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A MAGAZINE FOR ESPOO RESIDENTS

3

2018

PARTICIPATE IN

YOUR OWN WAY

HOBBIES ON

WEDNESDAYS

AURORA HAS

GROWN UP

MADE

TOGETHER

PAGES 18-19

Espoo Day is

made up of

events organised

jointly by city

residents. Male

Singers with their

pancakes are an

annual number.


MY ESPOO

MIRA KÖYMÄRI

CREATIVITY BLOOMS IN KARAKALLIO

IN MAY, an art day was held in Karakallio.

The local residents built a balloon installation

in the market’s air space and painted

metal tiles for the community art piece of

visual artist Tiina Herttua.

The art day was part of the Karakallio

Creative project that enlivens the Karakallio

suburb with art and events for several years.

The first artwork completed in the project

was a plant mural painted by the Argentinian

artist Pastel.

“As an area, Karakallio is like a clean and

natural blank slate. Its spaciousness and simplicity

are a good basis for the project. For

example, the murals in Karakalliontie can

be seen from a long distance away,” says

Karakallio-Seura association member Mira

Köymäri.

In Karakallio Creative, the Karakallio-

Seura association operates as a link between

residents and the project organiser Elävä

Espoo and the City of Espoo.

“In the whole of Finland, Karakallio Creative

is a new way of profiling a neighbourhood.

Because of it, I now look at my environment

in terms of what art could be implemented

there,” Köymäri says.

PIRITTA PORTHAN

SEND YOUR

OWN ARTWORK

SUBMISSION:

KARAKALLIO

CREATIVE.COM/EN/

SUBMISSION

The balloon

installation

was the official

starting shot of

the Karakallio

Creative project.

Unfortunately,

this piece of art

did not become a

permanent part

of the market’s

look.

2


CONTENTS 3/2018

A MAGAZINE FOR ESPOO RESIDENTS

3

2018

IN THIS ISSUE:

2 MY ESPOO › Creativity blooms in Karakallio

4 EDITORIAL › Jukka Mäkelä

5 PICKS › Espoo is the smartest in the world

7 AT YOUR SERVICE › Conductor Klaus Mäkelä

8 THEME › Participate in your own way

12 ACTIVE ESPOO › What’s on this autumn?

15 INSIGHT › Espoo is a safe place to move around

16 PEARL › Pikku-Aurora grew up

18 SERVICE › Espoo Day comes again

20 VI I ESBO › City Theatre’s Erik Söderblom

22 THE PEOPLE OF ESPOO › Encouraging boys to read

AURORA’S

CULTURE

HOUSES ALL

HAVE THEIR OWN

SPIRIT AND

CONTENT

THEME.

8

Environmental

designers help

Espoo residents

implement their

own ideas in their

neighbourhood.

’’

Human encounters are at

the core of experiencing

participation.

7 14 20

ESPOO MAGAZINE 3/2018 >> 3


EDITORIAL

Espoo Day is

celebrated together

OUR BIGGEST city event, Espoo Day, will be held on Friday and

Saturday 24–25 August 2018. Thousands of Espoo residents

are once again involved in organising fun activities around the

city. Espoo Day, if anything, reflects the genuine communality

in Espoo and the Make with Espoo spirit – that is, doing things

together, generating ideas and learning.

Enthusiasm for co-creation has brought Espoo recognition

as the best innovation community in the world. In the

summer, Espoo and Aalto University were selected to a top

league together with Cambridge in the UK, Palo Alto in the US,

Heidelberg in Germany and Noida in India to implement the

UN’s sustainable development goals as a pioneering community.

The selection is a continuation of the “Intelligent Community

of the Year 2018” prize we won in London in June. Espoo

has also proven to be the most sustainable city in Europe

2016–2017.

According to the acknowledgements, Espoo is a pioneer in

creating smart, people-oriented and scalable solutions for a

sustainable future through local cooperation. Espoo’s assets

include the people, communities and businesses in Espoo. In

the long term, active cooperative with various operators will

bring great benefits to the everyday life of city residents and

the entire community. On Espoo Day, there are many reasons

to celebrate together. Welcome aboard!

JUKKA MÄKELÄ

Mayor

Updates from different

parts of the city and

pages dedicated to

various operators.


From the beginning of

the season, an average

of more than 2,600 city

bike trips per day have

been made in Espoo;

that is, 3.8 trips daily on

each bicycle.

Always up to date.

Information, answers

and discussion.


Espoo and

@AaltoUniversity

selected to a top

league together with

four other universities.

#kestäväespoo

#espoo

Great moments, events

and landscapes through

the eyes of Espoo

residents.


As if you look smart

when someone takes

a picture of you

chewing! #pentala

#saaristomuseo

#pentalanlampaat

MAGAZINE FOR ESPOO RESIDENTS Public bulletin to all households FEEDBACK AND SUGGESTIONS espoolehti@omnipress.fi

PUBLISHER City of Espoo, PO Box 12, 02070 City of Espoo, tel. 09 81 621, espoo.fi, firstname.lastname@espoo.fi

EDITOR IN CHIEF Satu Tyry-Salo, Communications director EDITORS Omnipress Oy, espoolehti@omnipress.fi

MANAGING EDITOR Kimmo Kallonen LAYOUT Hannu Kavasto/Hank PRINTED BY Punamusta DISTRIBUTION SSM

NOTIFICATIONS jakelupalaute@omnipress.fi COVER Timo Porthan ISSN 1798-8446 Next issue 24.11.2018

4


PICKS

2025

The

United Nations has invited the City of Espoo to become a pioneer of sustainable

development. This entails Espoo undertaking to reach the UN’s goals by 2025.

25 cities have been invited to the Sustainable Development Program. Espoo

was invited to the university cities category, which includes in addition to Espoo

Cambridge in the UK, Heidelberg in Germany, Noida in India and Palo Alto in the

United States. Each city will be appointed to lead at least one of the 17 goals.

Espoo’s operations will focus on learning, education and innovation.

Espoo is the

smartest in the world

THE CITY OF ESPOO has won the international Intelligent Community

Awards 2018. Espoo was the only European city among

the seven finalists. The competition was built around the theme

of utilising data in human-oriented service development.

The three-day final was held in London in early June.

During the days of the final, Espoo Innovation

Garden, a metropolitan development community,

ESPOO’S BEST gained visibility and new networks for information

RESOURCE ARE sharing and contacts. These are helping Espoo residents

to implement the city strategy i.e. the Espoo

ITS PEOPLE,

BUSINESSES AND Story, solve the challenges associated with a sustainable

future, and create new intelligent services

COMMUNITIES.”

and jobs.

Espoo has already been cited in an international

comparative study as Europe’s most sustainable city.

The city wants to continue along these lines, guaranteeing not

only good services, but also economic, ecologically, socially and

culturally sustainable growth.

“Espoo’s best resource are its people, businesses and communities.

Bearing this in mind, this is clearly a shared victory,” says

Mayor Jukka Mäkelä.

The competition was arranged by the international expert network

of cities and regions, the Intelligent Community Forum (ICF).

KULPS!

Ten years

The KULPS! Culture path was

split into two 1st August 2017.

The Once a Year destinations

can be selected by a group once

during a school year free of

charge. To Your Heart’s Content

destinations can be selected free

of charge once or several times

during a school year without any

restrictions.

KULPS!, a tool for cultural and physical education in Espoo schools,

will soon turn ten years old. KULPS! promotes cooperation between

schools and cultural and sports actors. It consists of three paths: the

culture, sport and library paths.

The goal of KULPS! is that all children have the opportunity to experience

and do art, learn to use libraries, and explore a wide range of

sports and venues. For basic education classes, KULPS! paths are part

of free tuition. Schools can choose the most suitable content from a

range of high-quality offerings.

The KULPS! cultural path is Espoo’s Cultural Education Plan. Finnish

cultural education plans received recognition in the spring, when the

plans currently being implemented by 71 Finnish municipalities were

presented with an award by European Commission and Europa Nostra,

Europe’s leading cultural heritage network.

JOIN US IN THE INTELLIGENT

ESPOO EXPERIMENT

SEVERAL FASCINATING digital experiments will be underway in

Espoo during the autumn, in which anyone can participate. On

Espoo Day, Saturday 25 August, you can use an augmented reality

app to plan the surroundings of the Tapiola Metro Station. At

the end of August, we also launched the Peput penkkiin (bums on

seats) trial – which encourages people to share cars – and a robotic

call service experiment. A few day-care centres will continue

the development of interactive skills begun during the summer, in

the company of the Pikkuli character.

› Follow our news coverage on Twitter @DigiEspoo, and you

won’t miss out! We also post news on our website at

espoo.fi/en-US/City_of_Espoo/Innovative_Espoo.

TEXTILE ART IN TAPIOLA

A TEXTILE ARTWORK will be completed in Tapiola for Espoo Day. Based on rugmaking

techniques, this large textile artwork will be a joint effort by city people,

school groups in Espoo and textile artist Greta Muuri. The work is being done in

cooperation with City Events Espoo.

The Espoo Culture Committee awarded the working grant for professional artists

to Muuri for 2018. She creates experimental textile art, based on used textiles,

to break down boundaries, arouse emotions and promote the values of sustainable

development.

The giant artwork will be created from 21 August and will be exhibited in Tapiola

throughout Espoo Day, 24 to 25 August.

ESPOO MAGAZINE 3/2018 >> 5


PICKS

We’re

moving!

The Urban Espoo app

provides cultural services

Matinkylä Health Centre

is moving premises

THE MATINKYLÄ HEALTH CENTRE will move to the Iso Omena service

centre at the beginning of 2019. Health centre activities in the

Iso Omena service centre will become part of the City of Espoo’s

operations. The Matinkylä Health Centre will continue to serve the

public in Matinkatu this year.

Residents have requested longer opening hours and services

located along good transport connections. The Health Centre’s

planned opening hours are 7am to 8pm on weekdays. Saturday

opening times are also being negotiated.

In addition to a traditional appointment-based and urgent appointments,

there will be an express-service polyclinic for people in

need of occasional rapid services.

A decision will be taken on the area’s dental services later in

the autumn. The Health Centre planned for the service centre will

mainly serve residents of Matinkylä, Olari and Kuitinmäki. Oma

Lääkäri Iso Omena will move out of the service centre, but the City

of Espoo will continue its cooperation with the private service provider:

Mehiläinen will continue to provide health centre services for

residents of Hentta and Suurpelto in its own premises near the Iso

Omena shopping centre.

Espoo residents are free to choose their own health centre and

change it every year.

THE APPLICATION

IS A VIRTUAL

CULTURAL CITY,

IN WHICH THE

USER EXPLORES

A FICTIONAL

3D WORLD.

APPLICATION ROUND FOR SOCIAL AND HEALTH

ASSOCIATION GRANTS IN OCTOBER

CITY EVENTS ESPOO has developed a mobile application

that provides cultural services in digital format. The application

is a virtual cultural city, in which the user explores a

fictional 3D world.

The application provides citizens with interesting cultural

experiences. For example, you can watch movie screenings,

music performances and live streamings of concerts, and

attend workshops.

The application, which was the brainchild of Cultural Producer

Laura Läntinen, received an honourable mention in

the mayor’s innovation competition in November 2017. The

application will be ready for Espoo Day and can be downloaded

from app stores.

ON AN ANNUAL BASIS, the Espoo Social

and Health Services Committee awards

grants to organisations operating in Espoo,

whose activities support and supplement

social and health services.

The grants support the basic activities of

organisations and communities whose activities

provide the basis for a good everyday

life for Espoo residents, increase their opportunities

for social inclusion and involvement

in peer activity, and promote their

functional capacity, health and well-being.

The 2019 grant application period is 1 to

31 October 2018. A briefing and discussion

session on grants will be held from 5.30pm

to 7pm on Thursday 27 September in the

City Council House café.

› For further details about grants

contact: maritta.samuelsson@espoo.fi

6


AT YOUR SERVICE

A COMPLETE

SYMPHONY SERIES

Klaus Mäkelä will lead the Tapiola Sinfonietta orchestra

through Beethoven’s series of nine symphonies in full.

The conductor also has strong roots in Espoo himself.

TEXT Tiina Parikka PHOTO Klaus Mäkelä’s gallery

Tapiola Sinfonietta is

a familiar orchestra

for Klaus Mäkelä

both from his own

childhood and

through previous

cooperation.

” I

have led Tapiola Sinfonietta

in individual

concerts as a guest

conductor before, but

when this kind of broader

cooperation with Beethoven’s

symphonies was suggested

by the orchestra, the

idea was very interesting

right away.

Performing Beethoven’s

nine symphony series is always

a special case. For

each symphony, I have designed

a programme that

provides the audience with

different perspectives on

these classic works.

We have also commissioned

a new piece for our

series from composer Sauli

Zinovjev.

The first concert featuring

Symphony No. 1 will

be held on 14 September

2018, and the last one in the

series will take place in December

2020.

During the cooperation,

I will perform with Tapiola

Sinfonietta not only as a

conductor, but also as a cellist

and chamber musician.

It is great that I can implement

all of these aspects in

this project. My next performance

as a cellist will take

place in January.

I lived in Espoo in my

childhood. This is a fine cultural

city and we can be

proud of its high-quality

cultural services. Espoo has

passionate orchestra capable

of transformation

that plays at an internationally

high level.

In addition to the partnership

with Tapiola Sinfonietta,

I am starting as the

main guest of the Swedish

Radio Symphony Orchestra

in the autumn and as the artistic

director of the Turku

Music Festival in 2019. The

rest of the time, I travel the

world as a guest conductor.

Cultural

City

Event and Cultural Services

organise more than 5,000

events annually with

900,000 visitors

participating.

THE LARGEST

CULTURAL CENTRES

(VISITORS IN 2017)

EXHIBITION CENTRE

WEEGEE

357,300

ESPOO

CULTURAL CENTRE

126,400

SELLOSALI

58,800

ESPOO

CITY MUSEUM

76,800

TAPIOLA

SINFONIETTA

40,600

ESPOO MAGAZINE 3/2018 >> 7


THEME

Inclusion is participation,

but also a feeling created

through encounters.

“That is why how city

residents are encountered

is important in all operations

of the city,” says Development

Manager Tuija Norlamo.

PARTICIPATE

Text Juha Peltonen

Illustration Susanna Tuononen

Photos Timo Porthan

IN YOUR OWN WAY

Espoo’s goal is for city residents

to be able to participate

in activities that are important

to them and influence

the affairs and future of their city.

There are plenty of opportunities

for this in a participatory Espoo.

According to Development Manager

Tuija Norlamo, we are talking

about a leap from good to excellent.

“We develop tools and operating

methods that are used to drive the

initiatives and ideas of municipal

residents forward, and practices for

communicating information from

residents to decision-makers.”

“Inclusion is an experience and

participation is an action. That is

why participation does not necessarily

lead to inclusion, but without

some participation, it will never

arise. Human encounters are at the

core of experiencing inclusion,”

Norlamo contemplates.

THERE IS A DESIRE TO MAKE PARTICI-

PATION A PART OF THE OPERATING CUL-

TURE. A large portion of the opportunities

for city residents to participate

are statutory. Plans for land

use being available for review and

the right to express an opinion are

already secured under law. In matters

involving plans, everyone

whose housing, work or other conditions

the plan may affect are concerned

parties.

In land use, the leap from good

to excellent means more resident

events and hearings than the minimum

requirement of the law as well

as new ways to express an official

opinion.

According to Norlamo, the

leap to excellence requires a

change in the operating culture;

mere administrative

development is not enough.

8


ESPOO MAGAZINE 3/2018 >> 9


THEME

“Everyday practices have not always

been built to support inclusion,

but have evolved slowly over time.

The development programme ’A participatory

Espoo’ considers how inclusion

and participation become

part of the operating culture instead

of a superficial approach,” she says.

Inclusion is both participation

and influence. Participation in the

planning of land use and traffic solutions

affects the future of the entire

city. Participatory budgeting directs

the use of tax money. Democracy

does not work without the participation

of city residents.

“Residents disagreeing with each

other and people having different interests

is part of urban life. Work on

inclusion allows different parties to

familiarise themselves with the arguments

of others and learn to understand

them,” Norlamo says.

THINGS THAT RELATE TO ONE’S OWN

EVERYDAY LIFE ARE THE MOST IMPOR-

TANT FOR EVERYONE. Environmental

Design Team members Niko Riepponen,

Martta Pirttioja and Iira

Niemeläinen strive to facilitate the

implementation of people’s own

development ideas. In their experience,

resident forums are mainly

attended by older people; the participation

of young people and immigrants

is gained by going to them.

Niko Riepponen has been designing

yard areas and play equipment

with schoolchildren for years.

The method is now open to all city

residents, and the team is strengthened

by Martta Pirttioja and Iira Niemeläinen.

They can be contacted

with all projects related to the development

of the living environment.

“Our first Facebook post in April

was seen by 15,000 city residents,

and messages started to come in.

We began pushing some of the development

proposals forward, and

some we directed to other actors of

the city,” Martta Pirttioja says.

The environmental designers do

not implement the city residents’

suggestions, but help the residents

carry out their development projects

themselves.

“We look into funding opportunities

and bring new partners together.

For example, we can help

with making a grant application to

the Culture Committee or determine

whether permits are required for the

project. If we do not know the answer

ourselves, we will find out who does,”

Iira Niemeläinen promises.

PARTICIPATION ALSO APPLIES TO

DEVELOPING THE CITY’S SERVICES. The

best experts regarding services are

their users. That is why social and

health care services utilise the firsthand

knowledge of experts by experience

in the development of services.

An expert by experience is a

person who has first-hand experience

of, for example, mental health

and substance abuse problems or

other life crises. Their work lowers

the threshold of participation for

the city residents who do not usually

have the energy or care to participate

even in their own everyday life.

“Through them, we obtain knowledge

from experience for decisionmakers

and those working with customers,”

says Marjo Järvinen, project

manager of the project for the prevention

of homelessness.

Environmental designers with

residents’ development projects

Facebook:

Espoon ympäristömuotoilun

tiimi

Instagram:

@inspiroivaespoo

DO YOU WANT TO PAINT a work of art in a

public place, set up a nature trail or fix an ugly

intersection? You should contact Espoo’s Environmental

Design Team.

The assistance of environmental designers is

available to everyone living in Espoo, including associations

and sports clubs. The team members

have visited residents’ association events and organised

local activity evenings around the city.

Get in

touch

10


HUMAN

ENCOUNTERS ARE

AT THE CORE OF

EXPERIENCING

INCLUSION.

HUNDREDS INVOLVED IN THE DESIGN OF SPORTS PARK

THE DESIGN OF THE TAPIOLA SPORTS PARK

has already been participated by hundreds of

Espoo residents, even though the project is

still in its infancy. The work began with a vision

workshop and map survey last autumn, and a

second resident event took place in the winter.

“At present, the outdoor areas of the sports

park are football and parking fields. What

people want there is some kind of a central

square surrounded also by services, making the

sports park itself an attractive environment,”

says Antti Mäkinen, Project Director of the Tapiola,

Otaniemi and Keilaniemi area.

’’

The residents

know the area

the best.

The map survey was answered by 337 people

who were able to mark on the map the places in

the sports park they feel are comfortable and

functional and, on the other hand, the ones that

should be developed. The respondents appreciated

well-functioning sports fields and a comfortable

park area.

The problems included underutilised areas

and confusing traffic arrangements. The pedestrian

and bicycle routes were considered unsafe

in part and improvements were desired for the

connection from the metro station to the sports

park.

Environmental

designers

Martta Pirttioja

and Iira

Niemeläinen

want to be

contacted

by residents

regarding all

kinds of local

environment

development

projects.

Official opinion

can be provided

directly on the

planning map

A lot of feedback

has been

received at

resident events

for the plan.

THE MASTER PLAN FOR ESPOO’S northern and central

parts is only in the draft phase, but it has already been the

subject of ten resident events.

“The residents know the area the best and provide valuable

source information about it,” says Urban Planner

Seija Lonka.

The master plan now being prepared will respond to the

city’s growth targets. A more cohesive city structure creates

good conditions for public transport and the future of

the Länsirata track.

The plan area covers more than one third of Espoo’s

land area. Two surveys open to all have been organised

during the planning process, and their results are available

on the plan’s subpages at espoo.fi. Eight resident events

open to all have been held already in the draft phase, and

two for residents’ associations. All the public events have

been attended by about a hundred people.

“We have also participated in resident forums and associations’

own events where we have spoken about the

preparation situation and answered the questions of the

residents,” Lonka says.

According to her, residents detail especially wishes for

services and public transport in their feedback.

“Some want to start building, others would like to preserve.

We have received a lot of feedback.”

The electronic feedback system that was developed together

with Mapita last year is also used in the preparation

of the master plan.

It allows feedback to be submitted directly on the planning

map during its review period, either by clicking on a

part of the map or by outlining the desired area. Planning

ordinances for a specific area can also be viewed by entering

an address.

An opinion can be provided either on the planning ordinances

of a single section or on the entire planning solution.

The system compiles the opinions of the reminding

party into a summary that it sends to the Registry Office

and to the reminding party.

Along with the electronic feedback system, traditional

ways of providing an official opinion or reminder directly to

the city’s Registry Office also remain.

“Opinions and statements on the draft master plan are

currently being reviewed. A resident event informing everyone

of the feedback received will be held in the autumn,”

Lonka says.

The plan proposal is expected to undergo committee review

in autumn 2019, after which it will be made available

for review.

ESPOO MAGAZINE 3/2018 >> 11


WHAT’S ON IN AUGUST-OCTOBER

› ADULT

EDUCATION

CENTRE COURSES

STILL HAVE ROOM

ENROLMENT FOR THE autumn

courses of the Espoo Adult Education

Centre started already

in May, but the enrolment process

is ongoing. New courses

are launched continuously

throughout the year – the Adult

Education Centre reacts quickly

to customers’ wishes and can

set up new groups for popular

courses, for example.

The course offering can be

browsed in the ilmonet.fi online

service. The curriculum is only

published once a year and includes

long, full-year courses.

Municipal residents are provided

guidance on the use of

electronic tools at the Adult Education

Centre’s Tietotupa sessions.

These sessions also offer

assistance on browsing courses

and learning how to enrol online.

› Enrol at www.ilmonet.fi or

by calling the Adult Education

Centre’s customer service,

tel. +358 20 692 444.

› PULSE OF

AUTUMN FOR

SENIORS

SYKETTÄ SYKSYYN – Låt hösten

pulsera (Pulse of Autumn) is a

traditional autumn celebration

for Espoo’s senior citizens where

senior organisations and the City

of Espoo with its partners showcase

their expertise. The programme

includes, for example, a

festive greeting as well as song

and dance performances. The

Espoo pensioner of the year 2018

will be announced at the event.

› Sun 14 October 2018 at 2.00–

5.00 p.m., Espoo Cultural Centre,

Tapiolasali. Duration 3 h (intermission).

Free entrance.

LEHTIKUVA

ESPOO

FROM DAY

TO DAY

Pick the most interesting

tips and hints on what

to do and where to go this

autumn.

MORE EVENTS:

espoo.fi › City of Espoo › What’s on? › Events in Espoo

Art inspired by Sami culture

THE FINE ARTS ACADEMY OF FINLAND Prize Exhibition at EMMA presents

the art of Outi Pieski (born 1973). Pieski’s work draws on Sami culture, and,

as such, has an important topical content. Pieski expresses her message in

the subtle language of art.

Her art brings the question of minority culture to the fore by playing on

the colours, forms, and methods associated with the Sami handicraft tradition.

References to the Northern light and landscape are also strongly present.

In Pieski’s works, these elements also receive new associations that

are separable from their origin.

In this way, both her paintings and the large and materially abundant

spatial installations embody lightness, sensitivity and immateriality. Pieski’s

particular way of using colour for artistic effect and her method of spatial

representation are also strongly inspirational for viewers. The Fine Arts

Academy of Finland Prize is awarded to a Finnish artist whose oeuvre deserves

greater visibility and recognition.

› Fine Arts Academy of Finland Prize Exhibition: Outi Pieski.

EMMA – Espoo Museum of Modern Art 12 September 2018–6 January 2019

Prinssi Yusuf

has released

five singles, of which

the most famous is

’Prinssille

morsian’.

› KANNUKLUBI GEARS

UP FOR A RAP AUTUMN

A CONCERT SERIES of five events lets

us experience the hottest artists in the

Finnish rap and hip hop scene today. The

performers of the autumn’s first gig will

include Prinssi Yusuf, Seksikäs-Suklaa,

Dosdela and VG. Prinssi Yusuf is known,

among other things, for his track “Prinssille

morsian”. Seksikäs-Suklaa and Dosdela,

in turn, are well-known social media

figures with many talents.

In September, we will tune in to the

currently best-known Finnish rap artist,

Gettomasa. Other names in the

autumn’s club gig calendar include

Gasellit, a group combining underground

rap and modern rhythm music, Tippa,

Bizi, Gracias and Djangomayn. Not

forgetting Kingfish, the voice of multicultural

Finland.

All the gigs in the concert series will

be held in Kannusali:

Fri 24 August at 7 p.m.: Prinssi Yusuf,

Seksikäs-Suklaa, Dosdela & VG

Free entrance. Free tickets from the

Lippupiste online shop (max. 2 tickets

per customer) without a service fee.

Fri 28 September at 7 p.m.: Gettomasa

Fri 19 October at 7 p.m.: Gasellit

Fri 9 November at 7 p.m.: Tippa, Bizi

Fri 30 November at 7 p.m.: Gracias,

Kingfish, Djangomayn

Tickets for gigs on 28 September–30

November EUR 12 + delivery fee, Lippupiste

and one hour before from the door

if seats remain.

More information: Kannusali.fi

12


› FROM THE

TRENCHES TO

MURHAMÄKI

PARTICIPATE in a history walk with the

theme civil war in Leppävaara – from

the trenches to Murhamäki. The history

walk lead by a local guide explores Leppävaara

during the Finnish civil war. Organised

by KAMU – Espoo City Museum

in cooperation with the Leppävaara Society.

› Walks on 26 August 2018 and 9 September

2018 at 6 p.m. Departure: Thorstorp

yard, Vanha maantie 12. Free entrance.

› IMMERSE YOURSELF

IN A BIRD PARADISE

THE EXHIBITION by the association Suomenojan Luonto

displays 30 photographs of the diverse nature of Suomenoja,

a natural site in the middle of the city. The Bird Paradise

exhibition focuses on birds, not forgetting mammals,

reptiles, butterflies and plants. History and an overview of

the area are also present.

› Espoo Cultural Centre, exhibition space 21 August–

9 September 2018. Free entrance.

› COMMUNITY OF

LARGE PLANTS

“A SPACE FOR TREES” exhibition at

Karatalo presents the works of Eeva

Tervala and Juan Antonio Muro. In this

exhibition, one makes space for trees

and the other one fills it. “I feel a warm

respect for the community of large

plants. People have always skilfully used

the forest as a mirror to vividly express

their thoughts and feelings,” says Eeva

Tervala.

› 30 August–1 October, Karatalo.

Opening of the exhibition Thu 30

August at 5–7 p.m. Free entrance.

› SAARA AALTO

ON STAGE

THE TALENTED interpreter who

has fared well in many singing

competitions was ranked

second in the UK series of X

Factor in 2016 and represented

Finland in the Eurovision Song

Contest in the spring of 2018.

The concert will feature Saara’s

most famous songs and fresh

material from her new album.

› Fri 19 October at 7 p.m.,

Tapiolasali. Tickets EUR 32.50 +

delivery fee, Ticketmaster.

› BOLD TALK

ABOUT ESPOO’S

FUTURE

ESPOO TALKs is a dynamic series that

offers insightful discourse on urban culture

and the future. Espoo Talks has featured

top experts from various fields

and witnesses of the future on an alternating

basis. The series, which was created

through cooperation between City

events Espoo and Radio Helsinki, has

included topics such as sports culture,

nature in the city, community, public art

and Espoo as a digital city. For example,

listen how cultural journalist Aleksis

Salusjärvi contemplates the

significance of identity for the

city and its inhabitants.

› The last episode of the 10-part series

on Radio Helsinki on Wed 22 August

at 10 a.m. The other episodes as

podcasts: www.radiohelsinki.fi,

www.espoo.fi/kaupunkitapahtumat

or via the Urban Espoo application.

› FATEFUL NOTES

TANGO DAY allows creative minds to

enjoy the welcoming beauty of tango.

The event warmly welcomes tango fanatics

and beginners alike. This concert

will bring people from Argentina

and Finland together to share a tango

or two. Unesco has protected the South

American tango as intangible cultural

heritage.

The event begins with an open dance

class (suitable for beginners). The concert

is organised by the Agencia Latina

association.

› Thu 23

August 2018

at 2.00–5.00

p.m., Sellosali.

Duration

3 h, incl.

intermission.

› NOSTALGIA

AT KINO RIIHI

There is still time to visit the Glims

Farmstead Museum before the summer

season ends. On Sunday 26 August at

3–4.30 p.m., the special programme will

include Kino Riihi where you can watch

old films in an atmospheric barn.

› Glimsintie 1. The programme is

included in the entrance fee.

› TIPS FOR FEELING

BETTER

COME AND LISTEN to the “Voi hyvin”

public lecture and pick the best advice

for your own use.

› “Voi hyvin” public lecture Wed 24

October 2018 at 5–7 p.m. Espoo Cultural

Centre, Louhisali. Free entrance. More

information: www.espoo.fi/hyvinvointi.

› KUTITUS SAILS TO THE SEA

THIS YEAR’S THEME of the Kutitus

festival is maritime adventures and

protection of the Baltic Sea and the

environment. The popular children’s

event offers a varied programme for

families with children at the Espoo

Cultural Centre in Tapiola and the

Children’s Arts Centre Aurora in

Järvenperä. The festival features,

for example, Dance Theatre

Hurjaruuth’s Flora & Fauna that

combines video art, music and dance

to create a video dance art piece

that you can dive into.

› Kutitus art

festival for

children

Wed 3 October–Sun

7 October

Check the

program from

facebook.com/

kutitus

› RARE TOP OPERA

INTERNATIONAL Opera Company Finland begins

its operation with a top production in Sellosali.

Vincenzo Bellini’s rarely presented Norma will premiere

on 6 September, directed by Ville Saukkonen.

› Shows: Thu 6 September at 7 p.m., Sat 8

September at 4 p.m. and Sun 9 September at 6 p.m.

Duration 3 h, incl. intermission. Tickets from

EUR 39/35/30 + delivery fee, Lippupiste. Groups

and advance bookings: info@teatro.fi/tel.

+358 40 528 8505.

ESPOO MAGAZINE 3/2018 >> 13


WHAT’S ON IN AUGUST-OCTOBER

OLLI HÄKÄMIES

Young people

who are still

looking for an

active hobby

can try out

water polo this

autumn.

HOBBIES ON

WEDNESDAYS

In the future, the Wednesday afternoons of secondary school pupils

will be reserved for hobby activities. There will also be a wide range of

things to try out available if you have not yet found your own hobby.

THE CITY OF ESPOO is the first in

Finland to introduce an experiment

where the school day of all secondary

school pupils will end at the

latest at 2.30 p.m. on Wednesdays.

The goal is to activate young people

to take up sports and cultural activities.

“Going forward, it will be possible

to arrange the practice sessions of

young people with goal-oriented

hobbies already in the afternoon.

This means that young people who

are training actively will also have

more time to spend with friends, for

homework and together with family

at least once a week with an evening

free of hobbies,” says Sports Coordinator

Camilo Miettinen.

On the other hand, many young

people lack a hobby of their own altogether.

There are a variety of lowthreshold

options available, which

are now concentrated specifically to

Wednesday afternoons.

“Young people are not bound to a

particular sport for the entire term,

but instead they can try out different

activities with the aim of as

many as possible finding a hobby

they like,” Miettinen explains.

FOR A START, nine types of sports

activities are included: ice hockey,

skating, football, basketball, floorball,

gymnastics, swimming/water

polo, track and field and fencing. For

those interested in culture, there

are media art workshops where you

can try photography, videotaping,

audio editing, green screen technology

and animation. Works are implemented

as projects lasting about

one month and you can jump in

whenever a new project starts.

“The media art workshops are

organised in cooperation with the

Espoo School of Art. The workshops

meet at the Entresse, Iso Omena,

Kalajärvi, Nöykkiö and Sello libraries,”

says Kaisa Koskela from

the Cultural Unit.

ENROLMENT for hobbies starts in

August through harrastushaku.fi.

There will also be other hobby options

available, such as billiards,

music, vlogging, cooking, handicrafts

and graffiti. Trying out hobbies

is free of charge.

TIINA PARIKKA

SEE MORE:

HARRASTUS-

HAKU.FI

RANGE OF

HOBBIES:

EXERCISE:

› Ice Hockey

› Skating

› Football

› Basketball

› Floorball

› Gymnastics

› Swimming/Water Polo,

› Athletics

› Fencing

CULTURE:

› Photography

› Videotaping

› Audio Editing

› Green Screen Technology

› Animations

YOUTH SERVICES:

› Pool

› Table Tennis

› Girls’ Club

› Rap Workshop

› DJ Workshop

› Video + Vlogging

› Baking + Cooking

› Photography

› Handicrafts: Ceramics,

Textile, Wood, Metal

› Console Games

› Movies

› Karaoke

› Moped Workshop

› Theatre

› Street Art

› Pokemon Go

› Exercise Experiments

14


INSIGHT

Espoo

is a safe

place to

move

around

1

Espoo’s city structure is conducive to road safety. Safe solutions

are created already in town planning, street design and construction.

The ability to direct the city’s growth into new areas has allowed

Espoo to take safety and increasing traffic into account already in

the planning phase. For example, it has been possible to build under- and

overpasses for bicycle and pedestrian traffic, reducing high-risk locations.

2

The development of the main road network, such as Länsiväylä,

Turunväylä and the ring roads (Ring I, II and III), together with

the Finnish Transport Agency and the Uusimaa ELY Centre has

significantly reduced traffic accidents. On Ring I between Turunväylä

and Helsinki, the number of traffic accidents has decreased following the

improvement measures implemented in Espoo, such as adding lanes, and

especially after the measures in Helsinki between the Espoo border and

Vihdintie were completed in the spring of 2017. Between Turunväylä and

the Helsinki border, there were 24 traffic accidents in 2008 and five in

2017.

3

Accident tracking, statistics compilation and analysis are used to

gather information about sites where measures to improve safety

are needed the most. Messages and initiatives from the residents

also play an important role in this. In May, for example, the parents

of primary school pupils in Espoo were invited to reply to a survey about

the safety of their child’s school commute. Some 250 sites were listed

based on the replies, the safety situation of which has been reviewed during

the summer. However, the greatest risk factor found was the behaviour

of motorists in traffic.

Road safety in Espoo has

improved for seven years in

a row. Safety is affected by

planning solutions, development

of the road network

and individual decisions made

based on feedback from the

residents.

TEXT Tiina Parikka

FEWER ACCIDENTS THAN AVERAGE

RELATIVE TO POPULATION, approximately 60% less traffic accidents

occur in Espoo than throughout the country on average.

According to police statistics, in 2017, there were a total of 353

traffic accidents in Espoo, of which about 25% resulted in personal

injuries (89 pcs). Six people died and 112 people were injured

in the accidents involving a personal injury.

Of the accidents in 2017, 50% took place on roads and 38%

on the street network. Approximately 12% of all the accidents occurred

on private roads and other traffic areas.

Pedestrian, bicycle and moped accidents accounted for 17%

(31 pcs) of all the accidents.

ESPOO MAGAZINE 3/2018 >> 15


PEARL

Our

Aurora

AURORA HAS GROWN

INTO FULL BLOOM

Espoo Day events in

Aurora are organised

together with city

residents.

#tehdäänyhdessä

THE YARD of Children’s Arts Centre

Pikku-Aurora has been a construction

site for the summer. The name

of the centre, which is officially opening

its doors again on Espoo Day, is

simultaneously changing into Children’s

Arts Centre Aurora.

The estate is named after its

former owner, Aurora Karamzin (born

Stjernvall). The City of Espoo bough

the Järvenperä village estate Aurorasommarhemmet

in 1982, but it stood

cold and unused for a long time until

the project plan of Pikku-Aurora was

put into action in 2000.

OF THE estate’s three buildings, the

first to be renovated was the main

building named Art House in 2003,

and then the Estate Steward’s House

ten years later. The renovations of

the last building, the Dairy Complex,

were completed in late 2017, and a

reform of the yard was carried out

this summer.

“We think that all the houses of the

arts centre will have their own spirit

and content theme in the future: the

Art House is for art, making and creativity

and the Estate Steward’s House

is for encounters, open activities, participation

and cooperation. The activities

of the Dairy Complex will focus on

performing arts, conferences and seminars

as well as private festive use,”

says Producer Johanna Kallioaho.

Aurora is a house for children and

families that also offers programme

for adults. In addition, facilities are

rented out to city residents for their

own events. The centre is also a

member of the Association of Finnish

Children’s Cultural Centers.

TIINA PARIKKA

16


CULTURE CENTRE PIKKU-AURORA

3/2018 ESPOO MAGAZINE >> 17


SERVICE

75,000

VISITORS LAST

YEAR.

PANCAKES

BETWEEN

SONGS

Espoo Day will once again

resound to evergreen melodies

at Heikintori, when the Espoo

Male Singers burst into song.

In addition to a two-part programme,

a pan will be heated

for traditional pancakes.

TEXT Hanna Ojanpää

TIMO PORTHAN

You can still

get on board!

Events can sign up

until Espoo Day itself.

If it was up to Tero Turkka,

Chairman of the Espoo Male

Singers, 25 August would be

blessed with fair weather and 22

degrees. Helge Kõrvits, the Artistic

Director of the choir, has decided

not to take any chances with the

weather and has opted for weatherproof

songs.

”There are many familiar evergreens,

which are sure to sweep the

listeners along. It is important not to

sing too loudly when outside, so as

not to strain your voice. But you still

need to put your back into it,” says

Kõrvits.

The main choir of the Espoo Male

Singers includes 45 singers, whereas

the senior choir has 15 upholding

the tradition of Finnish war veterans.

On Espoo Day, the choir will

be around twenty singers strong.

Kõrvits regards the event as an enjoyable

opening for the autumn, and

a good way to publicise the choir’s

activities on a practical level.

HUNDREDS OF EVENTS. Espoo Day

was celebrated for the first time in

1992 and has been arranged as a

yearly urban event since 2010.

”As an Espoo choir, of course we

are involved during the event,” sums

up Turkka, explaining that the choir

has been involved in Espoo Day

since 2008.

Espoo Day is celebrated through

various events around the city. Last

year, Espoo Day was bigger than

ever: 75,000 visitors attended almost

300 events. In honour of Finland’s

100 anniversary, Espoo Day 2017 was

uniquely large-scale and one of the

largest programmes of the national

‘Together’ weekend. Over 3,000

people contributed to Espoo Day.

This year Espoo

Day will be a twoday

event held on 24 to

25 August. Single events are already

being announced; this can be

done until Espoo Day itself.

The Espoo Male Singers’ tent in

Heikintori will be open from 11am

to 1pm on Saturday. The half-hour

singing performances will be held

between 11am and 12 noon.

So pancakes will be offered again

this year. Do pancakes form part of

the Espoo Male Singers’ repertoire

at other events?

“No, they are exclusive to Espoo

Day in Tapiola.”

THE SONG NEVER FADES. The finishing

touches for the Espoo Day concert

will be made in a two-day singing

camp at the beginning of August.

“We will catch up on the summer

news, choose our pancake

flippers and then

sing our hearts out,” said

Kõrvits at midsummer.

”If you’re interested in singing,

why not find out about what we do

and buy a recording from our stand?

The Espoo Male Singers will celebrate

their 40th anniversary next

year: the choir will head to Japan for

a two-week singing tour in spring

2019. Strangely enough, one of the

concert days will mark 100 years

since diplomatic relations began between

Finland and Japan.

Although the choir highly values

its traditions, it also has a positive

attitude to change. This year, change

will come in the form of a slightly

thicker pancake mix.

18


Don’t miss these attractions:

SEE THE FULL

PROGRAMME:

ESPOOPAIVA.FI/EN

FRIDAY 24.8.

NALLEPOLKU – SATUJEN SILTA

(TEDDY TRAIL – FAIRYTALE BRIDGE)

› The Teddy Trail will take you on an

active trek into the world of fairytales

and late-summer nature.

★ Ystävyyden silta, Espoonlahti, 9am to

11.30am.

HOBBY HORSE COURSE

› Bring your own hobby horse or borrow

one from us. You can enter the course

from the outdoor terrace. No pre-registration.

Subject to weather conditions.

★ Pääkaupunkiseudun Kierrätyskeskus

(Reuse Centre), Suomenojan kauppa,

9am to 1pm.

STREET FOOD & MICROBREWERIES

TAPIOLA IN FLAVOURS

› A street food event brings the joy of

gastronomy to the centre of Tapiola.

Food trucks and local entrepreneurs will

fill the streets with their delicious treats.

Come and taste the new Tapiola beer

launched by Espoo microbreweries!

★ Tapiola Centre, Tuulikinilta/Taponaukio,

11am–7pm.

MOONLIGHT DANCES, FLEA

MARKET AND JUMBLE SALE

› A fantastic day in Soukka with live

music and delicious café fare, while exploring

a fascinating flea market and

jumble sale tables. Will move indoors in

the event of rainy weather.

★ Soukan elä ja asu -seniorikeskus,

4pm to 8.30pm.

SATURDAY 25.8.

POWER YOGA: SUN SALUTATION

› Learn about the power of yoga, which

both lengthens and strengthens the

muscles. A great way to start the day.

★ Tanssistudio Liike, 9am to 9.45am.

FINNISH SCHOOL OF

WATCHMAKING (KELLOSEPPÄ-

KOULU) OPEN DAY

› Individually-designed watches on display,

you can follow the work of students

in the classrooms, public lecture

on watchmaking at 11am, identification

of old precious metal stamps, and you

can try out the perlage technique in the

workshop.

★ Kelloseppäkoulu, 10am to 2pm.

FINNISH NATURE DAY IN HALTIA

› The day’s theme is mushrooms: recipes,

scientific mushrooming, music, excursions,

tasting, games, mushroom exhibition.

★ Finnish Nature Centre Haltia and its

surroundings, 11am to 3pm.

ESPOO SHORELINE MARATHON,

GROUP RUN

› Run along the beautiful Shoreline Marathon

Route in September. You can run

the whole route (21.1km) or explore a tenkilometre

run. Several speed groups to

choose from. For further details see rantamaraton.fi/in-english

★ Otaniemi Sports field (Otaniemi urheilukenttä),

11am–1pm.

SAMULI PENTTI SAMULI PENTTI JUSSI HELLSTEN

Forneldarnas Natt, night of ancient

fires, ignites.

The Trapesan Catwalk was featured at

Espoo Day 2017.

SAARA VANHALA

192

EVENTS HAD

ALREADY SIGNED

UP IN EARLY

AUGUST.

SAMULI PENTTI

Nuori Espoo (Young Espoo) live

performance.

ESPOO> 19


SWEDISH IN ESPOO

City Theatre’s Erik Söderblom aims to

ESTABLISH ESPOO AS

A CULTURAL CENTRE

“Of all the theatres in the Capital Region, Espoo City Theatre is the best placed to rise to today’s

challenges,” says Erik Söderblom, who was appointed the theatre’s Artistic Director a year ago. The

new space that the City Theatre will eventually occupy will enable Espoo to become a unique cultural

city, capable of hosting the kind of major international productions that currently pass Finland by.

20


”CULTURE AND THE ECONOMIC

SECTOR NEED EACH OTHER.”

Espoo City Theatre markets

itself as the country’s international

stage – ‘The International

Theatre of Finland’.

The theatre’s programme is based

on both domestic and international

guest performances, alongside its

own productions. Sweden and Estonia

are close partners in terms of

guest performances. The City Theatre

does not have a permanent ensemble

of its own, but engages artists

on a project basis, which allows

for flexibility in planning.

“Finland is becoming increasingly

international; in the Capital Region

there are now more people who

communicate in English than there

TIMO PORTHAN

are people living in Turku. Espoo is

now practically a trilingual area,”

says Söderblom.

“Until now, English speakers have

not had their own theatre scene.

From autumn, all of our performances

in Finnish will be translated

and subtitled in English. Foreign

guest performances that are subtitled

in Finnish will in future be subtitled

in both Finnish and English.”

“INTERNATIONALLY, the entire theatre

scene is undergoing major

changes, with the blending of different

art forms. Dramatic theatre is

being combined with physical performance,

music, circus and dance.

New technology is giving virtual reality

a larger role,” says Söderblom.

“Such performances are limited

by the space available. In the Capital

Region, there is not a single stage

that is large enough to accommodate

major international productions

– the nearest are in Tallinn and

Stockholm. Helsinki’s large theatres

and Opera House have set repertoires

and are unable to host guest

performances.”

“Espoo has every opportunity to

be a pioneer in this field. The arts

need a focal point and the city has

chosen to concentrate its cultural

offering in Tapiola, with the EMMA

museum of modern art and Espoo

Cultural Centre, which plays host to

the Tapiola Sinfonietta and Espoo

City Theatre.”

THE CITY THEATRE stages its own productions

at Revontuli Hall, while

guest performances are held at

Louhi Hall in the Cultural Centre.

In a few years, the Cultural Centre

will undergo extensive renovation

and expansion. When it reopens in

2025, the City Theatre will not only

have Louhi Hall, but also its own

large hall, which will replace Revontuli

Hall.

According to Söderblom, the performance

areas in Revontuli Hall

are acceptable, but the building was

not constructed for theatrical use

and the audience areas in particular

could be better. The new hall will

have up to 700 seats and is tailored

to the City Theatre’s needs.

“The construction project provides

a unique opportunity. We

have been in dialogue with the

city’s building department since

last autumn with regard to the design

of the theatre. A theatre is part

building, part business – like a musical

instrument: it’s not enough to

construct a violin, you also have to

make it play a tune.”

In June, five groups were announced

to go forward in an architectural

competition for the new

Cultural Centre. The winning proposal

will be decided in early 2019.

“If everything works out, Espoo

will be very different to how it is

today: a centre for a particular type

of culture in Finland. Culture and

the economic sector need each

other,” says Söderblom.

THE REPERTOIRE at Espoo City Theatre

this autumn contains a couple

of guest performances of particular

note.

The 200th anniversary of the

birth of Zachris Topelius is celebrated

on 5 November in the musical

drama ‘Snow King and the

Black Madonna’ – a production by

the Seinäjoki Opera Association and

Seinäjoki City Orchestra.

“It is a kind of scenic oratorio

based on Topelius’s own texts,

written and performed in Finnish,

Swedish, German and Latin. The

performance is subtitled in Finnish

and Swedish.”

In November, there are three performances

of the co-production ‘All

The Sex I’ve Ever Had’, which is presented

by Canadian group Mammalian

Diving Reflex. On stage, ordinary

Finnish senior citizens tell all

about their sex lives and romantic

affairs.

“Anyone aged 65 or over can register

to join the production,” encourages

Söderblom.

HARRIET ÖSTER

ESPOO MAGAZINE 3/2018 >> 21


THE PEOPLE OF ESPOO

ENCOURAGING BOYS TO READ

Boys’ long-term reading has decreased, and it competes for attention with games

and films. But #boysreadtoo when the story in the book is interesting enough.

MATIAS PYLVÄNÄINEN, 12, knows

a lot about monsters. In the first

grade, he read a book called the

Monster Handbook from the

school’s bookshelf. A couple of

years later, he found the thrilling

Monster Nanny and its sequel Monster

Route from the library.

“Monster Nanny has good characters,

and my classmates also

started reading it thanks to my

tip”, says Matias who attends Ymmersta

school.

“I also like the Diary of a Wimpy

Kid series, it has fun characters and

familiar situations.”

Matias’ bookshelf at home also

has books in his second native language,

Hungarian.

“My favourite is my mother’s

old A Pál utcai fiúk (The Paul Street

Boys). In it, the boys are fighting

over an area where they want to

play football.”

ACCORDING TO library assistant

Petri Saarela, 34, the long-term

reading of boys has decreased with

the increase in different screen

time. Interesting content is required

from books. According to

Saarela, boys get excited about

humour, fantasy, science fiction

and non-fiction as well as horror,

thrillers and detective stories.

“For boys, I suggest books with

modern language, striking dialogue

and a fairly fast-paced story,”

says Saarela who works at the Lastenmaa

children’s section of Sello

library.

Boys are also attracted to

reading through library events, for

example, by bringing science fiction

literature to a sci-fi event. The

#pojatkinlukee (#boysreadtoo)

campaign is running on social

media, and efforts are made to

spark boys’ interest in book stories

at book talk events.

“For example, boys may be fans

of a game that is based on a book

series. For games, there are also

books that expand on the game

world’s background or provide

guidance on game tactics.”

MATIAS READS during reading lessons

at school, on the couch at

home and in libraries. Now he is

browsing Siri Pettersen’s Bubble

in the Kauniainen library.

“I read a couple of books a

month. I borrow the next volume

of book series, and with new books

I check the cover image and the

text on the back cover first. After

Bubble, I plan to read The Trials of

Morrigan Crow, which is called the

new Harry Potter. Dad already read

the Potter series to me and my big

brother as bedtime stories.”

PIRITTA PORTHAN

Matias

Pylvänäinen

likes to

read books.

In early

summer,

he picked

up Bubble

by Siri

Pettersen.

22


“I READ

A COUPLE

OF BOOKS

A MONTH.”

PETRI SAARELA’S BOOK

TIPS FOR BOYS:

› Riina and Sami Kaarla: Arttu Tirttu herää henkiin

› Timo Parvela & Bjørn Sortland: Kepler62 series

› Neil Gaiman: Fortunately, the Milk

› Jari Mäkipää: Masi Tulppa: Pääsy kielletty!

› Jeff Kinney: Diary of a Wimpy Kid series

› Patrick Ness: A Monster Calls

TIMO PORTHAN

ESPOO MAGAZINE 3/2018 >> 23


Admission to the

Espoo Day events is

at all times.

For information on more than

200 events and experiences,

see espooday.fi

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