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Indiana Donor Network Brand Book

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INDIANA DONOR NETWORK<br />

BRAND<br />

BOOK


“Your brand is the single most important investment<br />

you can make in your business.”<br />

- Steve Jobs


TABLE OF CONTENTS<br />

Who we are<br />

Part of a community<br />

Mission, vision and values<br />

Historic milestones<br />

<strong>Brand</strong><br />

<strong>Brand</strong> Platform<br />

Core Message Elements<br />

<strong>Brand</strong> Position<br />

<strong>Brand</strong> Identity<br />

Logo<br />

Colors<br />

Fonts<br />

<strong>Brand</strong> Elements<br />

Photos<br />

Other Assets<br />

Voice<br />

2<br />

5<br />

6<br />

8<br />

10<br />

12<br />

14<br />

18<br />

20<br />

22<br />

28<br />

30<br />

32<br />

38<br />

42<br />

50


WHO WE ARE<br />

<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> was founded in 1987. With multiple office locations, and<br />

nearly 150 staff members, it has grown significantly from one small office tucked into<br />

what was then Methodist Hospital in <strong>Indiana</strong>polis, and is now <strong>Indiana</strong> University Health<br />

Methodist Hospital. The mission has never wavered – saving and healing lives through<br />

organ, tissue and eye donation and transplantation.<br />

<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> serves as the vital link between those who donate and those<br />

who wait. Across the country, there are only 58 like agencies responsible for linking<br />

donors to transplant centers.<br />

Every day, <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> works to educate and register Hoosiers through<br />

social media, news stories, active advocates and community events. A robust<br />

aftercare support team works with donor families to offer grief support through<br />

remembrance events and celebrations, as well as providing helpful materials on loss.<br />

2


PART OF A COMMUNITY<br />

<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> is a member of the United <strong>Network</strong> for Organ Sharing, the<br />

organization contracted by the federal government to operate the nation’s organ<br />

donation system. UNOS also maintains the national database of people waiting for<br />

organ transplants.<br />

Due to the sensitive nature of our mission, <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> must follow specific<br />

federal guidelines and regulations.<br />

Accreditations:<br />

Association of Organ Procurement Organizations<br />

American Association of Tissue Banks<br />

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid<br />

United <strong>Network</strong> for Organ Sharing<br />

US Food and Drug Administration, <strong>Indiana</strong>polis<br />

US Food and Drug Administration, Fort Wayne<br />

Memberships:<br />

Association of Organ Procurement Organizations<br />

Donate Life <strong>Indiana</strong><br />

The communities we serve:<br />

85 of 92 <strong>Indiana</strong> counties<br />

160 hospitals<br />

478 funeral homes and over 1,600 funeral directors<br />

85 county coroners’ offices<br />

3 transplant centers<br />

6+ million Hoosiers<br />

5


OUR MISSION<br />

The mission of <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> is saving and enhancing the quality of life<br />

through organ, tissue and eye donation and transplantation.<br />

OUR VISION<br />

The vision of <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> is to be a leader in organ and tissue recovery, as<br />

evidenced by sustained operational and clinical excellence, innovative practice and<br />

exceptional customer service.<br />

OUR VALUES<br />

Think<br />

BIG<br />

Bring our passion.<br />

Push the boundaries.<br />

Tackle challenges.<br />

Serve<br />

WELL<br />

Be a good steward.<br />

Support the team.<br />

Respect those we serve.<br />

Be<br />

REMARKABLE<br />

Champion the cause.<br />

Do exceptional work.<br />

Leave a lasting impression.<br />

6


EVANSVILLE OFFICE<br />

INDIANAPOLIS OFFICE<br />

FORT WAYNE OFFICE<br />

HISTORIC MILESTONES<br />

National Organ<br />

Transplant Act<br />

passed by Congress<br />

1984<br />

<strong>Indiana</strong> Organ<br />

Procurement<br />

Organization<br />

(IOPO) is formed<br />

1987<br />

IOPO moves <strong>Indiana</strong>polis<br />

office to <strong>Indiana</strong> Avenue<br />

1989<br />

Northeast <strong>Indiana</strong><br />

office in Fort Wayne<br />

is opened<br />

1990<br />

Southern <strong>Indiana</strong><br />

office in Evansville<br />

is opened<br />

1992<br />

IOPO is accredited<br />

by the Association of<br />

Organ Procurement<br />

Organizations (AOPO)<br />

1994<br />

<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong><br />

Alliance, the<br />

foundation for<br />

Donate Life <strong>Indiana</strong>,<br />

is created by the<br />

state legislature<br />

1995<br />

The PRN pool is<br />

formed to enhance<br />

clinical resources<br />

1997<br />

IOPO Foundation<br />

is established<br />

2000<br />

1985<br />

Methodist Hospital<br />

recovers first heart<br />

1988<br />

IOPO is certified as<br />

a federally designated<br />

Organ Procurement<br />

Organization (OPO)<br />

IOPO performs first<br />

organ recovery<br />

1991<br />

IOPO employs a<br />

staff of 18<br />

1993<br />

IOPO volunteer<br />

program is formed<br />

1996<br />

IOPO is accredited<br />

by the American<br />

Association of<br />

Tissue Banks (AATB)<br />

1999<br />

<strong>Indiana</strong>polis office<br />

moves to North<br />

Pennsylvania Street<br />

IOPO Tissue Services<br />

department is formed<br />

1998<br />

Donate Life <strong>Indiana</strong><br />

is established<br />

2001<br />

Lesiglature passes<br />

the <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong><br />

Choice Law<br />

IOPO coordinates 100 organ<br />

donors in one year<br />

8


<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> begins<br />

evaluating patients with HIV<br />

for potential organ donation<br />

IOPO coordinates 170<br />

organ donors - a record<br />

for the organization<br />

2005<br />

IOPO Vital Link<br />

call center is formed<br />

2006<br />

IOPO recovers the first<br />

Vascular Composite<br />

Allograft donation in<br />

<strong>Indiana</strong><br />

2008<br />

2011<br />

IOPO purchases<br />

Cessna jet and<br />

launches aviation<br />

division<br />

The HIV Organ Policy<br />

Equity (HOPE) Act is<br />

passed by Congress<br />

<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong><br />

facilitates a record-breaking<br />

1,000+ tissue donors<br />

2016<br />

2013 2017<br />

Aviation division is<br />

rebranded to TxJet<br />

<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong><br />

celebrates 30 year anniversary<br />

2003<br />

IOPO facilitates its<br />

first eight-organ donor<br />

2004<br />

IOPO facilitates its first<br />

Donation After<br />

Cardiovascular<br />

Death (DCD) donor<br />

2007<br />

IOPO adopts the<br />

revised Uniform<br />

Anatomical Gift Act<br />

IOPO employs 92<br />

people across<br />

the state<br />

2009<br />

2010 2012<br />

IOPO gains EMR access First IOPO Walk<br />

for tissue screening and Angel Fund Gala<br />

IOPO moves <strong>Indiana</strong>polis<br />

office to Guion Road<br />

2015<br />

IOPO changes name to<br />

<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong><br />

<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong><br />

facilitates a record-breaking<br />

629 organs transplanted<br />

2018<br />

IOPO forms partnership<br />

with <strong>Indiana</strong> Lions<br />

Eye Bank<br />

IOPO performs first in-house<br />

tissue recovery<br />

9


OUR<br />

BRAND


The <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> brand represents what we stand for as an organization. It<br />

reflects the spirit that we all have to save and enhance lives through organ, tissue and<br />

eye donation. Our brand reflects the power of hope and healing made possible by<br />

the legacies of donor heroes. Our brand defines our reputation as a leader in organ,<br />

tissue and eye recovery.<br />

Our voice, logo, font choices and photography style all contribute to and define the<br />

promise of trust and support to our donor families, transplant recipients, registered<br />

donors and community and business partners.<br />

11


OUR<br />

BRAND<br />

PLATFORM


BRAND PROMISE:<br />

Our commitment to those we serve is to elevate the conversation,<br />

honor the donation decision and save and heal more lives.<br />

BRAND PERSONALITY:<br />

Driven, compassionate, collaborative, innovative<br />

BRAND EXPERIENCE:<br />

Collectively embrace the human experience that is<br />

donation/transplantation.<br />

13


OUR<br />

CORE<br />

MESSAGE<br />

ELEMENTS


CORE MESSAGE ELEMENT 1<br />

CORE MESSAGE ELEMENT<br />

Ethical and regulated processes<br />

Peace of mind<br />

Trust<br />

BENEFITS<br />

<strong>Donor</strong> family: Peace of mind that their loved one’s gift was<br />

maximized<br />

Public: Understanding of and belief in the integrity of the<br />

donation process and ecosystem<br />

Hospital: Peace of mind that patient was treated with<br />

respect and they have associated with a reputable partner<br />

Job candidates and team members: Peace of mind<br />

knowing we do things the right way<br />

REASONS TO BELIEVE<br />

KEY WORDS<br />

Accreditation and audits<br />

Partnerships<br />

Donation process facts<br />

Third-party validations/awards<br />

OPO visits<br />

Conference attendance<br />

National benchmark data<br />

Advisory boards and councils<br />

Key performance indicators<br />

Trust<br />

Peace of mind<br />

Integrity<br />

Validation<br />

Approved<br />

Certified<br />

Regulated<br />

Benchmarked<br />

Modeled<br />

Outcomes<br />

Accredited<br />

Collaborative<br />

15


CORE MESSAGE ELEMENT 2<br />

CORE MESSAGE ELEMENT<br />

Skilled and empathetic staff<br />

Confidence<br />

BENEFITS<br />

<strong>Donor</strong> family: Confidence in knowing that their loved one’s<br />

gift was treated with respect and dignity<br />

Public: Confidence in their decision to register to donate<br />

Hospital: Confident they can trust our team with their<br />

patients and their families’ needs and dynamics<br />

Job candidates and team members: Career opportunity to<br />

work with peers who will make me better and inspire me to<br />

help others<br />

REASONS TO BELIEVE<br />

KEY WORDS<br />

Certifications<br />

Work and life experience<br />

Staff and customer testimonials<br />

Staff profiles<br />

Presentations<br />

Conference attendance<br />

National benchmark data<br />

Outcome letter for hospitals<br />

Thank-you letters<br />

Process improvement results<br />

Knowledgeable<br />

Respectful<br />

Empathetic<br />

Skilled<br />

Caring<br />

Compassionate<br />

Driven<br />

Excellence<br />

Appreciated<br />

Results<br />

Values<br />

16


CORE MESSAGE ELEMENT 3<br />

CORE MESSAGE ELEMENT<br />

Save and heal lives<br />

Legacy<br />

Hope<br />

BENEFITS<br />

<strong>Donor</strong> family: Brings hope from tragedy<br />

Public: Personal fulfillment in helping someone in need (life,<br />

health, financial)<br />

Hospitals: Brings hope from tragedy since patient’s life could<br />

not be saved<br />

Job candidates and team members: Personal and<br />

professional fulfillment from helping others<br />

REASONS TO BELIEVE<br />

KEY WORDS<br />

Data and national benchmarks<br />

Advocates<br />

Stories of hope<br />

Connection to recipients<br />

Outcome letter for hospitals<br />

Connect to purpose<br />

Staff connections to donation<br />

Scholarship recipients<br />

Angel Fund<br />

Opportunities to interact<br />

Staff and customer testimonials<br />

<strong>Donor</strong> family events and stories<br />

Toiletry bags<br />

Grateful<br />

Inspired<br />

Meaningful<br />

Legacy<br />

Lifesaving<br />

Impactful<br />

Personal<br />

Giving back<br />

Connected<br />

Remembered<br />

Stories<br />

Celebrated<br />

17


OUR<br />

BRAND<br />

POSITION


<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> elevates the donation<br />

conversation to inspire and empower Hoosiers to<br />

save and heal lives through organ, tissue and eye<br />

donation and transplantation. Our work honors<br />

donor heroes and families who selflessly give and<br />

those who receive another chance at life.<br />

Emotional need<br />

of customer<br />

Differentiation<br />

from competitors<br />

Business value<br />

proposition<br />

Proof statement<br />

19


OUR<br />

BRAND<br />

IDENTITY


How to represent the mission through consistent graphic design<br />

and imagery.<br />

<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong>’s graphic identity is instrumental in conveying our mission<br />

accurately and consistently to all audiences. The following pages contain guidelines<br />

for using our logo and for incorporating colors, fonts, photography and other design<br />

elements.<br />

The effectiveness of <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong>’s graphic identity depends on how closely<br />

we all reinforce it. Making deviations can be tempting, so we have included rationale<br />

behind many <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> graphic choices.<br />

Following the guide faithfully will streamline the production process and, more<br />

importantly, maintain a graphic identity that is easily recognizable to all current and<br />

future <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> partners.<br />

21


OUR<br />

LOGO


The <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> logo features a vibrant color palette. To the left of the<br />

typeface, the mark (or circular symbol) conveys embracing life, helping others and the<br />

cycle of life and donation. (Logo diagram on page 25.)<br />

Whether the impact is conscious or subconscious, the mark leaves the lasting<br />

impression of people coming together and communities uniting. It is a fitting reminder<br />

that <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> is a chain of human connections in which to exchange<br />

information, find help and give comfort.<br />

The logo must appear on all printed and online materials. It should always be printed in<br />

full color (or gray/white if the option of color is not available).<br />

Using the mark and typeface together is recommended. The mark, typeface and<br />

tagline are to remain proportional in size to one another and are not to be seperated<br />

and laid out in any other orientation than the approved logo formats.<br />

In rare instances, the mark can be used alone, but only with permission from brand<br />

team leadership.<br />

23


OUR LOGO USAGE<br />

The <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> logo is more prominent, prestigious and visible when<br />

a generous amount of clear area surrounds it. It should stand out from other visual<br />

elements such as typography and photos. Always plan for the placement of the logo,<br />

and modify the position of other graphic elements to ensure that you maintain the<br />

required amount of clear space.<br />

The distance between the <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> logo and other visual elements must<br />

be at least one-half the distance of X on left and right and one-forth the distance of X<br />

on top and bottom (X being the width of the mark). This is a minimum for clear space.<br />

Wherever possible, we recommend using additional clear space.<br />

X<br />

1/2 X<br />

1/4 X<br />

24


MARK<br />

TYPEFACE<br />

TAGLINE<br />

LOGO<br />

25


FORMATTING OUR LOGO<br />

The <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> logo must appear on the first page of all documents in<br />

its entirety. On rare instances, when readability or embroidery becomes challenging,<br />

the tagline may be removed. Continuity is important. Exceptions are made only for<br />

internal documents and pages within PowerPoint presentations.<br />

Do NOT adjust the angle or alignment of the mark. The mark to the left is meant to<br />

open wider than the rest of the text to the right. The mark should not be reduced in<br />

size.<br />

When printing color materials, the logo should not be distorted and should print full<br />

color when possible. It should never be outlined or boxed in black or any other color.<br />

The following examples are the only approved formats of our logo.<br />

The examples outlined and boxed in black on the facing page are depictions of the<br />

logo on a black background.<br />

26


APPROVED LOGO COLORS<br />

27


OUR<br />

COLORS


COLOR PALETTE<br />

<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> colors are contemporary, fresh and inviting - as in nature. Blue<br />

and green tones dominate, keeping company with a sprinkling of complementary<br />

colors. Although man-made technology makes our mission possible, <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong><br />

<strong>Network</strong>’s message of hope and healing is as eternal as nature’s own cycles.<br />

The overall visual hue is often uplifting, sometimes somber and always respectful.<br />

Please see below for the primary and secondary color palette. Secondary palettes<br />

should be used as accent colors. No more than two accent colors can be introduced<br />

in each piece.<br />

#0067A5<br />

Pantone 301<br />

#F47B20<br />

Pantone 166<br />

#8EC641<br />

Pantone 376<br />

#14477B<br />

Pantone 295<br />

#D07028<br />

Pantone 167<br />

#79A440<br />

Pantone 377<br />

#414042 80% Pantone Black<br />

Pantone 1535<br />

Pantone 7712<br />

Pantone 395<br />

Pantone Cream<br />

Pantone 2593<br />

Pantone 103<br />

Pantone 368<br />

Pantone 100<br />

29


OUR<br />

FONTS


APPROVED FONTS<br />

Text for letters, flyers, direct mail, envelopes, correspondence:<br />

Century Gothic Regular<br />

Headlines and subheads:<br />

Century Gothic Bold<br />

Other corporate fonts for use:<br />

Myriad Pro<br />

No more than two fonts are used in letters and printed pieces. The message is<br />

important and should be clearly communicated to the reader. Using too many fonts<br />

can be distracting. Sometimes bold and italic are all that is needed for emphasis.<br />

Century Gothic - Bold<br />

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ<br />

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz<br />

0123456789<br />

Century Gothic - Regular<br />

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ<br />

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz<br />

0123456789<br />

Myriad Pro - Bold<br />

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ<br />

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz<br />

0123456789<br />

Myriad Pro - Regular<br />

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ<br />

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz<br />

0123456789<br />

31


OUR<br />

BRAND<br />

ELEMENTS


WHAT MAKES UP OUR BRAND<br />

BOLD COLORS<br />

Bold colors demand attention.<br />

Our colors incite excitement and energy.<br />

Our colors represent health (green), caring (blue) and progress (orange).<br />

SHARP LINES<br />

Sharp lines bring precision to the brand.<br />

The lines show movement and progress.<br />

SIMPLE ICONS<br />

Simple icons help us more clearly and visually communicate our message.<br />

In a world full of visual imagery, clear and simple communication is key.<br />

33


BOLD<br />

COLORS


SHARP<br />

LINES


SIMPLE ICONS<br />

VALUE ICONS<br />

PEOPLE ICONS<br />

THINK BIG SERVE WELL BE REMARKABLE<br />

INDIVIDUAL TWO PEOPLE GROUP<br />

ORGAN, TISSUE AND EYE ICONS<br />

EDUCATION ICONS<br />

ORGAN TISSUE EYE REGISTERED<br />

DONOR<br />

REGISTER YOUR<br />

DECISION<br />

TIME<br />

CONTACT BY<br />

PHONE<br />

MEDICAL ICONS<br />

MEDICAL<br />

FACILITY<br />

MEDICAL<br />

TRANSPORTATION<br />

MEDICAL<br />

PERSONNEL<br />

36


SOCIAL ICONS<br />

37


OUR<br />

PHOTOS


PHOTOGRAPHY<br />

<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> photography puts the focus on lives saved, using natural<br />

lighting for photographs of transplant recipients and donor families.<br />

The hues must be fresh and natural, showing subjects engaged in life. Sometimes, that<br />

means depicting subjects at their favorite leisure or <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong>-sponsored<br />

activity.<br />

Where possible, photos selected for use reflect the diversity of donor families and<br />

transplant recipients. Various ages, gender and ethnicities must be represented.<br />

Material targeted for the medical community must emphasize the professionalism of<br />

our staff and volunteer advocates.<br />

39


OUR<br />

OTHER<br />

ASSETS


INDIANA DONOR NETWORK<br />

FOUNDATION<br />

<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> Foundation was formed when family members and friends<br />

of organ and tissue donors and recipients began making memorial and honorary<br />

contributions to <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong>. The organization’s governing board identified<br />

the need to provide stewardship for these funds and to look for ways to educate<br />

Hoosiers about the importance of organ and tissue donation.<br />

Today, the foundation proactively raises funds to support <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong>’s<br />

efforts to increase organ and tissue donation in <strong>Indiana</strong>, support transplant recipients<br />

and support donor families as they journey through the grieving process.<br />

43


INDIANA DONOR NETWORK<br />

5K SERIES<br />

Teams, families, individual participants, companies and healthcare professionals<br />

gather at the annual <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> 5K to celebrate life, honor organ<br />

and tissue donors and spread awareness about the importance of donation and<br />

transplantation.<br />

44


FORE LIFE OPEN TM<br />

Donation champions gather each year at a great <strong>Indiana</strong> golf course to celebrate<br />

the gift of life and promote the importance of organ, tissue and eye donation.<br />

Proceeds from this event help support <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong>’s lifesaving efforts to<br />

educate Hoosiers on the importance of donation and transplantation.<br />

45


ANGEL FUND GALA<br />

Those who are fortunate enough to receive an organ donated for transplant have<br />

truly been given the gift of life. Transplant patients want to honor those incredible<br />

gifts by returning to good health. Too often though, unexpected challenges arise<br />

and patients incur significant costs. That’s why <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> established the<br />

Angel Fund – to assist patients with funds for medications.<br />

46


STRUT2SAVELIVES<br />

Strut2SaveLives honors Bryan Clauson, who saved five lives as an organ donor and<br />

healed the lives of more than 75 as a tissue donor. In memory of his love for dogs and<br />

passion for helping others, participants and their pups gather each year to celebrate<br />

and honor Bryan.<br />

47


DONATE LIFE INDIANA<br />

Donate Life <strong>Indiana</strong> is the state-authorized, nonprofit organization responsible<br />

for managing the <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> Registry. Its mission is to save lives by creating<br />

opportunities for all <strong>Indiana</strong> citizens to sign up on the official state registry while striving<br />

to raise awareness for organ, tissue and eye donation and transplantation through<br />

public education. Donate Life <strong>Indiana</strong> contracts its team members and other services<br />

from <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong>. All youth education activities <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong><br />

undertakes are branded Donate Life <strong>Indiana</strong>.<br />

48


TxJET<br />

TxJet is a 501(c)(3) subsidiary of <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong>. TxJet provides a safe<br />

and transparent aviation solution for transplant centers and organ procurement<br />

organizations. It is committed to saving more lives by decreasing time to transplant,<br />

decreasing expense associated with transport and providing 24/7 dependable<br />

availability with one phone call.<br />

49


DRIVEN2SAVELIVES<br />

<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> and IndyCar driver Stefan Wilson launched the<br />

Driven2SaveLives racing campaign in April 2016 as a way to promote organ, tissue and<br />

eye donation and transplantation. Today, the campaign honors two drivers: Stefan’s<br />

late older brother, IndyCar driver Justin Wilson, and IndyCar and USAC driver Bryan<br />

Clauson. Both drivers died in racing accidents and as registered organ donors, were<br />

each able to save five lives.<br />

50


OUR<br />

VOICE


GENERAL WRITING<br />

<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> follows AP style, with exceptions as noted below.<br />

Academic degrees<br />

• First preference is to avoid an abbreviation and instead use terms such as<br />

“doctorate” or “master’s candidate.”<br />

• Lower case and use an apostrophe when writing “bachelor’s degree” or “master’s”<br />

or “master’s degree.”<br />

• “Bachelor of Arts” or “Master of Science” are not possessive.<br />

• An “associate degree” is singular (no apostrophe).<br />

• Do not use periods when writing “PhD”<br />

• Academic abbreviations are set off by commas following a name: Jane Smith,<br />

PhD, addressed the audience.<br />

• Lowercase academic subjects: master’s in leadership<br />

Acronyms<br />

With some exceptions, spell out words on first reference before using an acronym. For<br />

example: “The school’s parent-teacher association raised funds. The PTA donated the<br />

funds to the student library.”<br />

Per AP style, don’t spell out a word and follow it with an abbreviation or acronym in<br />

parentheses. If an abbreviation or acronym would not be clear on second reference,<br />

don’t use it.<br />

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Addresses<br />

• Abbreviate only “Ave.,” “Blvd.” and “St.” with a numbered address; always spell<br />

out “alley,” “drive,” “road,” “terrace” and other street types. Example: 1234 E.<br />

Washington St., 3010 Santa Rosa Drive<br />

• Abbreviate compass points used to indicate directional ends of a street or<br />

quadrants of a city in a numbered address: Example: 1234 E. Washington St.<br />

• Spell out and capitalize all street names when used as part of a formal street name<br />

without a number: Example: Washington Street<br />

• Lowercase and spell out when used alone or with more than one street name:<br />

Meridian and Washington streets<br />

• Do not use periods in the abbreviation for post office box; however, always<br />

capitalize “Box.” For example: PO Box number 444<br />

Dates<br />

• When a month is used with a specific date, abbreviate the following months as<br />

follows: Jan., Feb., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov. and Dec.<br />

• Spell out the name of the month when using it alone. Example: His birthday is in<br />

September.<br />

• Spell out the month when using it with a year; the word “of” is not needed.<br />

Example: “December 2012,” not “December of 2012”<br />

• Do not use a comma when referring to a month and a year: December 2012<br />

• Insert a comma when referring to a date, month and year: Sept. 29, 2017<br />

• Do not use ordinal numbers (“st” or “th”) after a date when used with a month.<br />

Example: “Dec. 7” and not “Dec. 7th.”<br />

Doctor/MD<br />

• MD: Has no periods<br />

• Do not use both “Dr.” and “MD” in the same title for a physician; it is redundant<br />

• Per AP style, use “Dr.” before the name of an individual who holds a doctor of<br />

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dental surgery, doctor of medicine, doctor of optometry, doctor of osteopathic<br />

medicine, doctor of podiatric medicine or doctor of veterinary medicine.<br />

Example: Dr. Tim Taber.<br />

• Do not continue the use of “Dr.” in subsequent references.<br />

Example: Taber says …<br />

• Do not use “Dr.” before the names of individuals who hold only honorary<br />

doctorates.<br />

• A more-descriptive word such as “physician” or “surgeon” is preferred instead<br />

of “MD.”<br />

Email – no hyphenation<br />

Healthcare – write as one word<br />

Job titles<br />

• Job titles are generally capitalized when they appear before a person’s name but<br />

lowercased after the name. Examples: President Donald Trump. Donald Trump is<br />

the president.<br />

• “CEO” (for “chief executive officer”) is acceptable for first and all subsequent<br />

references.<br />

• Spell out all other “C-level” titles (chief financial officer, chief operating officer, etc.)<br />

on first reference before referring to CFO or COO.<br />

• Do not capitalize an occupational designation, only a true title: We met President<br />

Becker. The president will speak at the dinner. Vice President for Student Affairs<br />

Douglass Covey issued the memo. Our speaker will be primatologist Jane Goodall.<br />

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Lifesaving – one word<br />

Nonprofit – one word<br />

Numbers<br />

• Spell out:<br />

- numbers under 10<br />

• Use figures for:<br />

- numbers 10 and above<br />

- preceding a unit of measure<br />

- referring to ages of people, animals, events or things<br />

- tabular matter<br />

- statistical and sequential forms<br />

- insert a space between a whole number and a fraction;<br />

for example, “2 1/2,” not “21/2”<br />

Times<br />

• Use figures except for noon and midnight.<br />

• Lowercase “am” and “pm” and do not use periods.<br />

• Do not use “:00” for whole hours, use the numeral only: “6 pm” (not “6:00 pm”).<br />

• Use hyphens with no space on either side to indicate a range of time: 8 am-5 pm.<br />

• If the hours are in the same time period (either am or pm), use “__-__pm” For<br />

example: The library will be open from 1-5 pm.<br />

• If you use the word “to,” write “am” or “pm” for both times: The library will be open<br />

from 1 pm to 5 pm.<br />

• When the clock times cross the meridian, include am and pm. For example:10 am<br />

to 5 pm or 10 am-5 pm.<br />

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PUNCTUATION:<br />

Ampersand (&)<br />

• Only use the ampersand when it is part of a company’s formal name or<br />

a composition title: Proctor & Gamble<br />

• Except for some accepted abbreviations, the ampersand should not be used in<br />

place of “and”: Examples: Not “Bill & Karen went to the fair.” but “Bill and Karen<br />

went to the fair.” Also, “B&B” or “R&B,” not “B and B” or “R and B.”<br />

Bullet points and punctuation<br />

• Capitalize the first letter of the first word in each bullet in list.<br />

• Per AP style, use periods, not semicolons, at the end of each section, whether it is a<br />

full sentence or a phrase.<br />

Commas<br />

• DO NOT use the serial or Oxford comma. Use commas to separate elements in a<br />

series but do not put a comma before the conjunction in a simple series: The flag is<br />

red, white and blue. He would nominate Tom, Dick or Harry.<br />

• Use a comma before the concluding conjunction in a series if an integral element<br />

of the series requires a conjunction: I had orange juice, toast, and ham and eggs<br />

for breakfast.<br />

Dashes<br />

• There are three lengths of dashes: a hyphen (-), en dash (–) and em dash (—).<br />

The en dash and em dash can be found on the Insert tab > Symbol > More<br />

Symbols > Special Characters.<br />

• Hyphen - Use hyphens as joiners, such as for compound modifiers: small-business<br />

owner. Also, use hyphens for ranges, such as Jan. 1-4. There should be no spaces<br />

surrounding a hyphen.<br />

• En dash - <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> does not use en dashes.<br />

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• Em dashes – Per The AP, they are used to signal abrupt change, as one option to<br />

set off a series within a phrase, before attribution to an author or composer in some<br />

formats, after datelines and to start lists. AP style calls for a space on both sides of a<br />

dash in most uses.<br />

Percentages – Percentages are always expressed as numerals, followed by the word<br />

“percent,” not the “%” sign. Example: The price of gas rose 5 percent.<br />

Periods – Use only one space after a period between sentences.<br />

Phone numbers – Use periods instead of parentheses and/or dashes<br />

• 317.685.0389 not 317-685-0389<br />

Quotation marks and punctuation<br />

• A period or comma always goes within the quotation marks. Example:<br />

“I’m going for a walk,” he said.<br />

• A dash, semicolon, question mark and exclamation point go within quotation marks<br />

when they apply to the quoted matter only. Example: “I’m going for a walk!”<br />

he said.<br />

• A dash, semicolon, question mark and exclamation point go outside the quotation<br />

marks when they apply to the whole sentence.<br />

Seasons<br />

• Capitalize only when used in a title or as part of a formal name. Use lowercase<br />

when these stand alone. Examples: The program started in fall 2012. The Spring Fling<br />

will be repeated this year.<br />

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INDIANA DONOR NETWORK-SPECIFIC LISTINGS:<br />

Certifications – Here’s how to list specific certifications:<br />

• Certified Procurement Transplant Coordinator: CPTC<br />

• Certified Tissue Banking Specialist: CTBS<br />

• Emergency Medical Technician – Basic: EMT-B<br />

• Emergency Medical Technician – Paramedic: EMT-P<br />

• Fellow of the American College of Healthcare Executives: FACHE<br />

• Licensed Practical Nurse: LPN<br />

• Nationally Registered Paramedic: NRP<br />

• Paramedic: PMD<br />

• Professional in Human Resources: PHR<br />

• Registered Nurse: RN<br />

• Registered Respiratory Therapist: RRT<br />

• Society for Human Resource Management – Certified Professional: SHRM-CP<br />

Department names – If “department” is part of the name, it is capitalized. For example:<br />

Department of Insurance. If it is used at the end of the name, it is not capitalized.<br />

Example: aviation department.<br />

Donate Life America – DO NOT abbreviate Donate Life America.<br />

Donate Life <strong>Indiana</strong> – DO NOT abbreviate Donate Life <strong>Indiana</strong>.<br />

Email – All <strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> email addresses should be written in this format, with<br />

the following letters capitalized: jsmith@IN<strong>Donor</strong><strong>Network</strong>.org<br />

Events – When listing an event, the preferred order is listing 1) day, 2) date, 3) time<br />

and 4) place. Example: The meeting will take place on Monday, June 4, at 2 pm at<br />

the library, located at 123 Main St. in Evansville.<br />

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Headline punctuation<br />

• For punctuation marks (periods or question marks) that follow a word in color in a<br />

headline, the punctuation marks should appear in that color.<br />

<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> (name)<br />

• DO NOT use “IDN”<br />

• DO NOT use “the” before “<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong>”<br />

• DO NOT hyphenate any of the words in “<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong>.” If a word<br />

breaks on a line, move the whole word to the next line.<br />

<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> Foundation<br />

• DO NOT use “IDNF”<br />

• DO NOT use the word “the” before “<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> Foundation”<br />

• DO NOT hyphenate any of the words in “<strong>Indiana</strong> <strong>Donor</strong> <strong>Network</strong> Foundation.”<br />

If a word breaks on a line, move the whole word to the next line.<br />

• You can refer to “Foundation” in the second and subsequent references.<br />

Says/said – When quoting someone, use “said.”<br />

URL<br />

The URL should be title cased with the “I,” “D” and “N” letters capitalized. Write as<br />

“<strong>Indiana</strong><strong>Donor</strong><strong>Network</strong>.org” not “www.indianadonornetwork.org.”<br />

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“Your brand is what other people say about you<br />

when you’re not in the room.”<br />

- Jeff Bezos


<strong>Indiana</strong><strong>Donor</strong><strong>Network</strong>.org<br />

3760 Guion Road | <strong>Indiana</strong>polis, IN 46222

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