MM_101118

22ndcenturymedia

mokena’s Award-Winning Hometown Newspaper mokenamessenger.com • October 11, 2018 • Vol. 11 No. 9 • $1

A

®

Publication

,LLC

Mokena Fire

Dept., Lions Club

put on pancake

breakfast show,

Page 3

Pop a wheelie

Mokena resident uses his

business to donate bikes

for children, Page 6

Earning his

patches

Gov. uses local shop for

vest upgrade, Page 10

Mokena Fire Protection District Trustee Ken Blank (right) serves a giant stack of pancakes, as Lions Club member Dennis Buxbaum looks on, at the

pancake breakfast hosted by the two organizations at Mokena Fire Station No. 1 on Sunday, Oct. 7. T.J. Kremer III/22nd Century Media

Like a fine wine

22CM’s Active Aging

Expo provides resources

for aging well, Page 13


2 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger calendar

mokenamessenger.com

In this week’s

Messenger

Police Reports................10

Pet of the Week.............15

Editorial........................19

The Scene......................35

Puzzles..........................35

Classifieds................ 36-48

The Mokena

Messenger

ph: 708.326.9170 fx: 708.326.9179

Editor

TJ Kremer III, x29

tj@mokenamessenger.com

assistant editor

Amanda Stoll, x34

a.stoll@22ndcenturymedia.com

Sales director

Lora Healy, x31

l.healy@22ndcenturymedia.com

real estate sales

Tricia Weber, x47

t.weber@22ndcenturymedia.com

Classified Sales

Kellie Tschopp, x23

k.tschopp@malibusurfsidenews.com

Legal Notices

Jeff Schouten, x51

j.schouten@22ndcenturymedia.com

PUBLISHER

Joe Coughlin 847.272.4565, x16

j.coughlin@22ndcenturymedia.com

Managing Editor

Bill Jones, x20

bill@opprairie.com

president

Andrew Nicks

a.nicks@22ndcenturymedia.com

EDITORIAL DESIGN DIRECTOR

Nancy Burgan, x30

n.burgan@22ndcenturymedia.com

Amanda Stoll

a.stoll@22ndcenturymedia.com

THURSDAY

AARP Safe Driving Class

9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Oct. 11

and Friday, Oct. 12, Mokena

Community Public Library,

11327 W. 195th St., Mokena.

Participants must attend both

classes. Cost is $15 with

proof of AARP membership.

Cost is $20 for nonmembers.

The Mokena Library will pay

for first 10 Mokena Patrons.

Class size is limited. Register

at the library.

FRIDAY

Halloween Hollow

4-8 p.m. Oct. 12; Noon- 8

p.m. Saturday, Oct. 13; and

1-5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 14,

Main Park, 10925 W. La-

Porte Road, Mokena. Enjoy

the Windy City Carnival all

weekend, with wristbands

available for $25 per person

per session. There will be a

beer tent and entertainment

this year from 4-8 p.m. on

Friday and Saturday for ages

21 and older. Halloweenthemed

fireworks are scheduled

for 8 p.m. on Saturday.

There will also be a variety of

contests for all ages including

a pumpkin pie eating contest,

costume contest and mutt

strutt. Activities include the

scarecrow laboratory, straw

maze, horse rides and face

painting. Admission is free.

Parking cost is $5 per vehicle.

For more information, more

activities and a full schedule,

visit www.mokenapark.com.

W22 nd Century Media

11516 West 183rd Street

Unit SW Office Condo #3

Orland Park, IL 60467

www.MokenaMessenger.com

LIST

Chemical- free printing on 30% recycled paper

circulation inquiries

circulation@22ndcenturymedia.com

The Mokena Messenger (USPS #025404) is

published weekly by 22nd Century Media, LLC,

328 E Lincoln Hwy New Lenox, IL 60451.

Periodical postage paid at New Lenox, IL

and additional mailing offices.

POSTMASTER: Send changes to:

The Mokena Messenger, 328 E Lincoln Hwy

New Lenox, IL 60451 St. Anthony WOW

7 p.m. Oct. 12, Frankfort

Published by

Township Building, 11000

www.22ndcenturymedia.com W. Lincoln Highway, Frankfort.

Join St. Anthony WOW,

a non-denominational social

group for widows and widowers,

for a short meeting,

entertainment and refreshments,

New faces are welcome.

For more information,

call Mary at (815) 469-4351

or Bill at (708) 478-6118.

SATURDAY

Shark Shredding

10-11 a.m. Oct. 13, Mokena

Community Public Library,

11327 W. 195th St., Mokena.

Shred and recycle your old

documents and confidential

files safely and securely. Residents

are invited to bring up to

two boxes of personal papers

and may witness the on-site

mobile shredding process

provided by Shark Shredding,

Inc. All shredded papers will

be recycled.

Marching Band Invitational

Noon Saturday, Oct. 13,

Lincoln-Way West High

School, 21701 Gougar Road,

New Lenox. A spectacular

lineup of 25 marching bands

will compete, with the Lincoln-Way

Marching Band

slated to conclude the show.

The LWMB will perform an

exhibition of their show Las

Rosas in the evening hours

of the competition. Cost is

$12 for adults, $7 for seniors

65 and older, $7 for students

with ID, and $35 for families

with 2 adults and 2 students.

Holiday Sides and Parties

1-2 p.m. Oct. 13, Mokena

Community Public Library,

11327 W. 195th St., Mokena.

Join Chef Michael Niksic for

holiday side dishes and party

planning tips to make this

hectic season a little bit easier.

Key organizational tips to

better plan your meal will be

discussed. Tastings will also

be provided. Space is limited.

To register, call (708)

479-9663 or visit www.mo

kenalibrary.org to register

through the online calendar.

SUNDAY

AOA Gentle Yoga Demo

Deadline to register is Oct.

14. Class will be held from

10-11 a.m., Tuesday, Oct 16,

The Oaks Recreation & Fitness

Center, 10847 W. La

Porte Road, Mokena. Join

the Mokena Park District for

a free demo class of gentle

yoga designed for active

older adults. Class size is

limited. For more information,

call (708) 390-2343 or

visit www.mokenapark.com

to register online.

MONDAY

WWII Radio Show

Deadline to register is

Oct. 15. Trip will leave at

10 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14

from the Frankfort Township

Office, 11000 W. Lincoln

Highway, Frankfort. Join the

Frankfort Township for a trip

to Starved Rock in Utica and

a World War II Radio Show.

Cost is $50, which includes

lunch. To reserve a spot, call

(815) 806-2766.

CPR Class

6 p.m. Oct. 15, Mokena

Fire Station #1, 19853 S.

Wolf Road, Mokena. Join

the Mokena Fire Protection

District for a CPR class. Fee

covers books, materials, and

instructor fees. Students are

instructed in adult, child and

infant CPR and AED. A CPR

card is issued to all those

who successfully complete

the course. The card is valid

for 2 years. To register, visit

www.mokenafire.org or stop

by the station between 8 a.m.

and 4 p.m. Monday-Friday.

Village Board Work Session

6 p.m. Oct. 15, Mokena

Village Hall, 11004 Carpenter

St., Mokena. The Mokena

Village Board is scheduled

to have a work session. For

more information, meeting

agendas and minutes visit

www.mokena.org.

Mokena Woman’s Club

7 p.m. Oct. 15, Mokena

Community Public Library,

11327 W. 195th St., Mokena.

Join the GFWC-Mokena

Woman’s Club as they welcome

Jim Gibbons to speak

about the Brothers Grimm.

Refreshments will be served

at 6:30. Guests are always

welcome.

WEDNESDAY

Board of Education Meeting

7-8:30 p.m. Oct. 17, Board

Room, Mokena Elementary

School, 11244 Willow Crest

Lane, Mokena. The Mokena

Board of Education meets

the third Wednesday of each

month. For more information

and meeting agendas,

visit www.mokena159.org.

UPCOMING

Senior Cooking Class

9:30-11 a.m. Thursday,

Oct. 18, Frankfort Township

building, 11000 Lincoln

Highway, Frankfort. Take

part in this cooking class

especially for seniors with

Tom Grotovosky. To reserve

a spot in this class, call (815)

534-6173.

Bunco for a Cause

6 p.m. Friday, Oct. 19,

LIST IT YOURSELF

Reach out to thousands of daily

users by submitting your event at

MokenaMessenger.com/calendar

For just print*, email all information to

a.stoll@22ndcenturymedia.com

*Deadline for print is 5 p.m. the Thursday prior to publication.

American Legion Post,

15052 Archer Ave., Lockport.

Cost is $20 per person,

which includes pizza, dessert,

and prizes. There will

be an open bar, raffle baskets

and a silent auction. All proceeds

will benefit My Joyful

Heart, a Mokena-based children’s

charity that provides

both life’s basic essentials

and letters of encouragement

to Chicago area children in

need. For tickets, visit www.

myjoyfulheart.org/newsevents/bunco.

Trick or Trot 5K

8 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 20,

Lincolnway Special Recreation

Center, 1900 Heather

Glen Dr., New Lenox. Join

the LWSRA for their third

annual Trick or Trot 5K and

help raise funds for the ADA

inclusive playground that will

be used by LWSRA participants

and community members.

Cost is $30 for adults,

and $15 for children ages 14

and younger. Register online

at www.lwsra.org/5k. Registration

on the day of the race

begins at 6:30 a.m.

ONGOING

Dine-and-Earn Fundraisers

Support the Mokena Meteors

music program at

their monthly dine-and-earn

events hosted at various local

restaurants. Present the flyer

and a percentage of the sales

will benefit the music program.

Visit www.mokenameteormusic159.org

and click

on the “Important News” tab

for upcoming events.


mokenamessenger.com news

the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 3

Partners in pancakes

Firemen flip

flapjacks, Lions lend

labor for annual

pancake breakfast

T.J. Kremer III, Editor

The griddle was working

overtime Sunday, Oct. 7,

for the second annual pancake

breakfast hosted by

the Mokena Fire Protection

District and the Mokena

Lions Club at Mokena Fire

Station No. 1.

Scores of community

members turned out to the

breakfast and open house,

where they were treated

to stacks of pancakes and

links of sausage.

It was the second year

the two organizations combined

efforts, which allowed

the firemen a chance

to put on demonstrations of

a controlled fire and sprinkler

system display, as well

as show off to the public

how a vehicle extraction

works.

For the Lions Club, the

partnership allowed the organization

to help out with

the serving and cooking, as

well as gain more exposure

in the community and offer

free hearing screenings onsite.

“Combining forces has

worked out great for us,”

said Lions Club member

Lee Kaz. “The fire department

gives us so much

help, and we’re glad we can

bring awareness and help

them out.”

“By having the Lions

Club here, it allows the fire

department to show everything

that we have and how

it works,” said Mokena Fire

Protection District Chief

Howard Stephens. “So, we

appreciate the Lions Club,

we really do.”

Also appreciative of the

combined efforts of the

two organizations was the

Wiekel family, of Mokena.

The family chowed down

on some breakfast before

Mom, Jennifer, and Dad,

Matthew, could take son,

Noah, 5, and daughter,

Hannah, 3, to check out the

fire trucks on display.

Jennifer said that the

family saw the signs along

Wolf Road and decided it

would be a fun time for the

family.

Hannah had just three

words about her experience

up to that point: “Yummy,

yummy, yummy.”

Later that morning,

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Community members enjoy a hot pancake and sausage breakfast on Sunday, Oct. 7,

courtesy of the Mokena Fire Protection District and the Mokena Lions Club. Photo by

T.J. Kremer III/22nd Century Media


4 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger news

mokenamessenger.com

From Oct. 2

Armed robbers allegedly hit three towns in 24 hours

T.J. Kremer III, Editor

Mokena police are investigating

an armed robbery that occurred at

approximately 1:50 a.m. on Oct. 1,

at the BP gas station at 191st Street

and LaGrange Road.

The lone suspect who entered

the BP gas station in Mokena was

described as a black male, approximately

6-foot 1-inch tall with a thin

build. The suspect was described

as wearing a hoodie and a ski mask

during the robbery, according to

Mokena Police Chief Steve Vaccaro.

According to Vaccaro, the suspect

fled south on foot and managed to

escape the area despite assistance

from Frankfort Police Department

and Will County Sheriffs Deputies.

It’s believed the suspect had an accomplice

waiting for him in a vehicle

to make his escape.

On Monday evening, another

armed robbery involving two black

males was reported at the New

Lenox Speedway Gas Station, located

at 800 W. Lincoln Highway,

around 11:30 p.m.

The same suspects are believed

to have been involved in

both robberies, and police are

looking into a third possible related

incident in a neighboring

community, according to New

Lenox Police Deputy Chief Louis

Alessandrini.

Tinley Park Police Chief Matthew

Walsh confirmed an armed

robbery occurred at approximately

2:40 a.m. Monday at the

Speedway gas station on 183rd

Street, but said the investigation

was too early to determine if any

connection existed between the

other reported robberies in neighboring

communities. Walsh said

a handgun was displayed and a

minimal amount of cash was stolen.

Police said no one was injured in

any of the three incidents.

New Lenox and Mokena police

are urging anyone with information

about the armed robberies to

call the NLPD tip line at (815)

462-6111 or MPD (708) 479-

3912.

Election 2018

Steve Weber, Tim Brophy will vie for treasurer’s position

Amanda Stoll, Assistant Editor

When there was no democratic

candidate on the ballot during the

spring primary, there was possibility

for incumbent Steve Weber to

have an uncontested Will County

Treasurer’s race. Then, Joliet resident

Tim Brophy accepted a nomination

as a candidate.

Now, voters will have a choice to

make on Nov. 6.

In recent interview with The

Mokena Messenger, the two candidates

outlined their priorities,

qualifications for the position and

ideas about how the office should

be run, if either is to be elected.

Steve Weber

Mokena resident

Steve Weber said he

chose to run for the

office of treasurer

again because of the

progress and results

he has had so far in

the position. Weber

“Because I’m getting

such great results, I wanted

to do it one more time,” he said.

“All the improvements I’ve made.

I want to make it easier for taxpayers

to pay [and] lower the fees.

Most elected officials raise the

fees.“

Weber, who previously served

as auditor, said working in financial

offices is something he is

good at and has been able to save

the county money and bring in

additional revenue through interest

from investments.

“I come in under budget every

year,” Weber said. “In the first

year I took that office as treasurer,

I returned $240,000 in operating

budget that I didn’t need.”

In addition to eliminating overtime

and reducing absenteeism

through the implementation of a

work week with four, 10-hour days

instead of the traditional five-day

work week, he said it has provided

his staff with work-life balance

they enjoy.

“[Being] fiscally responsible

also means we purchased our conference

table on Craigslist, used,”

Weber said. “We didn’t need a new

piece of furniture.”

If reelected, Weber said he plans

to continue providing a friendly

environment geared toward helping

taxpayers as much as he can

by reducing fees for credit card

payments and allowing people to

schedule payment throughout the

year.”

He said his license as a certified

public accountant is an important

attribute for the treasurer to have

and makes him good at investing

funds to benefit the county and

community.

“You can trust me because

[CPA’s are] the most trusted profession

and I was the watchdog, the

auditor, prior to this,” Weber said.

“I’ve got banking experience. I

used to investigate people wasting

government resources or stealing,

so you can trust me.”

Tim Brophy

Brophy, who

served on the Joliet

City Council for

16 years, said his

background and financial

experience

make him a great

candidate for treasurer.

Brophy

“I’ve had a public service calling

my whole life,” Brophy said. “I

was raised in a family that values

volunteering and community service.”

As treasurer, Brophy said he

would be the “eyes and ears and

voice” of the office, as he believes

the framers of the Illinois Constitution

intended.

“Fiscal responsibility means

doing the right thing when nobody’s

looking,” Brophy said,

“And a lot of bureaucrats, a lot

of government employees have

much to say about how other

people’s money is spent without

necessarily daily or constant

oversight.”

If elected, he said it is important

to him to conduct a review of

where the county currently invests

its money.

“I think [it’s] important that

there’s an objective public body,

maybe an advisory group, that

evaluates the opportunities that

there are for investing county

funds and objectively decides

on applying those or awarding

bids based on best practices and

not on favoritism or familiarity

or campaign contributions,”

he said.

Brophy has experience in the

banking industry and has a master’s

degree in business administration

from the University of Chicago

Graduate School of Business.

He currently works as an executive

manager of a nonprofit organization.

While serving on the Joliet City

Council, Brophy said he chaired

multiple committees, including

those for land-use and finance, as

well as the communications, technology

and information systems

committee.

“I think that you have to have

the capacity to understand everything

that’s going on in the office. I

certainly do,” he said. “...I’ve also

worked on several major projects

that involved millions of dollars

of investments. So that experience

with public funds and the

direction of public funds is one of

those critical traits and one that I

possess.”

When dealing with a large

amount of public funds, Brophy

said trustworthiness is an important

trait to have, and said his work

in leadership and volunteering can

speak to his character.

Visit us online at mokenamessenger.com


mokenamessenger.com News

the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 5

McGrath relocated after archdiocese said it learned of the allegations against him

Former Providence

president was living at

friary near school, day

care

Amanda Stoll, Assistant Editor

When the Roman Catholic

Archdiocese of Chicago heard

that a man under investigation for

sexual abuse was living within

their boundaries, it asked him to

leave.

The Chicago Sun-Times reported

on Sept. 21 that the Rev.

Richard McGrath, the former

president of Providence Catholic

High School in New Lenox, was

residing at the St. John Stone Friary

in Hyde Park. The friary is a

mere 390 feet from the St. Thomas

the Apostle grade school, and also

is near a preschool and a day care

center.

McGrath is a member of the

Augustinian Order of Priests, who

have not responded to multiple attempts

for comment on the situation.

McGrath left his position at

Providence High School after a

student allegedly saw a photo of

a naked boy on McGrath’s cellphone.

When confronted by police

and Providence administrators,

McGrath refused to hand over the

phone. A lawyer later informed

police the phone likely no longer

existed, leaving no evidence of any

inappropriate material.

Earlier this year, McGrath was

publicly accused of sexual abuse

and rape by a former student, and

the case is currently under investigation

by the Will County State’s

Attorney’s Office.

Anne Maselli, director of communications

and marketing for the

Archdiocese of Chicago, said in an

email that the archdiocese knew

of McGrath’s move to the friary,

but that members were unaware of

the seriousness of the allegations

against him.

“The Archdiocese was informed

by the Augustinian Order four

Rev. Richard J. McGrath. 22nd Century Media file photo

months after Fr. Richard McGrath

was moved to the friary in Hyde

Park, however in informing the

Archdiocese the Augustinian Order

only mentioned that Fr. Mc-

Grath had allegations of ‘inappropriate

material’ on his mobile

phone, and he had completed safeenvironment

training,” she wrote.

“The Order did not say anything

about an allegation of sexual

abuse against Fr. McGrath. If they

had fully informed us of his status

he would not have been permitted

to live in the Archdiocese of Chicago.”

After finding out that he is currently

under investigation for

sexual abuse during his time at

Providence, Maselli said the archdiocese

notified the Augustinians

that he must be moved elsewhere

immediately. The Augustinians

were tasked with his relocation,

but further details about when and

where he was moved were unavailable.

She said the archdiocese was

informed that McGrath had completed

safe environment training

in response to the allegation

of inappropriate material on his

phone, and therefore “did not

see the need to notify nearby

schools.”

Calls to the friary were not returned.

pan cakes

From Page 3

MFPD demonstrated how

a sprinkler system works,

using a simulated room to

ignite a fire and letting the

sprinkler system do its job,

which is to break open a

tube and release the water

once the temperature reaches

170 degrees fahrenheit,

in front of a enthusiastic

crowd.

Firemen also demonstrated

how they extract people

trapped inside a vehicle using

a new Jaws of Life hydraulic

tool, which made

short work of the wrecked

minivan used for the demonstration.

RIGHT: Mokena firemen

demonstrate how they

extract people using a new

Jaws of Life hydraulic tool.

Photo by T.J. Kremer III/22nd

Century Media

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6 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger news

mokenamessenger.com

Mokena resident donates refurbished bikes to families in need

Megan Schuller

Freelance reporter

Bike riding around the

local neighborhood is a

staple of many childhood

memories, as much as trading

training wheels in for a

two-wheel bike is a rite of

passage. Not all children get

to share this experience due

to financial hardships within

their family. Mokena native

Ron Kittler, owner of FnA

Bicycles/FnA Outdoors in

New Lenox, is working to

change that.

“Donating a bike can

change a life,” Kittler said.

“When we were kids that’s

all we’d think about. We had

our bikes and that was it.

A lot of kids unfortunately

don’t have that.”

Kittler’s bicycle shop has

been in business since 2012

at 1303 S. Schoolhouse

Road after seeing a need for

a bicycle repair shop in the

community. It wasn’t until

2017 that he added outdoor

equipment like kayaks to his

shop. He often gets bikes

donated that people have

outgrown, so he has made

it his mission to give these

donated bikes new life with

a safety tune up and a new

home.

Lead social worker in

D122 Sue Francimore said

that the 30 bikes donated by

Kittler in late September will

help 15 families. Bikes were

donated in an array of sizes

for both students and their

parents.

“Having a bike as a child

is something so many of us

take for granted,” Francimore

said. “It’s such a positive

thing to build family relationships.”

Kittler said that fixing up

and donating used bicycles

is a rewarding way of giving

Some of the more than 30 bikes that were donated in late

September.

back to the community. He

said that the bikes are donated

to people that wouldn’t

otherwise be able to afford

them, which increases accessibility

to be active and outdoors

together as a family or

with friends.

“A bike is not a financial

priority. We make it a priority

so the families can work

together as a family unit and

ride together,” Kittler said.

More than 300 bikes have

been donated throughout the

local and Chicagoland area

by Kittler’s shop in the past

few years. He has donated

to the school districts within

the community, as well as

Ron Kittler, Mokena Resident and owner of FnA Bicycles/

FnA Outdoors in New Lenox, unloads more than 30 bikes

that his shop donated to families in D122. Photos by Megan

Schuller/22nd Century Media

organizations such as Big

Brothers Big Sisters, All

God’s People and the local

Mokena Marley Frankfort

FISH Resale Store.

“It’s such an opportunity

for our lower income families

who are struggling,”

Francimore said. “As a social

worker, we love to help

in any way we can. I like

to imagine families riding

around together, which is

something they haven’t been

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mokenamessenger.com mokena

the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 7

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8 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger news

mokenamessenger.com

Fire department hosts info sessions, outlines referendum details

Amanda Stoll, Assistant Editor

This November will mark

the sixth time New Lenox

Fire Protection District has

placed a referendum on the

ballot. The previous five

times the measure failed to

pass.

The district has known for

years that its operating costs

were increasing at a rate

faster than its income from

tax levies were. But, in lieu

of failed referendums, Fire

Board Trustee Joe Leavy

said the department has continued

to tighten its belt.

“We’ve cut absolutely everything

you can cut out of

the budget,” said Levey, who

serves as vice president on

the board. “We do our own

lawn maintenance, our own

fertilizer [and] a lot of our

own station maintenance.

We work on our own vehicles.

There’s really no fluff.”

After the fifth failed referendum

in March of this year,

the board voted to close Fire

Station No. 2 on North Cedar

Road because of the increasing

deficit.

“The hardest meeting that

I ever sat in as a public official

was voting to close a

firehouse because heaven

forbid someone dies across

the street from that firehouse

because we didn’t get there

in time. That’s a gut wrenching

thing,” Levey said. “...

We take our position on the

board at the fire district extremely

seriously because it

deals with lives.”

After public outcry and

Voters in the New Lenox Fire Protection District

will be asked the following question on the Nov. 6

ballot:

Shall the limiting rate under the Property Tax Extension

Limitation Law for the New Lenox Fire Protection

District, Will County, Illinois, be increased by an

additional amount equal to 0.2021% above the limiting

rate for the purpose of fire protection and ambulance

service for levy year 2017 and be equal to 0.59% of

the equalized assessed value of the taxable property

therein for the levy years 2018, 2019, 2020 and

2021?

Upcoming information

meetings

All meetings will be

held at New Lenox Fire

Station No. 1, 261 E.

Maple St., in New Lenox

2:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct.

18

7 p.m. Oct. 23

11 a.m. Oct. 24

widespread concern about

the closure, the Village of

New Lenox voted to loan the

fire district $450,000 — an

amount that would allow the

district to operate the station

through the end of the year.

Without a passing vote

on the referendum, Levey

said the board will again be

forced to close Station No. 2

until a time when the district

can fund it again through a

referendum.

He said getting information

out to voters this time around

has been the top priority, especially

after the district got

feedback that voters felt like

they were not well-enough

informed about the previous

referendum and the consequences

of a failed vote.

“We want to be able to get

all the information out to the

voters as we possibly can,”

Levey said. “...After the last

referendum failed, we did a

survey. We went to great extents

to find out [why].”

A passing vote will allow

the district to keep all four

of its stations open and fully

manned, while putting money

toward replacing some of

the aging vehicles in the fleet

and beginning to pay back

the interest-free loan from

the Village.

It will not, however, create

any sort of surplus, Levey

said.

“To live within our means

basically,” said New Lenox

Fire Chief Adam Riegel,

“...Unfortunately there’s no

other way to make that drastic

of a cut is through closing

a station [and reducing]

manpower.

“Limiting little programs

just aren’t going to make a

dent in that.”

New Lenox Fire Protection District’s Station No. 2 status will be in question once again as

voters will weigh in its fate in November. 22nd Century Media file photo

For owners of a $200,000

home, that increase is estimated

at $135 per year. For

a $300,000 home, the cost

increase is estimated at $202

per year; and for a $400,000

home, $270 per year.

Since most homes do not

fall into one of the exact

values outlined in their referendum

guide, which is

available on their website,

the district had a tax calculator

added to the referendum

page that will allow homeowners

to get a more accurate

estimate that is based on

their actual home value.

The New Lenox Fire Protection

District’s service area

includes a vast majority of the

New Lenox Township, which

includes some neighborhoods

in Mokena and Homer Glen.

In addition to allowing

the district to keep Station

No. 2 open, the referendum

guide outlines vehicles that

will soon require replacing

and programs that cost

money to offer at low or no

cost to residents, including

CPR and first aid classes,

babysitting classes, car seat

inspections and installations,

the fire cadet program, soldier

welcome home events,

and having an ambulance on

standby at community and

youth sporting events.

The district has recorded

a 378 percent increase in

workload from increasing

call volumes. In 2010 the

district received 2,802 calls

for service, and in the last

seven years those calls for

medical help and fire calls

have increased to 4,252.

Closing a station would

trigger a layoff of about 25

percent of the district’s first responders,

as well as some ancillary

staff. Levy said having

those first responders are crucial

to keeping response times

low and operating effectively

and safely at a structure fire.

“That manning allows

us to effectively operate at

a structure fire,” he said.

“That’s really what we base

things on, is being able to

operate at a structure fire.

You need 17 guys to operate

safely, and that’s the number

we [currently] have.”

Please see station, 16

donate

From Page 6

able to afford to do.”

Kittler donates year round

and looks for donations from

the community to continue

spreading the joy of cycling.

His business, FnA Bicycles/FnA

Outdoors, started

out of a combined passion

for cycling and the outdoors.

Kittler serviced bikes

on the side at first, but once

it picked up he decided to

make it a business.

“I’ve been cycling my

whole life and I love it, so

I turned it into a business,”

Kittler said. “Then, boom, it

just blossomed.”

Kittler said that he often

sees bikes in the trash, and

he wants to change that by

not only recycling bikes that

have life left in them, but

giving back to the community

that has helped his business

grow.

“People, they have no

idea what a bike will do

for them,” Kittler said. “We

know that this is going to

change their life... That’s

why we do this. It is a business

and we do the business

side of things, too, but doing

this is intangible.”

The bikes were wheeled

into the backstage auditorium

of Oster-Oakview School

one by one to be stored until

the recipient families could

be notified by the district to

pick them up. The bikes were

dispersed throughout the district

of New Lenox D122 to

families who were identified

as families who would benefit

the most from the donation.

“We’ll be driving down

the street and see a bike we

donated. That right there is

it, that’s all we need,” Kittler

said.

Kittler urges families that

are cleaning out their garages

for the winter to donate

outgrown bikes rather than

leaving them on the curb

for garbage so that he can

continue to pay it forward to

those who need it across the

community.

For more info on how to

donate a bike, visitfna-outdoors.com/donate-bicycles


mokenamessenger.com news

the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 9

Magical night for a

cause at St. John’s UCC

Megan Schuller

Freelance Reporter

Thanks to the world-wide

fan base of Harry Potter, a

local man is throwing a fundraiser

to raise money for a

young Harry Potter fan in

Crest Hill recovering from

acute myeloid leukemia.

New Lenox native Johnny

Frank saw a Facebook post

from a family member of

13-year-old Kayla Zbroskewich,

who urged members

of the cosplayer Facebook

group to send positive messages

and photos of their

Harry Potter costumes to

Kayla to help lift her spirits

during her recovery.

The fundraiser is scheduled

to be held on Oct. 20 at

St. John Church in Mokena,

with all the proceeds going

to Kayla’s family for medical

expenses. Cosplayers

are coming from around the

nation to be involved. Even

local actors from All About

Music will be participating.

Todd Beebe, owner of All

About Music and Children’s

Theatre, said that he is proud

of their participation in the

fundraiser because it is a

great way for the young actors

to give back to their

community.

“We try to be community

minded and donate to

causes,” Beebe said. “It’s

great to use your talent to

help out others in any way

you can. It’s great to see because

that’s something we

try to instill in them.”

After realizing that Kayla

was local, Frank reached out

to the family and decided he

wanted to do more than send

some encouraging words.

He wanted to bring the wizarding

world of Harry Potter

to life.

“When I saw her on the

Facebook page, a picture of

Kayla in a hospital bed with

Kayla Zbroskewich, who is recovering from acute myeloid

leukemia, at Luries Children’s Hospital. A fundraiser for her

is scheduled for Oct. 20 at St. John’s UCC. Photo submitted

medical machines around

her, it broke my heart and

put things into perspective,”

Frank said. “It just kind of

hit me hard because I have

three daughters and a son.

Next thing I know it’s four

in the morning, I’m in the

garage covered in foam and

paint.”

Kayla was diagnosed five

months ago after having

had a stroke and near heart

failure. After undergoing

chemotherapy and rehabilitation,

she is back home and

continuing with physical and

speech therapy rehabilitation.

“She has clung onto life

for the past five months,”

her mother, Amy Zbroskewich,

said. “She is in remission

up to 0.1 percent. If

there is even one bad white

blood cell, it can mutate in

to 400,000 cells again like it

was.”

Amy said that Kayla’s

love for things like Harry

Potter and music have been

positive for her during her

recovery.

The community is joining

in on paying it forward by

contributing to the fundraiser.

Raffy Candy Store is donating

ice cream, and many

residents have donated their

time and supplies. Frank has

even made full-sized store

fronts to recreate sets from

the Harry Potter movies.

“Social media makes it

seem like people are divided,

but it makes you realize

that people can truly come

together and be wonderful,”

Frank said. “Everyone steps

up and pulls together. The

amount of people from the

community who have come

forth, its just amazing.”

More than 20 vendors are

scheduled to be at the fundraiser.

Harry Potter-themed

drinks, such as “Butterbeer,”

will be available,

as well as a live sorting

hat and more than 20 live

characters to take photos

with. The first main event

begins at 9 a.m. Frank advises

people to bring their

dancing shoes because the

venue will transform for

the “Hogwarts Witches and

Wizards Ball” from 7-9

p.m.

“We just want to have a

good time and raise some

money for the family,” Frank

said. “We want people to

have a good time, smile and

forget their worries, and embrace

the spirit of the event.

Whether you like Harry Potter

or not, it’s definitely going

to be fun.”

Tickets are on sale via

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10 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger news

mokenamessenger.com

Police Reports

Parking in handicapped spot leads to arrest for suspended DL

Richard E. Hiller, 31, of

8165 W. Brickstone Drive

in Frankfort, was charged

Sept. 18 with operating a

vehicle with a suspended

registration and driving on a

Don’t let your business

suspended/revoked driver’s

license.

According to police reports,

an officer on patrol

observed Hiller park in a

handicapped spot at a business

in the 19800 block of

LaGrange Road. The officer

ran Hiller’s registration,

which came back as

suspended for a mandatory

insurance violation. The officer

then initiated a traffic

and ran Hiller’s driver’s license,

which also came back

suspended. Hiller was then

placed under arrest.

Oct. 1

• Kyle L. Aguon, 30, of

97 Redar Drive in Schererville,

Indiana, was

charged with speeding and

driving on a suspended/revoked

driver’s license.

According to police reports,

an officer on patrol

observed Aguon traveling at

a high rate of speed in the

10100 block of West 191st

Street. A check of the radar

reportedly showed Aguon

going 57 mph in a 40 mph

zone. The officer initiated

a traffic stop, where it was

revealed his driver’s license

was suspended in Indiana.

Aguon was then placed under

arrest.

EDITOR’S NOTE: The Mokena

Messenger’s police reports

come from the Mokena Police

Department. Anyone listed in

these reports is considered

to be innocent of all charges

until proven guilty in a court

of law.

short this season.

BE SMART. ADVERTISE IN

CONTACT

LORA HEALY

The Mokena Messenger

708.326.9170 ext. 31 l.healy@22ndcenturymedia.com

®

Gov. makes stop at local leatherworks shop

T.J. Kremer III, Editor

During this time of the

year, when a politician

comes to town it’s usually

to make a speech and rally

voters. Not so on Thursday,

Oct. 4, when Governor

Bruce Rauner came to town.

It turned out that the governor,

who is known for his

passion about motorcycles,

need some patch work done

on his leather vest, and he

was recommended to one of

the area’s best in the business:

Ramon’s Shoe Repair

and Motorcycle Leatherworks.

No paparazzi, no stump

speeches. Just a man in

need of a wardrobe update

since he has collected

many new patches in recent

years.

“Some of my veteran

friends who I ride with,

they’ve used [Ramon’s]

great business here to buy

some of their leathers and

get some of their patches

sewn on to their motorcycle

gear,” Rauner said.

Ramon Anguiano, owner

of the shop, said he’d never

worked on anything for the

governor before, but was eager

to work on the vest, the

same as he is for any other

customer.

“I’m gonna’ treat him

just like anybody else over

here,” Anguiano said. “I

can tell you, as far as my

business — my work is the

same. Whether it’s the governor,

the president or just

a regular customer.”

Governor Bruce Rauner (right) consults with Ramon’s Shoe Repair and Motorcycle

Leatherworks owner, Ramon Anguiano (middle), and his wife, Connie, about getting new

patches sewn on his vest on Thursday, Oct. 4. T.J. Kremer III/22nd Century Media


mokenamessenger.com School

the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 11

The mokena messenger

Standout Student

Sponsored by Marquette Bank

Free preschool screening

scheduled for Oct. 15

Audrey Kaplan

Audrey Kaplan is a secondgrader

at Noonan Academy

What is one essential you

must have when studying?

I do my homework I like

it to be quiet, so I can focus.

Sometimes my brother Ian

and my sister Ruby are loud.

What do you like to do when

not in school or studying?

I like to play with my

friends outside. I also like to

watch, “America’s Got Talent.”

I also have my camo

belt in karate.

When is your dream job?

I want to be in the army. I

want to help people and protect

our country.

What are some of your most

played songs on your iPod?

I like Justin Timberlake

when he was in the band

NSYNC. My favorite song

is, “I want you back.” I also

like, “Hit me baby one more

time,” by Britney Spears.

“Wannabe,” by the Spice

Girls is also a good song.

What is one thing people

don’t know about you?

I like to dunk my potato

chips in ketchup.

Whom do you look up to and

why?

I look up to my mom. She

is nice, takes care of my

family, and she takes care of

other people at work.

Who is your favorite teacher

and why?

My favorite teacher is

Mrs. Galloway. I like her

because she is helping me

become a better writer.

What’s one thing that stands

out about your school?

Photo submitted

Our school has chess club.

I have never played chess, but

I get to learn chess this year.

What extracurricular(s) do

you wish your school had?

I wish my school had band

for second graders. Next

year I will be able to do

band.

If you could change one thing

about school what would it

be?

I wish I could wear my pajamas

to school.

Standout Student is a weekly

feature for The Mokena Messenger.

Nominations come from

Mokena area schools.

Submitted by Mokena

School District 159

Thanks to a generous

grant funded by the state

of Illinois, Mokena School

District 159 is able to offer

free preschool to eligible atrisk

children who will be 3

or 4 years old on or before

Sept. 1, 2018. To be eligible

for this service, children

must attend a free screening

offered multiple times

throughout the year. Members

of our Early Childhood

Staff preschool team conduct

screenings of children

who then may be eligible

for the program based on a

number of qualifiers, such

as low family income, multiple

or premature birth,

English language skills, or

an additional home or community

factor that may contribute

to a child being atrisk

for learning. If the child

has been found “at risk”

as a result of the screening

and if space is available,

students may be admitted

into the Early Start program.

The screening services

are provided at no cost to

parents.

During the screening,

the team will assess the

development of a young

child in the following areas:

large and small muscle

coordination skills; delays

or problems in speech and

language skills; cognitive

skills; socio/economic

growth; and preschool readiness.

Parents/guardians

are interviewed in the following

areas: basic health/

physical needs; socio-economic

factors; safety needs;

and social/emotional needs.

After the screening, members

of the Early Start team

will share with parents/

guardians the information

acquired from the screening

about their child’s development.

Results of these

screenings are used to identify

students who might be

at risk of developing difficulties

with school and to

identify students for further

evaluation if a disability is

suspected. Staff will determine

the necessity, if any,

for further individual evaluation

that would assist in the

identification of the need for

special education services

or if the student qualifies for

the Early Start program.

The preschool program

curriculum is evidencebased

best practices for

early learning and aligned

with the Illinois Early

Learning and Development

Standards. This program

encourages children to

make choices and interact

in various learning centers

throughout the classroom,

as well as greatly encouraging,

and supporting parent

participation. A socialemotional

curriculum is

also used within the program.

Students are assessed

throughout the school year

to ensure they are making

progress academically, socially

and developmentally.

Two daily sessions are offered:

a morning session

and an afternoon session.

The next Developmental

Screening will be held on

Monday, Oct. 15 at Mokena

Elementary School. Please

contact the school at (708)

342-4850 for an appointment.

Free preschool screenings

will also be held on

October 29 and November

13.

Aurbury Hills

School ‘Stomps Out

Bullying’

Students wear blue in support of

World Day of Bullying Prevention

RIGHT: First- and second-graders pose in their

blue attire to help support an end to bullying.

Photo submitted


12 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger mokena

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the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 13

Active Aging Expo offers ‘healthy’ serving of services

Laurie Fanelli

Freelance Reporter

Aging isn’t what it used

to be.

People over 50 are more

active than ever and, along

with physical well-being,

folks are prioritizing healthful

practices across every aspect

of their lives.

With its fourth annual

Active Aging Expo, 22nd

Century Media empowered

attendees to maintain and

improve their medical strategies,

financial planning,

exercise routines, mental

health and more with over

40 vendors offering a variety

of services. The Saturday,

Oct. 6 event – held at

the Tinley Park Convention

Center from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

and sponsored by DuPage

Medical Group, Ingalls

Health System, Porter Place

and Women’s Healthcare

of Illinois – also featured a

healthy serving of fun with

free bingo games and prizes.

The early-fall scheduling

of the expo empowered attendees

to learn more information

about staying healthy

during flu season.

“We were able to get Jewel-Osco

pharmacy to come

in with flu shots and they are

offering some limited vaccinations

for shingles and

pneumonia,” said Heather

Warthen, chief events officer

of 22nd Century Media.

“That’s a great addition to

have this year.”

As attendees entered the

doors of the expo, one of the

first things they found was

the DuPage Medical Group

booth, where insurance

agents Sakeena Gilbert and

Allyson Rush shared information

about Medicare and

more.

“We’re here to represent

LifeSmart Senior Services

on behalf of DuPage Medical

Group,” Rush explained.

“We represent all of the insurance

carriers and a lot of

people are unsure of what is

covered under the different

plans. We work very closely

with our Medicare beneficiaries

if they have questions

and concerns about

what’s covered and what’s

not.”

Rush encouraged attendees

to take advantage of their

complimentary Medicare

overview if they have any

lingering questions about

making Medicare best work

for them.

“Don’t listen to your

neighbor. Don’t listen to

your friend at church or

what you heard out and

about,” she said. “Seek us

out.”

The Active Aging Expo

featured several vendors

offering services to make

daily life a little easier, like

ShelfGenie, a company

which designs and installs

custom pull-out or glide

shelves.

“It’s perfect for anyone

who has trouble reaching

into their cabinets,” said

Judy Meyers, owner of

ShelfGenie Chicago South.

“We do kitchens, bathrooms

or any existing space and

you can get it installed in a

couple of hours.”

Warthen explained that

the expo aimed to cover the

full spectrum of health in

older adults.

“Medical health is obviously

very important when

you’re in the aging process,

but in addition to medical

health you also have emotional

health, financial health

and mental health, too,” she

said.

Vendor Monica Makin, of

Cruise Planners, aimed to

take the stress out of travel

by sharing information about

domestic cruise options as

well as travel abroad.

“We’ve got Pearl Seas

Cruises which actually has

a cruise that leaves from

Chicago and sails the Great

Lakes, and we’ve got American

[cruises] which sails the

Mississippi, the Ohio River,

the Cumberland River [and]

the Snake River,” Makin

said, noting that Cruise Planners

is a full-service travel

agency. “Those are the kind

of cruises that people don’t

always think about.”

Orland Park resident Susan

Thomas invited her

friend Linda Campbell, of

New Lenox, to join her on a

trip to the expo before going

out to lunch.

“A lot of the things sounded

interesting,” Thomas

said.

Campbell added, “We

wanted to get information on

what’s available to us.”

The Tinley Park Police

Department had plenty of

information to share on protecting

oneself from identity

theft and fraud while Edward

Jones, Marquette Bank

and Country Financial were

among the vendors offering

financial advice.

Attendees also had the

opportunity to say a special

“thank you” to the troops

by signing a holiday card

for members of the military

serving overseas. The cards

will be sent out in conjunction

with the Military Mama

Network.

On top of all the vendors

and activities, the Active

Aging Expo also featured

a variety of speakers and

performers hosting sessions

throughout the event.

Women’s Healthcare of Illinois,

Phil Orsi (the 2018

Orland Township Senior

Idol), Frann Carnivele and

Michael Barr-Schinzel, and

chef Tom Grotovsky all

were scheduled to take the

expo stage.

“We’re closing the stage

out with a cooking demo

from the Unforgettable Chef,

Tom Grotovsky,” Warthen

said. “He does a lot of cooking

classes at Frankfort

Township for the seniors and

Gail Kaufman (left), of Homewood, Linda Campbell (middle), of New Lenox, and Susan

Thomas, of Orland Park, chat with Tinley Park Police Department crime prevention officer

Dina Navas Saturday, Oct. 6, at 22nd Century Media’s Active Aging Expo.

Photos by Laurie Fanelli/22nd Century Media

Jose Andrade (left), of Humana, chats with Orland Park resident Don Pieczynski.

has done a few of our expos

before, so it seemed like a

natural fit.”

Up next, 22nd Century

Media will once again host

its Healthy Living Expo at

the Tinley Convention Center

on Jan. 19, 2019. More

information about upcoming

events can be found at

www.22ndcenturymedia.

com/our-company/events.


14 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger mokena

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16 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger News

mokenamessenger.com

Will County tax rate could decrease again

Staff Report

The Will County Board

Finance Committee voted

Oct. 2 to adjust the corporate

tax levy down from

what the County Executive

has proposed. The adjustment

would continue to

lower the tax rate on the

county portion of residents’

tax bills. If approved at the

Thursday, Oct. 18, board

meeting, the rate could drop

to approximately 0.58 percent.

The rate last year was

0.61 percent. The Finance

Committee voted 5-3 to reduce

the levy increase by

approximately $300,000.

The board has lowered the

tax rate for the last three

years in a row.

“We’re really concerned

about providing the highest

amount of services for

the least amount of dollars

as efficiently as possible,”

said County Board

Member and Finance Chair

Mike Fricilone. “We just

want to play it safe and not

plan to spend revenue that

we might not receive; however,

this will result in no

reduction in services to our

residents.”

The vote comes on the

heels of the first budget

workshop, which was held

on Sept. 26. The workshop

helped to set the context of

the $565 million budget and

to go over the projected revenue

and expenses for the

coming fiscal year.

At the workshop, county

board members discussed

the Will County Executive’s

proposed budget of

$565 million. The County

Executive proposed taking

an additional $4.3 million

this year, which would

come from new property

and the consumer price

index. The Finance Committee’s

vote recommended

only taking $4 million.

Three members of the committee

voted to keep the

amount at $4.3 million.

“Will County is already

doing more with less because

of state funding cuts,”

said Will County Board Minority

Whip and Finance

Committee member Lauren

Staley-Ferry. “I don’t

think it is wise to cut more

funding for services to residents.”

Voter registration

deadline approaching

Staff Report

station

From Page 8

Will County voters will

have until Oct. 21 to register

online.

Two forms of identification

are necessary when

registering: One must show

current name and address,

while the second identification

can be name only.

Anyone who is unsure

about the status of their registration

may visit the Will

County Clerk’s website at

thewillcountyclerk.com,

click on “Voter Lookup” under

the “What’s New” section.

Some important dates for

Keeping response times

low is critical to saving lives

because in a fire or medical

emergency every second

counts.

“Within four-six minutes

[of when someone stops

breathing] your brain starts to

die, your heart muscle starts

to die. Fire double in size

each minute,” said Levey “...

If we can’t get to you in five-

10 minutes, your chance of

survival are not so great.”

A common misconception

Levey and Riegel said

people have is that the fire

protection district gets money

from taxes paid to the Village

of New Lenox. In reality,

it does not because the

fire district is a separate taxing

body, just like the school

districts and library districts.

Since the closure and reopening

of Station No. 2,

Riegel said the fire department

has received a lot of

support from community

members and local businesses

willing to help out,

and said he hopes people ask

questions and educate themselves

on the situation before

the Nov. 6 election date.

The fire department has

several information sessions

scheduled where there will

be a very short presentation,

but the majority of the

session will be devoted to

answering questions from

residents. For those unable

Mokena residents:

• Oct. 22: first day of early

voting at Mokena Village

Hall, 8:30 a.m-4 p.m.

• Nov. 1: Last day to request

a “Vote by Mail” ballot

• Nov. 2: Last day to early

vote at Mokena Village Hall,

8:30 a.m.-4 p.m.

to attend any of the sessions,

Riegel said the department

will schedule separate meeting

times for individuals of

groups.

More information about

the referendum, including

FAQ, the 2017 year end treasurer’s

report, and tax calculator

can be found at nlfire.

com under the “Public Info”

tab. Other questions or concerns

can be directed to the

fire department by phone at

(815) 463-4500 or email at

info@nlfire.com.

For a more in-depth

look at the district’s financial

information, including

monthly financial analyses,

budgets, audits and year end

treasurer’s reports, visit nlfire.com/content/financials.

Election 2018

Various local candidates

to run uncontested Nov. 6

Lauren Coughlin

Assistant Managing Editor

This November, it’s off

to the races for many candidates

in Illinois elections.

For some, though, the

race ahead looks to be an

easy one. Several candidates

are seeking office with

no ballot competition in the

Tuesday, Nov. 6 General

Election.

The 2018 uncontested

candidates with interests

in 22nd Century Media’s

southwest suburban coverage

area are listed below.

General Assembly District

38

Democrat Debbie Meyers-Martin,

of Olympia

Fields, is running uncontested.

Meyers-Martin

previously served as the

Village president and as a

Village trustee in Olympia

Fields. District 38 represents

portions of Frankfort

and Tinley Park.

General Assembly District

80

Democrat Anthony De-

Luca, of Chicago Heights,

is running uncontested. De-

Luca served as the mayor

of Chicago Heights for six

years and also served on

the Bloom Township High

School District 206 Board

of Education. District 80

represents portions of

Frankfort, New Lenox and

Mokena.

Cook County Board District 6

Democrat Donna Miller

will run uncontested in

Cook County Board District

6. Miller is a member

of the League of Women

Voters. She also serves on

the board of Planned Parenthood

of Illinois, and is

second vice-president of Illinois

Democratic Women.

She was a candidate for

State Senator 2012. District

6 represents portions of

Tinley Park, Orland Park,

Orland Hills and Orland

Township.

State House District 85

Democrat John Connor,

an incumbent candidate and

resident of Lockport, is to

run uncontested in the 85th

State House District. Connor

has served in his role with

District 85 since June 24,

2017. His Republican opponent

Lisa Bickus, also of

Lockport, withdrew in late

August, according to the Illinois

State Board of Elections.

State House District

85 represents portions of

Lockport.

In the next two weeks,

The Mokena Messenger is

to feature candidate questionnaires

for contested

races with interests pertaining

to the southwest suburbs.

As is the case each election

season, it is 22nd Century

Media’s policy not to

run any election-related coverage

in the final issue — in

this case Thursday, Nov. 1 —

before Election Day. 22nd

Century Media reminds that

all election-related Letters to

the Editor must be received

by 5 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 18,

for inclusion in the Oct. 25

issue of The Mokena Messenger.


mokenamessenger.com mokena

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18 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger news

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FROM THE NEW LENOX PATRIOT

Pooch-a-Palooza provides fun in

the park for pets

It was a paws-itive afternoon at

Walker Country Estates Park on

Sept. 30 as the New Lenox Community

Park District hosted its

fourth annual celebration of man’s

best friend, Pooch-a-Palooza.

Raffles and games designed for

dogs encouraged pets to let loose –

while being leashed – and enjoy a

day dedicated to dogs. This year’s

festivities featured even more dogrelated

vendors onsite, where pet

parents could purchase their fur

babies a snack or souvenir, as well

as the welcome return of several

popular contests.

Each year, New Lenox-based pet

food store Tucker’s Doggie Delights

sponsors Pooch-a-Palooza

and helps recruit food vendors and

more offerings for dogs big and

small.

“We love this event because it’s

dogs, dogs, dogs,” said Tucker’s

owner Nick Janowski. “It’s on the

north end of town, so this is a great

opportunity for us to meet some

new dogs.”

Each year, the popularity of

Pooch-a-Palooza continues to

grow.

“A lot of people in New Lenox

are dog people, and dog people

love to go to events with their

dogs,” Wrase said. “They’re part

of the family so they like to do

something fun together. This event

allows people to come out to a park

– since we can’t offer a dog park

per se – with their dogs and enjoy

time with their family.”

Pet parents can mark their calendars

for Saturday, Oct. 27, when

Tucker’s Doggie Delights will be

hosting a Halloween party inside

the store at 2011 Calistoga Drive in

New Lenox.

Reporting by Laurie Fanelli,

Freelance Reporter. For more, visit

NewLenoxPatriot.com.

FROM THE FRANKFORT STATION

ComEd rate falls below Frankfort’s

electric aggregation program rate

Frankfort residents participating

in the Will County Electric

Aggregation Group program will

see electricity rates comparatively

higher than ComEd’s rate following

an unanticipated order by the

Illinois Commerce Commission,

Frankfort Mayor Jim Holland announced

during the Frankfort Village

Board’s Oct. 1 meeting.

In August, the board approved

an updated electric aggregation

group agreement authorizing a new

electric supplier for participating

communities, including Frankfort.

Under the contract, Constellation

NewEnergy, Inc., agreed to supply

electricity for three years at a

rate of $0.07517 per kilowatt-hour,

compared to ComEd’s $0.07941

per kilowatt-hour rate.

“In that contract it was very clear

that it least for the first six months

— nobody knows after that — but

for the first six months the price

would definitely be lower from

[Constellation] than with ComEd,”

Holland said. “And recently we’ve

told our residents that we’ve signed

a new three-year contract with

[Constellation]. Well, it turns out

that things aren’t always the way

that they appear.”

On Sept. 25, the Illinois Commerce

Commission unexpectedly

announced that it would temporarily

rebate a portion of the ComEd

price as a result of a settlement,

reducing the company’s rate to

$.07292 per kilowatt hour — a rate

lower than the Constellation rate,

Holland said.

Because the aggregation program

is an opt-in program, residents

have the option to leave

the program without penalty by

contacting Constellation, Holland

said. He also noted the cost

savings would amount to about a

dollar a month, adding residents

can choose to rejoin the program

at a later date and there was “certainly

a very good chance” that the

ComEd price would go up during

the three-year term of Constellation’s

contract.

Reporting by Nuria Mathog, Editor.

For more, visit FrankfortStation.com.

FROM THE ORLAND PARK PRAIRIE

Orland Park police honored for

traffic safety efforts

The Orland Park Police Department

was recognized Oct. 1, with

a slew of awards for making local

roads safer.

The department was awarded

first place in the Illinois Traffic

Safety Challenge for the “Municipal

66-100 Sworn” category.

It also won the Judges Award for

best overall submission by any department,

as well as an award for

having the top distracted driving

awareness program. Both awards

were based on 2017 performance.

“We were fortunate to win a

number of awards as a result of

our traffic safety program for the

year, which also included no traffic

deaths in 2017,” Orland Park Police

Chief Tim McCarthy said.

Scott Kristiansen, director of

the Illinois Traffic Safety Challenge,

was on-hand to present

three awards to McCarthy and the

Village of Orland Park Board of

Trustees.

“The Illinois Traffic Safety Challenge

is a friendly competition between

like-sized agencies with all

the departments in Illinois,” Kristiansen

said. “This year, for the

2017 Illinois Traffic Safety Challenge,

the Orland Park Police Department

did an exceptional job.

Some of you may know that this is

one of the top agencies in the state

of Illinois when it comes to traffic

safety, highway safety, as well as

law enforcement in general.”

Kristiansen said there are four

main violations that the Challenge’s

organizers attribute for

causing crashes: impaired driving;

speeding; occupant protection; and

distracted driving.

“It is the enforcement and the

education of those types of violations

that have the biggest impact

on the number and the severity of

fatality and injury crashes in the

state of Illinois,” he said, adding

that the Traffic Safety Challenge

encompasses a lot of different criteria

— but “it’s not who writes the

most tickets — not by a longshot.”

“To win this award, you have to

have comprehensive traffic safety

program [encompassing] policies

and procedures, training, recognition,

enforcement, public education

and information, and a datadriven

approach to the traffic safety

programs that you have,” he said.

Reporting by Jon DePaolis, Freelance

Reporter. For more, visit OPPrairie.

com.

FROM THE TINLEY JUNCTION

Tinley Park golf course also serves

as a nonprofit for veterans

Nestled just beyond the Hollywood

Casino Amphitheatre in

Tinley Park lies the only nonprofit,

public golf course explicitly dedicated

to U.S. veterans and active

service members in the country.

The Odyssey Golf Foundation

was created in 2013 by the Halikias

family with a mission to serve

veterans, active military personnel,

and children and adults with special

needs. Prior to the formation of

the 501(c)(3) charity, the Halikias

family built the Odyssey Country

Club in 1990 with the goal of creating

a public golf course with a

country club feel.

The course along with the pro

shop, golf academy, and practice

facilities was then gifted to the

foundation to provide free golf instruction

and practice, discounted

course and driving range fees, and

camaraderie in the form of wellattended

weekly outings and specialized

programs for amputees,

visually impaired and those with

special needs.

“What I enjoy the most is coming

out and coaching the visually

impaired people that come from

Hines [VA] Hospital,” veteran volunteer

Warren Gill said. “That’s the

most fun.”

Veterans can purchase a bucket

of balls at the driving range for $1.

A typical outing — held multiple

times a month and attended by an

average of 100 veterans each time

— features breakfast, 18-holes of

4-person scramble-style golf with

a cart, and a hot dog lunch for $15.

“It’s wonderful,” retired Army

medic John Mitchell said. “Everybody

you meet has a different story

from a different generation, but it’s

all tied to the same common denominator.”

Reporting by Cody Mroczka, Editor.

For more, visit TinleyJunction.com

FROM THE LOCKPORT LEGEND

Lockport Rotary Club to start new

Halloween tradition with Coffin

Races

It’s been a tradition in Colorado

for almost 25 years and, now, Lockport

is soon to start one of its own.

Lockport Rotary Club President

Kelly DeLaFuente came across the

Emma Crawford Coffin Races &

Festival in Colorado Springs, Colorado,

while visiting her daughter

at college.

Emma Crawford died in the late

1800s and was buried at the top of

Red Mountain in Colorado. Her

coffin was later moved and reburied

elsewhere on the mountain, and

after several years of harsh weather

conditions, her remains slid down

the mountain where her casket was

discovered. It is that story that is

the foundation of the Coffin Races

that DeLaFuente wanted to bring to

Lockport.

On Saturday, Oct. 20, the Lockport

Rotary Club is to host its inaugural

Coffin Races. Twenty teams

of five people are invited to participate

and race down Hamilton

Street in style.

“We really didn’t have any Halloween

events going on in Lockport,

with the exception of the

haunted houses, and we thought

this would be a really good draw

to bring people in during the October

month,” DeLaFuente said.

“And with the construction and everything

going on downtown, it’d

be good for businesses, as well as

hopefully raising some money for

the Rotary.”

Applications to participate are

available online at www.cityo

flockport.net/645/Coffin-Race.

Teams can register up until the day

before the race, given that the event

hasn’t reached its 20-team limit.

“I would encourage people to try

and build a coffin,” DeLaFuente

said. “If they have any questions or

something they can always email

us. We can send them pictures of

what ours looks like. The application

is out there online and it

should really be a fun event.”

Reporting by Jacquelyn Schlabach,

Assistant Editor. For more, visit

LockportLegend.com.

FROM THE HOMER HORIZON

Third annual Race to Walk 5K has

more than 100 finishers

Fall weather is ideal for running,

and the southwest suburbs

are home to a variety of races dur-

Please see nfyn, 19


mokenamessenger.com sound off

the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 19

Social snapshot

Top Web Stories

From MokenaMessenger.com as of

Monday, Oct. 8

From the Editor

On the value of a good scare

1. Armed robbers allegedly hit three towns

in 24 hours

2. Halloween Hollow returns, new features

added

3. Rimkunas sisters improve their bond on

and off the court as doubles partners

4. Football: Griffins continue to roll in 63-0

blowout over Lockport

5. HS football powerhouses LW East,

Stevenson agree to games

Become a member: mokenamessenger.com/plus

TJ Kremer iii

tj@mokenamessenger.com

I’ve often wondered

why some people are so

enthralled with the horror

genre. It always seemed

to me that if one wanted to

be terrified, then all he or

she needed to do was watch

a little bit of the TV news.

There’s plenty of stuff out

there that should scare a

rational person senseless.

And why people would

actually pay money to have

film makers, or authors, or

whatever medium of one’s

particular choice plant

disturbing, grotesque, often

extremely violent images

that could last for life is still

beyond my comprehension.

But there was a story this

week in The Messenger that

had me rethinking (a bit)

about the mentality behind a

good scare.

Now, to be clear, I don’t

disparage people who enjoy

the macabre; I just don’t understand

it. And it’s not all

things sinister that I have an

aversion to. My confusion

and reluctance to support is

aimed directly to the overthe-top-,

violence-for-thesake-of-violence-style

of

horror or thriller.

For example, I’m a fan

of “The Walking Dead.”

But it’s not the zombies and

violence that draw me in;

it’s the story and interconnections

with so many

character arcs that keep me

interested. There’s nuance,

in my opinion, and that’s

what’s valuable about the

show to me, far more so

than watching how many

ways the show can decimate

a zombie or a character

(poor Glenn and Abraham).

And with Halloween

quickly approaching, I find

more and more that the

exposure to that particular

brand of entertainment is

tough to ignore.

But here’s the thing that

got me thinking more about

why people enjoy being

scared: I interviewed Gary

Krohn, the man behind the

mayhem at his Halloween

Haunt. (You can read that

story on Page 23.)

Krohn is one of those

people who seems to live

for all things creepy and

spooky. To each his own.

But, there was genuine joy

in his voice and eyes when

he described his passion for

Halloween season. He connected

with the people who

would come year after year

to willingly expose themselves

to as much abject fear

as possible.

And then it kind of hit me

a day later: With so much

terror in the world — at all

times in history, and especially

now — maybe people

need a dose of the absurd

to help relieve that tension

from not knowing what kind

of world they’ll wake up to

in the morning.

Maybe this is the time of

year where we’re allowed to

let our guard down a little

bit and be afraid of things

that go bump in the night,

rather than the things that

stare us in the face in broad

daylight.

Maybe it’s a sort of cathartic

experience for those

horror lovers. And if that’s

what it takes for someone

to make it through this

crazy world, then I like to

borrow a line from Hunter

S. Thompson: “When the

going gets weird, the weird

go pro.”

So, go weird this Halloween

season, folks. Let your

freak flags fly.

“Anytime passing through Mokena, got to

stop and see Grandma & Grandpa. Miss

them”

Jim Loomis shared this to his Facebook

page Saturday, Oct. 6

Like The Mokena Messenger: facebook.com/

mokenamessenger.com

“Thanks to all of our fans tonight!! 5-2 and

playoff eligible again!!! Let’s finish strong!!! ”

@LWCFootball posted this on its Twitter

account Friday, Oct. 5

Follow The Mokena Messenger: @mokenamessenger

nfyn

From Page 18

ing the season, including

the Race to Walk 5K, which

recently brought the community

together for a day of

fun, fitness and fundraising.

On the morning of Sept.

30, participants flocked to

Konow’s Corn Maze in

Homer Glen for the 5K,

which raised money for Alexandra’s

Ambition Foundation.

The nonprofit organization’s

mission is to

financially assist families of

children born with arthrogryposis

multiplex congenita,

a condition which impacts

the joints of newborns.

The third annual 5K

doubled its participation

numbers, with more than

100 people completing the

3.1-mile course. That number

increased to over 200

when factoring in all of the

supporters who signed up

for the daylong fundraising

event, which included

a raffle drawing, live music

and all-day admission to Konow’s

Corn Maze.

While everyone was looking

forward to a fun day on

the farm, more than anything,

participants wanted to

support the Alexandra’s Ambition

Foundation, which

was inspired by 6-year-old

Alexandra Toma.

“Our namesake and literal

poster child is Alexandra, my

niece. She was diagnosed in

utero at 20 weeks,” explained

foundation President and

5K Director Sheila Hughes.

“Arthrogryposis multiplex

congenita is a rare disability

that children in the United

States are born with. One out

of about every 3,000 children

could be born with it.”

Reporting by Laurie Fanelli,

Freelance Reporter. For more,

visit HomerHorizon.com.

Visit us online at www.Mokenamessenger.com

Sound Off Policy

Editorials and columns are the

opinions of the author. Pieces

from 22nd Century Media are

the thoughts of the company as

a whole. The Mokena Messenger

encourages readers to write letters

to Sound Off. All letters must be

signed, and names and hometowns

will be published. We also ask that

writers include their address and

phone number for verification,

not publication. Letters should be

limited to 400 words. The Mokena

Messenger reserves the right to edit

letters. Letters become property

of The Mokena Messenger. Letters

that are published do not reflect

the thoughts and views of The

Mokena Messenger. Letters can be

mailed to: The Mokena Messenger,

11516 West 183rd Street, Unit

SW Office Condo #3, Orland

Park, Illinois, 60467. Fax letters to

(708) 326-9179 or e-mail to tj@

mokenamessenger.com.

www.mokenamessenger.com.


20 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger mokena

mokenamessenger.com

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Lil’ Thangz teaches how to

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the mokena messenger | October 11, 2018 | mokenamessenger.com

Tried and true Traditional

Middle Eastern dishes serve as pride, joy

of Orland Park restaurant, Page 34

Popular Mokena Halloween attraction makes return, Page 23

Ghosts, goblins and ghouls of all sorts once again adorn the lawn of Gary Krohn’s home in Mokena. The popular attraction is back after a three-year

hiatus. T.J. Kremer III/22nd Century Media


22 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger faith

mokenamessenger.com

St. Mary scheduled to host

Polka Mass, ethnic luncheon

Staff Report

A special Polka Mass is

scheduled for 1:30 p.m. on

Oct. 21. The mass, which

will be a catholic liturgy in a

polka beat, will be followed

by a Polish ethnic luncheon

at 2:45 p.m. in the lower level

of the church. Lemont’s

Old Town Restaurant will

provide the catering service.

The special musical guest is

Faith Briefs

St. John’s United Church of Christ (11100

Second St., Mokena)

Blood Drive

8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Sunday,

Oct. 14. Join St. John’s

for a blood drive with the

Heartland Blood Centers. To

schedule and appointment,

call (708) 479-5123. Walk

ins are also welcome. All

donors will receive an entry

voucher for Siegel’s Cottonwood

Farm Pumpkin Fest.

Turkey Dinner

4-7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3,

Christian Community Center,

FUNERAL SERVICES DIRECTORY

Kim O’Neil Golob

Kelli Hartseil Mores

Kelly Furlong Foresman, Secretary

It was easy to

decide on cremation.

Now, what about the

rest of the decisions?

Colonial Chapel

Funeral Home

Private, On-site Crematory

15525 S. 73rd Ave.

(155th/Wheeler Dr. & Harlem)

Orland Park, Illinois

Family owned for 40 Years

colonialchapel.com

708-532-5400

The Cremation Experts.

scheduled to be Wesoly Lud

Polish Folk Dance Ensemble.

Tickets for adults are $26.

Tickets for children 12 years

and younger are $10. Tickets

can be purchased following

mass on Saturday, Oct. 13

and Sunday Oct. 14.

For more information, visit

St. Mary Church at 19515

S. 115th Ave., or call Evelyn

at (708) 479-1736 or Gennie

at (708) 479-7322.

2017 WINNER

"BEST FUNERAL

HOME"

©2006 Copyrighted Material

11046 Second St., Mokena.

Join St. John’s for their annual

Turkey Dinner. Tickets

will be sold at the door for

$12 for adults, $5 for children

ages 5-11 and $2 for children

2-4. Carry outs will be available

at the church.

Traditional Service

8 a.m. traditional mass,

9:45 a.m. contemporary &

traditional music in a service

of praise and reverence. Supervised

childcare available.

For more information, call

(708) 479-5123.

ADVERTISE

YOUR

FUNERAL

SERVICES.

Contact Classifieds at

708.326.9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

Garden Club

8 a.m. Tuesdays. For more

information, call (708) 479-

5123.

Cards for a Cause

7 p.m. the second Monday

of each month. Bring your

tape, scissors and colored

pencils — if you have them

— and plan for a creative

evening with lots of fun.

Bundles of Love

7 p.m. the second and

fourth Monday of each

month. Enjoy fun and fellowship

while making baby

quilts for infants baptized at

St. John’s and lap quilts for

shut-ins.

Mokena United Methodist Church (10901

LaPorte Road, Mokena)

150th Celebration

5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27.

To RSVP, call the church at

(708) 479-1110 and leave

your name, the number of

people who will be attending

and a phone number.

Service and Sunday School

10:15 a.m. Sundays.

Church service and children’s

Sunday School will

be held. For more information,

call (708) 479-1110.

Bible Study

7 p.m. Tuesdays at the

parsonage. For more information,

call (708) 479-1110.

Community Prayer Gathering

2:30 p.m. every 4th Sunday.

Breakfast

9 a.m. every third Saturday

of the month.

Choir Practice

7:30 p.m. Wednesdays.

Newcomers welcome.

Weight Watchers

Wednesday

Weigh-ins take place at

6:30 p.m., while the meeting

is at 7 p.m.

Marley Community Church (12625 W.

187th St., Mokena)

Church Service

10 a.m. Sundays. Childcare

is provided.

Sunday School

9-10 a.m. Sundays.

Senior High Youth Group

7-8:30 p.m. Wednesdays.

For more information, email

marleycommunitychurch@

gmail.com.

Junior High Youth Group

6-7:30 p.m. Fridays. For

more information, email

marleycommunitychurch@

gmail.com.

Men’s Group

6 p.m. Sunday nights in

the church basement. All

men are welcome.

Immanuel Evangelical Lutheran Church

(10731 W. La Porte Road, Mokena)

Trunk or Treat

4-6 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 28.

Worship

9 a.m. Sundays.

God’s Kids Club

10:15 a.m. Sundays in

Sept.-May.

Adult Bible Study

10:15 a.m. Sundays in

Sept.-May.

Mokena Baptist Church (9960 W. 187th

St., Mokena)

Sunday Services

11 a.m. and 5 p.m. For

more information, call (312)

350-2279.

Sunday School

10:15 a.m. Sundays. Mokena

Baptist offers Sunday

School classes for all ages.

For more information, call

(312) 350-2279.

St. Mary’s Catholic Church (19515 115th

Ave., Mokena)

Church Service

5 p.m. Saturdays; 8 a.m,

9:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6:

p.m. Sundays

Please see faith, 32


mokenamessenger.com life & arts

the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 23

Mokena fright attraction

back from the (un)dead

T.J. Kremer III, Editor

Strange lights flicker

across the foggy moor, as

wails and screams reverberate

off dew-soaked autumn

leaves — dew, or something

more nefarious.

Creaky, gnarled wooden

cages and caskets strain to

keep the monsters at bay.

Skeletal hands and limp,

served limbs reach out,

beckoning and daring people

to get closer.

A ship of lost souls sets to

depart once again, perhaps

in search of more weary

deckhands to navigate the

inky-black depths.

Nightmares come alive

If you’re going…

What: Halloween Haunt

Where: 18909 Parkway

Lane, in Mokena

Price: No money, just a

risk of losing one’s soul

Things to bring: A priest,

good pair of running

shoes and a stern

intestinal fortitude

again on this ghastly piece of

land in Mokena, which has

remained buried for the last

three years.

But, now, ghouls, ghosts

and goblins of all ages can

scare themselves silly again

at the masterwork of evil genius

Gary Krohn’s Halloween

Haunt.

The display at the longtime

Mokena resident’s

home — which is absolutely

free to any who dare to try it

— is straight out of a horror

film, all designed and built

by Krohn himself, inspired

by his love for all things terrifying.

Legend has it that what

started as a simple experiment

in scaring the bajevus

out of the neighborhood

children quickly evolved in

to an ever expanding hellscape.

“We set up some things

for the kids to scare the

Please see undead, 33

LEFT: Trick-or-treaters beware: the grounds become alive with undead after dark.

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OCT 20, 5:30PM

Ozinga Chapel, Palos Heights

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Stilian Kirov, Conductor

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Works by Bernstien, Korngold,

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Tickets from $27 in advance.

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Don’t Miss The Shoe Event of the Season

“Meet the Representatives from SAS, Rockport, Naot and Vionic”

Friday, October 19th

This lovely couple can be found at the Halloween Haunt of Gary Krohn, 18909 Parkway

Lane, in Mokena. The attraction is free of charge and will be available evenings through

Halloween. Photos by T.J. Kremer III/22nd Century Media

FREE GIFT WITH PURCHASE, ENTER TO WIN A FREE PAIR OF SHOES*

14360 S. LaGrange Rd. Orland Park 708-349-7377

www.miroballishoes.com

*Ask store for details


24 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger life & arts

mokenamessenger.com

Local author holds key to living dreams through moderation

T.J. Kremer III, Editor

Children often have a special

outlook on life and that

starts with dreaming big.

Ask a child what they want

to be when they grow up

and they’re likely to respond

with all sorts of professions

— from doctors and lawyers,

to princes and princesses.

Children are allowed to

dream big; they haven’t yet

learned the pressures of socalled

“adult life” and the

multitude of responsibilities

that pull one in so many different

directions.

But here’s the thing:

Adults can, and should,

dream big, too. That’s part

of the premise of Joel Krooswyk’s

book, “Don’t Stop

Just Quit.”

The Mokena resident argues

that moderation in

one’s pursuit of his or her

goals is the key to finding

success and achieving happiness.

Krooswyk said he came to

realize this through observing

his wife, Beth. And if

that name sounds familiar,

it’s because Beth is a regular

contributing columnist

for The Messenger with her

“Mokena Munchies” recipes.

“[Beth] has always said,

‘Everything in moderation,’

and I would hear that and go,

‘OK, I shouldn’t overeat,’

or, ‘OK, I get it. I won’t do

too much of any one thing.

I won’t overplay my video

games,’ or something,” Joel

said. “That’s great, but when

you apply it to the broader

spectrum of if I pour myself

100 percent into my job —

and I work for startup companies,

[and] a lot of times

these companies will take

every hour you’ll give them

because there’s a place to

go, we want to be successful

[and] I love that culture —

but if I can’t come home at

night and actually be a parent

to my kids, then I have a

generational negative impact

on my kids because I chased

a job. I have to be careful

with that kind of thing.”

It’s finding that kind of

balance and yet still maintaining

persistence of one’s

dreams and goals that’s the

subject of the first part of,”

Don’t Stop Just Quit.”

In part two of the book,

Joel offers some practical

ways of achieving that balance

in the key areas of life:

financial stability, health

personal relationships and

other areas.

And so, we needn’t learn

to give up on our dreams and

goals, rather, we should focus

on eliminating the clutter

in our lives that impede our

progress or take away our

focus from those goals.

A crucial part of learning

to prioritize goals and

dreams is questioning why

one is doing this or that, Joel

said.

The dreams that will have

the greatest impact and

chance of success are the

ones done at the right time

and for the right reasons.

“It’s one of those things

that depends on your stage

of life and who’s involved

in that stage of life,” Joel

said. “One of the things I

talk about is a dream for

yourself is probably not be

the right dream. A dream for

yourself is probably going to

fail. When you talk about a

dream for yourself, you’re

not seeing the bigger picture.”

“Don’t Stop Just Quit” is

available on amazon.com,

or on Joel’s website at dont

stopjustquit.com.

Joel Krooswyk, a Mokena author, poses with his book,

“Don’t Stop Just Quit.” The book aims to help people

become more successful by practicing moderation. T.J.

Kremer III/22nd Century Media

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mokenamessenger.com life & arts

the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 25

LW East student builds life-size checkerboard for Eagle project

Mokena business

donates materials

for project

Megan Schuller

Freelance Reporter

The Eagle Scouts of Boy

Scout Troop 270 gathered at

Chelsea Intermediate School

the morning of Sept. 22 to

shovel gravel into a square

hole they had dug near the

school playground. Each

member of the troop carefully

laid a large black or white

square stone in a checkerboard

pattern and pounded it

into place in the gravel.

Within a few hours, the

stones had transformed into a

playable giant checkerboard

in the school’s backyard.

The checkerboard was the

brainchild and Eagle Scout

project of 17-year-old Cole

Chojnacki. After seeing a

similar life-size checkerboard

while on vacation,

the Lincoln-Way East senior

wanted to bring the game to

Frankfort, so the local community

and children could

enjoy it.

“I wanted to do something

a little outside the box,”

Chojnacki said. “Now, a

little part of me is here. I’m

proud of it. I’ve worked for a

long time on it.”

Chojnacki was responsible

for developing the concept

for the project, pitching it to

the school and coordinating

the labor and resources to

complete it. More than 14

members of his troop helped

make his vision possible.

Elemental Landscapes, of

Mokena, donated all the materials

needed for the landscaping

of the project, as

well as labor to ensure it was

safely installed. Owner Mike

Bonifacio said he was eager

to help the Eagle Scouts because

he was a Cub Scout

when he was younger.

“It’s something I really

support,” Bonifacio said.

Mike Bonifacio (left) and Cole Chojnacki shake hands and

pose with a plaque Bonifacio received for donating his

supplies and labor for the Eagle Scout project.

Frankfort Boy Scout Troop 270 members Quinn Hickling

(left), 13, and Alec O’Connor, 16, load sod into a

wheelbarrow to lay around the stones that were set in

place.

“When this project came up,

I wanted to help since I’m

in the industry. It’s nice to

get the younger generation

involved in manual labor

because it’s kind of a lost art

with the new generations. It

organizes them as a group

and teaches teamwork.”

Troop 270 Committee

Chairman Chuck Rudy said

Eagle Scout projects such as

Chojnacki’s instill a sense of

pride and community into

the Scouts.

“I think it’s a tremendous

project,” Rudy said. “The

Eagle project is a way for

the Eagle candidate to provide

something back to the

community that showcases

the aspects of Scouting.”

The Eagle Scout pack

installed the stone checker

board alongside Bonifacio,

as well as a storage bench

to keep the pieces in. The

checker pieces also have

pole so when the player

king’s their piece, the pieces

can be stacked as they would

be on a real game board.

“I’m very proud of him,”

Cole’s mother, Cori Chojnacki,

said. “He’s been

working hard on the project.

Cole has really enjoyed

being a part of the Eagle

Scouts.”

Assistant Scout Master

Mike Bonifacio (left), owner of Elemental Landscapes, and Lincoln-Way East student Cole

Chojnacki lay the stones for a giant checkerboard Sept. 22 at Chelsea Intermediate School

in Frankfort. Photo by Megan Schuller/22nd Century Media

Mike Bonifacio works with Frankfort Boy Scout Troop 270 members (left to right) Matt

Lexow, 16; Drew Clarkin, 12, Aaron Herbst, 13, and Quinn Hickling, 13, to lay the stones

that will become the playground checkerboard.

Paul Herbst said that the Eagle

Scout projects teach the

young eagles valuable lessons

in real-world situations.

“It gives them a sense of

ownership in the community,”

Herbst said. “It gives

them a sense of how things

really work in the world. It’s

a great environment to make

mistakes. They now know

how to get projects done and

how they can benefit the

community.”

Months of working and

planning came to a head

once the final stone was laid

by Cole and the sod was

replaced around the checkerboard.

To celebrate their

work, Cole played a game of

checkers with his fellow Eagle

Scouts when the project

was complete.

“Now that it’s come together

its kind of a closure

for me. I hope it lasts a long

time and kids will get to enjoy

it for longer then I’ll be

here,” Cole Chojnacki said.


26 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger mokena

mokenamessenger.com


mokenamessenger.com life & arts

the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 27

Fun facts about Halloween contests, part II

Deadline, prizes and

more for our 2018

contests

Bill Jones, Managing Editor

Fun facts: The average

pumpkin has hundreds of

seeds inside of it, and according

to some internet reports

they have been on this

continent for thousands of

years, and the biggest ones

have been recorded passing

the 2,000-pound mark.

The average jack-o’-lantern?

Zero seeds, if you did

it right. Decidedly lighter.

Now, here are some fun

facts about our 22nd Century

Media’s Halloween contests.

Details for each are below,

but questions can be directed

to Managing Editor Bill

Jones at bill@opprairie.com

or (708) 326-9170 ext. 20.

The Costumes

The Halloween Costume

Contest for 2018 features

a total of three categories.

Adults 16 and older have two

ways to win, with awards for

scariest costume and most

creative up for grabs. Children

15 and younger, meanwhile,

will compete in one

category in which creativity

is key.

We’re going to pick just

one winner across each category

from all seven of our

southwest suburban towns:

Orland Park, Tinley Park,

Frankfort, Mokena, New

Lenox, Homer Glen and

Lockport. So, your entries

need to be good.

We have just a few rules.

1) You have to be the person

in the costume. You cannot

submit for anyone else,

with the exception of parents

who submit for their children.

2) Each person can only

submit one costume for an

22nd Century Media’s Halloween contest runs through Nov. 1. Prizes will be awarded for

best costumes and pumpkin carving. 22nd century media file photo

entry (basically, you cannot

send yourself in multiple

costumes — pick one),

though families can send one

entry per person from different

members of the family

(and they can be submitted

together). A group also may

enter one group costume,

eligible for one prize, as a

group.

3) We understand there

may be a bit in the way of

scary imagery (such is the

nature of the holiday), but

the costumes have to be relatively

family friendly to be

considered and published.

Nothing beyond PG-13.

4) Entries must be submitted

no later than 2 p.m.

Thursday, Nov. 1, to bill@

opprairie.com or 22nd Century

Media, c/o Managing

Editor Bill Jones, at 11516

W. 183rd St. Unit SW Office

Condo 3, Orland Park,

IL, 60467 (physical entries

cannot be returned), along

with names, email addresses

and/or phone numbers, and

towns for each of the entrants.

5) The entries will be

judged by 22nd Century

Media’s editorial staff, with

winners being chosen based

on creativity, successful execution

of an idea, quality of

craftsmanship and consideration

of the holiday/season.

6) All entries are subject to

being published.

The prizes are detailed in

the accompanying sidebar.

The Pumpkins

Our pumpkin carving contest

returns in 2018 with a

category for adults 16 and

older, as well as one for children

15 and younger. In both

categories, it is all about creativity

and skill.

We will pick just one winner

across each category

from all seven of our southwest

suburban towns: Orland

Park, Tinley Park, Frankfort,

Mokena, New Lenox, Homer

Glen and Lockport.

We have just a few rules.

1) You have to be the person

who carved the pumpkin.

You cannot submit for

anyone else, with the exception

of parents who submit

for their children.

2) Each person can only

submit one pumpkin photo

(can feature multiple pumpkins

if there is a theme) for

an entry, though families can

send one entry per person

from different members of

The Prizes

A breakdown of the prizes available in 22nd Century

Media’s 2018 Halloween contests, by category.

Best Adult Costume-Scary (16 and older)

• A $25 gift certificate for Rubi Agave Latin Kitchen,

Tequila & Whiskey Bar, 12622 W. 159th St. in Homer

Glen

• A $5 gift certificate for Whizzy Puffs, 106 MacGregor

Road in Lockport

Best Adult Costume-Creative (16 and older)

• A $25 gift certificate for White Street Cafe, located

inside the Trolley Barn in Frankfort

• A $5 gift certificate for Whizzy Puffs, 106 MacGregor

Road in Lockport

Best Children’s Costume (15 and younger)

• Two hours of free bowling for up to six people,

including shoe rentals, along with a pizza and pitcher

full of pop, at Laraway Lanes, 1009 West Laraway

Road in New Lenox

• A $25 gift card for Gizmos Fun Factory, 66 Orland

Square Drive in Orland Park

Best Adult-Crafted Pumpkin (16 and older)

• A $25 gift certificate for Rubi Agave Latin Kitchen,

Tequila & Whiskey Bar, 12622 W. 159th St. in Homer

Glen

• A $5 gift certificate for Whizzy Puffs, 106 MacGregor

Road in Lockport

Best Pumpkin Created by a Child (15 and younger)

• Gift certificate valued at $25 from Odyssey Fun

World, 19111 Oak Park Ave. in Tinley Park

• A $25 gift card for Gizmos Fun Factory, 66 Orland

Square Drive in Orland Park

the family (and they can be

submitted together).

3) We understand there

may be a bit in the way of

scary imagery (such is the

nature of the holiday), but

the pumpkins have to be

relatively family friendly to

be considered and published.

Nothing beyond PG-13.

4) Entries must be submitted

no later than 2 p.m.

Thursday, Nov. 1, to bill@

opprairie.com or 22nd Century

Media, c/o Managing

Editor Bill Jones, at 11516

W. 183rd St. Unit SW Office

Condo 3, Orland Park,

IL, 60467 (physical entries

cannot be returned), along

with names, email addresses

and/or phone numbers, and

towns for each of the entrants.

5) The entries will be

judged by 22nd Century

Media’s editorial staff, with

winners being chosen based

on creativity, successful execution

of an idea, quality of

craftsmanship and consideration

of the holiday/season.

6) All entries are subject to

being published.

The prizes are detailed in

the accompanying sidebar.


28 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger MOKENA

mokenamessenger.com mokenamessenger.com MOKENA

the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 29

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access and service.

■ Expanded, State-of-the-art Emergency Department

with added patient rooms, trauma and fast-track

rooms, more ambulance bays and expanded

EMS facilities.

■ All private patient rooms

■ New state-of-the-art Operating Rooms

■ New MRI Caring Suite improving patient comfort

and image quality

■ New Infusion Suite with 24 private treatment bays

■ New Franciscan Health Family Birth Center

■ New Inpatient Rehabilitation Center

The Future is

■ New Clinical Decision Unit

■ Expanded Intensive Care Unit

■ Renovated Outpatient Neurodiagnostics, Respiratory

Therapy, Imaging Services, Lab and more

■ Award-winning Specialty Care Services

– Franciscan Health Heart &Vascular Institute

the Southland’s first accredited Chest Pain Center

– Patricia A. Joyce Comprehensive Cancer Institute

accredited by the American College of

Surgeons Commission on Cancer and the National

Accreditation Program for Breast Centers

– Franciscan Health Orthopedic &Spine Center

using advanced surgical and medical treatments

FRANCISCAN

Close to Home

CHICAGO HEIGHTS

Franciscan Urgent Care

a24/7 urgent care facility

located in Chicago Heights at

15th St. and Vincennes Ave.

TINLEY PARK

Franciscan Physician

Network TinleyPark

Walk-in Clinic, in addition

to Franciscan ExpressCare

in Frankfort

FRANKFORT

Franciscan

Express Care

Need adoctor.

See adoctor.

Open every day

7AM to 11PM


30 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger life & arts

mokenamessenger.com

Weathering the Storm

Above-normal temps carry

into September, October

September weather

in review

Mark T. Carroll

Contributing Columnist

For the fifth consecutive

month, we

experienced above

normal temperatures during

September.

The last month that had

temperatures below normal

was April (our spring had

temperatures well below

normal). The average

temperature for September

2018 was nearly 4 degrees

above normal.

Five days in September

had a high temperature

above 90 degrees (we

normally have one day each

September with a temperature

at or above 90).

O’Hare International

Airport set a record high

temperature on Sept. 20

with a high of 93 degrees.

The previous record had

just been set in 2017 with a

high of 92.

Midway Airport also set

a record on Sept. 20 with

a high of 95 degrees. The

previous record of 92 also

occurred in 2017 at Midway

Airport.

We have had a total of

26 90-degree days in 2018,

with the normal number of

90-degree days being 14

annually. The 26 such days

this year was the first time

since 2012 that we have

had more than 20 90-degree

days in a year.

The coldest temperature

in September was 42

degrees on the morning of

Sept. 29.

Thunderstorms made

the precipitation totals for

the month of September

inconsistent throughout our

region.

O’Hare Airport recorded

3.65 inches of rain in

September, which was 0.44

inches above normal.

Midway Airport had 2.28

inches of rain in September,

which was a little more

than one inch below normal

for the month.

September rainfall totals

for the south and southwest

suburbs

• Oak Forest: 4.82 inches

• New Lenox: 4.65 inches

• Homer Glen: 3.23

inches

• Manhattan: 3.12 inches

• Mokena: 3.01 inches

• Joliet: 2.60 inches

Remnants from Tropical

Storm Gordon brought

precipitation to our area

Sept. 6 and 7. New Lenox

and Homer Glen recorded

just over 1 inch of rain,

while Oak Forest had 0.77

inches, Manhattan had 0.52

inches and Lemont had

0.45 inches.

During the early evening

of Tuesday, Sept. 25, a cold

frontal passage brought

damaging winds to the west

and northwest suburbs. For

us, the front brought brief

but at times heavy rainfall.

Precipitation totals for

Tuesday, Sept. 25

• Lockport: 0.71 inches

• Channahon: 0.64 inches

• Joliet: 0.64 inches

• Manhattan: 0.46 inches

• New Lenox: 0.40 inches

• Homer Glen: 0.36

inches

Hurricane Florence

While our weather was

not directly impacted by

Hurricane Florence, the

deadly storm wreaked

havoc in the Carolinas.

Nearly 50 deaths have been

attributed to Hurricane

Florence.

For the six days from

Sept. 12-17, Wilmington,

North Carolina, recorded

23.65 inches of rain,

including over 16 inches

within one 24-hour period.

Youpon Beach in

Brunswick County, North

Carolina had 17.38 inches

of rain in a 24-hour period.

In contrast, we receive

roughly 37 inches of liquid

precipitation for the entire

year.

Six cooperative weather

observers in North Carolina

recorded over 30 inches of

rain from Sept. 13-17. A

total of 20 to 30 inches of

rain from Florence fell at

27 North Carolina recording

locations.

Prepare for winter

In a future article, we

will cover winter weather

safety. As we are now in

October, it is time to think

ahead and prepare for the

coming winter season.

Check your snowblower

to make sure it will start

when the first winter storm

arrives. If you use snow

shovels and salt or other

snow and ice melting materials,

make sure you have

them available for the first

snow.

The weather for October

and beyond

The temperature and

precipitation forecast from

Please see weather, 33

Spanish Flu epidemic hits Mokena

Mokenians fight own

battle at home in

1918

Matt Galik

Contributing Columnist

The Mokena of fall

1918 was a place of

worry. World War

I was reaching its bloody

end, and many village

families had loved ones in

the French combat zone.

Although the war was

winding down, American

casualties were still a daily

occurrence. Exactly a century

ago this month, another

enemy reared its ugly head,

and this one at home. The

new foe, the Spanish Flu

pandemic, proved itself to

be just as deadly as anything

lurking in the trenches of

the Western Front.

While the outbreak of the

illness is usually dated as

having begun in early 1918

and carried on until the end

of 1920, October 1918 bore

the worst of it in the United

States. One chronicler called

the Spanish Flu the “greatest

medical holocaust in

modern history,” while the

London Times wrote “never

since the Black Death has

such a plague swept over

the world.” Anywhere between

50 million to 100 million

people across the globe

were lost to the pandemic.

Normal strains of influenza

are most dangerous to the

children and the elderly,

while the variant from a

century ago was claiming

relatively young people in

robust health.

By Oct. 2, the first recorded

case in small-town

Mokena cropped up when

16-year-old Hugo Niethammer

fell ill. The son

of a Front Street hardware

merchant, the trouble

was compounded when

pneumonia also set in, but

luckily, the lad was able to

pull through. Meanwhile,

just outside town, another

drama was unfolding. At

the time, the Rock Island

railroad housed 52 itinerant

Mexican workers in several

converted box cars on a

sidetrack about a quarter of

a mile east of Mokena. It

was here that the Spanish

Flu’s deadly tentacles would

wreak the most havoc.

Over the course of the

second weekend in October,

the entire camp was walloped

with the pandemic,

entire families coming down

with it at once. Mokena

farmer George Maue, who

also served as the supervisor

of Frankfort Township,

knew what was happening

and immediately went into

crisis mode, sending an

urgent call for doctors, of

which three Rock Island

physicians showed up that

Sunday. On Monday, Oct.

14, the railroad sent out

mattresses and blankets for

the ill, which was a step up

from the austere condition

of the bare box cars they

were living in, the inhabitants

often times sleeping

on the floors. Before long,

new cars were sent down

the line, while the old ones

were fumigated.

It was all to no avail. By

the end of that week, six

of the workers were dead,

including a young, freshly

married couple. The harvest

of human life also left a

baby motherless. Saddest of

all, time has not preserved

any of the victims’ names,

whose immediate burial was

provided for in St. Mary’s

Cemetery.

As October carried on,

hardly a family in the village

escaped the flu, the list

of infected reading like a

who’s-who of Mokenians

in the era. The Wolf Road

home of Carl and Mable

Krapp was invaded by the

virus, while at around the

same time Clinton and

Dorothy Kraus, children

of the town barber, also

were knocked down with

it. Also included among the

sufferers were blacksmith

Albert Braun, postmaster

Ona McGovney, and cattleman

John Cappel. Eighteen

people were displaying

flu-like symptoms on Oct.

14, and that the number had

dramatically climbed to 25

two days later demonstrates

the rapidity with which the

Spanish Flu was making

short work out of Mokena.

To protect village residents,

warning signs were

placed around town, and

the homes of the infected

were quarantined. All four

village churches and the

Mokena Public School were

closed until further notice,

and “gatherings of every

nature” were banned in the

incorporated limits. Early on,

15-year-old Ruby Bechstein

of Mokena Street was one of

the ill. On Oct. 16 she lost

her battle with the Spanish

Flu and has been remembered

by history as the first

resident of the village proper

to succumb to the pandemic.

The grim reaper struck

town twice that day, when

33-year-old Emma Schenkel

was also claimed by the

virus. Their deaths, along

with those of the Mexican

railroad laborers, led the

local correspondent to the

Joliet Herald-News to lament

that week as “one of funerals”

for Mokena. In keeping

with quarantine rules and

Please see Mokena, 33


mokenamessenger.com life & arts

the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 31

Art shifts perspective

from large to small

ONLY 4 LEFT!

Designed With

You In Mind

T.J. Kremer III, Editor

It starts with just a few

scraps of paper, some cardstock,

scissors and glue. A

Few folds here, a couple

cuts there and, viola, a perfect

cube that can now be

used to make just about

anything one can imagine,

from miniature pieces of

furniture to teeny, tiny people

or other objects to interact

with.

It’s no magic — not quite

— but, rather, the culmination

of years of practice by

artist CoRiccio Baskin, who

was on-hand at Mokena

Community Public Library

District on Saturday, Oct. 6,

to lead a workshop to teach

others how to create similar

pieces of miniature art.

The hobby turned profession

began for Baskin when

he was 16 years old and suffered

a broken foot. Disappointed

about not being able

to play basketball and looking

for something to help kill

the time while he was on the

mend, Baskin began to cut

up most everything paper he

could find lying around his

home.

Soon, the artist had honed

his craft well enough to begin

a business around it:

Lil’ Thangz Miniature Paper

Models.

What may be little can

sometimes be complex, as the

dozen or so participants in the

workshop soon found out.

Lori Stanton and her

11-year-old daughter Emily,

of Mokena, were a few

minutes late showing up for

the workshop, but were able

to catch up with a little help

from Baskin.

“There was a little pressure

there in the beginning,”

Lori said.

Emily, who likes all things

miniature, said she was hoping

to learn how to make a

tiny cookie tin, but admitted

that she also had other designs

on her mind.

“I like the coloring part

better,” she said.

To learn more about Lil’

Thangz, visit ltworkshops.

blogspot.com.

Phone: 630-323-7600


HOMER GLE

Our open floor plans allow you to

customize your home to fit your

dreams and desires.

Ranch and 2-story townhomes

feature a first floor master along

with additional bedrooms.

Townhomes with dual master suites

Ranch and

Two-story Townhomes

FROM THE LOW $400’s

Model is located at 14713 Astor

Lane, Homer Glen

Open Fri. – Mon. 11-5

or by appointment.

Some of the creations by artist CoRiccio Baskin on display at his Lil’ Thangz workshop at

Mokena Community Public Library District on Saturday, Oct. 6.

T.J. Kremer III/22nd Century Media


32 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger life & arts

mokenamessenger.com

Community comes out for ‘New Look’ church

Grace Fellowship Church provides music, food, entertainment for

‘New Look’ party

Autumn Pencil makes a balloon skeleton for children at Grace Fellowship Church’s grand

re-opening on Saturday, Oct. 6.

Andrew Youngblood tries to win a bottle of root beer in a ring toss game.

Photos by T.J. Kremer III/22nd Century Media

Logan Erickson (left) and Charlie Tustin play a game of bags at GFC’s outdoor party.

Former Barnum & Bailey clown “Freight Train the Hobo Clown” entertains the crowd at

GFC.

faith

From Page 22

Adoration

Wednesdays following

8:00 a.m. Mass in the Chapel

until 6:45 p.m.

Young at Heart Senior Club

1 p.m. the first and third

Wednesday of the month.

Join the senior club for activities

and outings Sept.-

June. For more information,

call (708) 699-5018.

Parker Road Bible Church (18512 Parker

Road, Mokena)

Worship Service

10:30 a.m. Sundays. Be

sure to arrive early for our

Sunday Worship Service to

enjoy a hot, complimentary

cup of coffee every week at

the church. Following the

Christian Education Hour

(9:15-10:15 a.m.), all beverages

can be found just outside

the sanctuary.

Victory Baptist Church (13550 US Route

6, Mokena)

Morning Worship

10:45 a.m. Sundays.

Evening Worship

6 p.m. Sundays.

Have something for Faith

Briefs? Contact Assistant

Editor Amanda Stoll at

a.stoll@22ndcenturymedia.com

or call (708) 326-9170 ext. 34.

Deadline is noon Thursday one

week prior to publication.


mokenamessenger.com life & arts

the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 33

weather

From Page 30

the National Centers for

Environmental Prediction

for Chicago for September

was accurate, as abovenormal

temperature and

above-normal precipitation

was predicted.

The centers’ forecast

for October is for above

normal temperatures and

above-normal precipitation.

The prediction for the

months of October through

December is for abovenormal

temperature and

normal precipitation.

Mark T. Carroll is

the president of CALM

Weather LLC, a meteorological

consulting service

based in Oak Forest. For

more information, visit

calmwx.com.

undead

From Page 33

trick-or-treaters — it was

over the top,” Krohn said.

“The kids were screaming,

yelling, laughing, running.

So, it’s like, ‘OK, this seems

like too much fun not to take

advantage of.’”

Word of the macabre fun

fest spread far and wide, and

Krohn did his worst not to

disappoint.

“By the fifth, sixth, seventh

year, we were getting

between 4,000 and 5,000

people in October looking

at this and taking pictures

and video and screaming

and yelling,” Krohn said.

“It made me feel good that

I could contribute and give

back to the community.”

But, alas, even old ghosts

must someday die, and

Krohn says this will be his

final year for putting on the

Halloween display.

All of his maniacal props,

creatures and collections of

insanely over-the-top creations

will be up for sale after

Halloween.

But, like all good thrillers,

Krohn has something

new in mind. The people

of Mokena will just have to

wait and dream — or have

nightmares — about what’s

to come next. Unlike the

movies, this evil genius

isn’t ready to reveal his

plans just yet.

Queen Anne’s Revenge is ready to set sail in search of lost

souls to man her decks. T.J. Kremer III/22 Century Media

Mokena

From Page 30

the belief that the flu thrived

indoors, theirs were held

outside, while crowds were

kept away, before the young

women were ultimately laid

to rest in St. John’s Cemetery.

In today’s Mokena, the

Spanish Flu pandemic of

1918 is mostly forgotten.

During its time, it was a

cataclysmic event, one that

stayed in the memories of

all those who lived through

it. Our community’s experience

was but a tiny sliver in

the grander experience of

the world.


34 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger dining out

mokenamessenger.com

The Dish

Orland eatery to carve out spot for new creations

Al Sufara Grill’s

menu features

grilled Middle

Eastern classics

Amanda Stoll, Assistant Editor

With a unique menu and

a subtle blend of spices, Al

Sufara Grill offers a taste

of Middle Eastern cooking

fired up on a charcoal grill.

“When it’s grilled on

a charcoal [grill] you get

the flavor,” owner Yazan

Rashed said. “We do not use

too many spices for the food

because you have to taste the

lamb [and] you have to taste

the chicken.”

After finding success with

Al Sufara Grill in Palos

Hills, Rashed and his brothers

decided to open the Orland

Park location in July. It

is a family tradition for the

brothers, whose father and

uncle have owned the same

two restaurants in their home

country of Jordan since

1989.

A new menu, which

Rashed said will be unveiled

soon, will include more vegetarian

options and will incorporate

quinoa into some

of the menu items.

Currently, Al Sufara’s

menu focuses largely on

lamb dishes, but includes

a good number of chicken

options and a bit of seafood

as well. All the food on the

menu is halal, in keeping

with Muslim food preparation

practices.

He said terms on the menu

are sometimes misunderstood

because of how they

are used in other establishments.

For example, the

term kebab brings to mind

anything on a stick, whereas

in traditional Middle Eastern

cooking the term refers

specifically to ground meat

cooked on a large skewer

such as chicken shawarma.

Rashed said it does not

take a professional chef to

make a good meal because

the thought and effort put

into the food is the most important

part. Cooking and

creating recipes is a way

for him to share the food he

loves with other people, he

said.

“When you like the food,

you like to eat, you enjoy it,”

Rashed said. “If you don’t

like the food, you’re not

going to enjoy the way you

cook it. … Each plate is going

to have a different taste,

so you have to imagine when

you grill it [that you will]

eat it. So when you put it in

front of the customer, when

you present the dish, that’s

how you enjoy it.”

To start things off, Rashed

recommends the baba ganoush,

which is prepared

in a way unique to Al Sufara.

Chargrilled eggplant

is mixed with chopped tomatoes

and pickles and finished

off with lemon juice

and pomegranate molasses

for a twist on the traditional

recipe.

Al Sufara’s appetizer

menu also includes options

such as stuffed grape leaves

($6.99) filled with rice, garlic,

parsley, tomatoes and

a side of yogurt; falafel

($2.99/6 pieces, $5.99/12

pieces); hummus ($5.99/

small, $9.99/large); and

mixed pickles ($3.49) provide

a variety of options for

appetizers.

The restaurant’s signature

charcoal-grilled entrees

include a variety of skewers

such as the marinated,

three-skewer lamb shuqaf

($16.99), the four-skewer

chicken kebab ($14.99)

served with onions and garlic,

and the popular half

grilled chicken ($8.99). All

Al Sufara Grill

9218 W. 159th St. in

Orland Park

Hours

9 a.m.-10 p.m. Monday-

Thursday

10 a.m.- 10 p.m. Friday,

Saturday and Sunday

Phone: (708) 949-8506

Facebook: @alsufara

The half grilled chicken ($8.99) is marinated and then grilled over a charcoal grill, as are

many of Al Sufara’s menu items. Photos by Amanda Stoll/22nd Century Media

The Al Sufara Mixed Grill ($18.99) gives restaurant-goers a taste of four different skewers

including lamb shuqaf, lamb kebabs, chicken shish tawooq and chicken kebab.

entrees are served with rice,

grilled vegetables and a salad

or soup.

For those who have a hard

time deciding — or who

just want to try a bit of everything

— the signature Al

Sufara mixed grill ($18.99)

provides a taste of four different

skewers including

lamb shuqaf, lamb kebabs,

chicken shish tawooq and

chicken kebab.

The lunch special ($6.99)

provides a lighter meal option

with two skewers of

lamb and chicken kebab

served with rice and a side

salad.

Open early enough for

breakfast each day, some of

Al Sufara’s morning meal

favorites include the lamb

liver, heart, kidney and

sweet bread single skewers

($5.99 each) and the chicken

liver dish ($11.99), which

is served in a clay pot with

sliced onions and spices.

Other breakfast options

include the fattet hummus

($7.99) made with toasted

French bread mixed with

hummus and lemon, and the

tomato skillet ($7.99) made

with chopped tomatoes sauteed

with olive oil. Garlic

and jalapenos are available

upon request, or meat can be

added for $4.

Al Sufara’s children’s

menu includes the kids grill

($6.99) with one skewer of

kebab meat or chicken and

rice or fries; chicken tenders

($6.99) with fries; and

cheese sticks ($6.99).

For a little something

sweet after the meal, the

dessert menu includes warbat

($4.99/2 pieces), hareesa

($4.99/2 pieces), baklava

($4.99/2 pieces) and milk

pudding ($4.99)


mokenamessenger.com puzzles

the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 35

crosstown CROSSWORD & Sudoku

The crosstowns: Frankfort, Homer Glen, Lockport, Mokena, New Lenox, Orland Park, Tinley Park

Crossword by Myles Mellor and Cindy LaFleur

Across

1. Chicago time

4. Eggs anatomically

7. Winter wear

12. Atoll protector

14. Extended

16. Having pitch

17. Rights org.

18. Old Fords

19. Showery

20. Packed out

21. High-mindedness

23. Barn where the

KidsWork Children’s

Museum is situated

25. Mental grasp

28. Intelligence

29. Gr. 1-6

32. Links prop

33. AAA assistance

35. Gypsy Rose __

36. Tailor-made

37. Reporter’s asset

40. Clobber

42. Frito-___

43. Mud bath locale

44. Oater affirmative

45. Put on board, as cargo

47. Prepares for printing

51. Esculent

54. Is unobliged to

56. Shopping mall,

Frankfort ____

59. Narrow way

60. Pertaining to the

moon

62. Epithet

63. Lithographer (abbr.)

64. Like some cold beverages

65. Writer Wiesel

66. He played James, also

known as 007

67. Shoestrings

68. Mach 1 breaker

69. O.R. workers

Down

1. Arts and _____

2. Protected

3. Give away

4. Half of an old comedy

duo

5. Carpet colorer

6. Sidekick

7. Las Vegas area

8. Seashore

9. Gives life to

10. Managed

11. On the ___ (rapidly

without a lot of inspection)

13. Road sign requirement

15. Government security

agency, abbr.

22. Units of luminous

flow

24. Composer Janácek

26. ___ Gardens in London

27. Hallow ending

30. Bridges in movies

31. Ballad’s end?

34. The Time Machine

author

36. Wraps, in a way

37. An unenjoyable experience

38. J.F.K. regulators

39. Fencing equipment

40. Slingshot shape

41. Common contraction

46. Boredoms

48. A little more silly

49. People of the “Friendly

Islands”

50. Rears

52. Support

53. Traditions

55. Large white bird

57. Compass point

58. Misery causes

60. Internet laughter

61. One, in Mexico

How to play Sudoku

Each sudoku puzzle consists of a 9x9 grid that

has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3x3

squares. To solve the puzzle, each row, column and

box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9.

LEVEL: Medium

Sudoku by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan

answers

MOKENA

The Alley Grill and Tap House

(18700 S. Old LaGrange

Road, Mokena; (708) 478-

3610)

■9 ■ p.m. Tuesdays: Karaoke

Fox’s Restaurant and Pub

(11247 W. 187th St.,

Mokena; (708)

478-8888)

■6 ■ p.m. Thursdays,

Fridays and Saturdays:

Performance

by Jerry

Eadie

NEW LENOX

Little Joe’s Restaurant

(1300 N. Cedar Road,

New Lenox; (815) 463-

1099)

■5-8 ■ p.m. Tuesdays:

Piano Styles by

Joe

HOMER GLEN

Front Row

(14903 S. Bell Road,

Homer Glen; (708) 645-

7000)

■7 ■ p.m. Wednesdays:

Trivia

FRANKFORT

Pete Mitchell’s Bar & Grill

(21000 Frankfort Square

Road, Frankfort; (815)

464-8100)

■6-8 ■ p.m. Wednesdays:

Free N’ Fun Bar Game.

Free to play.

LOCKPORT

Port Noir

(900 S. State St., Lockport;

(815) 834-

9463)

■4-7 ■ p.m. Monday-Friday:

Happy Hour

■8-10 ■ p.m. Thursdays:

Comedy Bingo

■8-11 ■ p.m. Fridays and

Saturdays:

Live Band

■7-11 ■ p.m. Sundays:

Open Mic Night

The Outpost Pub & Grill

(14929 Archer Ave., Lockport;

(815) 836-

8893)

■8 ■ p.m. Tuesdays and

Thursdays:

Live DJ and

Karaoke

To place an event

in The Scene, email

a.stoll@22ndcenturymedia.

com.


36 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger classifieds

mokenamessenger.com

Distinctive Home Builders Introduces New Craftsman Homes

In Manhattan and Peotone – From the mid-$200’s

New designs are a result of buyer feedback

Two refreshing designs mark

the beginning of a new series

of Craftsman-style homes

available from Distinctive Home

Builders at its latest new home

communities: Prairie Trails;

located in Manhattan within the

highly-regarded Lincoln-Way

School District and at WestGate

Manor in Peotone within

the desirable Peotone School

District.

“Craftsman homes were

introduced in the early 1900s

in California with designs

based on a simpler, functional

aesthetic using a higher level

of craftsmanship and natural

materials. These homes were a

departure from homes that were

mass produced from that era,

“according to Bryan Nooner,

president of Distinctive Home

Builders.

“The Craftsman design has

made a comeback today for

many of the same reasons it

started over a century ago. Our

customers want to live in a home

that gets away from the “mass

produced” look and live in a

home that has more character. As

a result of our daily interaction

with our homeowners and their

input, we are excited to introduce

these two homes, with additional

designs in the works.”

Nooner, who meets with

each homeowner prior to

construction, has been working

on these plans for a while and felt

that the timing was ideal for the

debut. “Customers were asking

for something different and

simple with less monotony and

higher architectural standards.”

The result was the Craftsman

ranch and the Prairie twostory,

now available at Prairie

Trails and WestGate Manor.

The Craftsman ranch features

an open floor plan with Great

Room, three bedrooms, two

baths and a two-car (optional

three-car) garage. The Prairie

features a two-story foyer and

Great Room, three bedrooms

and one and one-half baths, a

convenient Flex Room space

on the main level and a two-car

(optional three-car) garage. The

Craftsman architectural elements

on both homes include brick and

stone exteriors with cedar shake

accent siding, low-pitched gabled

bracket roofs, front porches with

tapered columns and stone piers,

partially paned windows, and a

standard panel front entry door.

Distinctive Home Builders

offers a Craftsman-style trim

package offering trim without

ornate profiles and routers. The

trim features simplicity in design

with rectangles, straight lines and

layered look trims over doors for

example. The front entry door

will have the standard Craftsman

panel style door. Distinctive has

also created a Craftsman color

palate to assist buyers in making

coordinated choices for the

interior of their new Craftsman

home. Colors, cabinet styles and

flooring choices blend seamlessly

with the Craftsman trim package

and are available in gray tones

package and earth tones.

Distinctive offers custom maple

kitchen cabinets featuring solid

wood construction (no particle

board), have solid wood drawers

with dove tail joints, which is

very rare in the marketplace.

“When you buy a new home

from Distinctive, you truly are

receiving custom made cabinets

in every home we sell no matter

what the price range,” noted

Nooner.

Distinctive Home Builders

works to achieve a delivery goal

of 90 days with zero punch list

items for its homeowners. “Our

three decades building homes

provides an efficient construction

system,” said Nooner. “Many of

our skilled craftsmen have been

working with our company

for over 20 years. We also

take pride on having excellent

communicators throughout our

organization. This translates into

a positive buying and building

experience for our homeowners

and one of the highest referral

rates in the industry.”

Nooner added that all homes

are highly energy efficient. Every

home built will have upgraded

wall and ceiling insulation

values with energy efficient

windows and high efficiency

furnaces. Before homeowners

move into their new home,

Distinctive Home Builders

conducts a blower door test that

pressurizes the home to ensure

that each home passes a set of

very stringent Energy Efficiency

guidelines.

With the addition of these two

new designs, there are now 15

ranch, split-level and six twostory

single-family home styles to

choose from each offering from

three to eight different exterior

elevations at both communities.

The three- to four-bedroom

homes feature one and one-half

to two-and-one-half baths, twoto

three-car garages and a family

room, all in approximately 1,600

to over 3,000 square feet of living

space. Basements are included in

most models as well. Distinctive

also encourages customization

to make your new home truly

personalized to suit your lifestyle.

Oversize home sites; brick

exteriors on all four sides of the

first floor; custom maple cabinets;

ceramic tile or hardwood

floors in the kitchen, baths and

foyer; genuine wood trim and

doors and concrete driveways

can all be yours at Prairie

Trails and WestGate Manor.

Most all home sites at Prairie

Trails and WestGate Manor

can accommodate a three-car

garage; a very important amenity

to the Manhattan homebuyer,

said Nooner.

“When we opened Prairie

Trails and WestGate Manor we

wanted to provide the best new

home value for the dollar and

we feel with offering Premium

Standard Features that we do

just that. So why wait? This is

truly the best time to build your

dream home!”

Prairie Trails is also a beautiful

place to live and raise a family

featuring a 20-acre lake on site,

as well as direct access to the 22-

mile Wauponsee Glacial Prairie

Path that borders the community

and meanders through many

neighboring communities and

links to many other popular

trails. The Manhattan Metra

station is less than a mile away.

Besides Prairie Trails,

Distinctive Home Builders

has built homes throughout

Manhattan in the Butternut

Ridge and Leighlinbridge

developments, as well as in the

Will and south Cook county

areas over the past 30 years.

Distinctive Home Builders

chose the Will County village

of Peotone for its newest

community of 38 single-family

homes at WestGate Manor

within walking distance of the

esteemed Peotone High School.

Its convenient location between

Interstate 57 and Illinois Route

50 provide easy access to I-80

and commuters enjoy several

nearby train stations and a

35-minute drive to Chicago.

Visit the on-site sales

information center for

unadvertised specials and view

the numerous styles of homes

being offered and the available

lots. Call Lynne Rinck at (708)

737-9142 or (708) 479-7700 for

more information or visit www.

distinctivehomebuilders.com.

The Prairie Trails and WestGate

Manor new home information

center is located three miles

south of Laraway Rd. on Rt.

52. The address is 24458 S.

Rt. 52, Manhattan, IL. 60422.

Open Daily 10:00 a.m. – 5:00

p.m. Closed Wednesday and

Thursday and always available

by appointment.

Specials, prices, specifications,

standard features, model

offerings, build times and lot

availability are subject to change

without notice. Please contact

a Distinctive representative for

current pricing and complete

details.


mokenamessenger.com real estate

the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 37

The Mokena Messenger’s

Sponsored content

of the

WEEK

Aug. 13

• 11900 Golden Gate

Drive, Mokena, 60448-

2029 - William Cook

to Daniel Peterson,

$590,000

• 19422 Leetrim Court,

Mokena, 60448-1771

- Brian W. Johnson to

Daniel J. Ponzi, Rachel

Ponzi, $319,500

Aug. 14

• 19806 Wolf Road 201,

Mokena, 60448-1385

- Jill C. Hickey to Keith

Czerwiec, $150,000

• 17663 Haas Road,

Mokena, 60448-8512 -

Frank Caruso to Matthew

N. Hosteny, Laura A.

Hosteny, $475,000

Aug. 15

• 19201 104th Ave.,

Mokena, 60448-8655

- Robert M. Gallagher to

Donald W. Bettenhausen,

Susan J. Bettenhausen,

$280,000

• 19239 Crescent Drive,

Mokena, 60448-7509 -

Michael E. Montvidas to

Ryan O’Connor, $237,000

Aug. 20

• 19964 Hillgate Road,

Mokena, 60448-1400

- Doris E. Moutrey to

Theodore John Pryor,

$195,000

Aug. 21

• 19380 Wolf Road

4, Mokena, 60448-

1161 - Anna T. Lattuca

to Stephanie Parise,

$77,500

• 19457 Moher Court,

Mokena, 60448-8005

- Us Bank Na Trustee to

Michael Archbold, Jennifer

S. Archbold, $329,000

• 19615 Cambridge

Drive, Mokena, 60448-

7946 - William E.

Morrison to Penny L.

Petrulis, $193,000

• 10504 Williams Way,

Mokena, 60448-3314 -

Hugh J. Waldier to Julia

Simmons, Barbara Kay,

$358,000

• 20011 Edgewood Court,

Mokena, 60448-1428 -

Todd W. Hironimus Trust

to John Wognum, Michelle

Wognum, $290,000

Aug. 27

• 18753 Wren Circle,

Mokena, 60448-8726

- Barbara Markham to

Elwood L. Hall, Johnnie M.

Patterson, $275,000

• 19879 Lakeview Way,

Mokena, 60448-7716 -

Hoven Trust to Anne M.

Cameli, $212,500

Aug. 28

• 19247 Wolf Road,

Mokena, 60448-1049

- Denise Vandervort

to Joshua M. Blake,

$155,000

The Going Rate is provided by

Record Information Services,

Inc. For more information,

visit www.public-record.com

or call (630) 557-1000

The owner of this condo enjoyed

sitting on the screened-in balcony

overlooking the manicured

grassy courtyard. Location in

Mokena was always peaceful and

afforded close proximity to all

needs and transportation.

What: Second-floor condo in

Willow Walk

Where: 19317 Everett Lane in

Mokena

Amenities: Absolutely beautiful

second-floor condo in highly

desirable Willow Walk is move-in ready for its new owners. Many upgrades include

Anderson windows (2014), roof (2015), and laminate floors in kitchen and laundry

room (2017). As you enter, you’ll feel the elegance and notice the volume ceilings

in the living room with a cozy gas fireplace. The living room has ample space to also

accommodate your dining room furniture. The eat-in kitchen has plenty of cabinets and

counter space, and provides access to the screened-in balcony. Enjoy sitting on the

balcony overlooking a grassy courtyard watching the sun rise. Adjacent

to the kitchen is another room that can be used for entertaining family

and friends or can be used as a home office or playroom. The full-size

laundry room with utility tub leads down to

the two-car attached garage. Ideally located

near expressways, Metra train, restaurants

and shopping.

Listing Price: $174,900

Listing Agent:

Michael Bochenek,

(708) 522-5266,

mikebochsellshomes@

gmail.com

Listing Brokerage: Keller

Williams Preferred Realty,

16101 108th Ave., 2nd

Floor, Orland Park, 60467

Want to know how to become Home of the Week? Contact Tricia at (708) 326-9170 ext. 47.


38 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger classifieds

mokenamessenger.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170 | Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It | DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

Lou Malnati's Pizzeria

JOIN OUR TINLEY

PARK TEAM TODAY!

Now Hiring: Kitchen Staff,

Phone Staff, Host/Cashier

and Server

We are located at

9501 W 171st St,

Tinley Park, IL 60477

Please apply online,

in person or our hiring line

847-313-4949

Safety Assistant

Tinley Park Safety Dept.

looking for individuals for

full-time office positions.

Candidates must be proficient

with Microsoft Office and

possess good commuication

skills. Will train the right

candidates. Please forward

resume to

recruiting@shipgt. com

Orland Park law office

seeks qualified individual

for F/T or P/T. Duties

include office functions,

phone reception & filing.

Computer literacy &

keyboard efficiency a plus!

Email resume to:

mrowinski

@grottadivorcelaw.com

1003 Help Wanted

22nd Century Media seeks Inside Sales Director

Position Overview:

22nd Century Media, a media publishing company based in

Orland Park, is seeking an Inside Sales Director

to join their team.

Responsibilities Include:

Proactively prospecting and qualifying potential new advertising

accounts; handling incoming leads; identifying business

opportunities and working with decision makers to obtain

customer commitment; and achieving weekly revenue targets.

Qualifications:

Ideal candidates will possess 1–3 years of experience in

sales environment. Must have a strong work ethic and ability to

work independently as well as with a team. Excellent

communication skills, time-management and

interpersonal skills required.

Next Steps:

For more information or to be considered for this

opportunity, email a resume to:

careers@22ndcenturymedia.com

HIRE LOCALLY

Reach over 83% of prospective

employees in your area!

CALL TODAY 708-326-9170

No phone calls please. EOE

Automotive

$52 4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50 7 7 papers

lines/

Help Wanted

$13 4 lines/

per line 7 papers

Merchandise

$30 7 4 papers

lines/

ATTORNEY

Divorce litigation firm seeking

associate attorney (full-time

and/or part-time) to develop

trial skills. Must be

motivated, organized, detail

oriented and reliable.

Candidate should have 1-2

years of domestic relations

experience and excellent

computer skills (namely

proficiency in Microsoft

Word, Excel, and Timeslips).

Excellent communication and

organizational skills, as well

as ability to multitask are also

essential. This position would

be for our downtown Joliet or

our Orland Park office.

Send resume and salary

requirement to mrowinski@

grottadivorcelaw.com

Hiring Desk Clerk

(must be flexible w/ shifts)

& Housekeeping (Morning)

Needed at

Super 8 Motel

Apply within:

9485 W. 191st St, Mokena

No Phone Calls

Dog Walker needed at

Tender Lovin’ Dog

Walking in New Lenox

area. 10am-3pm, Mon-Fri.

Must be 21 yrs. & love

pets. Excellent refs req’d,

E-mail:

tenderlovin@mail.com

1003 Help

Wanted

Same Day Tees is looking for

a customer service/inside

sales person to join our team

in our new, expanded

Frankfort location. Previous

sales experience in ASI or

similar industry a plus. Ideal

candidate will work with

retail customers looking for

custom screen printed apparel

for their business, group or

organization. Strong computer

& customer service skills with

ability to multitask is

necessary. Email resume to:

pete@samedaytees.com

Sox Outlet - Register Help

Conducive to college student.

Must be over 18. $9.75/hr to

start, raise after 6 weeks.

Minimum 20 hours/week

Employee receives 15%

discount after 30 days.

Never work past 9 pm.

Apply within: 6220 W. 159th

Street, Oak Forest, IL

As we continually grow,

SW Suburban cleaning co.

has openings for

Cleaning Pros

Exp. Preferred but Will

Train. P/T Weekdays.

No Evenings/Weekends

815-464-1988

Wanted in Frankfort,

a person for making

telemarketing phone calls 1

day a week for an insurance

agency. 815-534-1140

1004 Employment

Opportunities

HELP WANTED!

Make $1000/week mailing

brochures from home!

No exp. req. Helping home

workers since 2001!

Genuine opportunity.

Start immediately!

www.WorkersNeeded.net

1023 Caregiver

Caregiver Services

Provided by

Margaret’s Agency Inc.

State Licensed & Bonded

since 1998. Providing quality

care for elderly.

Live-in/ Come & go.

708.403.8707

Heaven Sent Caregivers

Professional caregiving

service. 24 hr or hourly

services; shower or bath

visits. Licensed & bonded.

Try the best! 708.638.0641

Private Experienced Caregiver

Will care for elderly patients,

CPR Caregiver Certificate,

Background Check &

References Available. PT/FT.

(708)979-3797

1024 Senior

Companion

Senior Companion

If you need someone to run

errands, go shopping, take

to appointments or just sit

& socialize for your elderly

loved one...

Call Betty (815)545-4935

Retired RN willing to be

Senior Companion

to Elderly.

Call Barb 708-907-1489

1025 Situations

Wanted

Did you forget to pick up the

gallon of milk on the way

home? Do you need your

favorite coffee or bottle of

wine but don't have time to go

get it? We can help. No time

to bring the clothes to the

cleaners or pick up the dog's

medication from the vet? We

can help and we can also help

with raking the leaves, car

cleaning, house cleaning,

weed pulling, grass cutting,

picking up the new Christmas

tree or on-line orders, grocery

shopping, dinner deliveries,

taking pets to the pet groomer

etc. Need a party tray made

for the Sunday game?

What can we do for you?

Ask for Susan or Patrick.

708-549-5205

1027 Arts and Craft Fairs

1037 Prayer / Novena

Oh, Holy StJude, Apostle &

Martyr, great in virtue and rich

in miracle, near kinsman of Jesus

Christ, faithful intercessor

of all who invoke your special

patronage in time ofneed. To

you Ihave recourse from the

depth of my heart and humbly

beg to whom God has given

such great power to come to

my assistance. Help me in my

present and urgent petition, in

p g p ,

return, I promise tomake your

name known and cause you to

be invoked. Say three Our Fathers,

three Hail Marys and

Glories for nine consecutive

days. Publications must be

promised. St. Jude pray for us

all who invoke your aid.

Amen. This Novena has never

been known tofail, Ihave had

requests granted. S.B.


mokenamessenger.com classifieds

the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 39

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

READYTO SELL YOUR

REAL ESTATE?

CALL

Mike McCatty

mccattyrealestate.com

708-945-2121

ONE BILLION IN LOCALLY

CLOSED SALES SINCE 1999

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

Automotive

Help Wanted

Real Estate

Merchandise

per line

DEADLINE -

$52

$13

$50

$30

4 lines/

4 lines/

7 lines/

4 lines/

Friday at 3pm

7 papers

7 papers

7 papers

7 papers

LOCAL REALTOR

DIRECTORY





Sell It!

With a Classified Ad

See the Classified Section for more info, or call


Contact Classified Department

to Advertise in this Directory (708) 326.9170


40 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger classifieds

mokenamessenger.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170 | Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It | DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

Garage

Sale

1052 Garage Sale

Frankfort 9138 Arbour Walk

Dr (Mile east of LaGrange on

Rt. 30, Pheasant Run Estates)

10/12-10/13 9-3pm You want

it, we’ve got it! Loads of

Christmas decor & more!

Orland Park, 8830 Merion

Dr. Oct 12-13, 8-3p. Baby &

toddler items & much more!

Tinley Park, 9031 W. 178th

St. 10/13 & 10/14, 9-4p. Baby

&children’s clothes/toys, misc

household items!

1058 Moving Sale

Tinley Park, 6626 W. 165th

Pl. 10/13 8-2p - 10/14 8-12p.

Everything must go! Furniture

& household items!

Automotive

1074 Auto for

Sale

Toyota Camry 2013 SE Sport

V6 Loaded w/Options:

Metallic Grey, Leather Seats

$14,500 Call 219-730-3211

DRIVE CAR BUYERS

TO YOUR DOOR WITH

A CLASSIFIED AUTO AD

708.326.9170

OPEN

HOUSE

Automotive

Real Estate

OPEN HOUSE

SHOWCASE

Sun. Oct. 14th 1-4pm

7946 167th St

Tinley Park

1061 Autos Wanted

WANTED!

WE NEED CARS, TRUCKS & VANS

Running Or Not from Old to New!

Top Dollar Paid - Free Pick-Up

Locally Located

(708)205-8241

Real Estate

Corner brick bi-level. Lg. eat

in kitchen w/appls. Over looking

family rm w/ fireplace &

bar. 3 good sized BR’s, 2BA,

ceiling fans & all window

treatments. Laundry rm

washer & dryer 3 years

young. Roof, siding, windows

14 years young. Lg. fenced in

yard & easy parking side

drive leading to2car garage

with opener. $250,000’s

Anita Cirrintano, Remax 10

708-429-9818

Don’t just

list your

real estate

property...

$52

4 lines/

7 papers Help Wanted

$50

7 lines/

7 papers Merchandise

Look for

Open Houses

near you today.

Or Call to

advertise

708-326-9170

Sell It!

With a Classified Ad

$13

per line

4 lines/

7 papers

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

See the Classified Section for

more info, or call 708.326.9170

22ndCenturyMedia.com

1225 Apartments

for Rent

New Lenox

2BR furnished apartment, 2

bath, $1,750 includes appliances,

gas, water, heat, garbage

included. (Was custom

set up for annual two person

corporate rental so has basic

kitchen needs, linens, bedding

etc.) Washer and dryer available,

walk to shopping and

train. No pets, no smoking.

Rent does not include housekeeping.

ALSO,

Unfurnished, 2BR/2ba apartment

is available for $1300

per month

815-485-2528

Oak Forest Terrace

15815 Terrace, Oak Forest

Spacious 1 & 2 Bdrms.

Serene setting & Beautiful

Grounds. Tennis, Pool,

Walking Trails. Near metra.

708-687-1818

oakterrapts@att.net

1310 Offices for

Rent

The perfect downtown

location!

11225 Front St. Mokena, IL

Newly rehabbed office spaces

avail. Office spaces are flexible

for any type of business.

Includes lobby, private bathrooms,

utilities and Comcast

Internet/Wifi. Units ready to

lease Sept 1st. $299/mo total.

Julie Carnes 708-906-3301

Village Realty Inc.

Business Directory

2003 Appliance Repair

QUALITY

APPLIANCE

REPAIR, Inc.

• Air Conditioning • Furnaces

Refrigeration • Dishwashers

Stoves & Ovens • Microwaves

Garbage Disposals

Washers&Dryers

Family Owned &Operatedsince 1986

Someone you can TRUST

All work GUARANTEED

BEST price in town!

708-712-1392

2004 Asphalt Paving/Seal Coating

2006 Basement Waterproofing

Leaky Basement?

• Bowing Walls

• Concrete Raising

• Crack Raising

• Crawlspaces

• Drainage Systems

• Sump Pumps

• Window Wells

(866) 851-8822

(815) 515-0077

Family Waterproofing Solutions

famws.com

FREE

ESTIMATES


mokenamessenger.com classifieds

the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 41

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

2006 Basement Waterproofing

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

Automotive

Real Estate

$52

4 lines/

7 papers Help Wanted

$50

7 lines/

7 papers Merchandise

2011 Brick/Chimney Experts

$13

per line

4 lines/

7 papers

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

2025 Concrete Work

2007 Black Dirt/Top Soil

Sawyer

Dirt

Pulverized Black Dirt

Rough Black Dirt

Driveway Gravel

Available

For Delivery Pricing Call:

815-485-2490

www.sawyerdirt.com

Place a garage sale ad & reach

over 96,000 homes across

the southwest suburbs!

FOR $42 YOU’LL GET

ASINGLE FAMILY AD

4 LINES in 7 PAPERS

CALL THE CLASSIFIED

DEPARTMENT: 708.326.9170

With the Purchase

of a Garage Sale Ad!

2011 Brick/Chimney Experts

Gunderson

Construction,

Inc.

708 717 8228

gundersonconstructioninc.com

J’s Concrete

Stoops

Curbs

Colored & Stamped

Patios

Driveways

Walks

Garage Floors

Over 30 Years Experience!

708 663 9584

Tinley Park Company

Specializing in all types of

concrete work.

• Driveways • Patios • Color & stamped

concrete • Stair patching

• Decorative pool deck

coatings • Epoxy flooring

• Resurfacing

Family owned business

Senior & First Responders

Discount!

Advertise your

RENTAL PROPERTY

in the newspaper

people turn to first

CALL US TODAY: 708.326.9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

2032 Decking

A+

2017 Cleaning Services

FANTASTIK POLISH

CLEANING SERVICE

If you’re tired of housework

Please call us!

(708)599-5016

Frank

5th Cleaning is

FREE! Valid only one time

Free Estimates

& Bonded

Sturdy

Deck & Fence

Repair, Rebuild or

Replace

Make It Safe - Make it Sturdy

708 479 9035

HIRE LOCALLY

Reach over 83% of prospective

employees in your area!

MORTGAGE

ALERT!

LOCK-IN MORE BUSINESS.

ADVERTISE LOCALLY.

CONTACT THE CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT

708-326-9170

22ndcenturymedia.com

CALL TODAY FOR

RATES & INFORMATION

708-326-9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com


®

42 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger classifieds

mokenamessenger.com

2060 Drywall

Drywall

*Hanging *Taping

*New Homes

*Additions

*Remodeling

Call Greg At:

(815)485-3782

2080 Firewood

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170 | Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It | DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

2120 Handyman

Automotive

Real Estate

$52

4 lines/

7 papers Help Wanted

$50

7 lines/

7 papers Merchandise

$13

per line

4 lines/

7 papers

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

2070 Electrical

EXPERIENCED

ELECTRICIAN

R E A S O N A B L E

D E P E N D A B L E

SMALL JOBS

CALL ANYTIME

(708) 478-8269

2075 Fencing

2090 Flooring

Lb Hardwood Floors Inc.

FREE ESTIMATES

Specialist in Hardwood Floors

Installation - Floor Sanding

Repairs - Designs - Swedish Finish

Custom Staining & All types of Varnish clear coating

Refinishing pre-finished & unfinished hardwood floors

Same Day Re-Coat & Dustless Sanding

708-654-3935 CALL ANYTIME

lbhardwoodflooringinc@gmail.com Licensed, Bonded & Insured

...to

place

your

Classified

Ad!

2080 Firewood

2130 Heating/Cooling

2120 Handyman

708.

HANDYMAN SERVICE —WHATEVER YOU NEED

"OVER 30 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE"

Windows, Doors, Decks Kitchen & Bathroom Remodeling, Plumbing Interior and

Exterior Painting Wall Paper Removal Professional Work At Competitive Prices

326.

CALL MIKE AT 708-790-3416

9170


mokenamessenger.com classifieds

the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 43

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

Automotive

Real Estate

$52

4 lines/

7 papers Help Wanted

$50

7 lines/

7 papers Merchandise

2132 Home Improvement 2132 Home Improvement

$13

per line

4 lines/

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44 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger classifieds

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the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 45

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46 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger classifieds

mokenamessenger.com


mokenamessenger.com classifieds

the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 47

2701 Property for

Sale

2701 Property for

Sale

2701 Property for

Sale

2703 Legal

Notices

2703 Legal

Notices

2703 Legal

Notices

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact:

SHAPIRO KREISMAN AND ASSO-

CIATES, LLC.

2121 Waukegan Rd, Suite 301

Bannockburn, Illinois 60015

P: 847-770-4348

F: 847-291-3434

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE

of 11851 JOSEPHINE DRIVE, MOK-

ENA, IL 60448 (single family brick att

2 car garage). On the 1st day ofNovember,

2018 to be held at 12:00 noon, at

the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57

N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL

60432, under Case Title: DITECH FI-

NANCIAL LLC Plaintiff V. SHAWN

MDIETEL A/K/A SHAWN DIETEL

Defendant.

Case No. 17CH 2072 in the Circuit

Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit,

Will County, Illinois.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. Nojudicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights in and tothe residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County. Judgment amount is

$215,004.81 plus interest, cost and post

judgment advances, if any.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact:

PIERCE AND ASSOCIATES

1 N. Dearborn Suite 1300

Chicago, Illinois 60602

P: 312-346-9088

F:

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE

of 11620 Blackhawk Ct. Unit 2-A,

Mokena, IL 60448 (Condo/Townhouse).

On the 1st day ofNovember, 2018 to be

held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County

Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street,

Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case

Title: JPMorgan Chase Bank, National

Association Plaintiff V.John A.Nyder;

et. al. Defendant.

Case No. 18CH 0088 in the Circuit

Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit,

Will County, Illinois.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. Nojudicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights in and tothe residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact:

Codilis & Associates, P.C.

15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100

Burr Ridge, Illinois 60527

P: 630-794-5300

F: 630-794-9090

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE

of 20944 Mayfair Drive, MOKENA, IL

60448 (SINGLE FAMILY). On the 1st

day of November, 2018 to be held at

12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse

Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street,

Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case

Title: Nationstar Mortgage LLC d/b/a

Mr. Cooper Plaintiff V. ROMELL WIL-

LIAMS, JR.; LATASHIA WILLIAMS;

Defendant.

Case No. 18CH 0524 in the Circuit

Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit,

Will County, Illinois.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. Nojudicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights in and tothe residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact:

SHAPIRO KREISMAN AND ASSO-

CIATES, LLC.

2121 Waukegan Rd, Suite 301

Bannockburn, Illinois 60015

P: 847-770-4348

F: 847-291-3434

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

2703 Legal

Notices

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

STATE OF ILLINOIS )

) SS.

COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE

TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NA-

TIONAL ASSOCIATION,

Plaintiff,

vs.

ANTONIO ANAYA, REINA ANAYA

AKA RINA ANAYA and CITY OF

CHICAGO,

Defendant. No. 16 CH 1504

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE

Public notice ishereby given that pursuant

toajudgment entered in the above

cause on the 15th day of June, 2017,

MIKE KELLEY, Sheriff of Will

County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the

1st day of November, 2018 ,commencing

at 12:00 o'clock noon, at the Will

County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa

Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432,

sell at public auction tothe highest and

best bidder orbidders the following-described

real estate:

LOT 16 IN SPRING MEADOWS

UNIT 1,BEING A SUBDIVISION OF

THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF

SECTION 36 NORTH, RANGE 11,

EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL

MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE

PLAT THEREOF RECORDED OCTO-

BER 8, 1993 AS DOCUMENT

R93-87991, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLI-

NOIS

Commonly known as: 18162 Spring

Meadow Drive, Mokena,, IL 60448

Description of Improvements:

Single Family Residence

P.I.N.: 16-05-36-401-002-0000

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. Nojudicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights in and tothe residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CON-

TACT:

Heavner Beyers and Mihlar LLC

111 E. Main Street,

Decatur, Illinois 62523

P: 217-422-1719

F: 217-422-1754

Plaintiff's Attorney

MIKE KELLEY

Sheriff of Will County

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

STATE OF ILLINOIS )

) SS.

COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE

TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

Pingora Loan Servicing, LLC

Plaintiff,

vs.

JAMIE E. JACOBS; RAUL E. JA-

COBS;

Defendant. No. 17 ch 1295

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE

Public notice ishereby given that pursuant

toajudgment entered in the above

cause on the 31st day of July, 2018,

MIKE KELLEY, Sheriff of Will

County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the

18th day of October, 2018 ,commencing

at 12:00 o'clock noon, at the Will

County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa

Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432,

sell at public auction tothe highest and

best bidder orbidders the following-described

real estate:

THE EASTERLY 73.65 FEET OF THE

WESTERLY 78.65 FEET OF BLOCK

3(EXCEPT THE NORTHERLY 100

FEET THEREOF) IN DENNY'S FIRST

ADDITION TO MOKENA, A SUBDI-

VISION OF PART OFTHE WEST 1/2

OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OFSEC-

TION 8, TOWNSHIP 35 NORTH,

RANGE 12, EAST OF THE THIRD

PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORD-

ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RE-

CORDED JANUARY 12, 1854, IN

BOOK 29, PAGES 509 AND 510, IN

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS.

Commonly known as: 11020 1st

Street, MOKENA, IL 60448

Description of Improvements:

SINGLE FAMILY

P.I.N.: 19-09-08-306-010-0000

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. No judicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights inand to the residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CON-

TACT:

SHAPIRO KREISMAN AND ASSO-

CIATES, LLC.

2121 Waukegan Rd, Suite 301

Bannockburn, Illinois 60015

P: 847-770-4348

F: 847-291-3434

Plaintiff's Attorney

MIKE KELLEY

Sheriff of Will County

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

STATE OF ILLINOIS )

) SS.

COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE

TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

DITECH FINANCIAL LLC

Plaintiff,

vs.

SHAWN MDIETEL A/K/A SHAWN

DIETEL

Defendant. No. 17 CH 2072

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE

Public notice ishereby given that pursuant

toajudgment entered in the above

cause on the 26th day of June, 2018,

MIKE KELLEY, Sheriff of Will

County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the

1st day of November, 2018 ,commencing

at 12:00 o'clock noon, at the Will

County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa

Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432,

sell at public auction tothe highest and

best bidder orbidders the following-described

real estate:

LOT 140 IN ROBERT BARTLETT'S

ARBY HILLS, A SUBDIVISION OF

THE WEST 3/4 OF THE SOUTH-

WEST 1/4 OFSECTION 6, TOWN-

SHIP 35NORTH, RANGE 12, EAST

OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERID-

IAN, (EXCEPT THAT PART

THEREOF DESCRIBED BY COM-

MENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST

CORNER OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4

AND RUNNING THENCE NORTH

ON THE TOWN LINE 815.0 FEET

FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING;

THENCE CONTINUING NORTH ON

THE TOWN LINE 400.0 FEET;

THENCE EAST 500.0 FEET ON A

LINE WHICH FORM ARIGHT AN-

GLE TO SAID TOWN LINE 400.0

FEET; THENCE WEST 500.0 FEET

TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING), IN

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS.

Commonly known as: 11851 JOSE-

PHINE DRIVE, MOKENA, IL 60448

Description of Improvements:

single family brick att 2 car garage

P.I.N.: 19-09-06-306-003-0000

Terms ofSale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. No judicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights inand to the residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County. Judgment amount is

$215,004.81 plus interest, cost and post

judgment advances, if any.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CON-

TACT:

PIERCE AND ASSOCIATES

1 N. Dearborn Suite 1300

Chicago, Illinois 60602

P: 312-346-9088

F:

Plaintiff's Attorney

MIKE KELLEY

Sheriff of Will County

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

STATE OF ILLINOIS )

) SS.

COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE

TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association

Plaintiff,

vs.

John A. Nyder; et. al.

Defendant. No. 18 CH 0088

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE

Public notice ishereby given that pursuant

toajudgment entered in the above

cause onthe 25th day of July, 2018,

MIKE KELLEY, Sheriff of Will

County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the

1st day of November, 2018 ,commencing

at 12:00 o'clock noon, at the Will

County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa

Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432,

sell at public auction to the highest and


48 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger sports

mokenamessenger.com

Athlete of the Week

10 Questions

with Katie Barry

Katie Barry is a junior outside

hitter on the Lincoln-

Way Central girls volleyball

team

How’d you get started

in volleyball?

My mom kind of directed

me toward it. When we were

younger, me and my sister

would always play when we

were younger, and I kind of

kept with it. I started playing

when I was in fifth grade at

camps.

What’s your favorite

memory playing so far?

Probably winning our Oak

Lawn Invitational Tournament

[Sept. 15]. It was really

fun beating the teams. It was

just really fun.

What’s your favorite

movie?

“The Hunger Games.”

The whole series.

What’s the hardest part

of the sport for you?

Mental toughness and

staying calm during it, and

trying to win points in stressful

situations.

What’s your spirit

animal?

A golden retriever.

They’re always playful and

fun and really energetic.

What’s more fun for

you: beach or indoor

volleyball?

Definitely [indoor] volleyball.

I get to play with a

team, and I don’t really do

well with beach volleyball

because I don’t do well with

the sun.

If you could have dinner

with anyone, alive or

dead, who would it be

and why?

Probably my grandma,

who recently passed away. I

would just catch up with her

and talk with her more.

Do you have any plans

for college yet?

I’m thinking about going

to University of Wisconsin.

I’m really looking in to

their business program…

I’m hoping to [continue

playing volleyball]. I’m

Photo submitted

looking at a couple colleges

right now.

If you could have one

superpower, what

would it be?

To heal people because

I feel that it would help the

world with diseases and just

in general.

What’s a lesson from

volleyball that you’ve

been able to apply to

your life?

Just get passed what happened;

look forward to the

next point or what’s going

on with your life.

Interview conducted by T.J.

Kremer III, Editor

2703 Legal

Notices

best bidder orbidders the following-described

real estate:

UNIT 11620-2A TOGETHER WITH

ITS UNDIVIDED PERCENTAGE IN-

TEREST IN THE COMMON ELE-

MENTS INARROWHEAD CONDO-

MINIUMS OF MOKENA, AS DE-

LINEATED AND DEFINED IN THE

DECLARATION OF CONDOMIN-

IUM RECORDED AS DOCUMENT

NO. R98-144071, AS AMENDED

FROM TIME TO TIME, IN AND THE

NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SEC-

TION 18, ALL IN TOWNSHIP 35,

NORTH, RANGE 12, EAST OF THE

3RD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, IN

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS.

Commonly known as: 11620 Blackhawk

Ct. Unit 2-A, Mokena, IL 60448

Description of Improvements:

Condo/Townhouse

P.I.N.: 19-09-07-303-061-1005

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. Nojudicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights in and tothe residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CON-

TACT:

Codilis & Associates, P.C.

15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100

Burr Ridge, Illinois 60527

P: 630-794-5300

F: 630-794-9090

Plaintiff's Attorney

MIKE KELLEY

Sheriff of Will County

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

STATE OF ILLINOIS )

) SS.

COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE

TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

Nationstar Mortgage LLC d/b/a Mr.

Cooper

Plaintiff,

vs.

ROMELL WILLIAMS, JR.; LA-

TASHIA WILLIAMS;

Defendant. No. 18 CH 0524

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE

Public notice ishereby given that pursuant

toajudgment entered in the above

cause on the 29th day of May, 2018,

MIKE KELLEY, Sheriff of Will

County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the

1st day of November, 2018 ,commenc-

2703 Lega

l Notices

ing at 12:00 o'clock noon, at the Will

County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa

Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432,

sell at public auction tothe highest and

best bidder orbidders the following-described

real estate:

LOT 84 IN OLD CASTLE SOUTH, A

SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE

NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SEC-

TION 19, TOWNSHIP 35 NORTH,

RANGE 12 EAST OF THE THIRD

PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORD-

ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RE-

CORDED NOVEMBER 4, 1994, AS

DOCUMENT NO. R94-101793, IN

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS.

Commonly known as: 20944 Mayfair

Drive, MOKENA, IL 60448

Description of Improvements:

SINGLE FAMILY

P.I.N.: 19-09-19-205-019-0000

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. Nojudicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights in and tothe residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CON-

TACT:

SHAPIRO KREISMAN AND ASSO-

CIATES, LLC.

2121 Waukegan Rd, Suite 301

Bannockburn, Illinois 60015

P: 847-770-4348

F: 847-291-3434

Plaintiff's Attorney

MIKE KELLEY

Sheriff of Will County

2900

Merchandise

Under $100

15 young ladies new/used

sweaters $4 ea. Ladies long

black Winter coat w/ hood $25.

Used Petite wedding dress with

veil, cleaned $50.

708.460.8308

2 piece med oak kitchen or dining

room china cabinet. Good

condition $75. 708.645.4954

22 inch Weber grill w/ cover

$40. 20 ton floor jack, like new

$20. 1pair folding horses $8.

815.524.7133

2900

Merchandise

Under $100

7 waverly valances, yellow

with blue 72”x16” each. $10

for 1 or $60 for all.

708.478.3454

Beautiful dark wood cabinet

EC 50”H x50”W x17”D $75

obo. 708.301.3598

Black IKEA leather chair,

great condition. Call Debbie

815.534.5273 $100

Dining room orkitchen light

fixture, new in box, never installed

$65. 815.485.6008

Elvis Presley new mug $4. 10”

glass fish bowl $8. Alum jello

mold $1. Alum 12 cupcake

baking pan $2. Potted hosta

plants $4. 708.460.8308

Floral love seat and 2 wing

chairs. FREE! You pick up.

Call Tom 708.460.2472 after

10.

Free to a good home. 600 personal

recorded VHS tapes.

Lockport, 815.588.1214

Golf shoes, Foot Joy, top of the

line, like new, size 10, two

pairs. $25 each pair.

708.601.1947

Haveaheart steel squirrel, rodent

trap $20. 12x12x33”

Brand new, still in shipping

box. Lists for over $70 at

Wal-Mart. 708.866.4282

Large metal tool box 23”x25”

1 shelf, 1 door with lock

bracket $100. 708.535.9354

Never used open arm stretch

stitch sewing machine $50.

Royal portable electric tpewriter

$20. Carsons Liberty

Falls signature Christmas village

$25. 815.464.9425

Nice 54” wood desk $100.

708.460.8308

Nordic track SL710 Recumbent

exercise bike $100. Did

not see much use. Perfect

working condition. Programmable

for specialized work

outs. Built in fan. Reasonable

offers accepted. Kathy

630.257.9231

One 100 used golf balls. All

brands $25. 708.301.7645

Teal colored sofa bed $100

obo. Very good condition.

708.301.4533

Thick Halloween, new doormat

$9. Four new green wine

glasses $15. 1960’s lazy susan

revolving chrome tray w/

glasses, quality $35.

708.460.8308

Tires: 4 Champion tires

195-75-14 like new. $50 Call

Mike 815.838.2344

Twin seat stroller, red. $100.00

Like new. 312-969-0711


mokenamessenger.com sports

the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 49

This Week In...

Knights Varsity

Athletics

Football

■Oct. ■ 12 - at Sandburg, 7:30

p.m.

Girls Volleyball

■Oct. ■ 11 - hosts Thornwood

(Senior Night),

5:30 p.m.

■Oct. ■ 12 - hosts Lincoln-Way

Central Invite, 8 a.m.

■Oct. ■ 16 - at Thornridge, 5:30

p.m.

■Oct. ■ 18 - at Lincoln-Way

West, 5:30 p.m.

Boys Soccer

■Oct. ■ 16 - hosts regional

semifinal vs. Marist, 7 p.m.

Girls Tennis

■Oct. ■ 12 - at IHSA Sectional

(at Lincoln-Way East High

School), TBA

■Oct. ■ 13 - at IHSA Sectional

(at Lincoln-Way East High

School), TBA

Boys Golf

■Oct. ■ 12 - at IHSA State

Finals, Round 1 (at The Den in

Bloomington), TBA

■Oct. ■ 13 - at IHSA State

Finals, final round (at The Den

in Bloomington), TBA

Girls Golf

■Oct. ■ 12 - at IHSA State

Finals, Round 1 (at Hickory

Point Golf Club in Decatur),

TBA

■Oct. ■ 13 - at IHSA State Finals,

final round (at Hickory Point

Golf Club in Decatur), TBA

Boys Cross Country

■Oct. ■ 13 - at SWSC Meet (at

Dellwood Park in Lockport),

10:30 a.m.

Girls Cross Country

■Oct. ■ 13 - at SWSC Meet (at

Dellwood Park in Lockport),

10 a.m.

Girls Swimming and

Diving

Oct. 11 - hosts Bradley-

Bourbonnais (Senior Night),

5 p.m.

Oct. 18 - at Thornwood, 5

p.m.

Girls Volleyball

Lincoln-Way Central 25, 20,

25, Andrew 17, 25, 11

Katie Barry finished with

double-digit kills with 10

kills and added six digs. Nicole

Dvorak had seven kills

and two aces, and Nicole

Ramirez had 22 assists and

four digs in the Oct. 4 win.

Lincoln-Way Central 25, 23,

25, Bradley-Bourbonnais 20,

25, 16

Rachel Kolodziej led all

scorers with 10 kills and three

blocks. Nicole Dvorak added

five kills and three blocks.

girls golf

From Page 50

that her game is only getting

better.”

Junior Jessica Loera (82),

senior Madeline Herbert (86)

and freshman Natalie Papa

(87) also contributed for the

Griffins, who met McGivern’s

expectations.

“We’ve played a lot of these

teams and, knowing the field

well, second place was our

high school highlights

The rest of the week in high school sports

Nicole Ramirez recorded

five aces and 26 assists, and

Layne Stevens finished with

four kills, three blocks and

two aces in the Oct. 2 win.

Boys Soccer

Lincoln-Way Central 3,

Andrew 0

Breandan Brannigan,

Nick Willner and Alex Sereleas

each scored in the Oct.

2 win. Assists belonged to

Joey Rotondi and Connor

Erickson (2). Adam Kedzior

earned shutout in goal.

Girls Swimming

Lincoln-Way West 109,

goal,” McGivern said. “We’re

happy with how we played.”

McGivern knows a bigger

challenge awaits at the Hinsdale

South Sectional.

“The sectional is packed,”

she said. “It’s going to be a

battle for teams and individuals

to get out. There’s going to

be some great golf out there.”

The Griffins will be prepared

to play for the event at

Prairie Bluff in Lockport.

“The girls have played

Lincoln-Way Central 107

Cetta Senese, Madi Jager,

Keara McGowan and Mallory

Brownrigg started the Oct.

4 crosstown by winning the

200 medley relay. McGowan,

Senese, Jager and Belle Dutka

won the 400 freestyle relay.

Jager also won the 100

breaststroke. McGowan won

the 100 breaststroke and 500

freestyle. The 200 freestyle

relay team of Megan Cales,

Dutka, Sierra Maze and

Autumn Hufnagl also won.

Dutka won the 100 butterfly.

Senese won the 200 individual

medley, and Sarah Rosinski

took first in diving.

some extra rounds there,”

McGivern said. “It’s a fair

course and we’re comfortable

with it. We think it sets up

well for our game.”

White plans to go into the

sectional with a nothing-tolose

attitude.

“I just want to go play a

round and if I don’t make it

to state, it doesn’t matter,” she

said. “I’ve had a good season

overall and I’m just a freshman,

so I have a lot of time.”

Griffins’ freshman Brandon Butcher got his hole-in-one on Sept. 20 on the fourth hole from

137 yards out at Square Links Golf Course in Frankfort. Photo submitted

golf

From Page 50

“I was shocked, because

I didn’t think that was going

to happen,” she said. “I

thought I was just going to

have a tap-in birdie putt, but

it was in the hole.”

And just days before

Loera’s ace, Brandon Butcher

got in on the fun on Sept. 20.

For Loera, it was a deeper

breath, but for Butcher, it

was having his good-luck

charm by his side.

His grandfather was the

one to get Butcher started

in golf and was there to witness

Butcher’s greatest golf

memory to date.

“It’s always someone’s

dream to get a hole-in-one,”

he said. “It just felt really

special to have everyone

around and just get it done.”

Just like Loera, Butcher is

a straight-at-the-pin type of

golfer. No fade. No draw. Just

one perfect, straight shot.

From 137 yards out,

Butcher went 8-iron straight

at the flag on the fourth hole

at Square Links Golf Course.

Before his ace, his greatest

memory was winning first

place in junior golf at Lincolnshire

Country Club two

years in a row.

He said that was his greatest

memory because it was

nice to win, but he had never

done anything this “big” before.

“I was already having a

good day and after that, it

didn’t get any better or any

worse,” he said. “I just had

that confidence running

throughout. I had a great

first few holes and this sort

of boosted me up.”

And as just a freshman,

Butcher etched his name

into East’s record books,

and, well, golf’s record book

in general.

As a freshman in the golf

program, Butcher liked that

he was able to showcase his

talents.

“It feels good that the

coaches know you got a

hole-in-one and they can

expect something from you

next year,” Butcher said.


50 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger sports

mokenamessenger.com

Girls golf

Knights cruise to regional championship

Golf

Griffins sink pair of aces in same week

Lincoln-Way East

finishes second

Steve Millar, Freelance Reporter

Lincoln-Way Central’s girls golf

team is on a mission to win a state

title. The Knights’ first postseason

test was passed with flying colors.

Central posted a team score of

291 to cruise to the Class 2A Marian

Catholic Regional championship,

topping runner-up Lincoln-

Way East by 42 strokes Oct. 3

at Lincoln Oaks Golf Course in

Crete.

The Griffins (333), along with

third-place Oak Forest (393), also

advanced to the Hinsdale South

Sectional, which was scheduled to

be played Monday, Oct. 8.

“Ever since conference [when

the Knights shot an even par

288], we’ve been playing great as

a team,” Central senior Brianne

Bolden said. “Everyone’s really

bringing it and you can tell we really

want [a state title].”

Bolden fired a 3-under-par 68

to edge teammate Grace Curran

(70) for the individual title. The

Knights had the top four finishers,

with Carly Schiene (76) and Maddie

Pyle (77) following Bolden and

Curran.

Bolden, who tied for second at

state last season one stroke behind

champion Penelope Tir of New

Trier, won Wednesday despite not

feeling like she played her best.

“I know I could’ve done better,

but this gets me to the next round,”

she said. “I started off really good.

I had a strong front nine, then

the wind started picking up and I

struggled hitting greens, and the

short game wasn’t coming in for

me.

“I kept fighting, though, punching

shots into the wind. I was still

able to put up a good score.”

Bolden, a Missouri recruit, has

been anticipating this postseason

ever since coming so close to being

a state champion last year.

“I’m really excited to give it one

more run,” she said. “I know if I

play to my potential I can hang

with any of the other girls and have

Lincoln-Way Central girls golf coach Brian Shannon (left) and Caitlyn

Parrish pose at the Marian Catholic Regional Tournament in Crete.

Parrish hit a hole-in-one on the eighth hole. Photo Submitted

a good shot at it.”

Curran, the 2016 state champion,

said she and Bolden continually

bring the best out of each other.

“We’re competitive,” she said.

“We go back and forth. It’s whoever’s

got their game that day. It’s

fun, though.”

That fun extends beyond the

golf course, and Curran feels her

team’s bond is leading to success.

“Our team chemistry is through

the roof,” she said. “We love coming

to these tournaments and we

have the best time. We have a fun

time preparing for them, riding to

them, and then once we get here

we know it’s go time. We’re super

focused and ready to get the job

done.”

It’s become more than just the

Bolden and Curran show at Central.

Schiene and Pyle, both juniors,

continue to raise their games.

Even the two Central players

whose scores did not count

Wednesday, Caitlyn Parrish (82)

and Sydney Miron (83), posted

numbers good enough to finish in

the top eight.

Parrish made a hole-in-one on

the par-3 eighth hole.

“As much as they all love each

other, they’re always trying to be

the best,” Central coach Brian

Shannon said. “When you’re used

to that much competition from

your own team, the bar is set high.”

Freshman Kailey White led

Lincoln-Way East, finishing fourth

with a 78.

White said she had to shake off

some jitters.

“At first, it was really nerve

wracking, but I had to tell myself

I must be here for a reason,” she

said. “So, I just have to play my

game and not worry about anyone

else.

“My putting was pretty good.

My drives were on. It’s a good

score, so I’m happy with it.”

White, playing in her first high

school postseason event, was in the

same threesome as Curran. Playing

with a former state champion with

the season on the line may have

overwhelmed some young competitors,

but it didn’t bother White.

Instead, she shot her best score

of the season.

“She’s been playing with the

best in the state and holding her

own, keeping her composure,”

East coach Mary McGivern said.

“I couldn’t be more proud of her.

“She’s been a super consistent

performer all year and to see her

break into the 70s just solidifies

Please see gilrs golf, 49

Sean Hastings, Freelance Reporter

Just days apart, two golfers from

the same school accomplished something

that most will never. According

to golfdigest.com, the odds of an

amateur golfer getting a hole-in-one

are 12,500-1.

Now, a betting man likely isn’t

taking those odds, but if he is, a safe

bet seems to be on Lincoln-Way East

golfers: senior Jessica Loera and

freshman Brandon Butcher to be exact.

Loera always takes one deep breath

before she tees off to clear her mind.

Still searching for her first birdie of

her round, which was filled with pars,

she took a deeper breath on the 12th

hole — a 148-yard, par-3 — at Silver

Lake Country Club, in Orland Park,

after a bogey on 10 and another par

on 11.

The putter stayed in her bag this

time as she found her ball sitting at

the bottom of the cup for a hole-inone.

“I didn’t actually see the ball go in

the hole,” Loera said. “I knew it was

going to be pretty close to the hole

but I didn’t think it would be in until

after I walked away and didn’t see my

ball on the green anymore and then I

realized it was in the hole.”

To make it even more special, it

was at the Griffins’ Conference Tournament

Sept. 25.

“I was really happy when I got it

because I was playing well that day,”

Loera said. “I was on a string of pars

and getting the hole-in-one made me

more confident with my game and I

finished strong afterwards. I wanted

to play well that day because it was

a conference tournament and I had

never done so well in conference

tournament before.”

From the first tee shot of the day, to

the final putt of the round, it’s a competition

for the girls. But when something

like that happens, time freezes

for a second and everyone can enjoy

it.

Embraced with hugs and seeing the

dropped jaws as her and the opposing

players realized what just happened,

Loera couldn’t help but crack her

own smile and get a confidence boost

going forward.

She said the girls she was playing

with had never seen a hole-in-one before.

Please see golf, 49

Lincoln-Way East senior Jessica Loera dropped a hole-in-one for the Griffins

— a 148-yard par-3 at Silver Lake Country Club in Orland Park on Sept. 25.

22nd Century Media file photo


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the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 51

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52 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger sports

mokenamessenger.com

Boys golf

LW West tops Central, East in regional championship

Knights qualify five

individuals for sectional

meet

RANDY WHALEN, Freelance Reporter

Donna Thompson wasn’t going

to leave Lincoln-Way West without

putting up a couple of numbers on

the boys golf banner.

The longtime coach, who is retiring

following this school year, has

been the only boys golf coach and

also badminton coach that West

has ever had in its 10 years of being

a school.

The Warriors followed up their

first ever Red Division of the

SouthWest Suburban Conference

title the previous week by winning

the Class 3A Joliet Central Regional

on Oct. 2 at Inwood Golf Course

in Joliet.

Led by a 74 each from brothers

Collin and Zack Phelps, West

shot a 302 total to edge Lockport

Township (306) and Homewood-

Flossmoor (307) to claim its first

regional championship in program

history. Lincoln-Way Central

(309), which made it to state as a

team last year, took fourth but had

five individual qualifiers.

The Top Three teams and the

Top 10 individuals qualified for

the Edwardsville Sectional, which

was scheduled to be held on Monday,

Oct. 8, at Sunset Hills Country

Club in Edwardsville.

Providence (317), Lincoln-Way

East (327), Joliet Central (331),

Thornton Fractional South (400)

and Romeoville (428) rounded out

the nine team field.

Last year Central won a sectional

championship for the first time

since 1984 and advanced to state

for the first time in 20 years. But

some high scores down the stretch

cost the Knights in last week’s regional.

“It’s just one of those things,”

Central coach Ryan Pohlmann

said. “We knew it would be a competitive

field and we just had some

untimely high scores. We had two

or three guys get some bad scores

with some bogies on the middle

holes or so. Outside of that, we

shot well. But it’s going to make

them better in the long run.”

The Knights still had the five

guys advance to the sectional and

have an opportunity as individuals

to get to state. They are sophomore

Sean Curran (73), senior Brian

Sterling (77), freshman Juney Bai

(79), junior TJ Edmier (80), and

sophomore Nick Tingley (80). Senior

Jon Soldan (83) wasn’t far behind

for the Knights.

While Curran paced Central,

he’s the first to admit he was disappointed.

After capturing the individual

title at the SWSC Red meet

the week before, he was 4-under

par through 13 holes. Then disaster

struck.

“I had a double [bogey] on the

14th hole and a [quadruple bogey]

on the 15,” Curran said. “So

it was rough. Our goal was to win

the sectional again. Sure it’s good

to get through as an individual, but

it’s much more fun to go as a team.

That’s what brings out the energy.”

East only advanced one player

to the sectional: sophomore Matt

Kelley, who shot a 1-over-par 72

to finish a stroke behind medalist

Perry Hoag, a senior from Homewood-Flossmoor.

“Personally I think this is one of

the hardest regionals in the state,”

Kelley said. “I had an eagle, my

second of the season, on 14. I

tracked it and saw it roll right in. I

really did phenomenal off the tee.

“It’s nice to go to the sectional,

but we had Scott [Schipiour] in the

playoff and I really wanted him to

make it, too.”

Senior Zack Jurgens (85), junior

TJ DeVries (89), Jack Bertolani

(95) and Nick Meiners (96) were

the other Griffin scores.

“Our team finished up 7-6 on the

year and 2-2 in the SWSC Red,”

East coach Jim Nair said of the

season. “We had a big win against

Sandburg at Silver Lake and almost

beat H-F at Coyote Run 153-156.

Matt [Kelly] shot a 35 to help us

almost beat H-F. Two of our losses

came to Lincoln-Way West, who

Lincoln-Way Central No. 4 golfer T.J. Edmier, of Mokena, hits a short-iron shot Oct. 2 during the Joliet Central

Regional at Inwood Golf Course in Joliet. Photos by James Sanchez/22nd Century Media

Brian Sterling, of Mokena, marks his par putt after hitting a chip up close for his up and down.

is having a awesome year under

coach Thompson.

“We were very competitive and

expect to be even better next year

with Matt leading the way. Matt

coming in second at regional was

not surprising, even though there

were a ton of great kids there, because

he has been solid all year. He

is one of the most talented sophomores

in the area. It was good to

see him clicking on all aspects of

his game. He works very hard on

his game in the summer and winter

with [The Players Service].”


mokenamessenger.com sports

the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 53

Football

Knights rush for more than 300 yards in shutout

RANDY WHALEN

Freelance Reporter

The Knights look to be

playoff bound, again.

Justin Ellis ran for more

than 250 yards and the

defense posted its second

straight shutout as the

Lincoln-Way Central football

team almost assuredly

clinched its third straight

playoff appearance with a

workman like 28-0 victory

over Champaign Centennial

on Friday, Oct. 5.

The win gave the Knights

(5-2) five wins on the season

to make them playoff

eligible. With their schedule

they should certainly

have enough playoff points

to qualify for the postseason

for the third consecutive

year. That’s the longest

streak since Central qualified

for the postseason 15

straight years through 2009.

“It does feel good,” Ellis

said of likely making the

playoffs. “[Fellow senior

running back Conner] Mc-

Williams was out of the lineup,

since he’s a little banged

up. So we had to try to give

lots of guys opportunities.

We scored on four of our

[seven] possessions and had

four players score.”

Poor Heather. Not only did she pick up a loss without

her predicted team taking the field (Providence

Catholic) but she sinned on two other games and fell

from second to fifth.

Game of the Week

• Montini (7-0) at Providence (5-2)

Other Games to Watch

• Lincoln-Way Central (5-2) at Sandburg (3-4)

• Lincoln-Way East (7-0) at Thornwood (1-6)

• Andrew (6-1) at Homewood-Flossmoor (6-1)

• Lockport (0-7) at Peoria Notre Dame (4-3)

• Tinley Park (2-5) at Oak Lawn (2-5)

• Lincoln-Way West (5-2) at Stagg (2-5)

Box Score

Ellis finished with 30

carries for 251 yards and

caught the only two pass

receptions of the evening

for 26 additional yards. He

set the tone right away, capping

the Knights opening

possession by breaking out

of a pack and dashing and

darting for a 46-yard TD

with 7:57 left in the opening

quarter.

The offensive line of juniors

Rikki Dobson at left

tackle, Keith Kaminski at

left guard, Collin Bookover

at center, Jacob Leggero

at right guard and senior

Drew Parrish at right tackle

open the holes for Central’s

ground game, which totaled

over 300 yards.

“Justin ran like a man,”

1 2 3 4 f

Centennial 0 0 0 0 0

LW Central 6 6 8 8 28

TOP PERFORMERS

1. Justin Ellis (LWC) RB: 30 carries, 251 yards, 46-yard TD run;

2 receptions, 26 yards

2. Lincoln-Way Central defense: Had seven sacks of Charger

QB Dayton Coleman

3. Frank Luce (LWC) RB: 6 carries, 41 yards.

38-9

Jeff Vorva |

Sports Editor

Central coach Jeremy

Cordell said of Ellis. “He ran

hard and we played a tough,

grind out the yards game. We

came out and scored on the

opening drive. We wanted

to start fast and we did. Just

the way the game unfolded,

we ran a lot and I was happy

with the efficiency.

“Plus, a shutout on defense

for the second straight

week. It was a good effort all

the way around.”

Junior running back

Danny Reyna (5 carries,

31 yards) swept to the right

side and scored on a 13-yard

TD run on the third play of

the second quarter to cap

the Knights second drive.

But for the second straight

time the 2-point conversion

OUR STAFF’S PREDICTIONS FOR THE AREA GAMES IN WEEK 8

39-8

Joe Coughlin |

Publisher

• Montini 35, Providence 31.

Shootout but experienced visitors

have the edge.

• Lincoln-Way Central

• Lincoln-Way East

• Homewood-Flossmoor

• Notre Dame

• Tinley Park

• Lincoln-Way West

• Montini 45, Providence 21. After

being charged with a forfeit, Celtics

should be well-rested but Montini

is proving it can play with the big

boys since moving to the Catholic

League Blue.

• Lincoln-Way Central

• Lincoln-Way East

• Homewood-Flossmoor

• Notre Dame

• Oak Lawn

• Lincoln-Way West

37-10

Tom Czaja |

Contributing Editor

• Providence 24, Montini 21. Hard

to say who has the edge with the

Broncos on short rest and the Celtics

with a two-week layoff, but home

team prevails in latest marquee

matchup.

• Lincoln-Way Central

• Lincoln-Way East

• Homewood-Flossmoor

• Notre Dame

• Oak Lawn

• Lincoln-Way West

Lincoln-Way Central running back Justin Ellis goes off for 251 rushing yards against

Champaign Centennial on Friday, Oct. 5. 22nd Century Media file photo

attempt was no good, leaving

the score at 12-0. That

remained the score at halftime.

Central scored again on

its second possession of

the second half. That came

when senior quarterback

Bryce Hayes (5 carries, 7

yards; 2-of-3 passing for 26

yards) plunged in from a

37-10

James Sanchez |

Contributing editor

• Montini 28, Providence 24. Broncos

do enough to stop the Celtics’ run

game and squeak out a win.

• Lincoln-Way Central

• Lincoln-Way East

• Homewood-Flossmoor

• Notre Dame

• Oak Lawn

• Lincoln-Way West

36-11

Heather Warthen |

Chief Operating Officer

• Providence 21, Montini 20. Celtics

have their hands full but walk away

with the win.

• Lincoln-Way Central

• Lincoln-Way East

• Homewood-Flossmoor

• Notre Dame

• Tinley Park

• Lincoln-Way West

yard out with 4:42 left in the

third quarter. The 70-yard

drive was kept alive thanks

to Leggero alertly diving on

a fumble by Ellis after an

11-yard gain on the opening

play. Ellis converted the

2-point run making it 20-0.

Thanks to a big kickoff

return and a 28-yard pass,

the Chargers tried to answer

as they quickly moved

to the Central 12 yard line.

But they fumbled and junior

outside linebacker Zach Orr

recovered for the Knights.

Running back Frank Luce,

who wears No. 14, scored on

a 14-yard TD run with 2:14

to play in the game. It was

the first varsity touchdown

for the senior, who finished

with six carries for 41 yards.

The Knight defense did

the rest, sacking senior

quarterback Dayton Coleman

(12-of-23, 111 yards)

seven times for their third

shutout of the season.

Linebackers Jackson Hosman,

Aaron Marcotte, and

Jackson Poirer, along with

fellow seniors defensive

lineman Jack Roberts and

Mason Sargent, were the

main guys that wrecked

havoc on the sacks.

“Our defense is good,”

Poirer said. “From our linebackers

to our defensive

line and defensive backs,

we can bring pressure and

that’s a great thing to have.


54 | October 11, 2018 | The Mokena Messenger sports

mokenamessenger.com

Griffins continue to roll in 63-0 blowout over Lockport

Jon DePaolis

Freelance Reporter

After a win last week

that even Lincoln-Way East

coach Rob Zvonar categorized

as one of the best in

school history, it would have

been easy for the Griffins to

have a letdown in Week 7 at

Lockport.

Think again.

The Griffins scored 42

points in the game’s first

16 minutes to put the game

away early, and finished

with a 63-0 victory Friday,

Oct. 5, to improve to 7-0.

“We just challenged them

this week to make sure we

competed, regardless of the

opponent, to stay at a high

level ourselves,” Zvonar

said. “We also wanted to

get a lot of guys involved

tonight, and I think we accomplished

our goals. It was

a good week and we stayed

on a path of improvement,

and now we’ve got to do the

same thing next week.”

Zvonar said the team knew

it needed to guard against a

letdown after the 48-6 win

over Homewood-Flossmoor

in Week 6, not only for the

short-term but the long-term

growth of the team.

“You might have success

on the scoreboard certain

weeks without being your

best, but if you’re not your

best, it will end up catching

up to you,” he said. “Had we

sputtered over here tonight

or next week, we might still

get through a game with

hopefully a victory, but it

doesn’t get us to where we

need to be in Week 9 and in

the playoffs.”

Leading the way for the

Griffins in the offensive onslaught

was senior quarterback

Jack Baltz, who in just

two quarters of work went

11-for-12 passing for 249

yards and three touchdowns.

He also ran twice for 25 total

yards.

One of his most frequent

Box Score

targets was senior Jackson

Ritter, who caught five passes

for 136 total yards and all

three of Baltz’s touchdown

passes.

“We thought we could beat

them deep, and with a lot of

our [offensive] schemes, we

were able to make plays,”

Baltz said. “It was a great

job by our coaching staff and

by our receivers for getting

open.”

Baltz said the team is able

to stave off complacency or

possible letdowns by focusing

during practice on bettering

themselves.

“Not playing at some

team’s level, but playing

at the level we know we’re

capable of doing,” he said.

“Even tonight, we can probably

look at a couple of mistakes

that we had and [look

at] what we did and how we

can get better and what we

need to work on.”

East junior running back

and wide receiver AJ Henning

(3 runs, 48 yards rushing,

2 TDs, 1 reception, 48

yards receiving) and junior

running back Devon Williams

(4 runs, 32 yards rushing,

TD) also had nice nights

for the offense.

But perhaps the biggest

moment of the game also

was the last. With East’s reserves

in the game for all of

the second half, the Porters

were able to drive the field

late in the fourth quarter on

a big, 37-yard run by senior

running back Austin Hubert

1 2 3 4 f

LW East 28 21 7 7 63

Lockport 0 0 0 0 0

Top Performers

1. Jack Baltz (LWE) QB: 11-of-12 passing, 249 yards, 3 TDs; 2

carries, 25 rushing yards

2. AJ Henning (LWE) RB/WR: 3 carries, 48 rushing yards, 2

rushing TDs; 1 reception, 48 receiving yards

3. Jackson Ritter (LWE) WR: 5 receptions, 136 receiving yards,

3 TDs

to put the ball at the East

15-yard line. The Porters’

coaching staff called timeout

to stop the running clock and

set up one final play.

While the players on the

field prepared for the final

play, their teammates on the

sidelines got loud. East starters

began jumping up and

down on the sideline, some

locked arm in arm, chanting

and singing support for their

teammates.

When the ball was

snapped, backup Lockport

quarterback Bryon Mane

was tackled a few yards behind

scrimmage by a gaggle

of Griffins to end the game

and preserve the shutout —

East’s fourth in five games.

“That was a great moment

for high school athletics

and high school football,”

Zvonar said of the final play

and the excitement it created.

“That was a great decision

by [Lockport] to call

the timeout there, and if they

had punched it in, we’d have

been happy for them. But it

was fun to see the guys in a

bit of a role reversal there.

The guys were encouraging

their friends and teammates

and their brothers out there.

“That was a special moment

that we will rally around

this year. And for those 11

who were out there, to make

that stop was good, too.”

Zvonar said it was “tangible,

visible evidence that

they care for each other and

they root for each other.”

Lincoln-Way East’s Jackson Ritter runs the ball in for a TD against Lockport on Friday, Oct.

5. Ritter had five receptions for 136 yards and three TDs in the 63-0 win.

Photos by Julie McMann/22nd Century Media

The Griffins wide receiver/running back AJ Henning finds the edge behind his blockers for

a TD.

“Those guys that come out

and practice every day that

don’t get opportunities all

the time got one tonight,” he

said. “The guys that usually

start the game were [on the

sidelines] supporting them

100 percent. You can’t minimize

the psychology of the

game, either. That was a big

deal for our program and our

team tonight.”

That also is part of why the

Griffins were able to avoid a

letdown, Henning said.

“I think it’s just keeping

everybody involved,” Henning

said. “Everyone has a

role on this team, everybody

knows they are important to

this team — from Guy 1 to

Guy 100. Everyone has value

on this team, and I think

that’s a big thing with us. We

show great teamwork during

the week, and I think that

shows on Friday nights.”


mokenamessenger.com sports

the Mokena Messenger | October 11, 2018 | 55

fastbreak

HS football powerhouses LW East, Stevenson agree to games

22nd Century Media File

Photo

1st-and-3

Right on Rimkunas

sisters

1. Emma Rimkunas

(above)

The Knights junior

has reached state

the last two seasons

as a singles player,

but made the decision

to move over to

doubles to play with

her sister Kara this

season.

2. Kara Rimkunas

The freshman finally

got to play for the

Knights after having

watched her sister

from afar. She’s

already made an impact

with Emma at

doubles with a 21-6

record as of Oct. 5.

3. Playoff push

Emma will attempt

to make her third

straight trip to state

at the Lincoln-Way

East Sectional on

Saturday, Oct. 13.

Jon DePaolis, Freelance Reporter

When the going gets tough, the

tough get going.

In a landscape where top teams

are finding it difficult to schedule

nonconference games, Lincoln-Way

East and Stevenson are bucking the

trend. The programs have agreed to

play one another in Week 1 of the

2019 and 2020 seasons, with East

hosting next year and Stevenson

hosting the following year.

“I’ve known [Stevenson athletic

director] Trish Betthauser for

a while, and I’ve got great respect

for her and the athletic program up

there,” East athletic director Mark

Vander Kooi said.

Finding a team willing to play

East has been a challenge the last

few years.

“I probably sent out an email to

450 athletic directors and made

about 25 phone calls, and I got a lot

of ‘Nos,’” Vander Kooi said. “But

Trish actually called me, which was

awesome, and said they were considering

it.”

Vander Kooi said the schools

needed to go over the details, because

of legitimate travel concerns.

“Getting from Lincolnshire to

Frankfort and Frankfort to Lincolnshire

on a Friday is not always that

easy, so we talked about the logistical

details,” Vander Kooi said.

They also needed to talk to their

respective coaches. But Vander Kooi

said a few days later Betthauser

called him to let him know that Stevenson

was in.

From a big-picture perspective,

it’s getting tougher and tougher for

successful high school football programs

to find teams willing to play

them in nonconference games. Under

the current format in Illinois, if

a team wins six of its nine games, it

gets an automatic bid to the IHSA

Perennial powerhouses Lincoln-Way East and Stevenson High Schools agree to play each other in Week 1 of the

2019 and 2020 seasons. The Griffins will host Stevenson in 2019 and then make the trip to Lincolnshire in 2020.

22nd Century Media file photo

playoffs. For teams in tough conferences

the nonconference schedule

becomes more valuable.

An unintentional consequence of

that format is that teams like East

can be left scrambling to find squads

willing to risk one of those precious

nonconference wins.

In spite of those challenges — alternatively,

possibly as a result of

those challenges — East has been

able to schedule top-tier programs

for its nonconference schedule,

including Montini, Maine South,

Crete-Monee and Naperville Central.

“Every year, it’s a struggle to find

teams to play us,” Vander Kooi said.

“That’s why we have great respect

for Crete-Monee and Naperville

Central, and now for Stevenson to be

committed and willing.”

Vander Kooi admitted the six-win

automatic bid to the playoffs has

made it tough for East, but said he

knows the IHSA is looking at potential

solutions to problems such as

these.

“Do we have regions instead of

conferences?” he said. “Or do they

just set the schedule for you? Or do

more teams get into the playoffs, so

they don’t need to worry about that

nonconference game as much? I’m

open to anything at this point, because

it’s a struggle to get people to

play Lincoln-Way East.”

Ultimately, Vander Kooi thinks

scheduling teams as tough as Stevenson

gives the players something

to look forward to over the summer.

“I think it’s great for the offseason,

because it gives those kids a little bit

of motivation knowing we’re coming

out of the block playing some

tough teams,” he said. “Secondly,

I think it develops the mentality of

a playoff atmosphere — big-time

games, big-time crowds. You’ve got

to work hard to beat them, which

is always a big deal. I think those

games are really important to develop

that playoff mentality.”

It also says something about both

programs to schedule such a tough

opening week matchup.

“I think they are going to be pretty

good,” Vander Kooi said of Stevenson.

“I usually have to do some armtwisting

to get people to play us, but

they were pretty eager. We know

we’re going to be in for a battle.

They are going to be really good.

Hats off to them. They didn’t bat an

eye. They were ready to play, too, so

we’re really excited about it.”

Listen Up

“They’ve got a tight bond that’s become

unbreakable.”

Sue Schneider – Lincoln-Way Central girls tennis coach, on Emma

and Kara Rimkunas as doubles partners.

TUNE IN

Girls and boys cross country

10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 13

• Lincoln-Way West and Lincoln-Way Central will

compete in the SWSC meet at Dellwood Park

in Lockport.

Index

49 – This Week In

48 – Athlete of the Week

FASTBREAK is compiled by Editor T.J. Kremer III, tj@

mokenamessenger.com.


mokena’s Hometown Newspaper | www.mokenamessenger.com | October 11, 2018

One step closer to CLINCH

playoffs LW Central football gets its

fifth win in 28-0 shutout, Page 53

Fore, er, five

Knights boys golf send five

to sectionals, Page 52

LW East offense stays hot, defense posts fourth shutout in five games, Page 54

Lincoln-Way East’s wide receiver/running back AJ Henning quiets the Lockport crowd with a TD. The Griffins dominated the Porters in a 63-0 blowout. Julie McMann/22nd Century Media

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