dijkstra

Jason Persse

Ultomatt

LOCATION

London

@heymusicofficial @heymusictweets @heymusicofficial @heymusicofficial www.heymusic.com

Hey Mag is published by Hey Music. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. The publisher regrets that they cannot accept

liability for error or omissions contained in this publication, however caused. The opinions and views within this publication are not necessarily those of the publishers or editors.

All credits are accurate at the time of writing but may be subject to change.

2 HEY MAG - AUGUST 2018


CONTENTS

14

4

RAYE

UK’s hottest rising singer-songwriter

10

PETER EDWARDS

Talks Jazz

10

14

LMYW

Goes on tour

4

17

22

DAN GREENPEACE

Vinyl & radio master

HOLLAPHONIC

Dynamic British DJ duo

24

24

A.R. RAHMAN

Mozart of Madras

30

CASH KINGS

Jay-Z tops rich list

30

34

DAD ROCK 75

Ultimate Dad rock playlist

22

10 16

22

22


RAYE - born Rachel Keen - in a way, embodies a presence of mystery. On

the surface we see her edgy style, voluminous rose gold curls and a bubbly

personality that matches her warm, yet mischievous smile. But who is RAYE?

Raised in Croydon, South London, RAYE’s natural beauty and musical passions stem

from her mother’s Ghanaian-Swiss heritage and her English father. Born into a

musical family, she naturally followed suit: “I had been writing songs from the age

of 7 or 8 years old, and they were so bad,” she says laughing. “But it was always in

me and my dad was a massive part of that. I used to watch him play keys and write

music, so you know, it came naturally.”

RAYE is an artist who strived to establish her songwriting art first, and by the age

of 14 she enrolled at the infamous BRIT school, majoring in music and minoring

in dance. It’s no secret that two years later the star dropped out after she felt ‘too

confined’ to one sound. She now describes her sound as a mix of pop music with

Afrobeat influences.

“I mean, I’m Ghanaian,” she says. “Growing up, my grandma was at home with us and

there was a strong Afrobeat culture, she’d play all the riddims, and my music has a

lot of that influence.”

RAYE is only 20 years old, but she’s been an unstoppable force since her BRIT school

days. Shortly after she left, she had her big break when Olly Alexander from the band

Years & Years heard her R&B jam, ‘Hotbox’ on HypeMachine. “He [Olly] was talking

about it in interviews, which was so weird and really crazy for me, and it kinda helped

me get my record deal with Polydor.”

“Years & Years invited me to support them on tour, it was really epic.” She then

recalls her first touring experience: “If you had seen me before, compared to the way

I like to do shows now, you know I was really nervous. I was chained to the mic the

whole time, I was a bit worried. But you know, practice makes perfect.”

Obsessed with songwriting, RAYE grew up listening to Nelly Furtado, Jill Scott and

Natasha Bedingfield, who are all prolific female songwriters. That inspiration has led

RAYE to rack up a list of writing collaborations for some of music’s top dogs, including

Stormzy, Nas, Little Mix and John Legend. “Most of this industry is just kinda luck,

right?”, says RAYE, as she humbly talks about how she co-wrote Charli XCX’s ‘After

The Afterparty’.

”We ended up in the studio at the same time and ended up getting in a session, we

just really clicked and wrote three or four songs in one day. I wanted to put out one

of the songs we did and asked her to direct the video, and she was like ‘yes’, and off

the back of that, she asked me to write for one of her projects.

“She’s great, so hardworking,” she adds with admiration.

RAYE doesn’t shy away from exploring other genres, whilst she describes her sound

as Afrobeat pop, it hasn’t stopped her from venturing into the grime scene. “Stormzy’s

my bredrin, I love him,’ she says, smiling.

4 HEY MAG - AUGUST 2018


RAYE

HEY MAG - AUGUST 2018

5


6 HEY MAG - AUGUST 2018

IT WAS VERY DAUNTING TO

CREATE MUSIC IN A CERTAIN

WAY AND WRITE A CERTAIN

TYPE OF MUSIC AND THAT

PEOPLE WOULD LIKE A BIT

MORE IF IT WAS WHITER OR

A BIT MORE POPPIER


“Stormzy is just one of those lovely guys who is never afraid to compliment or reach out and make

someone feel good. He followed me on Twitter and was like ‘Yo RAYE, you’re doing something sick, I

love it’”. The pair have since released ‘Ambition’ and she also made a cameo appearance in his video

‘Big For Your Boots’.

RAYE’s writing creativity saw her team up with producer Jax Jones, and unknowingly to them, their

house anthem, ‘You Don’t Know Me’, was an instant hit.

“None of us saw that coming, it was really insane. It was the way we wrote the song, it was natural,” she

recalls. “We ended up in a session together, because we have the same A&R label, we had one day, and

you know we were drinking and having a party and it was mostly freestyles and vibes.

“He [Jax Jones] took it away and put the Booka Shade’s bassline on it, and I was like ‘sick’, but I just had

no idea it was gonna do like it did, so it was very cool.”

And cool it was, the song dominated the charts, hitting the number 3 spot and it was nominated for

‘Best British Single’ at the BRIT Awards in 2018.

RAYE’s talents are also seen through her own music, bringing her own sound to the music scene she

aims to ultimately diversify the charts. “I kinda got down about it for a while, back home is very whitefied

but things are ready to change,” she says frankly. “It was very daunting to create music in a certain

way and write a certain type of music and that people would like a bit more if it was whiter or a bit more

poppier.

“I realised that that’s not me and not what I want to do, so I have been working really hard to do both,

and I’m excited to see what people think.”

The budding songstress released her first EP ‘Welcome To The Winter’ in 2014 on SoundCloud, followed

by ‘Second’ and this year’s ‘Side Tape’. Her newest six-track EP features a versatile blend of artists,

including Kojo Funds, RAY BLK, Nana Rogues and Mr Eazi, who have all contributed to her rare sound.

RAYE’s EP is a mixture of sultry love songs, catchy dance tunes and girl power themed rhythms. Let’s

take ‘Decline’ for example, the singer takes Ja Rule and Ashanti’s ‘Always On Time’ hook and reverses

the meaning to empower women, she also teams up with labelmates R&B singer Mabel and MC Stefflon

Don for ‘Cigarette’.

RAYE also dropped the video for ‘Confidence’, the track itself features Maleek Berry and Nana Rogues

and offers subtle Afrobeat sounds yet Latin beats. The video sees RAYE alone dancing seductively in

casual clothing teamed with Nike Cortez – a style which she is most confident in. “I like to mix and

match, I’ve always been quite boyish, I’ve probably worn one skirt in my life,” she says jokingly.

RAYE is also calling out for girl solidarity: “What’s up with all the girl hate girl shit...?”, she sings in her

new track ‘Friends’. Produced by Mark Ralph and Kyle Shearer, and alongside Fred Gibson, the energetic

summer tune calls for females to support each other and to drop the negativity.

The artist has now cemented her name in the industry, both songwriter and singer, RAYE has certainly

made her mark, but she still has some words of wisdom for her younger self.

“I’d tell her to calm down and trust that everything will be okay. It’s so easy to overthink and be worried,

and when you’re putting something out publicly, you just wanna get it right. I need to relax and keep

doing my thing, the doors will open when they are meant to.”

The doors are certainly staying open for RAYE. Right now, the star is touring across the UK, as well

as playing numerous summer festivals, and with rumoured studio sessions with Drake, Hey Mag is

watching out for RAYE!

HEY MAG - AUGUST 2018

7


1

RAYE

A LONG WALK -

JILL SCOTT

2

LOOK WHAT

YOU’VE DONE -

DRAKE

3

SAY IT RIGHT -

NELLY FURTADO

4

FOUR WOMEN -

NINA SIMONE

RAYE reveals

her favourite Top 5

songs exclusively on

Hey Music’s YouTube channel.

Full interview coming soon.

www.youtube.com/heymusicofficial

5

SOULMATE -

NATASHA BEDINGFIELD

8 HEY MAG - AUGUST 2018


PETER EDWARDS

TALKS HYBRID JAZZ

PHOTO CREDIT: PETER EDWARDS

10 HEY MAG - AUGUST 2018


UK JAZZ MUSICIAN PETER EDWARDS ON HIS LOVE FOR

THE GREATS AND HOW TO MASTER THE ART OF JAZZ.

WORDS : AASHA BODHANI

Peter Edwards has, by anyone’s standards, a multifaceted craft. From the

tender age of six he began to learn the art of becoming a pianist. Shortly

after he added composer and musical director to his portfolio. Despite the

early start, Edwards was in his late 20s when he made the decision to turn

his musical hobby into a professional career, and it was a risk that has since served

him well.

It would be fair to say that music ran in Edwards’ blood; his parents provided him

and his siblings with endless opportunities to find their own creative flair. But it was

his brother who gave him the inspiration to develop his own style by introducing

him to legendary musicians, including trumpeter Miles Davis, jazz pianist Johnny

Parker and composer Herbie Hancock.

“One of my heroes was Herbie Hancock, he was classically trained and an incredible

improviser. I think overall that is what got me into jazz, seeing someone who was a

world-class improviser,” he recalls.

Once he found the sound he aspired to, his mission was to find other artists and

absorb live music, citing that he fell in love with the idea of being able to

create in the moment.

“I thought it was magical the way musicians would generate music, you know, off

the cuff. The curiosity of how they did that is what won me over.” He describes his

style as a hybrid of jazz, mixed with soul, Carribean grooves, Latin tones and gospel.

“These are the sounds that are rhythmically impulsive and

interesting,” he says.

He adds: “I grew up in the 90’s and at a time when acid jazz in the UK was big, but it

also had a mixture of that older stuff from the 60s to newer sounds where jazz was

seen in the likes of Jamiroquai, Incognito and Jason Lyon.”

Edwards isn’t limited to composing, he speaks fondly of working with his band

and working on various commissioned projects. “I like the flexibility of either

performing, directing or writing, they are all different,” he explains.

HEY MAG - AUGUST 2018

11


Last year, Edwards was commissioned to form a 15-minute composition that celebrates

the year of 1917, which was a defining year for jazz. Named ‘Journey with the Giants of

Jazz’, it sees the births of some of the most well-recognised jazz musicians, including

composer ‘Tadd’ Dameron, singer Ella Fitzgerald, trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie, pianist

Thelonious Monk, drummer Buddy Rich and percussionist Mongo Santamaria.

Taking inspiration from the classics, Edwards pieced the six greats together and

incorporated 100 years of jazz into 15 minutes, to form an episodic creation of their

different styles of music and characters.

“When I was given the commission, the first thought was ‘how can I do all of that in 15

minutes’. Sometimes it takes a couple of days to get my head around the project and

come up with ideas. I create the context first, and the science and form will come from

those jazz artists.”

“From there I would sketch ideas on the piano and record it, but I wouldn’t question what

I do too much, I just continue to record. Later I will go back and refine it by finding a way

of putting different strands together and structuring the beginning and end,” Edwards

says.

One of my heroes was Herbie Hancock, he was classically

trained and an incredible improviser. I think overall, that is

what got me into Jazz...

- Peter Edwards

He goes on to say that a project of that size typically takes two months from the

beginning to rehearsals, and even then, he may scrap the idea and completely start

again.

April marked Jazz Appreciation Month, but is there enough jazz influence in today’s

commercial music? Edwards talks of combining his jazz sound with other genres, but he

explains jazz solos are usually heard during the Christmas period when the likes of Nat

King Cole and Ella Fitzgerald become more commercially present.

Whilst jazz influence in today’s music may not be so obvious, Edwards does mention that

there are hints of jazz, whether it be Bebop, blues, funk or Latin, coming through.

With years of experience in the music industry, Edwards offers his take on how to

master the art of jazz.

He recalls his first time at Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club in London, where he sat in on a jam

session and listened and would search the Internet to find the song and form his own

sound.

“I would say at the beginning of a career in jazz, aim to work with different types of jazz

musicians, or even any type of musician. Try to find opportunities, go to jam sessions,

gigs, and be seen. It’s all about networking.”

Edwards points out that new musicians need to master the basics. “You must be easy to

work with and [be] on time. When I first started, I didn’t feel like I had the confidence, but

I knew I was reliable and that’s how I began to build a network of people. It’s important to

have that foundation early on.”

One thing is for sure, Edwards shows no sign of slowing down. Following the last show of

‘Journey with the Giants of Jazz’ at London’s Queen Elizabeth Hall, he will now tour with

Mica Paris and Zara McFarlane and continue to take on more commissioned projects.

12 HEY MAG - AUGUST 2018


1

PETER

EDWARDS

GREENSLEEVES -

JOHN COLTRANE

2

ROUND MIDNIGHT -

MILES DAVIS

3

THE MAZE -

HERBIE HANCOCK

4

LUSH LIFE -

CHICK COREA

5

BEWITCHED, BOTHERED AND BEWILDERED -

ELLA FITZGERALD

HEY MAG - AUGUST 2018

13


WORDS: SOPHIA NYANANYO

The first LMYW LDN (Love Music Your Way - London) series kicked off in May this year

and it’s been a whirlwind, from famous faces to energetic audiences, and even open

mic sessions, LMYW LDN has offered the ideal hub for all music lovers and music

creatives.

BLACK JOSH

LMYW LDN is a platform for artists ready to launch their careers and a testing ground

for them to showcase their talents in a room full of like-minded creatives. Taking place

in the cosy basement of The Book Club in Shoreditch, London, DJ Darka got the place

heated, with banger after banger and host Shezar had the crowd laughing, dancing,

and singing to the top of their lungs.

Named as Complex’s ‘One to Watch’, Jamilah Barry hit the stage with her delicate yet

powerful vocals, followed by Black Josh, who rapped his latest tracks. LMYW LDN’s

second event saw Pier James fuse grime with hip-hop on stage, along with singer /

songwriter Riiver.

For the finale, plenty of familiar faces were in attendance, and a few friendly music

industry faces too, including BBC Radio 1’s Benji B and one of our favourite vocalists,

singer / songwriter Maverick Sabre - who was celebrating his birthday.

Manchester’s HMD pronounced ‘Hamdi’ opened the show with his laid-back soulful

falsetto vocals, followed by Laura Roy. She performed her latest single ‘Temporary’

which had the crowd singing along, it’s fair to say they both gained new fans. Host

Shezar introduced special guest Liam Bailey and in true Liam style, he interacted with

the crowd and had everyone bopping and singing along to his reggae rhythm for

‘When Will They Learn’.

LMYW LDN will be back in September, new and improved! Watch this space...

JAMILAH BARRY

THE HOST

THE BAND

LAURA ROY


GRACE CHATTO & YASMIN GREEN (CLEAN BANDIT)

& FRIENDS

LIAM BAILEY

PIERS JAMES & TIA SACKEY

MAVERICK SABRE &

TACHIA NEWALL

PIERS JAMES

RIIVER

HMD

SHEZAR

DJ DARKA


LISTEN NOW

TO THE FIRST

SET OF

PODCASTS

HOSTED BY DAN GREENPEACE

AVAILABLE VIA


Q&AWITH

DAN

GREENPEACE

DAN GREENPEACE IS A RADIO PRESENTER, PRODUCER, OBSESSED CRATE-

DIGGER AND MANAGES DUBAI-BASED BRITISH DJ DUO, HOLLAPHONIC.

THE DYNAMIC DUO, OLLY WOOD AND GREG STAINER, ARE SIGNED TO SONY

MUSIC AND RECENTLY LAUNCHED THEIR LATEST SINGLE ‘NEW ONES’.

HEY MAG SITS WITH DAN GREENPEACE AND HOLLAPHONIC TO FIND OUT HOW

IT ALL BEGAN.

Q: WHEN DID YOUR MUSICAL JOURNEY START?

DG: My earliest music memories come from my parent’s vinyl collection. My father was

into The Beatles, ABBA and Wings and my mother leant towards early R&B and Jazz like

Jimmy Smith and Booker T, so that formed my musical DNA. I used play with vinyl a lot and

make little mash-ups using our record player and cassette deck. That was probably around

1982/1983 when hip-hop as a genre started to emerge. The rest is history as they say.

Q: WHAT WAS YOUR SOUNDTRACK IN YOUR TEENS?

PHOTO CREDIT: DAN GREENPEACE

DG: The first act I discovered and really embraced was Adam & The Ants around 1981 and

I was 10 years old by that point. I was pretty fanatical about them and feigned illness one

day to skip school then persuaded my grandfather who was looking after me that day

to take me to Woolworths to buy the new Adam & The Ants single. The next step was a

full-on immersion into every aspect of hip-hop culture. I inherited both a pop and ‘urban’

sensibility from my parents’ so when Chaka Khan released ‘I Feel For You’ featuring rapper

Melle Mel (of Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five) it really blew my mind. That’s when

the switch flicked, and I was hooked. I feel lucky that I was the right age to have formed

musical tastes by the time hip-hop emerged because I lived every day of its progression,

single by single and album by album. Every week was a new exciting sound throughout

my teenage years.

HEY MAG - AUGUST 2018

17


Q: WHEN DID YOU FIRST FALL FOR THE TURNTABLES?

DG: My father had a decent turntable, but it wasn’t actually until I was 21 that I could afford a pair of Technics 1200s.

Before then, I had a makeshift setup of my father’s turntable, another cheap addition and a really basic mixer, but it

forced me to learn the basics and make do with what I had. In 1983 the movie Wildstyle came out and there was a part in

the movie where DJ Grandmaster Flash performed ‘Adventures on The Wheels Of Steel’ live in his kitchen. It was utterly

mind blowing to me and probably thousands of others.

Q: LET’S TALK ABOUT YOUR MASSIVE VINYL COLLECTION...

DG: How long have we got? Ok, let me give you a topline. I have a lot of hip-hop, that’s been the backbone of my career.

I was a professional broadcaster on London’s XFM for several years, so I amassed a lot of music during that time. I have

many of the original rap records I bought as early as 1983 so some of my vinyl is 35 years old but as hip-hop and music

technology embraced sampling record from the ‘60s and ‘70s, I discovered a lot of that music too, so I have a large

collection of old Jazz, Funk and Soul. As I was also a working DJ for many years I also have all the R&B, pop and rap hits

from the ‘90s. I have pretty much every record needed to rock a party if I had to. Recently I’ve been visiting India and

Lebanon a lot for business as I promote shows there, so I’ve been immersing myself into old Indian music whether Jazz or

Bollywood albums. I’ve discovered some amazing music and part of that journey has been going to old authentic record

dealers in Delhi or Bombay and getting to know them. I’ve loved going on that journey so my vinyl collection is going in all

sorts of new directions lately. Essentially my collection is a musical journey of discovery that I hope never ends.

Q: HOW DID YOU FIND BEAT-MATCHING, MIXING AND SCRATCHING?

DG: I’ll be honest, I’m a great beat matcher and mixer as I have a natural sense of rhythm but I’m not the best scratcher.

That’s an element of the culture that requires real dedication like learning to play an instrument. If you liken it to playing a

piano, I’d say I’m a very confident Grade 5 DJ. Not technically perfect but I could and have played in front of 10,000 people

and pulled it off. For me it’s about music selection, reading the crowd and taking them on a journey but also giving them

a bit of what they want too. Recently I’ve been doing more vinyl sets, playing to a hundred people rather than thousands

and I’ve been enjoying that much more.

Q: WHAT WAS A PROUD MOMENT FOR YOU?

DG: Around 1988 I started getting involved in pirate radio in my hometown of Leeds. I loved the medium of radio

PHOTO CREDIT: DAN GREENPEACE

18 HEY MAG - AUGUST 2018


and sharing new music with people. Fast forward to the year 2000, my friend Zane Lowe was already a presenter

on MTV and XFM and his passion for hip-hop lead to us getting a dedicated hip-hop show with our mutual friend Theo.

That moment was pivotal for me when a passion became a profession. I didn’t think about it at the time as we were in

the moment but looking back it was a proud moment. A more recent proud moment was when I organised Ed Sheeran’s

first Middle East and Indian tour. Again, I’d been booking and promoting artists for several years but that felt like a pivotal

moment where all my hard work was suddenly validated. Those are just two that spring to mind but as I look back I’m

happy with my contributions. As long as I’m contributing, I’m happy.

Q: TALK ME THROUGH ABOUT BECOMING/BEING A RADIO PRESENTER?

DG: Becoming a professional radio presenter was pivotal and opened many doors, which lead me to now being a concert

promoter. It also helped me become an artist manager, record label owner, journalist, publisher and so many other

things. Some pre-dated radio but the move to professional radio validated everything. I interviewed and met some of

my music heroes and I got to break new artists. I was literally the first UK radio presenter to interview Eminem and I

played some records first that became global hits. It helped me understand the music industry on so many levels. I

was presenter in a largely pre-digital era, which meant live radio was so thrilling. We had a genuine connection with our

listeners.

Q: YOU’RE ALSO AN ARTIST MANAGER - WHAT IS THAT LIKE?

DG: Becoming a manager was a bi-product of radio. I was already running a record label in parallel to the radio show but

inviting new artists on my show made me realise there was a gap in the market for great UK rap and hip-hop. I met new

cutting edge artists and could not only offer them radio airplay and exposure but also marketing and distribution for their

music. In turn that lead into actually managing them.

Q: WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD FOR YOU?

PHOTO CREDIT: DAN GREENPEACE

DG: As long as I continue being passionate about music I’ll hopefully be lucky enough where I can continue to generate

enough income to give my family a nice life. If the future continues on that trajectory, I’ll be happy. I want to get back into

music production so that’s a personal goal. I’m also working on building a podcast network, which is the natural, modern

equivalent of what I was doing with radio back in 2000. I’ll always buy vinyl and discover new and old music. I also really

enjoy managing the artists I’m currently working with and watching their careers develop.

HEY MAG - AUGUST 2018

19


DAN

GREENPEACE

1

BUGGIN’ OUT -

A TRIBE CALLED QUEST

2

OBSESSION 77 -

OBSESSION 77

3

NICE AND SMOOTH -

GREG NICE & SMOOTH B

4

WE CAN DO THIS -

RED ALERT

Check out the

Hey Music YouTube

channel to hear Dan

talk about his

ultimate Top 5 tunes

5

www.youtube.com/heymusicofficial

BIG BEAT -

NICK INGMAN

20 HEY MAG - AUGUST 2018


Q&A

WITH

HOLLAPHONIC

Q: HOW DID HOLLAPHONIC COME ABOUT?

H: Two musical guys introduced in a nightclub in Dubai; one producing and one songwriting,

both missing each other’s skills... fast forward to today and we’ve got a No.1 album under

our belt and share the creative process having taught each other and found a groove.

Q: WHAT WAS THE INSPIRATION BEHIND YOUR LATEST EP - SPACESHIP?

PHOTO CREDIT: HOLLAPHONIC

H: Adventures to London and meeting new artists, we created Spaceship as a metaphorical

love story about a pure relationship knowing no bounds, not confined to the world we live

in, but a story told about the endless search for ‘The One’ ... we have this one, some funk

and live R&B vibes, and enjoyed every minute. They use it to teach English in Thailand and

we’ve been in their top 10 since December 2017... it’s definitely the track that has changed

everything.

Q: HAVE YOU PLAYED AT ANY FESTIVALS THIS YEAR?

H: This year has been about new music, so we’ve taken a short break from performing

to gather a completely new sound for Hollaphonic; much more soul, more lyrical content

and a real sunshine vibe. The latest representation Hollaphonic can be found in our single

‘New Ones’ which is out now!!

Q: WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON THE EMERGING TURNTABLE TALENT?

H: Dance music is shifting into a new phase of artistry, DJs are as much selectors again as

they are technically capable. James Hype is doing some special stuff across the board so

that’s exciting to see - to us it’s about creating your own sound from edits of existing music

to writing and producing your own, from that perspective we’re on an exciting path as live

electro is starting to push through again. I’m interested to see where it goes next and we’re

trying to be ahead of the curve.

22 HEY MAG - AUGUST 2018


Q: YOU RECENTLY TEAMED UP WITH LA PERLE FOR A MUSIC VIDEO - WHAT WAS THAT LIKE?

H: It was awesome, having the chance to have such amazing performers interpret your sound into physical

movement, dance and acrobatics was breathtaking. The end product was spectacular, as is the show itself,

and we’ll continue to work with them on new ideas. The video is now on all Emirates airline flights, so catch

it on ICE when you next travel!

Q: HOW DID THE COLLABORATION BETWEEN HOLLAPHONIC’S AND FILMMAKER MOHAMMED SAEED HARIB COME ABOUT?

H: Mohammed and his studio Lammtara are responsible for some truly groundbreaking work, we have

searched for such a partner to take our sound and visualise our brief. He absolutely nailed it and the

wicked cover for Spaceship was the product. This has now been seen by over 4 million listeners worldwide

so we’re really happy about that, the collaboration was so successful for everyone involved. Mohammed

is such a dude, as are his team.

Q: WHAT HAS BEEN A PROUD MOMENT FOR YOU BOTH?

GS: When I catch my daughter singing the words to our songs or watching our videos on YouTube, family

is everything.

OW: We love the fact Thailand has adopted us with such a welcome and the fact our lyrics are teaching

people English is a real honour.

Q: WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD FOR HOLLAPHONIC?

H: New music, we’ve got some great stuff coming out in 2018; new sounds with Thai artists, Japanese

artists and some more music with both BXRBER and Aaron Camper. We couldn’t be more excited; it’s

about focus and honing in our performance into a live show to take across the planet... so we can’t wait

to be everywhere VERY soon! The passion for what we do is contagious and our energy is relentless... Hey

Music industry! We’re ready!

PHOTO CREDIT: HOLLAPHONIC

PHOTO CREDIT: HOLLAPHONIC

HEY MAG - AUGUST 2018

23


PROFILE: THE MOZART OF MADRAS –

A.R. RAHMAN

WORDS: DARREN HAYNES

When it comes to dinner party discussions

about music in Indian films, there are a couple

of initials and a surname that you must quote to

demonstrate some semblance of knowledge -

A.R. Rahman.

To call him a ‘prolific composer’ is an

understatement. A.R. Rahman has composed

the soundtracks for over 100 films, resulting

in sales of over 200 million albums worldwide.

Remarkably, he’s also the only Asian in the list of

the world’s top 25 bestselling recording artists.

Time magazine dubbed him “the Mozart of

Madras” and placed him in its list of the world’s

100 most influential people in 2009. His Tamil

fans simply call him “Isai Puyal” (English: the

Musical Storm).

He has won numerous awards, both in India and

further afield. At the 81st Academy Awards, he

won two Oscars for Best Original Score and for

Best Original Song, making him (at that time),

only the third Indian to win an Academy Award.

Rahman must have a very wide mantelpiece

in his home (or homes plural) to display his

dizzying array of awards. Sitting alongside those

two Oscars for 2008’s Slumdog Millionaire are: a

Golden Globe, a BAFTA, two Grammy Awards,

six National Film Awards, fifteen Filmfare

Awards and seventeen Filmfare Awards South.

In 2010, the Government of India awarded him

the Padma Bhushan, the third highest civilian

award.

Let’s just say that he’s a massive star in his native

India. What’s bigger than massive? Humongous?

He’s that word. Or bigger.

Allah-Rakha Rahman was born in Chennai to a

Hindu-Tamil family. In actual fact, A.R. wasn’t

born Allah-Rakha Rahman at all. His birth

name is Dileep Kumar but he converted to

Islam in 1989 and assumed his present name.

His father, R.K. Shekhar, was also a film-score

composer, arranger and conductor for Tamil

and Malayalam films and was supportive of

Rahman’s musicianship until his death when

Rahman was just nine years old.

Rahman took inspiration from western music as

well as more traditional Indian music. He recalls

listening to Jim Reeves and the Carpenters

alongside the work of Indian film composers

such as Madan Mohan, Naushad Ali and Roshan

(who wrote in Hindi) and Tamil composers

including K.V. Mahadevan and Vishwanatiian

Ramamurthy.

As a music director, his big breakthrough came

PHOTO CREDIT: WIKIPEDIA

when he scored the 1992 Tamil movie, Roja. It

was an instant hit, with Rahman’s soundtrack

taking the country by storm and starting him

on his personal journey to multiple awards and

global fame.

Over the years, India has produced many

legendary film composers (or ‘music directors”

as they’re called in the Indian film industry).

For example, alongside Rahman’s, you could

namedrop Naushad, R.D. Burman, Shankar-

Jaikishen or Ilaiyaraaja. The main difference

between them, is that Rahman has gained much

wider international acclaim, has transitioned

back and forth between Bollywood and

Hollywood, conquering the Western world and

bringing Indian music to the Western masses.

But hang on a second. Calling him “The King of

Bollywood Music” shows ignorance and sells

him a little short. The generic term, ‘Bollywood’

refers to Hindi language films. But Rahman

is a veteran composer of scores for not only

Bollywood but also Hollywood in English … and

Tamil … and Telugu … and Malayalam … and

even Mandarin.

British composer and previous collaborator,

Sir Andrew Lloyd Webber has been quoted

as saying “A.R. Rahman is nothing short of

a melodic genius. I admire his unique sense

of harmony, his staggering rhythms and his

melodies that take an unexpected twist that no

Western composer would dream of.”

It’s impossible to argue with that tribute.

A.R. Rahman can do no wrong. It seems that

everything the composer-songwriter-singerproducer-multi-instrumentalist

touches turns

to gold.

Indeed, he is credited with single-handedly

revolutionising Indian film music and has

24 HEY MAG - AUGUST 2018


himself become one of the Indian film industry’s

biggest money spinners, virtually owning the

industry for more than two decades. That’s

not an overstatement. His staggering musical

brilliance can make or break a film in India

and Indian producers swear by him. “In Indian

cinema, the music is such an important part of

it, that music can save a mediocre film. With

Rahman, it happens frequently” says film critic

Jai Arjun Singh.

Constant praise, fan adoration and commercial

success must bring a heavy responsibility in

terms of maintaining a high quality, prolific

output. In an online interview with Vijay Amritaj,

Rahman explains his philosophy: “If you have a

very strong mind and will, you can do anything.

For me, I was always learning so I was moving

from one thing to another thing. Now I have

the respect how do I keep it up? How do I learn

more to keep the love which people are giving

me? I’m grateful to God, to family, to my fans,

to music and musical skills.”

And does he ever think of turning his duo of

Oscars into a trio? “I made my mind realise that

two is enough for a lifetime and anything else

comes as a bonus,” he says. “Your mind is not

thinking about awards, it’s thinking about art.”

TOP 10 RECOMMENDED VIEWING & LISTENING

1. Roja (1992)

2. Rangeela (1995)

3. Dil Se (1998)

4. Lagaan (2001)

5. Rang De Basanti (2006)

6. Slumdog Millionaire (2008)

7. Couples Retreat (2009)

8. 127 Hours (2010)

9. Rockstar (2011)

10. Viceroy’s House (2017)


THEIR LIFE IN SONG

NICK STEPHENSON MEETS FOUR SONGWRITING

LEGENDS TO DISCOVER THE STORY BEHIND THEIR

SONGS.

BARRY MASON was a leading songwriter of

the 1960s, writing many songs in

partnership with Les Reed. He

earned numerous awards

throughout his career

including five Ivor Novello

Awards. His songwriting

credits include “Love

Grows (Where My

Rosemary Goes)”, “The

Last Waltz” and “Delilah”

which was made famous

by Tom Jones.

BM on songwriting ... “I’m

interested when people

use imagery in their songs.

My stuff is so simple. I seem

to write like a story. I feel that

every word’s got to be in normal

conversation. I did an interview

once for one of the broadsheets. It was

very flattering to get it. It was in my heyday

with stuff in the charts and feeling no pain, you

know. And the guy said ‘Barry, you’re amazing,

you just know how to put your finger on the

pulse of the everyman, of the common man’.

Little did he know, I was writing to the absolute

limit of my intellectual capacity. My style is very

simple.”

BM on the song, “Delilah”: “The inspiration ...

my first pop hit as a child was Frankie Laine

singing Jezebel ... a naughty girl song. I tried

Salome in my mind, you know, trying to think

of naughty girls but Salome was a difficult word

and not edgy enough. Then Delilah came in my

mind. I was trying to do a story from history,

you know, Samson and Delilah. It was going to

be about him losing his hair and everything but

I didn’t get that far. I ended up with a whole new

story.”

GRAHAM GOULDMAN is best known for his

work with 10cc, penning classic hits such as

“Dreadlock Holiday”. In 2014, he was inducted

into the Songwriters Hall of Fame at the 45th

annual induction ceremony.

GG on songwriting … “I’ve written songs on my

own and I collaborate a lot. I’ve been very lucky,

I’ve had great songwriting partners, particularly

Eric Stewart from 10cc and the late, great

Andrew Gold.’

GG on the song “No Milk Today”: “This is a song I

wrote in the ‘60s. My late father used to help me

with lyrics and often came up

with song titles as well.

I’ve told this story eight

billion times but I’m

going to tell it eight

billion and one now.

He went round to

one of his friends’

but his friend wasn’t

in. He turned on the

doorstep and he saw

an empty milk bottle

with a little note in it.

He came back to me and

said “Graham, you should

write a song called ‘no milk today’. I said that

is a TERRIBLE idea. He said it’s not going to be

a song about the fact that people don’t need

any milk that day, it’s what the empty bottle

symbolises; it’s the fact that love has left the

house. Anyway, I did write it.”

GG on the song “Dreadlock Holiday”: “The phrase

... the song title was given to me by somebody I

was talking to. I was on holiday in Jamaica and

we were talking about sports and I talked about

Manchester United, obviously. I said “what

about cricket? Do you like it?” And he said, “No,

I don’t like it”. I said “Oh” ... surprised. He said,

“No, I love it” and that was it. I got back from

holiday and we were writing at my house - Eric

and I. Eric had been on holiday in Barbados, I’d

been to Jamaica and we started talking about

our holidays and we started playing this thing

and that was it, off we went. Quite simple and a

really quick song to write as well.”

MIKE BATT is a singer-songwriter, musician,

record producer, director, conductor and

former Deputy Chairman of the BPI. He is

best known for creating The Wombles pop act,

writing the chart-topping “Bright Eyes” and

discovering Katie Melua. His awards include five

Ivor Novello Awards.

MB on the song “Bright Eyes”: “In 1976, I was

commissioned to write a piece of music which was

to change my credibility rating out of ten from

one to whatever it became, at least temporarily

anyway. The song was commissioned by the

[original] producer of ‘Watership Down’. John

Hubley, the great director, said to me ‘write me

a song about death’. He didn’t really want songs

at all, he wanted a dark film. I thought, wow, that

really is serious, that’s going

to be a heavy song and I

really worried about

it for a while. Then,

I was sitting at the

piano and I thought

actually it’s one of

the most important

things in our life.

What happens

afterwards?

26 HEY MAG - AUGUST 2018


It’s not the death, it’s the afterlife or whatever

you might believe in. I wrote three songs, two

of which were chucked out. “Bright Eyes” was

chucked out three times and luckily got put back

in three times. Two weeks after the session with

Art Garfunkel, the director John Hubley died on

the operating table during open heart surgery

so when he commissioned me to write the song,

death must’ve been in the forefront of his mind.”

RAY DAVIES - often referred to as ‘the godfather

of Britpop’ - was the lead singer, rhythm

guitarist and main songwriter for The Kinks. He

was knighted in the 2017 New Year Honours for

services to the arts.

RD on songwriting: “A great song structure is

very much like a great short story. Have a great

opening, compelling verse, take them into a

story, have a ‘because bit’ which I call the bridge,

take them into another verse and a chorus and

you’re out of there. I love

writing to deadlines. It

brings me to life. I think

deadline imposes a set

of thought. You can

think to yourself,

what shall I write

about? Everybody says

Ray go on a holiday,

write an opus but the

real opus is written

when you’ve got ten

minutes to deliver it.”

CLASSICAL FOCUS

NEVER TOO LATE TO START

Not all of us can claim Mozart’s “child prodigy” status (writing ten symphonies

before his teens - the show off!) but as our infographic shows, some of the best

pieces in a composer’s career don’t always occur early on. Whatever your

age or level of fame, it’s never too late to start composing, so put pen to

paper, right away. Research by Nick Stephenson


CASH KINGS

IN HIP HOP

FORBES RELEASES ITS ‘FORBES FIVE: HIP-HOP’S WEALTHIEST ARTISTS 2018’ LIST, AN THERE’S A NEW CASH KING.

WORDS: AASHA BODHANI

Jay-Z has finally dethroned Diddy as hip-hop’s number one cash king as he enters 2018 with a

$900 million fortune.

The Brooklyn-born mogul, who has remained in the top five since 2011, upped his riches by $90 million over the past year.

Though Jay-Z released his ‘4:44’ album in June last year, along with his substantial stakes in Roc Nation and TIDAL, it’s his

investments in ‘Armand de Brignac’ Champagne and ‘D’Ussé’ cognac that gave him the needed boost.

In March this year, Forbes released its ‘Forbes Five: Hip-Hop’s Wealthiest Artists 2018’ list, which saw heavyweights Sean

‘Diddy’ Combs and Dr. Dre in second and third place, respectively. Followed by Drake in fourth position and Eminem

cementing fifth place due to Birdman’s supposed liquidity problems.

Since Forbes began accounting the riches in the hip-hop world, Diddy has secured the top spot, but this year his estimated

worth was $825 million. Like Jay-Z, he also has investments in the booze business where he saw a steady growth in his

luxury ‘DeLeón Tequila’ brand, however Diddy’s interests in premium vodka brand ‘Cîroc’ took a slight hit.

Despite dropping to second place, Diddy took to Instagram to share a picture of himself alongside Jay-Z with a message

empowering black excellence globally.

West coast giant Dr. Dre is a non-mover in the Forbes list, but has a net worth of $770 million thanks to Apple’s $3 billion

purchase of ‘Beats by Dre’ in May 2014. Additionally, Dre’s fortune over the next year is expected to grow substantially

once his Apple stock is fully vested and depending on the tech titan’s share price the amount could be over $100 million.

If this is the case, Dre could surpass both Jay-Z and Diddy.

The last two places see a massive drop, down to $100 million to be precise as Drake and Eminem tie in fourth and fifth

position.

The Toronto-born rapper has acquired more than $250 million since 2010, and after taxes and spending, Drake hit the

$100 million net worth mark. The young rapper has an extensive real estate portfolio, with properties in Canada and

California, as well as an equity stake in Virgina Black whiskey.

Though Eminem isn’t perhaps regarded as a business mogul, he is the best-selling rapper of all time and from any genre,

during the 2000s. Furthermore, his 2017 ‘Revival’ album release incurred strong music sales.

The consumer shift in alcohol preference has certainly given Jay-Z an edge, and if the market continues to lean towards

cognac, whiskey and tequila, the newest cash king could become the first billionaire hip-hop star.

Forbes complies the ‘Forbes Five’ list by analysing assets and financial documents, plus speaking with analysts, attorneys,

managers, industry players and the moguls themselves.

30 HEY MAG - AUGUST 2018


PHOTO CREDIT: PIETER- JANNICK DIJKSTRA

PHOTO CREDIT: THE COME UP SHOW

PHOTO CREDIT: JASON PERSSE

PHOTO CREDIT: DOD NEWS

HEY MAG - AUGUST 2018

31


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ULTIMATE

It’s been 42 years since Thin Lizzy released

‘Boys Are Back in Town’ and as songs go,

this is dad music at its finest. Dad music

or the better-known term ‘Dad Rock’ has

a distinctive sound, but defining it isn’t

easy. Whilst there is no straightforward

explanation, it is typically tied to classic rock hits

from the ‘60s and ‘70s, with dad vibes coming

through Steely Dan, Queen and AC/DC.

Dad Rock is one of those ‘once you hear it, you’ll

know it’ genres; the bass guitar takes centre

stage, along with the heavy drum beat and a

strong hook. The lyrics, in most instances, are

filled with masculine-themed, edgy lyrics instead

of soft, romanticised vocals. Dad Rock isn’t just

hardcore rock ‘n’ roll, but all are certainly wellconstructed

songs. Dad Rock shares a familiar

‘feeling’ or ‘groove’. Maybe it’s more than a

feeling?

This new ‘genre’ is enjoyed by all age groups but

Dad Rock (for us) conjures up images of white

middle-aged men, wearing Levi’s 501 Originals,

rocking hairstyles inspired by Led Zeppelin or

Whitesnake. Nothing wrong with that! Think

Jeremy Clarkson in his Top Gear heyday.

In honour of dad rockers everywhere, Hey Mag

has put together a list of the Top 75 ultimate

dad tunes.

‘A Horse With No Name’ - America

‘Ace Of Spades’ - Motorhead

‘Africa’ - Toto

‘All Right Now’ - Free

‘All The Young Dudes’ - Mott The Hoople

‘American Pie’ - Don McLean

‘Another One Bites The Dust’ - Queen

‘Baba O’Riley’ - The Who

‘Black Magic Woman’ - Santana

‘Born In The USA’ - Bruce Springsteen

‘Born To Run’ - Bruce Springsteen

‘Boys Are Back In Town’ - Thin Lizzy

‘Broken Wings’ - Mr. Mister

‘Brown Eyed Girl’ - Van Morrison

‘Cat’s In The Cradle’ - Ugly Kid Joe

‘Chelsea Dagger’ - The Fratellis

‘Crazy Crazy Night’ - Kiss

‘Crazy On You’ - Heart

‘Delta Lady’ - Joe Cocker

‘Don’t You (Forget About Me)’ - Simple Minds

‘Don’t Stop Believin’ - Journey

‘Down Under’ - Men At Work

‘Eye Of The Tiger’ - Survivor

‘Fight For Your Right’ - Beastie Boys

‘Foxy Lady’ - Jimi Hendrix

‘Free Bird’ - Lynyrd Skynyrd

‘Go Your Own Way’ - Fleetwood Mac

‘In The Air Tonight’ - Phil Collins

‘Johnny B. Goode’ - Chuck Berry

‘Kashmir’ - Led Zeppelin

‘LA Woman’ - The Doors

‘Layla’ - Derek and the Dominos

‘Live And Let Die’ - Paul McCartney & Wings

‘Lola’ - The Kinks

‘London Calling’ - The Clash

‘Love Is The Drug’ - Roxy Music

‘Lust For Life’ - Iggy Pop

Maggie May’ - Rod Stewart

‘Money For Nothing’ - Dire Straits

‘More Than A Feeling’ - Boston

‘Mr Blue Sky’ - Electric Light Orchestra

‘Oh Well’ - Fleetwood Mac

‘Paranoid’ - Black Sabbath

‘Pinball Wizard’ - The Who

‘Pride (In The Name Of Love)’ - U2

‘Rebel Rebel’ - David Bowie

‘Reelin’ In The Years’ - Steely Dan

‘Rock And Roll’ - Led Zeppelin

‘Rockin’ All Over the World’ - Status Quo

‘Rockin’ In The Free World’ - Neil Young

‘School’s Out’ - Alice Cooper

‘Seven Nation Army’ - The White Stripes

‘Shine On You Crazy Diamond’ - Pink Floyd

‘Should I Stay Or Should I Go’ - The Clash

‘Since You’ve Been Gone’ - Rainbow

‘Smoke On The Water’ - Deep Purple

‘Stay With Me’ - The Faces

‘Stuck In The Middle With You’ - Stealers Wheel

‘Sultans Of Swing’ - Dire Straits

‘Summer of 69’ - Bryan Adams

‘Sweet Child O’ Mine’ - Guns & Roses

‘Sympathy For The Devil’ - The Rolling Stones

‘Take It Easy’ - The Eagles

‘Teenage Kicks’ - The Undertones

‘The Joker’ - Steve Miller Band

‘Two Princes’ - Spin Doctors

‘Under Pressure’ - David Bowie & Queen

‘Up The Junction’ - Squeeze

‘Walk On The Wild Side’ - Lou Reed

‘Walk This Way’ - Aerosmith/Run DMC

‘We Will Rock You’ - Queen

‘Werewolves Of London’ - Warren Zevon

‘Where The Streets Have No Name’ - U2

‘Wild Thing’ - The Troggs

‘You Shook Me All Night Long’ - AC/DC

34 HEY MAG - AUGUST 2018


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