SLO LIFE Magazine Oct/Nov 2018

slolife

LIFE

SLOmagazine

FLAVORS

FOR FALL

REAL ESTATE

BY THE NUMB

CENTRAL COAST

NEWS BRIEFS

STUDENT

SPOTLIGHT

TRAVEL

ABROAD

EXPLORING

RAILWAYS

VIEW FROM

THE TOP

LOCAL

BREW

BEHIND

SCENES

OCT/NOV 2018

SLOLIFEMAGAZINE.COM

MEET

JORY BRIGHAM

CARVING A NEW PATH

& BUILDING A FUTURE

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 1


We’re more than

just ink on paper.

Print Mail Apparel Design Web

2226 Beebee St, San Luis Obispo, CA 805.543.6844 prpco.com

cfd

2 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


M O D E R N • C L A S S I C • J E W E L R Y

1128 GARDEN STREET SAN LUIS OBISPO WWW.BAXTERMOERMAN.COM

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 3


Ride SLO Transit

FREE

Rideshare Week 2018

October 1 - 5 | Monday - Friday

slotransit.org

4 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 5


6 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS . LANDSCAPE CONTRACTORS

805.704.7559 License 731695

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 7


8 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


SLO’s only local

community-owned

marketplace

Helping build

healthy communities,

individuals,

& businesses

A MEMBER OWNED CO-OP WHERE ANYONE CAN SHOP

HOT SOUP

SERVED DAILY

HEALTHY FRESH LOCAL FOOD

VISIT OUR LOCATION AT:

2494 VICTORIA AVE., SLO (OFF BROAD @ CAUDILL)

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 544-7928 OR VISIT

WWW.SLONATURALFOODS.COOP

HOURS: MON.-SAT. 8:30 AM -7:30 PM & SUN. 10 AM -5 PM

WOODBRIDGE ST

BROAD ST

DOWN

TOWN SLO

VICTORIA AVE

CAUDILL ST

FRANCIS ST

FIND US ONE BLOCK EAST OF BROAD

AT CAUDILL AND VICTORIA

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 9


SLO LIFE

magazine

CONTENTS

Volume

9

Number 5

Oct/Nov 2018

42

JORY BRIGHAM

We check in with the furniture

designer to talk business and

personal success.

14

16

18

20

Publisher’s Message

Info

On the Cover

In Box

10 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018

28

30

34

Briefs

Check out the latest news highlight reel.

Timeline

We take a look at local events from the past two months.

View

After climbing a hillside overlooking the city of San Luis

Obispo, MARK NAKAMURA captured the perfect moment.


OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 11


| CONTENTS

36

38

40

52

Q&A

Ready to take the helm at Cuesta College,

incoming president JILL STEARNS shares

her thoughts about the local institution.

Now Hear This

Guided by his punk rock roots, local

winemaker and singer-songwriter

MARK ADAMS reveals how his grit,

determination, and do-it-yourself

tendencies have led to his success.

On the Rise

With a passion for performing arts,

San Luis Obispo High School senior

ELLA LIVINGSTON is well on her way

to an entertaining future.

Family

Ready for an adventure-packed day,

PADEN HUGHES hits the rails for a train

trip through the hills to Paso Robles.

64

72

Real Estate

Look no further for insight into the local housing market

as we share the year-to-date statistics of home sales

for both the City and the County of San Luis Obispo.

Health

Vaping is on the rise with flavors like cotton candy and

bubble gum marketed to a youthful audience. After

investigating the permanent risks of puffing the toxic

stuff, we here at SLO LIFE share the findings.

.

78

Taste

More than just ground-up chick peas fried and served

piping hot, JAIME LEWIS explores this popular

Mediterranean comfort food: Falafel.

54

Dwelling

We take a look at the classic charm of the

BARBIERI Craftsman home located in the

downtown Mission Garden Tract.

12 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018

86

88

92

96

Kitchen

Tapping into his wife’s Italian heritage and recipes,

CHEF JESSIE RIVAS creates his unique version of the

traditional Bolognese sauce.

Wine Notes

Exploring more than the taste of wine on its own,

ANDRIA MCGHEE steps into a tasting room to discover

how the ambiance, service, history, and food pairings

create the whole wine experience.

Brew

Beer aficionado extraordinaire BRANT MYERS serves

up a history lesson on the stories behind local breweries.

Happenings

Looking for something to do? We’ve got you covered.

Check out the calendar to discover the best events

around the Central Coast in October and November.


Singer, songwriter, producer, guitarist, and

extraordinary gentleman Damon Castillo has been

electrifying audiences with his unique blend of funk,

pop and soul for more than 20 years. Denim by H&M,

sweater by Banana Republic, Von Zipper sunglasses

from Moondoggies, and classic Puma basketball

shoes from Shoe Palace.

www.sanluisobispocollection.com

#sanluisobispocollection

Shop like a Local.

40 world-class brands in the heart of downtown San Luis Obispo.

Court Street • Monterey Street • Downtown Centre

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 13


| PUBLISHER’S MESSAGE

I was wrapping up an interview the other day when my phone vibrated. Glancing down, I could see it was my

daughter, Geneva. Her text read, “Dad come pick me up at the gym.”

Not happy to cut my conversation short, I mostly took exception to the tone of the message. There was no

“Please,” no “Thank you,” and I was right in the middle of something.

She was the only one there, and I spotted her black and yellow SLO High hoodie instantly as I rolled up to

the curb. “Sorry about that, Dad,” she said as she climbed into the car. “Geneva, what? You don’t even bother

to say, ‘Please’ anymore?” I asked.

“I’m really sorry, Dad, but my phone was running out of power; it was at 1%. See, look,” she said showing me

her phone, “it’s totally dead now—and I wanted to make sure the message went through.”

“I doubt that typing out ‘Please’ would have drained the battery,” I retorted, which was also the opening salvo

of my soapbox lecture. As I droned on about how busy my day had been, how I had to leave my interview

early, how I still had 40,000 things remaining on my to-do list, blah, blah, blah, blah.

Sometimes I even bore myself, and this was one of those times. It was almost as if I was watching the scene unfold, outside of my body from the back

seat, as I droned on with my high-and-mighty self-righteousness. That’s when it hit me. Her message was nearly identical to the one I sent to my mom

back in the day. Only it wasn’t an iPhone; it was 1-800-COLLECT.

Up to that point, to summon a ride home, there were two options and both required a payphone. Either you could drop two dimes into the slot—money

that could have been put to better use, like buying Kit Kats, or Whatchamacallits, or baseball cards—to place a call. Or, you could dial “0” and talk to the

crotchety lady on the other end of the line to make a collect call. Considering the number of rides my younger sisters and I required to all of our various

sports and activities, those expenses were stacking up. That’s when I found a workaround.

After spelling “collect” with the touch-tone keypad, a chirpy recorded voice greeted me. “Thank you for calling 1-800-COLLECT, please enter the

phone number you wish to call. Following the prompt, clearly state your name.” When the beep stopped, I rattled off as fast as I could, auctioneer-style,

into a single amalgamated word: “Mom-come-pick-me-up-at-the-gym!” Seconds later, the rotary phone framed by the floral-print wallpaper above the

kitchen table where my mom was grading English papers rang, startling her out of her flow. “Hello?” she answered.

The chirpy recorded voice stated, “This is 1-800-COLLECT. You have a collect call from,” and there was a brief pause followed by my recording, “Momcome-pick-me-up-at-the-gym!”

The voice then asked Mom if she agreed to the charges. That’s when she hung up, finished filling the essay with red ink,

and grabbed her keys.

I pulled the sweatshirt tight around my neck, doing my best to hold in my body heat, as I strained to see through the voracious Tule fog. Did she get the

message? I wondered and worried. Every car that approached, I willed to morph into our old Volkswagen van. Knowing how much the German hippie

mobile hated the cold, I whispered a prayer to myself, hoping it would start this time.

The familiar putt-putt-putt gave it away. I heard the geriatric seven-seater before I saw it. Pulling hard twice to unstick the front door, I said, “I’m sorry,

Mom. Practice got canceled.” That’s when she let me have it. “What about saying, ‘Please?’” she asked. “You know that this is my paper grading time. Do

you know how busy I am? I’ve got 40,000 things to do today.”

I don’t know where she came up with 40,000, but it was always 40,000, never 28,500 or “a ton of stuff ” or some other thing. What’s interesting to me

now is that’s exactly how much I’ve got to do in any given day, at least that is what I tell my kids—40,000.

“Mom, you don’t understand. That’s not how 1-800-COLLECT works. I’ve got to keep it super short, otherwise they will charge us for the call.”

As if behind a drum kit, she lifted her right foot at the same time pressing down her left on the clutch while dropping the shifter from third to fourth.

“Really? That’s how it works?” she wondered aloud. “Be sure to tell your sisters about it, okay.”

I would like to take this opportunity to say “thank you” to everyone who has had a hand in producing this issue of SLO LIFE Magazine and, most of all,

to our advertisers and subscribers—we couldn’t do it without you.

Live the SLO Life!

1-800-COLLECT

Tom Franciskovich

tom@slolifemagazine.com

Get the story within the story by going to GrowWithTom.com and subscribing to

Tom’s Bombs to receive the next installment called “Decomposing Room.”

14 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


TILE SHOWROOM & NATURAL STONE SLAB YARD

SHOWROOM HOURS MON-FRI 10-5, SAT 10-3 SLMARBLE.COM, 5452 ENDA RD

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 15


SLO LIFE

magazine

4251 S. HIGUERA STREET, SUITE 800, SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIFORNIA

SLOLIFEMAGAZINE.COM

info@slolifemagazine.com

(805) 543-8600 • (805) 456-1677 fax

PUBLISHER

Tom Franciskovich

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Sheryl Disher

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Paden Hughes

Dawn Janke

Jaime Lewis

Andria McGhee

Brant Myers

Jessie Rivas

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Seth Doyle

Dave Garth

Mark Nakamura

Jennifer Pallian

Vanessa Plakias

Duncan Shaffer

Talen de St. Croix

Emily Wren

CONTRIBUTIONS

Have some comments or feedback about something you’ve read here?

Or, do you have something on your mind that you think everyone should

know about? Submit your story ideas, events, recipes, and announcements

by visiting us online at slolifemagazine.com and clicking “Share Your Story” or

emailing us at info@slolifemagazine.com. Be sure to include your full name

and city for verification purposes. Contributions chosen for publication may

be edited for clarity and space limitations.

ADVERTISING

If you would like to advertise, please contact Tom Franciskovich by phone

at (805) 543-8600 or by email at tom@slolifemagazine.com or visit us

online at slolifemagazine.com/advertise and we will send you a complete

media kit along with testimonials from happy advertisers.

SUBSCRIPTIONS

Ready to live the SLO Life all year long? It’s quick and easy! Just log on to

slolifemagazine.com/subscribe. It’s just $24.95 for the year. And don’t

forget to set your friends and family up with a subscription, too. It’s the

gift that keeps on giving!

NOTE

The opinions expressed within these pages do not necessarily reflect those of

SLO LIFE Magazine. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole

or in part without the express written permission of the publisher.

CIRCULATION, COVERAGE, AND ADVERTISING RATES

Complete details regarding circulation, coverage, and advertising

rates, space, sizes and similar information are available to prospective

advertisers. Please call or email for a media kit. Closing date is 30 days

before date of issue.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

info@slolifemagazine.com

4251 S. Higuera Street, Suite 800

San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

Letters chosen for publication may be edited for clarity and space limitations.

16 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 17


| ON THE COVER

A SNEAK PEEK

BEHIND the scenes

WITH JORY BRIGHAM

“I wanted to do a little book, a catalog showing the furniture, so

we did a photo shoot at SLO High. We heard that you can turn the

lights on there at the football field, so I rounded up some friends

and we got all dressed up in ‘70s gear, drove a muscle car out there

in the middle of the night and played Ping Pong on the table I had

just built. It was hilarious.”

“My kids are 7 and 9 now,

and my dream—my dream

has always been—I’ve always

wanted my kids to grow up

in the country.”

“I’m really proud of this chair. We call it “Hank,” and it’s really

tough to make. Not a single 90-degree angle on the whole thing.”

“I remember the first time I was told

that my furniture would be featured in a

magazine, it was pretty exciting. I said,

‘Oh my gosh, get ready.’”

SLO LIFE

18 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


Because you deserve the

very best representation.

Let The Avenue guide you home.

THE AVENUE CENTRAL COAST REALTY

REAL ESTATE | IN-HOUSE MARKETING | PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

1333 JOHNSON AVE, SAN LUIS OBISPO, CA 93401 | (805) 548 2670 | THEAVENUESLO.COM

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 19


| IN BOX

Take us with you!

Hey, SLO LIFE readers: Send us your photos the next time you’re relaxing in town or traveling

far and away with your copy of the magazine. Email us at info@slolifemagazine.com

MOUNT COOK, NEW ZEALAND

NAIROBI, KENYA

THEA and COLE RAGSDALE

POVLJANA, CROATIA

RUDY and JACKIE BACHMANN with boys JUSTICE

and KENYON FAIR and nephew JOSEPH SIMARD

couldn’t pass this colorful fruit and vegetable stand

without stopping to taste the sweetest nectar only

the Motherland can provide... and, yes, it’s organic!

GRANGEVILLE, IDAHO

ETIENNE and SYBIL BRENNAN

EMMERSEN and ELAINE HILL

ALINA DZUKOLA

and JACOB DEVOR

20 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


MACHU PICCHU, PERU

ALPIGLEN, BERN, SWITZERLAND

KARA WOODRUFF and DAUGHTERS

FREDERIKSBORG CASTLE, COPENHAGEN

AUDREY, CONNIE, and CLINT PEARCE

MOROGORO, TANZANIA

BASS LAKE, CALIFORNIA

MARCIA and

BILL BESS

CHARLIE and NANCY CRANE, MIKE and JONI

STALLINGS with guide ALEX CHARLES at the

hippo pond in the Mikumi Wildlife Park.

ALBERTA, CANADA

NORA AND PIPER CULLEN

JESSE ENGLERT

We went on a two week RV trip and one of the

highlights was Lake Louise. We always travel with

SLO LIFE Magazine, waiting for the perfect

opportunity for a pic!

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 21


| IN BOX

You showed us!

PHOENIX, ARIZONA

DANUBE RIVER CRUISE

ANNIE and ALBERT YU (40 years) with

BRIAN and DEBI SCHWARTZ (23 years)

celebrated their anniversaries at the Biltmore.

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK

PATTI and JERRY HEMPENIUS

Our group, organized by Brian & Johnine Talley,

was 1/3 of the ship! We had a fabulous time visiting

Austria, Czech Republic, Slavakia, & Hungary. Cruise

began in Vienna & ended in Budapest.

NORTH LAKE TAHOE, CALIFORNIA

US OPEN, NEW YORK

JOEL and KERRY SHEETS

TONI FLEMING and BRUISER

MUNICH, GERMANY

MARY and MIKE ALLWEIN

Celebrating Lucia Landeros’ Quinceañera:

MONICA GARCIA, MARTIN LANDEROS, HALEY SARABIA,

JOSEPHINE SEPULVEDA, EMIRI SARABIA, LUCIA

LANDEROS, PABLO LANDEROS, JÜRGEN BRAUN, EVE-VA

SARABIA, ANIKA BRAUN, SANTOS SARABIA, CLARITA

LANDEROS, PANCHO LANDEROS, SIGRID BRAUN.

22 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


SCARBOROUGH, ENGLAND

TICINO, SWITZERLAND

DARIN WARD

MYKONOS, GREECE

MAX, KATHLEEN, RICK, and KAREN MUNN

This photo was taken at the Church of San Giovanni

Battista designed by Mario Botta in Mogno Village.

GARY and DARLENE TROWER,

JANICE SMITH, and

DEXTER MACWHORTER

ALBEROBELLO, ITALY

SCHILTHORN SUMMIT, SWITZERLAND

TIM, MICHELLE, HENRY, and VIOLET AURAN

BRUCE and LEE TEDONE

RICCARDO CAPELLI, and EMILY TEDONE

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 23


| IN BOX

SLO LIFE travels!

HUNTINGTON LAKE, CALIFORNIA

LEH, INDIA

ALAN LATTA, DDS and ROXANA CRESPO,

Dental Hygienist, working with the nonprofit,

Global Dental Relief, to provide dental

services to children. Leh, India is situated in

the Himalayas at 11,000 feet, and is a starting

point for many trekkers.

We enjoy SLO LIFE Magazine for its uplifting articles

on people and events in our community. Here is a

photo of AIDAN and CINDY HILL taken in the High

Sierras. China Peak is in the background.

NEW YORK, NEW YORK

ST. PETER’S BASILICA, VATICAN CITY

JOSEPHINE SEPULVEDA bringing SLO LIFE

Magazine to see the Pope at the Papal Basilica

of St. Peter in the Vatican.

MARY WESNOUSKY and CAROLYN SMITH

24 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


OB Hospitalist

Program

PROVIDING AN ADDED LAYER OF SAFETY FOR

WOMEN WHO GIVE BIRTH AT OUR HOSPITAL

You want the best care for you and your baby. And so do we. Our team of OB

Hospitalists are dedicated solely to enhancing quality of care for Sierra Vista

moms-to-be. Always on-site, our doctors will support your doctor or midwife

and your birth plan to help give you peace of mind when your baby arrives.

Elevating the Standard of Women’s

Healthcare on the Central Coast

SierraVistaRegional.com/OBHospitalist

Tour our Birth Center: (800) 483-6387

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 25


| IN BOX

Trekking with you!

GEORGETOWN, WASHINGTON, D.C.

MALLORCA, SPAIN

MACKENZIE (age 5), SARAH, and BEN HAWKINS

just reached Mile 0 after cycling 350 miles from Pittsburgh,

PA to Washington, D.C. along the historic Great Allegheny

Passage and Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Towpath trails.

LALUSH FAMILY

DANVILLE, VERMONT

CORY and LAURA HEIDEN

HAWKINS 96TH ANNUAL FAMILY REUNION

26 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018

Please send your photos and comments to info@slolifemagazine.com

Follow SLO LIFE on Facebook: Visit facebook.com/slolifemagazine

Visit us online at slolifemagazine.com

Letters may be edited for content and clarity.

To be considered for publication your letter should include your name, city, state, phone number or email address (for authentication purposes).


E X P EC EC T B E T T ERSM

ERSM

BHGREHAVEN.COM

BHGREHAVEN.COM

SAN LUIS OBISPO

2885SEECANYON.COM

SAN LUIS OBISPO

2885SEECANYON.COM

One could argue that Paradise has been discovered in this amazing See Canyon property. A rare and unique opportunity to own the property where See Canyon

Hard Cider Company was founded. Situated on just over 5 acres this amazing property features a remodeled main house with large outdoor covered patio, detached

garage

One could

with

argue

bath,

that

creek

Paradise

side bunk

has

house,

been

multiple

discovered

outdoor

in this

decks

amazing

and

See

patio

Canyon

areas with

property.

an outdoor

A rare

fireplace.

and unique

On the

opportunity

other side

to

of

own

the

the

creek

property

there is

where

the apple

See

orchard

Canyon

with

Hard

more

Cider

than

Company

250 producing

was founded.

trees,

Situated

barn with

on just

cold

over

storage

5 acres

and

this

covered

amazing

parking.

property

This

features

property

a

allows

remodeled

for an

main

additional

house

residence

with large

or

outdoor

additional

covered

farm

patio,

support

detached

bldgs.

garage

Also available

with bath,

is a

creek

part of

side

local

bunk

history

house,

in the

multiple

See Canyon

outdoor

Hard

decks

Cider

and

Company.

patio areas

Business

with an outdoor

sale information

fireplace.

available

On the other

upon

side

request.

of the creek there is the apple orchard

with more than 250 producing trees, barn with cold storage and covered parking. This property allows for an additional residence or additional farm support bldgs.

Also available is a part of local history in the See Canyon Hard Cider Company. Business sale information available upon request.

STEVEN FERRARIO, REALTOR ® , LIC. #01033421 805.215.3350

STEVEN FERRARIO, REALTOR ® , LIC. #01033421 805.215.3350

SAN LUIS OBISPO

$749,900

SAN LUIS OBISPO $859,000 SAN MIGUEL $749,900

SAN LUIS OBISPO $749,900

This classic, single level 3 bed/1 bath charmer in

SAN LUIS OBISPO $859,000

Fantastic investment opportunity or personal use.

SAN MIGUEL $749,900

Charming 2 BD/2BA 1925 farmhouse nestled just

the Sinsheimer area is in a prime location to bike, This charming duplex in the heart of downtown San minutes from town on rolling 10 acres with an

This classic, single level 3 bed/1 bath charmer in Fantastic investment opportunity or personal use. Charming 2 BD/2BA 1925 farmhouse nestled just

drive, walk or ride to schools, shopping and the Luis Obispo on San Luis Creek is in close proximity additional 10-acre parcel. Home could be used as

the Sinsheimer area is in a prime location to bike, This charming duplex in the heart of downtown San minutes from town on rolling 10 acres with an

bike path. The home features an open floor plan to your favorite restaurants and shops! This a tasting room, B&B, or residence. The wraparound

drive, walk or ride to schools, shopping and the Luis Obispo on San Luis Creek is in close proximity additional 10-acre parcel. Home could be used as

with wood floors, updated kitchen and bath, lots of property features two 550 sqft one bedroom, one porch offers panoramic city, vineyard and sunset

bike path. The home features an open floor plan to your favorite restaurants and shops! This a tasting room, B&B, or residence. The wraparound

storage and is on a large lot with drought tolerant, bathroom units in addition to a 950 sqft permitted views, a free standing wood stove to keep you cozy

with wood floors, updated kitchen and bath, lots of property features two 550 sqft one bedroom, one porch offers panoramic city, vineyard and sunset

mature landscaping yet still provides room for a bonus space on the ground level, with a 1/2 & a special dining porch to for large gatherings.

storage and is on a large lot with drought tolerant, bathroom units in addition to a 950 sqft permitted views, a free standing wood stove to keep you cozy

gardener with their own ideas. Property Website: bathroom, suitable for an office, art studio, or gym. Original barn and workshop add a rustic ambiance.

mature landscaping yet still provides room for a bonus space on the ground level, with a 1/2 & a special dining porch to for large gatherings.

1184SanCarlosDrive.com

Property Website: 507Dana.com

Property Website: 6260Independence.com

gardener with their own ideas. Property Website: bathroom, suitable for an office, art studio, or gym. Original barn and workshop add a rustic ambiance.

1184SanCarlosDrive.com

LINDA BUTLER

805.801.5914 GAVIN Property PAYNE Website: 507Dana.com805.550.3918

LINDA Property BUTLER Website: 6260Independence.com 805.801.5914

BROKER ASSOCIATE, LIC. #00597458

BROKER/OWNER, LIC. #01381849

BROKER ASSOCIATE, LIC. #00597458

LINDA BUTLER

805.801.5914 GAVIN PAYNE

805.550.3918 LINDA BUTLER

805.801.5914

BROKER ASSOCIATE, LIC. #00597458

BROKER/OWNER, LIC. #01381849

BROKER ASSOCIATE, LIC. #00597458

Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate

Haven Properties

Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate

547 Haven Marsh Properties Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

805 Main Street, Morro Bay, CA 93442

547 805.592.2050 Marsh Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

805 Main Street, Morro Bay, CA 93442

805.592.2050

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 27


| BRIEFS

13

The number of oak trees Justin Vineyards

and Winery has applied to remove as part

of its expansion of a bottling facility in

Paso Robles, which is a few thousand less

than the winery—wholly owned by The

Wonderful Co. of Beverly Hills—illegally

cut down on its Adelaida property two

years ago.

“The trampoline

didn’t bounce

like I was

expecting it to.”

San Luis Obispo firefighter Thomas

Kofron, 31, who fell during the final

round while attempting to navigate

the Jumping Spider obstacle on NBC’s

“American Ninja Warrior.”

22%

The percentage of San Luis Obispo

County residents who can afford to buy

a median priced single-family home,

currently at $618,500. The housing

affordability index reached a ten-year low

and mirrored data indicating that just

25% of California residents are able to

afford a home in the Golden State.

“Appreciate ya,

brother.”

Rapper Snoop Dogg in a shout out to Greg

Steinberger, owner of Doc Burstein’s Ice

Cream Lab, who recruited SLO Baked

Bakery to assist in the construction of a

massive, 100-inch-long ice cream sandwich

estimated to weigh 300 pounds, for an

episode of VH1’s “Martha & Snoop’s

Potluck Dinner Party.”

$410,957

The total 2017 earnings of San Luis

Obispo County employee, Dr. Daisy

Ilano, the highest-paid government

employee, who serves as Medical

Director and Psychiatrist.

“I first met met [sic]

Neal not long after

my father died…”

The first line of the classic Jack Kerouac

novel, On the Road, which was originally

written by typewriter on a single, continuous

roll of paper. The scroll was unformatted and

replete with spelling and grammar errors, just

as in the first line with the repeated use of the

word “met” in 1951. When it was published

as a book six years later, the opening line

was changed to, “I first met Dean not long

after my wife and I split up.” The original

manuscript, a 120-foot roll of paper known to

fans as “The Scroll,” was on display at the San

Luis Obispo Library this summer, as Kerouac

aficionados traded stories about the writer’s

brief stay in SLO when he worked locally in

1953 as a railroad brakeman.

345,000

The number of gallons of water it took to

refill Heart Castle’s Neptune Pool, which

had been empty for the past five years as it

underwent a $5.4 million renovation.

“My dad

always taught

me to finish

what I begin.”

Morro Bay resident Jack Smith, 61, on his

second attempt in as many years to be the

first to ride across the United States on an

electric skateboard.

8%

The City of San Luis Obispo received its

first Spotlight Award from The Institute for

Local Government for cutting its electricity

use by eight percent since 2010.

“We share the

community’s

anger, and will

continue to

work with the

city to rectify

the situation.”

Mitch Woolpert, Compass Health

spokesman, commenting on the

unauthorized teardown of Alex Bar-B-Q

in Shell Beach, originally built in the

early 1930s. SLO LIFE

28 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


T. KEITH

For Our

Neighborhoods!

Call | (805) 543–3118

Visit | GurneeForSLO.com

Email | GurneeForSLO@gmail.com

w w w.G u r n e e F o r S L o. c o m

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE |

Paid for by T. KEITH GURNEE for SLO MAYOR 2018 | FPPC # 140635829


| TIMELINE

Around the County

AUGUST ’18

8/8

The head of San Luis Obispo County’s

waste management agency, Bill Worrell,

was abruptly placed on leave after a

private investigator uncovered $445,077

in charges—taxpayer funds—that

appear to have been personal in nature.

The Integrated Waste Management

Authority (IWMA), which was formed

in 1994 under a joint agreement among

the county’s seven cities, requested

receipts and documentation from

Worrell, which he failed to provide.

Additionally, the investigator discovered

that contractors who had received

lucrative IWMA contracts had done so

without going through a competitive

bidding process. The District Attorney’s

Office is currently investigating Worrell

and, absent a felony conviction, the

now retired executive will continue to

receive his benefits.

8/22

In a major win for local policymakers, an $85 million bill intended to mitigate the short-term

effects of Diablo Canyon’s closure passed and was later signed into law by the governor. The

bipartisan bill, co-authored by Senator Bill Monning (D-Carmel) and Assemblyman Jordan

Cunningham (R-San Luis Obispo), directs the California Public Utilities Commission to

fully fund the mitigation effort as well as $350 million for employee retention and retraining.

California’s last remaining nuclear facility is scheduled to close by 2025, and is forecasted to leave

as much as a $1 billion annual shortfall to the local economy in its wake.

8/22

Following a marathon five-hour packed-house meeting, the San Luis Obispo City Council

authorized an increase of construction for buildings on upper Monterey Street up to 75 feet tall,

while the closely watched tiny house ordinance was sent back to staff for further refinement before

going up for vote. The council also approved new electric vehicle parking requirements for new

construction, as well as bicycle parking with lockers and showers, considerations for adding child

care facilities as part of a push for affordable housing, and new standards for hillside developments

that require maintaining a natural appearance.

8/18

The San Luis Obispo County Board

of Supervisors pondered the expansion

of eight large land tracts for rezoning

and future housing developments.

Although each of the locations face

significant hurdles for eventual

approval, such as water shortages and

lack of infrastructure, and unacceptable

distances from services including police

and fire stations, the county identified

the following: 1) West Paso Robles; 2)

West Templeton; 3) South Atascadero,

east of Highway 101; 4) Pozo Road

area, south of Santa Margarita; 5) Los

Osos Valley Road area, near San Luis

Obispo; 6) Edna Valley area, southeast

of the San Luis Obispo city limits; 7)

South Arroyo Grande/North Nipomo,

west of Highway 101; and Southeast

Nipomo, east of Highway 101.

8/25

A report published by the real estate website Trulia found that it costs $636 less per month for

Cal Poly students to live on campus rather than off campus. The study examined 48 universities

nationwide, and compared rents for on-campus rentals versus in-town rentals. In the city of San

Luis Obispo, the average cost for housing is $1,553 per person per month, while the rate for oncampus

housing is $917. While some Cal Poly officials have expressed a desire for housing 65%

of its students on campus as part of its new master plan, this figure contrasts sharply with the last

academic year when less than 30% of its students were housed on campus. Additionally, many city

policymakers see increased student housing as a key component toward easing San Luis Obispo’s

housing crisis, as more of the existing units in town, currently occupied by students, would become

available for permanent residents instead.

30 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


SEPTEMBER ’18

9/3

Morro Bay moved to the head of a list of potential sites for an offshore wind

farm, as the U.S. Navy entered talks with Seattle-based Trident Winds concerning

development of such a project a few miles out to sea. The site, which is considered

ideal because of its existing power infrastructure that had been mothballed with

the closure of “The Stacks,” as they are known to locals, face challenges concerning

zoning as well as objections within the fishing industry. However, the state

continues its aggressive push toward clean, renewable energy as the Assembly

recently approved a bill that would require California to generate 100% of its

electricity from renewable sources by 2045. It was reported that Trident Winds

expects to sign a memorandum of understanding with the City of Morro Bay this

fall as the first step in the process.

9/5

In a politically fraught decision, the San Luis Obispo City Council approved the

highly controversial Anholm District bike lanes. After many meetings and many

hours of debate, the council was split on the decision, 3 to 2, with Heidi Harmon

casting the deciding vote in favor of the project (Carlyn Christianson and Andy

Pease both voted “No,” while Dan Rivoire and Aaron Gomez voted “Yes”). The $3

million project put long-time residents along the Chorro Street corridor at odds

with local bicycle advocates, and clearly defined the central issue for the upcoming

election which pits the incumbent mayor, Heidi Harmon, against her challenger, an

outspoken project opponent, Keith Gurnee.

9/8

Pismo Beach Councilman and California Coastal Commissioner Erik Howell

was ordered by a judge to pay $959,307 in attorney’s fees and court costs related

to corruption charges from 2016. Howell, who was a defendant in the case along

with four others, was found to be personally liable for the judgment according to

San Diego Superior Court Judge Timothy Taylor in a 12-page ruling. Despite

the findings, Pismo Beach has failed to run a candidate against Howell, who

campaigns uncontested again this year for another term in office.

9/11

Oil companies dump money, nearly $1 million as of this

writing, into the campaign on Measure G, otherwise known

as the “fracking measure.” Vastly outspending supporters of

the legislation by a 7 to 1 clip, which would permanently

ban fracking in San Luis Obispo County, multinational

oil conglomerates from outside the area represented the

largest donors in the effort to stop the passage of Measure

G. The local, grassroots group, Coalition to Protect San

Luis Obispo County, has received far less funding and

expects the gap to widen, citing a similar vote in Monterey

County which led to oil companies spending $5 million in

opposition to their fracking ban, which ultimately passed

but remains tied up in court.

9/19

As the San Luis Obispo County Jail continued to be

among the leaders in the nation when it comes to inmate

deaths, the Board of Supervisors elected to outsource

medical care at the facility. Carty Holland, whose son,

Andrew, died at the jail last year after being placed in

a restraint chair for 46 hours, expressed his skepticism,

as he cited the need for culture change at the Sheriff ’s

Department, stating, “You have got to look at the root of

the problem.” The handoff to the private service provider is

expected to take up to six months, but will likely come at a

slightly lower cost overall. SLO LIFE

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 31


Tim & Kathleen Choal, Jen Cusack,

Tim Morrow & Michelle, Carrie Cusack

Sarah Johnson

Damon & Andrea Castillo

Cait Johnson & Céleigh Chapman

Trudie Safreno

Todd Lemay

Foundation for the Performing Arts Center

Sidecar

Loading

Dock Party

Megan Glimpse, Steffanie Medina, Craig & Skye Christakos,

Candace & Bert Forbes, Daniel Glimpse, Nelson Medina

Hundreds of arts supporters gathered

Saturday, September 22 on the loading dock

at the Performing Arts Center to support the

Foundation for the Performing Arts. Guests

were treated to delicious hor d’oeuvres and

pop up surprises. Funds raised will help

bring 12,000 students to the PAC next year

to experience live performances for free.

For more information visit fpacslo.org

Photo credit to Heraldo Family Photo

32 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018

Renee Periat & Lea Brandy


Gary Hale & Terri Kahn

Janet Windman & Jill Anderson

Leann Standish, Courtney Meznarich & Adam Montiel

Cooper Hawes &

Kiko Chicas Aleman

Cliff & Lynette Branch

Tricia Kobielusz & Lindsey Miller

Sandy Dunn, Erin Steed, Leann Standish, Kathy Coull, Martha Kettelkamp

Drew Silvaggio & Kevin Harris

Johnny Chavez & Jeff Al-Mashat

Ben and Pat McAdams & Dr. Minke WinklerPrins

Warren Baker

Ty & Trudie Safreno

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 33

Kristin Hoover


| VIEW

MOOD

LIGHTING

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK NAKAMURA

After 32 years in the classroom, Mark Nakamura knows how

quickly the mood can change: mostly it depends on how near

or far it is until recess. Movement, light, fresh air—those are the

ingredients for happiness. That much he understands.

It was a breezy afternoon, not long ago, when Nakamura and

the family who had hired him to do their portraits trudged

their way up the Tower Trail from San Luis Obispo High

School to the top of the hill behind it. The sky was filled with

wispy, stringy clouds just like the teacher/photographer liked it.

He knew it would lead to something good, but it did not matter

because everyone was having fun and the weight of his Canon

5D Mark IV never felt heavy over his shoulder, more like

another appendage, familiar, a pendulum swaying with his gait.

The photo shoot went well, just as they always did after a long

walk. But, as he clicked away, zeroing the viewfinder on his

happy clients, he became distracted by the scene unfurling itself

on his starboard side: a young couple bidding the day farewell.

Excusing himself for a second, he whirled around and caught

it. At the precise moment the girl’s smile widened to its apex

reflecting back the radiance she was spying from a distant star

falling slow motion into the ocean, he pressed the button. Click.

One moment—a mood—was forever frozen in time and space,

for better or worse, a man-made digital dimension.

When Nakamura booted up his computer back home that

night, he realized he had it. Fussing around with Photoshop

was minimal, some adjustments were made, little tweaks here

and there, but mostly it was preserved how he remembered

seeing it with his own eyes. And the composition reminded

him of his work as a wedding photographer, which he did on

the side throughout his teaching career, sometimes shooting as

many as 50 or 60 weddings per year. There was just a moment—

you may now kiss the bride—and that was it. The trick was

to be there, with the right light, prepared to capture it, the

memory, the mood. It was all so fleeting. It always is. SLO LIFE

34 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 35


| Q&A

HOMECOMING

This summer, JILL STEARNS took over the top job at Cuesta College,

which was a homecoming of sorts. She had met and married her husband

while they were students at Cal Poly, and he returned to the area three

years ago to become the head of IT for the community college, which

meant a lot of long weekend commutes. With deep roots in the area—their

two sons are also Cal Poly graduates—the family has been reunited for

good. We sat down one recent afternoon to talk about everything from

assembling the perfect floral arrangement to how not to make money in

the gas station business. Here is some of what she had to say…

Tell us, Jill, where are you from originally?

I am from Avenal. It’s a small town in the

Valley, about 5,000 people. There were 63 kids

in my graduating class, and 15 of us had been

together since preschool. I played everything

growing up. Actually, I broke my leg playing

football when I was in sixth grade. I played

a lot of volleyball and tennis. I was also in

the band. Music has always been a big deal

for me. My parents were both educators. My

mom was a counselor at the high school.

My father was a counselor at the elementary

school, but he taught kindergarten for eight

years in his journey.

So, what brought you here? I came to Cal

Poly where I met my husband, Keith. We

got married in college, and lived in San Luis

Obispo. We’ve lived in Atascadero. And

we’ve lived in Paso Robles. Keith worked

at Diablo Canyon for a couple of years in

the late ‘80s. When we left, it was to raise

our boys in Avenal close to family. And we

always had the desire to come back. And,

as it turns out, our oldest son got married

in January, and he and his wife own a home

in Oceano, and he works in San Luis. So,

it’s nice that not only Keith and I are in the

same household, but also that our son and

daughter-in-law are close. Our other son is

in Fresno, so he’s not too far away.

What was small town life like? For 60 years,

my family has owned a gift and floral shop in

Avenal. I’m actually an FTD Master Florist.

We did lots of weddings, lots of events. And,

after graduating from Cal Poly, I managed

that business for ten years while my boys were

little. I worked with them in my backpack;

had a playpen set up. It was ideal because both

sides of my grandparents were still living, so

they’d come down to the shop during the day

and push the stroller, go for a walk. After that,

I landed a teaching job at the high school,

which I did for four years. It was there that I

started building websites to provide practice

space for my math students online. This was

all while we were building a gas station.

Wait, what? Gas station? I often say that

I am a recovering entrepreneur. I had this

idea that I was going to own gas stations;

that was what I was going to do. But life

sometimes has a different path for you. And

this was one of those opportunities. We had

some real challenges with construction. We

did get it built. It’s the Chevron there, and

it has a convenience store and carwash. But

I couldn’t be there full time, and I needed to

be doing something else. I found my path

when I went to work at West Hills College

in Coalinga. They were looking for someone

with experience in Distance Education. So,

I started doing faculty training to develop

and teach online courses. I did that for four

years, then I stepped into administration. So,

it was twelve years in all at West Hills, then

I served six years as president of Modesto

Junior College.

What is your take on Cuesta College so

far? I would say that we are really a college

that is in transition. One of the things that

has been really exciting during the monthand-a-half

that I have been here is how

open the community has been to helping me

understand the kinds of partnerships that

are already in place, and where public and

private are working together around major

issues like the closure of Diablo Canyon. It’s

been fantastic to have so many people willing

to help me onboard and understand where

some of the big community-based challenges

lie. And, of course, my predecessor, Gil Stork,

has been very helpful. He left quite a legacy,

51 years at Cuesta, which is just incredible.

I don’t think I’ll be here quite that long. The

math doesn’t work out. [laughter] SLO LIFE

36 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


I said we

had time for a

short ride.

I heard

“short bride.”

What did you hear?

Helping you, your children and grandchildren since 1978

Call us today

for your consultation

805 541-1790

www.KarenScottAudiology.com

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 37


| NOW HEAR THIS

MARK ADAMS

Local singer-songwriter MARK ADAMS learned early on in his career how to do things on a

budget. During the several years he was in Hollywood working at indie film companies like Troma

Entertainment, Adams says, “I was in boot camp for the ‘Do It Your Damn Self’ approach to art, which

taught me to understand that you can produce tons of stuff without much money.”

BY DAWN JANKE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY EMILY WREN

38 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


Mark Adams’s albums are available at Boo Boo Records on vinyl and CD.

long with those independent film companies,

Mark Adams credits the punk rock ideals

of his youth as influential to his DIY way

of being in the world—a modus operandi

he applies to both his music and the wine

he makes for the small but successful Ledge

AVineyards. In both, he also honors history and

tradition: Adams’s music, for example, cites anything from lead singer

Jello Biafra, of the punk band Dead Kennedys, to the “Master of the

Telecaster,” blues guitarist Albert Collins.

Adams, a San Luis Obispo County native, started playing music at a

young age. He credits his mom, a second grade school teacher, with

having instruments lying around the house—piano, guitar, and various

others—on which he’d tinker. Adams then participated in the grade

school band and continued on to jazz band in high school, while shifting

his personal musical focus to folk and indie rock; writing songs for fun

and playing drums outside of school with a couple of buddies.

After high school, Adams left Templeton and played in a local band

up north while majoring in Cinema Studies at Chico State. He then

headed down to Los Angeles, where he got involved with low budget,

independent film companies, and performed with a band called Rancho

Deluxe. Over the course of five years, Rancho Deluxe released three

albums and enjoyed widespread success with several songs featured on

the Sirius XM Outlaw Country radio station, as well as song placement

in television shows, and a few European tours.

It seemed as if Adams was living the dream when he finally landed a

sounds effects editing position at Sony Pictures, but all the while the

Central Coast called. “Ultimately, I wanted to get something going with

the family ranch my parents bought back in the ‘70s in prime westside

wine country in Templeton,” says Adams.

In 2005, Adams returned to Templeton and started Ledge Vineyards

on the Adams ranch. “At first, I thought I might do walnuts or fruit

trees because I didn’t want to be a copycat and get into winemaking like

everyone else,” Adams explains, “but my longtime friend Justin Smith,

who owns Saxum Vineyards in Paso, suggested a small vineyard.” In

exchange for a job at Saxum, Adams gained invaluable winemaking

advice from Smith, and his cult winery was born.

Eventually, Adams was able to quit his editing gig at Sony, and he and

his wife, a singer for the Los Angeles Opera who holds a doctorate in

classical music from UCLA, permanently relocated to their Templeton

ranch. “We dropped out of the real world little by little,” Adams says,

“but the music always continued.” In fact, Adams has recorded more

than seven albums since starting the vineyard over ten years ago. “The

schedule is writing and recording from January through the summer

months,” he says, “and I always seem to be finishing an album during

harvest, which, I guess, is a harvest in its own right.”

Adams’s most recent album, Switcheroo, was recorded down in Los

Angeles with session musicians with whom he became friends during

his tenure in Hollywood, including backup singer Leslie Stevens, who

has also performed with Father John Misty and Brian Wilson; bass player

Gregory Boaz, who was one of Dave Alvin’s Guilty Men for a number of

years; and drummer Jim Doyle, who has played with Jackson Browne.

The first release from the album, “Where is My Town,” is in heavy rotation

on local radio stations The Krush and KCBX. Adams describes the song

as one with visceral, angry nostalgia for the time when a town was smaller,

with stop signs instead of stop lights. According to Adams, “The song

was intended to be about Everytown USA and certainly not intended to

be about Templeton, but surely there are long-time residents of San Luis

Obispo County who can relate to its sentiment.”

Speaking of nostalgia for what once was, Adams talks briefly about Live

Oak Music Festival, which recently announced a new Central Coast

location for 2019: “For a lot of people, it will be sad to see that campground

go, but the reason for moving has noble intentions,” he says. “It’ll now be

closer to home, and there are a lot of positives about the relocation.”

This past June, Adams and his band performed at the festival, his third time

on a Live Oak stage. “My wife and I have attended the festival for eight

years now, and I was happy to be included on this year’s roster. It’s always a

privilege to work with KCBX; their staff is wonderful.”

With harvest season upon him now, Adams will be busy in the

vineyard, so he anticipates the release of his next full-length album to

be sometime in 2019. The album has already been recorded at Painted

Sky Studios in Cambria, and according to Adams, what remains is the

tidying up of the production, or the “sprinkling on of the fairy dust” as

he calls it.

The upcoming release features talented local musicians Daryl Vandruff on

drums, Bob Hamilton on pedal steel guitar, and Paul Lewolt on bass. The

quartet has been performing live together for a while now, and Adams is

excited because the music “directly reflects the laid back SLO lifestyle.” He

depicts the sound on the upcoming album as “high lonesome” with themes

of staunch independence, thoughtful self-exploration, and a time “when

the air smelled more like straw and cow dung and less like grape vines and

capitalism. There is a ‘60s inspired instrumental

trip-out jam called ‘West Coast Fog’ inspired by

a radio show by the same name,” he shares, “and a

really chill ballad called ‘Doves,’ a musical imprint

of growing up on the Central Coast.”

“In a nutshell,” explains Adams, “my musical

sound is an Americana-rock hybrid. We play

old school country and blues, we’re heavily

influenced by the Byrds, and I always have a

Jello Biafra punk element to what I do.” He

continues, “I guess I always have some axe

to grind, be it outrage at what’s happening

politically, or something about love, but, mainly,

I just want people to make music a real part of

their lives.” SLO LIFE

DAWN JANKE, Director,

University Writing & Rhetoric

Center Cal Poly, keeps her

finger on the pulse of the

Central Coast music scene.

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 39


| ON THE RISE

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

Ella Livingston

Sixteen-year-old San Luis Obispo High

School senior ELLA LIVINGSTON is

counting the days before heading off

to the bright lights of New York.

What sort of extracurricular activities are you involved in? I’ve

been very involved in both the theatre program and choir program

since middle school, and I joined the high school film production

club in my sophomore year.

What are your interests? I’m the co-president of the school’s Drama

Club, and president of the Film Production Club. I also really enjoy

performing and entertaining, and find almost every form of the

entertainment business to be very interesting.

What’s going on with you now? I’m getting ready to direct one of

my first musicals at school with auditions coming up in a few weeks.

I’m also working on getting college scholarships, and setting up a

great year for both drama and film club.

What career do you see yourself in someday? I see myself

somewhere in the entertainment business. I have been interested by

many of forms of the business ever since I was little. Writing songs

when I was little, singing, acting, performing, working behind the

scenes, and filming. I love it all.

What has influenced you? I was born and raised in Ireland, and we

moved to America in 2013 and that really has helped me to mature

and grow, and turn me into the person I am today.

What are you looking forward to this year? We have a good set

of shows that we are doing this year with the SLOHS Drama

Department, and film ideas with the Film Production Club, which

I’m both excited for. I’m also really excited to start college.

If you could go back in history and meet anyone, who would it be?

Although it is not that far back in history, I would love to be able to

meet Ella Fitzgerald. My parents named me after her and we share

a birthday. I think it would be so cool to sing with her, or to just talk

about her profession.

What schools are you considering for college? I actually got

early acceptance into the American Musical and Dramatic

Academy last April, and I committed there right after summer

ended. So I’m heading to New York City for college! SLO LIFE

Know a student On the Rise?

Introduce us at slolifemagazine.com/share

40 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


Call Today

and mention

SLO LIFE for your

FREE one hour

consultation!

Your Local College Planner!

Helping Students Plan &

Prepare for College

Offering PSAT, SAT, ACT test prep , student

positioning, career planning, and guidance

throughout the entire application process.

NOW enrolling for your Junior and Senior year!

Local, Ethical & Accountable

805.440.4178 | EliteCPP.com


Speak Your Best!

with Deborah Lee

Coaching

professionals

and other

leaders

to educate,

motivate, and

inspire

their audiences

for over

20 years.

Keynotes . Signature Talks . Presentations

TED Talks . Videos . Storytelling . Motivational Speaking

Webinars/Teleseminars . Workshops & More

805-994-9977 | SPEAKYOURBEST.COM

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 41


| MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR

42 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


TRIAL AND

ERROR

A few years ago, around the time Central Coast furniture maker JORY BRIGHAM

won a reality TV show called “Framework,” he started wondering how life

might be different if he was not paying so much rent. Between the shop he was

leasing in San Luis Obispo and his family’s home in Los Osos, the monthly tab

was bumping up against $5,000. And considering how many hours he was

working, wouldn’t it be nice to have a shop at home? Besting the other top-tier

woodworkers on cable television netted a cool $100,000 plus another $20,000

in gift certificates at ACE Hardware, not to mention a deal with Crate

& Barrel. That was about the time he stumbled upon an ad for a 13-acre

property tucked away in the remote hills at the top corner of San Luis Obispo

County. The shop there seemed to be sent from the heavens above, and now

serves as the headquarters for a once a month two-and-a-half day intensive

woodworking course, where enthusiasts from all over the country show up to

learn the tricks of the trade as his kids and his wife, and their 25 chickens, all

pitch in to make the family business a success. Here is his story…

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 43


44 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


et’s take it from the top, Jory. Where

are you from? Yeah. I was born in

Los Olivos. I was born at home, I was

homeschooled, all that. We moved to

Hawaii when I was about a year old.

We lived there until I was 16. Then my

parents decided to move to Pennsylvania,

which was a complete culture shock. My Lsisters were older than me and already out of school, so I was the only one

that had to go along with them. They moved to Pennsylvania because they

just loved adventure. They’d never been there in their life. My mom loves

the season changes, the trees turning different colors. So they decided to

sell everything and ship whatever was left to Pennsylvania. They’d never

been there before. We flew in. We rented a car and just drove around until

they found some place they wanted to live.

Where did you end up? It was Doylestown, which is a tiny little town

about 30 miles north of Philadelphia. Up until that time, I had been

homeschooled. Now I was in public school. I got out of there as quick

as I could; graduated early. Went back to Hawaii. Stayed there for a year,

and then moved to California when I was almost 19. At the time, I didn’t

really know what I wanted to do. I grew up working in construction and

carpentry. My dad went to Cal Poly for architecture. And he went almost

all the way through before dropping out; he decided he didn’t want to be

sitting at a desk. He always had that; he was always into design, for sure.

And so, when I was a kid, I helped him build our house from the ground

up. I mentioned that I was homeschooled, but I just drove my mom nuts.

She’d tell my dad, “Take him to work.”

Why didn’t you stay in Hawaii? Everything is centered around the tourist

industry in Hawaii. I worked at a restaurant and a surf shop, but if you

have any aspirations to do anything else, you should get out of there. I

went to Cuesta for maybe a semester. I’m not cut out for school. I just

don’t have the patience. So I started working with my uncle, who builds

reclaimed furniture. I had this idea for a piece and I asked him if I could

build it. I told him I’d do it on my own time and we could split the profit.

Looking back on it now, it wasn’t very good. It was sort of a mix between

a credenza and a dresser. It was decent though; it had this curved front, it

was bowed. So I bent the wood and spent a lot of time getting it just the

way I had envisioned. At the time, he had some retailers he worked with

up north and I remember driving up with him to Carmel. The store was

called the Carmel Bay Company. We walked up to it and my piece was in

the front window. I was so stoked. I’ll never forget that feeling.

Did the piece sell? It did. It actually sold in just a few days, so I said,

“Hey, do you want to do another?” It started like that. I was hooked. I

loved designing. I loved just coming up with a design idea, and then

making it come to life. When you do that, and build it with your own

hands, and then someone likes it, it’s just so cool. The whole thing for me

is it’s such an honor when someone likes it, wants it in their house. That’s

a very intimate, personal thing. You’re like, “Hey, this stuff is growing up

with them. They’re going to have it their whole life.” And I love to think

about how, back in the day, people would invest in a piece of furniture.

And it wasn’t cheap. They would buy furniture that was expensive, but they

would buy it with the intention of handing it down to their children. And

it meant a lot to them. It was a family heirloom. We’ve gotten so far away

from that. Now it’s like, “Well, it’s cheap. We’ll toss it when it breaks or

when we don’t like it anymore.”

What do you remember about your move to the Central Coast.

I remember building a compost toilet. [laughter] And I didn’t have a

shower, so I would hose off. Basically, I was living in the shop where I

worked. I would come to San Luis on the weekends. I had friends here,

but mostly I would just work. I still do. I work really long hours: 12, 15,

16 hours a day. Last week, I put in one 19-hour day and one 20-hour

day. I get so excited when I’m doing something that I just can’t wait to

see this thing come to life. It gives me energy. Ever since I was a little

kid, I would just skip meals. I wouldn’t get hungry; I was just completely

focused. I don’t sketch my designs on paper first; they’re all in my head

and that makes it really exciting, but also scary because, at a certain

point, you can go too far. The security of having a rendering on paper

gives you a pretty good idea for how it’s going to turn out. But when you

don’t have that, you don’t know how it will come together until you’re

done with it sometimes.

I bet that approach keeps you on your toes. The weird thing is that my

wife tells me I do this almost every time with every single project. I get

to this point where I start panicking. I can’t sleep and I’m like, “Oh, man.

I’ve done it this time.” Invariably she goes, “You say that every time.” And

I’ll say, “No, this time I’ve done it. I don’t know how to come back from

this. There’s something off and I’m staring at it, and I don’t know what it

is. There’s something that is missing, and I can’t figure it out.” And she’ll

come to the shop and look at it and say, “It looks fine.” And I’ll say, “No,

something’s off.” So, I think what happens when I’m like, “Something’s off,

something’s off,” is I’m in this kind of like half-anxiety, half-excitement,

and half-panic state during the process. At that point, that’s when time

kind of disappears. And I’m like, “I can’t sleep, so I might as well just do

this.” Because I’ll just be laying in bed there thinking about how I screwed

this thing up.

How are you able to put in so many hours? I mean, I have two kids now,

seven and nine years old. But now we live on this property, which was

always my dream to have my shop at the house. It changes everything

because I’m able to eat at least two meals with the family and hang out

every night. Then, when the kids are asleep, I go right back out there. I

really wanted my kids to grow up in the country. To me that was success.

That was my goal. I had been renting a shop in San Luis; it was big,

about 3,000 square feet, and I was getting a really good deal. I was only

paying $1,800 a month, which was great. But, when you combine that

with what we were paying to rent our house in Los Osos, it was $4,500

a month. That’s almost five grand a month just on rent. So, we started

looking around for some land where we could have our house and a

shop, but everything is just so expensive. So we started looking further

and further out.

How far out? I stopped for lunch in Paso one day flipping through one

of those real estate magazines, and I found an ad for 13 acres way up by

San Miguel. It had a whole bunch of pictures of a crappy double wide

with one shot of this amazing shop. So, I drove out there, down all these

dirt roads to find it. Then I pull up to this shop and my mouth just drops.

It’s on top of a hill. It was the most beautiful shop I had ever seen in my

life. It overlooks the surrounding vineyards; doors that open all the way

up, a wraparound redwood deck. I said to my wife, “You’ve got to check it

out.” She’s like, “That place is way too far; it’s in the sticks.” I did not want

to push it at all because I knew she would resent me forever if I did, so I

just kept quiet. She sort of walked around, taking it in, and then said, “For

some reason I feel at peace here.”>>

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 45


So, how’s country living? Someday, my dream is to build a house there,

something other than the double wide. But now, actually starting a

couple of years ago, we host woodworking classes there at the property.

I do it twelve times a year, once a month, Friday through Sunday. It’s

kind of set up for intermediate woodworkers, people who know a little

bit but want to advance. During our weekend together they’ll build

a piece of furniture with me at the shop and take it home with them.

There are twelve people in each class, so it’s small and we all get to know

each other. It’s a lot of fun. We all pitch in to make it happen. My wife

cooks the meals; I’ll barbecue. My kids help out. There’s something

about that experience. People come and they’re like, “You know, this is

kind of cool.” I’ve had so many students tell me, “Man, I’m re-thinking

my whole way of living right now.” They’ll mostly stay in Paso at a hotel

or something, but we’re looking into building some cabins, maybe like

those tent cabins in Yosemite where we would also do an Airbnb thing

on the side, too.

Sounds like a nice business way out there “in the sticks.” So, what

I realized, you know, is that I’m really bad at business. And it’s hard

to make money in woodworking. I’m just running around like crazy,

trying to find time for everything. I’m hoping this will help me stop

working as many hours as I do. Right now we’re just trying to save.

Working hard and trying to save. And I’m building furniture mostly

for designers and architects. I don’t know how word gets out. They did

recently feature the Ping Pong table I designed and built in Vanity Fair.

And, a couple of years ago, I did hire a publicist. It was a huge jump

for us. But I realized that it just didn’t feel right, like it wasn’t what

we were supposed to be doing. And, as soon we stopped trying to

attract publicity, stuff started happening. My wife and I decided to

hit the brakes. We said, “Hey, let’s just slow grow it, you know? We’re

fine. We’re as busy as we want to be.” And when it comes down to it,

honestly, I don’t want to have a whole bunch of guys working for me.

That sounds like a nightmare; I’d be managing people. I don’t want to

do that. So, let’s just figure out ways to do what we’re doing, and keep

it in the family. And then we’re happy.

Expand on that idea, if you would. You start it. You decide to do

it. Then you work really hard trying to figure out how to make it

happen. You commit to it. No matter what, you are going to find a

way. Then you can see how you can make a living doing it. And, no

matter what you do, you go into it knowing that it’s not a sure bet.

A lot of things are going to come up. But you have to be open to it, >>

46 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018



It was great working with Graham. He did an outstanding job helping us sell our rental home. He

went the extra mile and was there for all the inspections, cleaning, and misc times needed to

facilitate the showing and sale of the property. Graham came highly recommended to us and I

would highly recommend him to others.

graham @ ccreslo.com

805.459.1865 | CalBRE #01873454

www.ccreslo.com

3196 South Higuera Suite D, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

– Tim & Donna Brown, Sunnyvale


EST. 1999

Drought-Tolerant, Lifestyle Landscapes

Hand Laid Natural Stonework

Design . Build . Maintain

805.927.0374 . ecotoneslandscapes.com . LIC # 767033

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 47


and figure stuff out as you go along. And then doors start to open

up at some point, and now it becomes this huge thing with a life of

its own, which is something I could have never foreseen, never have

imagined. But, when you are committed to doing what you love, stuff

We’re so stuck on this how-do-you-make-money thing.

Instead, do what you love to do.

Let’s talk about that and everything will follow.

just happens. And I really do think that humans are capable of so

much more than they know. We, as a society, we work nine to five,

and then we do this, we do that. Then we take a vacation and do it

all over again. And it’s fine. But I think when you really want to do

something, if you’re willing to push it, we can do so much more.

How do we teach that idea to our young people? We need to be

cultivating these things in our kids at an early age. If the parents can’t do

it, which for some reason seems like it’s a problem, then teachers need

to say, “Hey, what do you love to do?” We’re so stuck on this how-doyou-make-money

thing. Instead, do what you love to do. Let’s talk about

that and everything will follow. Not first how to make money; that’s all

backwards. Find out what you think you might want. You don’t have to

commit to it. You don’t have to go to college and say, “I want to do this.”

We have to teach our kids to ask themselves, “What do I want to do?”

>>

48 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 49


And then search for the answer. You see it so often where kids go off

to college and end up in some major after never doing any exploring.

They get a whole bunch of time and money invested into it and they

say, “Well, I guess I have to do this,” when it is not even something

they love to do. They might be screwed at an early age, as opposed

to some kid in Europe where they really push apprenticeships. They

may say, “You have an idea. Why don’t you go try it out for a year.” I

actually have some apprentices at the shop myself, but I kind of stick

to the Europeans, truthfully, because they have a better work ethic

than the kids here.

What does the future hold? So, my wife gets a little overwhelmed

because I’m always like, “Hey, let’s do this, let’s do that.” And I start

this, and start that, and it’s all fun for me, but it gives her anxiety. You

know, the woodworking courses are good because it’s cool to see people

just get so stoked on stuff. We have a lot of students who have day jobs,

and they’re off working a ton of hours in an office somewhere and then

they come out here and find that woodworking is so simple. But so

often they want to complicate it. They want rules. But there are no rules

to this. Woodworking has no rules. Design has no rules. It’s not, “You

can’t do this; you can’t do that.” It’s kind of cool to help free that up in

people. That’s the idea. So, we’re always evolving. We have no idea what

we’re doing. You know, it’s amazing how much we don’t know about

what we’re doing. But, you just wing it—it’s all trial and error. SLO LIFE

50 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


New Patient Special $99

Exam, X-Rays & Standard Cleaning

D I S B E L M A N S I L L A , D D S

ALEJANDRO ECHEVERRY, D D S

1551 Bishop Street

Suite D-420

San Luis Obispo

805.547.7010

slodentalpractice.com

facebook.com/slodental

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 51


| FAMILY

TRAVEL

BY TRAIN

BY PADEN HUGHES

Earlier this year, we moved into

a small Victorian home in

the Historic Railroad District

of San Luis Obispo. As you

might expect, we’ve become

fascinated with the history of

the neighborhood and, of course, charmed by the

humming of the train station nearby. With an

18-month-old daughter, who is obsessed with

trains, this fascination was compounded.

It is not unusual now to have her come running

into the room shouting “choo choo” and pointing

expectantly to the door. We head outside and

walk up to the train station to cheer, wave, and

take in the scene.

The significance of the train station to our

community is not lost on us, as we’ve since gone

to the Railroad Museum many times with our

future little conductor.

It’s hard to imagine San Luis Obispo once

being a small farming community cursed by its

geographic isolation. While the first local rail

line came in 1876, the Pacific Coast Railway—

connecting San Luis Obispo to Avila, and later

Los Olivos—was small compared to the promise

of the big Southern Pacific Railroad. Locals

dreamt of connecting Los Angeles and San

Francisco through the Central Coast. They could

almost taste it when in 1886 the Southern Pacific

Railroad reached King City. Then, in 1889 they

connected the rail all the way to Santa Margarita,

but that is where it stopped. With the rail line

only 16 miles away, locals fought to bring the

railroad giant into town. It comes as no surprise

that the biggest barrier was the Cuesta Grade.

The Southern Pacific Railroad put the power in

the hands of the citizens of San Luis Obispo to

get the necessary right-of-way. So our locals did

just that and proudly welcomed the first steam

engine on May 5, 1894 when it cruised into the

San Luis Obispo station. It resulted in a

three day celebration.

The city has grown considerably and is now

the economic hub for the region. And it

all started right outside my front door at

the train station. Recently, after months of

running out front to admire the train, we

decided to board for a ride from San Luis

Obispo to Paso Robles.

The journey was a big hit for all. Not only

did it deliver on our wishes to see parts of

the county we hadn’t yet seen, but it also

offered stunning views. Our daughter,

Kennedy, was thrilled the entire trip. She was

mesmerized by passing through the tunnels.

And, seeing her reflection in the window was

a big hit. My husband and I were intrigued

to take in the Grade from a completely

different vantage point and enjoyed the

back country behind Highway 101. It was a

unique, not often seen perspective, of North

County. Our hour-long trip was the perfect

amount of time to feel like an adventure

without it monopolizing the whole day.

There’s something

romantic about

riding the rails.

It offers an

amazing view

and is incredibly

monumental to

this place we

call home. The

experience felt like

going back in time,

and it was certainly

something we will

look forward to

doing again. SLO LIFE

PADEN HUGHES is

co-owner of Gymnazo

and enjoys exploring

the Central Coast.

52 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


Elder Placements realizes the

IMPORTANCE of listening to the

client, in order to find the appropriate:

Independent Living

Assisted Living

Alzheimer’s & Dementia Care Homes

Let their experienced Certified Senior

Advisors take you on a tour to find the

Retirement Home or Community that

fits your loved ones Medical, Financial

and Social needs, at NO Cost to you.

Nicole Pazdan, CSA,

Contact us today for FREE placement assistance.

(805) 546-8777

elderplacementprofessionals.com

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 53


| DWELLING

MISSION

54 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


BELLS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVE GARTH

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 55


I

n July of 1976, Ron Barbieri declared his

independence.

Fresh out of dental school—Georgetown in

Washington, D.C.—the newly minted dentist had

resolved himself to find a small town to plant roots, to

move away from his native Bay Area where things had

gotten too busy, too crowded. He was searching for a certain quality of life.

He wanted to know his community, his neighbors. That’s when he found

San Luis Obispo.

There was a tiny dental practice coming available, and Barbieri did not

hesitate. Something about the Central Coast felt right, as if he was being

called to it. He could almost hear it. One thing led to another, and soon >>

56 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


PASO ROBLES SAN LUIS OBISPO SLO SLEEP & COMFORT SANTA MARIA

2361 THEATRE DR

122 CROSS ST

189 CROSS ST

1158 W BETTERAVIA RD

805 238-6020

805 543-6600

805 269-6600

805 348-1000

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE |

APPLIANCE CENTER SLEEP CENTER OUTDOOR LIVING KITCHEN DESIGN

57


the young dentist was hunched over the open mouths

of locals needing bridges and crowns and root canals.

Before long, Barbieri became an integral component of

his adopted hometown.

Not far away, a chef, Leo Logsond, was wedging

himself into his car—again. The restaurant in Santa

Barbara was waiting, but it was becoming increasingly

difficult to escape the gravity of his beloved Craftsman.

He built it in 1924 and had been its only resident to

that point, but his back ached now, and the commute

was no longer complying with his creaking bones.

By the time he slipped into old age, the once proud

home had fallen into disrepair. That was about the

time—1995—that longtime locals, Vic and Randi

Montgomery stepped in. Not only did they clean it up,

they also expanded, adding a two-car garage with an

in-law apartment above. >>

58 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 59


Life marched forward, as it always does. A few years

later, Barbieri and his wife, Maureen, and son bought

the property with an eye toward how they could

put their own stamp on it, while also preserving its

heritage. Their plans were extensive and would take

years to execute. The footprint was expanded with an

addition in 1998 and an entirely new floor, a second

story, was constructed seven years later. Landscaping

was reimagined to include an intimate seating area,

perfect for quiet conversation around an outdoor

fireplace, followed by a dip in the spa. For good

measure, a Koi pond was also included.

Through it all, the Barbieris were careful to maintain

the classic elements and stylings of Craftsman

architecture: a low-pitched gable roof, broad eaves,

a large and expansive front porch, and a whole

lot of exposed wooden beams. Fittingly, this style,

Craftsman, was a product of the Arts and Crafts

movement of the 19th Century and is also sometimes

referred to as Mission style. An apt description, as the

Barbieri home is located in San Luis Obispo’s Mission

Garden Tract, and its property line at the end of the

backyard demarcates the very spot where the rock wall

once stood protecting Mission de Tolosa’s garden from

the hungry critters wandering down from Cerro San

Luis above. >>

60 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


ARCHITECTURE

LANDSCAPE

INTERIORS

New Brisco Road development in Arroyo Grande.

GIVE BACK

“We make a living by what we get.

We make a life by what we give.”

-WINSTON S. CHURCHILL

Will Ruoff collaborating with Julia Ogden, CEO of Habitat

for Humanity San Luis Obispo County.

One of our firm’s core values is to GIVE BACK. To

this end, we are committed to building community

through pro-bono and discounted fees for non-profit

organizations. We are currently working with Habitat

for Humanity of San Luis Obispo County on eight new

single-family homes on Brisco Road in Arroyo Grande.

This net-zero project will be built with significant

volunteer hours as well as the sweat equity of the new

homeowners. To learn more about our local Habitat

Chapter see their website at www.hfhsloco.org.

TENOVERSTUDIO.COM

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 61


As of last year, 41 years after his declaration, the

dentist called it a career. The work is physical, more so

than many imagine, and Barbieri’s neck and shoulders

were objecting. But, before he turned off the lights,

he did something that occupies much of his thinking

today. It was five years before his retirement when he

sat down with Dr. Ahmad Nooristani, the founder of

the SLO Noor Foundation, an organization with the

tagline: “Free healthcare for the uninsured.” While the

non-profit had been making significant headway in the

community with its SLO Noor Clinic, there was an overwhelming need for dental services.

The longer the two talked, the more they appreciated one another, and in no time plans for a

dental clinic were hatched.

As an administrator, Barbieri found his place once again. Recruiting dentists, pushing the

papers that must be pushed, and adding his energy to the cause is where his passion lies today.

It’s not any different than when he first came to town, really; just a different time. And the

passing of time is something that Barbieri knows well. His neighbor—Mission de Tolosa—just

a stone’s throw from the back fence, and approaching 250 years old, will not let him forget as

the daily chorus of its iron bells call out for all to hear. SLO LIFE

62 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


+

OUTDOOR MOVIE NIGHTS ARE BACK!

Join us for one or all of our Cinema

Evenings focusing on environmental

awareness and community health!

CLB #940512 C27 #996677

RAINWATER HARVESTING

A TRADITION OF

TRUST

ON THE CENTRAL COAST

3 BED • 2 BATH • 2070 SQ FT • ATASCADERO RETREAT $690,000

TIM COWAN

REALTOR ® LIC#02021716

805.459.3818

Tim@BHGREHaven.com

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 63


| SLO CITY

REAL ESTATE

BY THE NUMBERS

laguna

lake

tank

farm

cal poly

area

country

club

down

town

foothill

blvd

johnson

ave

2017

Total Homes Sold

45

Average Asking Price

$691,184

Average Selling Price

$681,838

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price 98.65%

Average # of Days on the Market 23

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

2017

19

$801,094

$793,574

99.06%

23

2017

23

$808,604

$797,043

98.57%

30

2017

12

$1,182,317

$1,132,779

95.81%

57

2017

63

$694,703

$686,978

98.89%

48

2017

39

$718,061

$707,055

98.47%

27

2017

39

$769,397

$768,551

99.89%

33

2018

34

$848,481

$836,503

98.59%

34

2018

13

$850,677

$845,094

99.34%

31

2018

19

$1,020,874

$984,552

96.44%

23

2018

15

$1,097,414

$1,214,458

110.67%

68

2018

42

$914,545

$903,982

98.84%

58

2018

31

$905,787

$898,343

99.18%

28

2018

36

$891,415

$884,484

99.22%

36

+/-

-24.44%

22.76%

22.68%

-0.06%

47.83%

+/-

-31.58%

6.19%

6.49%

0.28%

34.78%

+/-

-17.39%

26.25%

23.53%

-2.13%

-23.33%

+/-

25.00%

-7.18%

7.21%

14.86%

19.30%

+/-

-33.33%

31.65%

31.59%

-0.05%

20.83%

+/-

-20.51%

26.14%

27.05%

0.71%

3.70%

+/-

-7.69%

15.86%

15.08%

-0.67%

9.09%

*Comparing 01/01/17 - 09/20/17 to 01/01/18 - 09/20/18

SOURCE: San Luis Obispo Association of REALTORS ®

SLO LIFE

64 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


Help Us End Hunger In

San Luis Obispo County

Please join in helping RPM Mortgage and the Food Bank Coalition of San Luis Obispo

County in their efforts to end hunger. RPM will donate $100 for every loan closed

by the San Luis Obispo and Atascadero branches beginning Hunger Awareness Day,

June 1st, 2018 through June 1st 2019 with a goal of raising $25,000.

Donna Lewis

Branch Manager/Senior Loan Advisor

NMLS #245945

805.235.0463

donnalewis@rpm-mtg.com

www.rpm-mtg.com/dlewis

Ken Neate

Loan Advisor

NMLS# 373607

925.963.1015

kneate@rpm-mtg.com

www.rpm-mtg.com/kneate

Dylan Morrow

Loan Advisor

NMLS #1461481

805.550.9742

dmorrow@rpm-mtg.com

www.rpm-mtg.com/dmorrow

Valerie Gonzales

Loan Advisor

NMLS# 1082998

805.550.4325

vgonzales@rpm-mtg.com

www.rpm-mtg.com/vgonzales

1065 Higuera Street, Suite 100, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

5805 Capistrano Avenue, Suite A, Atascadero, CA 93422

LendUS, LLC dba RPM Mortgage NMLS #1938 - Licensed by the Department of Business Oversight under the CA Residential Mortgage

Lending Act. | 11365 | Equal Housing Opportunity.

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 65


It’s here.

A low down payment loan program

for doctors, nurses, attorneys, CPAs,

dentists, veterinarians, and pilots.*

• No mortgage insurance

• No down payment on loans to

$850,000

• Low down payment on loans up

to $1.5M

• Purchase and rate/term refinance

for primary residence

| SLO COUNTY

REAL ESTATE

REGION

Arroyo Grande

BY THE NUMBERS

NUMBER OF

HOMES SOLD

2017

235

2018

238

AVERAGE DAYS

ON MARKET

2017

58

2018

51

MEDIAN SELLING

PRICE

2017

$764,235

2018

$766,500

Contact me today to learn more.

Atascadero

290

270

54

45

$547,575

$577,987

Avila Beach

12

9

86

56

$1,099,140 $1,295,564

Cambria/San Simeon

112

126

79

74

$713,593

$736,430

Cayucos

46

39

118

91

$1,052,354 $1,129,936

Creston

11

10

95

153

$813,718

$949,100

Grover Beach

137

91

43

48

$518,625

$534,681

Ben Lerner

Mortgage Advisor

NMLS 395723

805.441.9486

blerner@opesadvisors.com

1212 Marsh St., Suite 1

San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

Los Osos

Morro Bay

Nipomo

Oceano

88

105

180

36

126

105

228

30

31

64

57

51

35

58

51

58

$590,639

$692,600

$632,441

$448,444

$639,443

$727,372

$670,296

$500,233

Pismo Beach

98

115

50

78

$1,079,618

$970,132

Paso (Inside City Limits)

349

296

42

34

$482,639

$502,298

Paso (North 46 - East 101)

37

43

47

50

$472,253

$513,502

Paso (North 46 - West 101)

72

87

96

82

$496,566

$643,960

Paso (South 46 - East 101)

41

30

67

70

$663,082

$806,550

© 2018 Opes Advisors, A Division of Flagstar Bank

Member FDIC | Equal Housing Lender

San Luis Obispo

264

244

35

40

$760,536

$937,932

* Borrower must open a checking or savings account with Flagstar to participate. Eligible borrowers

include: a Medical Resident (with educational license), Doctor of Medicine (MD), Doctor of

Dental Surgery (DDS), Doctor of Dental Medicine or Surgeon (DMD), Doctor of Optometry (OD),

Doctor of Ophthalmology (MD), Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO), Doctor of Podiatric Medicine

(DPM), Nurse Anesthetist, Nurse Practitioner, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Attorney, Certified

Public Accountant (CPA), Veterinarian, and ATP (Airline Transport Pilot). With an adjustable-rate

mortgage (ARM), your 5/1 loan will have an initial fixed-rate period of 60 months and your 7/1

loan will have an initial fixed-rate period of 84 months.

After the fixed rate period, your interest rate will adjust up or down according to market rates at

the time of the reset. Rate is variable after the fixed-rate period and subject to change once every

year for the remaining life of the loan.

This is not a commitment to lend. Programs available to qualified borrowers. Subject to credit

approval, underwriting approval and lender terms and conditions. Programs subject to change

without 66 notice. | Primary SLO residence LIFE only. MAGAZINE Restrictions may apply. | OCT/NOV 2018

Santa Margarita

Templeton

Countywide

15

84

2,155

15

93

2,094

*Comparing 01/01/17 - 09/20/17 to 01/01/18 - 09/20/18

35 95 $405,933 $424,600

70 81 $741,762 $789,403

54 53 $656,726 $695,580

SOURCE: San Luis Obispo Association of REALTORS ®

SLO LIFE


At Semmes & Co. Builders,

we are guided by environment.

As pioneering green builders on California’s Central Coast,

we believe in building responsible, healthy and inspiring

living spaces – just as we’ve done since 1978.

PRICE ADJUSTMENT!

Well maintained property with views of seven sisters and Laguna

Lake. Wood burning fireplaces in both family and living rooms. Large

four bedroom three bath home of 2475 Sq ft. on a huge lot of 9380

sq.ft. Competivly priced at $839,000.00. Please contact Jason Vork

805-440-4593, or jasonvork@gmail.com for a personal showing.

FEATURED PROPERTY:

Modern Farm House, Arroyo Grande

CA LICENSE #962529

Jason Vork

DRE 01031282

805-440-4593

visit us on HOUZZ

Semmes Homes: Built with purpose.

ph 805·466·6737 · fx 805·466·6739 · semmesco.com

7900 El Camino Real, Atascadero, California 93422

A strong voice for putting people

and the environment first.

“Change is important, and it is constant. But in democracy--in our

City--how we change is up to us. How we change matters. It matters

to people, and to the environment and to this place we call home.

My vision for San Luis Obispo includes an engaged community

working together with a commitment to long-term social, economic

and environmental sustainability, where transparency is valued

and a broad array of perspectives are considered.”

HOW WE CHANGE MATTERS.

www.sarahflickinger.com

Paid for by Flickinger for Council 2018, FPPC ID # 1406806

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 67


SPONSORED

GARDEN STREET

GOLDSMITHS

In the wee hours of the morning, it must have been

a sight to see a toddler riding a 5,000-pound safe

being pushed down the middle of Higuera Street.

After opening their first downtown SLO location,

The Najahe Inc. in the 1970s, Richard and Laurel

Stephens were now expanding to their second

location in the Barrett Block building across from

Hanna’s Hardware on Garden Street. Little did they

know at the time that Garden Street Goldsmiths

was destined to become a multi-generational

mainstay for more than four decades.

Richard and Laurel’s daughter, Amanda Stephens,

had a natural talent and vision for the complex

engineering and manufacture of heirloom quality

jewelry. Being a designer and a bench jeweler

herself, Amanda took the reins in 2000 and has

been GSG’s leader ever since.

Old school ethics, integrity, and environmentally

sustainable manufacturing practices have been

some of the cornerstone values of GSG’s business

model since its inception. Amanda’s stewardship

of her business is no different, she takes pride in

finding or designing inventive ways to reuse or

repurpose her client’s sentimental gems or jewelry.

And, when the design calls for new materials, she

will reach for recycled metals every time.

It’s a family business. Amanda is the spear’s point,

Richard, a co-owner, is still an integral member of

the GSG team. Amanda’s husband, David Hillebrecht, has always enjoyed

carving and sculpting and has now become one of GSG’s top jewelry

designers. Finnegan the beagle, their senior jewelry ambassador, is ready

to greet you at the door. Samantha, Amanda and David’s daughter, comes

to work most days and is growing up within the same four walls that

Amanda herself did. While Sam works at evading her grandmother, many

of our downtown locals enjoy a quick high five, or if lucky a big hug, when

they stop in for a new addition to their jewelry family.

The People of Garden Street

SOPHIE BOBAN-DOERING

OWNER, FROMAGERIE SOPHIE

Currently on my playlist: ‘Dusk’ album by The The…

love the lyrics and how they interact with the music;

quite sexy!

I wanted to grow up to be a: school teacher, but

dreamed of being a solid gold dancer, too.

The greatest musician of all time is: the Russian

composer and pianist Dmitri Shostakovich.

Someday I will: have a day off!

GARDEN STREET - The Heart of Downtown San Luis Obispo

68 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


SPONSORED

ANOTHER LEVEL

Browse our curated gift section for beautiful linens, cookbooks, jewelry,

stationary, and an assortment of ceramics like these mugs from Japanese

company Kinto. These handmade mugs take a cup of tea or coffee to a

whole new level. The two colors of layered glaze make each mug unique,

and the mix of luster glaze and matte finish leave a beautiful finish.

$24.50 // Scout Coffee Co.

1130 Garden Street and 880 E. Foothill Boulevard, San Luis Obispo

(805) 439-2253 // ScoutCoffeeCo.com

LIFE OF PIE

Choose from our selection of fruit, nut,

cream, chocolate and savory pies. Take

one home or enjoy a slice à la mode at

Hotel Serra. Now you can have your pie

and eat it too by joining our Pie of the

Month Club. Sign up to be notified when

memberships and Gift Certificates are

available.

Hotel Serra Coming Soon //1125 Garden

Street, San Luis Obispo // hotelserra.com

INDULGE YOURSELF

What better way to let your style

shine than with a custom designed

piece of jewelry? This pendant

of multi-color Tahitian pearls and

diamonds was created for a special

client with a flair for fashion. Let us

create something beautiful for you.

Contact for Pricing

Marshalls Jewelers

751 Higuera Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 543-3431 // marshalls1889.com

FEED MY LIPS

Transition from summer to fall with

Aveda Feed My Lips lipstick in

Goji. Our stylist, Emy, is wearing

this moisturizing formula with long

lasting color in this snapshot.

Perfect for bringing daytime into

evening. Come in and play to find

the color that lifts your spirits.

$24 // Salon62

1112 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 543-2060 // salon62.com

MANGO A GO GO

Our Montrose Coffee Table will look the part and play the part

in your living space—we select high quality materials to create

impressive products that last. This solid mango wood table is

40” in diameter and comes in a refined misted ash finish.

$849 // San Luis Traditions

748 Marsh Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 541-8500 // sanluistraditions.com

MODERN MALACHITE

Our new one-of-a-kind earrings feature a perfectly matched pair

of rich green-banded Malachite drops. The polished Malachite is

thoughtfully suspended from modern 18K rose gold hexagonal

French hooks, and accented with twenty-four Canadian

diamonds to provide a subtle sparkle. Modern classic jewelry.

Made fresh daily.

$1,650 // Baxter Moerman // 1128 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 801-9117 // baxtermoerman.com

GARDEN STREET - The Heart of Downtown San Luis Obispo

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 69


FALL IN WITH CHEESE…

Fall is here, and it’s the perfect time

to celebrate the season of giving.

Together, we will create a fabulous and

delicious selection for your Thanksgiving

Celebrations, a romantic evening by the

fireplace, or spending an evening with

friends. All platters are created based

on budget, event size, cheese, and

charcuterie selection. Check out our

website for more information.

Contact for Pricing // Fromagerie Sophie

1129 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 503-0805 // fromageriesophie.com

SPONSORED

LET ME CALL YOU SWEETHEART

We call them Sweetheart cakes. At the

perfect size, these 6” cakes come with

edible flowers or just loads of honest-togoodness

all-American frosting. Perfect for

two, especially love birds. Multiple flavor

choices are available, as well as vegan and

gluten-free options.

Prices Vary // Linnaea’s Cafe

1110 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 541-5888 // linnaeas.com

BOTANICAL ENGAGEMENT

Created with your stones or ours.

Yellow, white, rose, or platinum. Custom

design appointments available.

Contact for Pricing

Garden Street Goldsmiths & Estate Jewelry

1114 & 1118 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 543-8186

GardenStreetGoldsmiths.com

CURL UP COZY

These custom Anichini throws created

exclusively for Hotel Serra provide a stylish

fluid drape and soft cozy comfort. Take

home the experience with 100% cotton

cable knit throws that are machine washable

and available for sale at Spa Serra.

Hotel Serra Coming Soon

1119 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

hotelserra.com

CHLOÉ... SAY NO MORE!

Be bold; let your boots do the talking.

Sashay your way into the fall season

wearing these blue suede booties

and be ready to have your world

transformed. Elegant, sexy, and

amazing are all synonymous with

CHLOÉ.

$356

Finders Keepers Consignment Boutique

1124 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 545-9879

slofinderskeepers@gmail.com

TORTELLINI CON PROSCIUTTO,

FUNGHI, E PISELLI

A rustic dish perfect for winter or fall. Customers

ask for this classic by name after it was featured

in our first review three years ago. Though not a

staple on our menu, be sure to ask your waiter

about it the next time you stop by. This dish

starts with tortellini and a creamy sauce, then

it is tossed with prosciutto and peas. It pairs

excellently with a chilly Sunday or a local Pinot

Noir. Keep an eye on our Seasonal Specials

chalkboard for its next return.

$18 // La Locanda

1137 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

(805) 548-1750 // lalocandaslo.com

GARDEN STREET - The Heart of Downtown San Luis Obispo

70 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


SPONSORED

the sense of place, local culture, climate and agriculture. A casual

atmosphere to gather, socialize and truly enjoy the abundance of this

remarkable year-round climate.

Local producers of fine wine, beers, ciders and spirits compliment the

endless array of produce, nut oils, aquaculture, ancient grains, citrus,

cheeses and magical seasons that offer pumpkins and strawberries at

the same time!

The food style at Brasserie SLO could best be described as Modern

Mediterranean but regional descriptions do not really apply. Keeping the

offerings as natural as possible producing generous flavors, bold color,

aromas and texture with uncomplicated cooking methods. Menu items

are unadulterated and unadorned emphasizing the essence of individual

ingredients.

BRASSERIE SLO

CHEF JAMES ANDERSON

Following the authentic style of European brasseries,

this new restaurant at Hotel Serra will offer all-day

dining in a wholly California-accessible style, capturing

With over a decade of high-end experience on the Monterey Peninsula,

Head Chef James Anderson recently joined Hotel Serra. “I am thrilled

to be joining the team at Hotel Serra and look forward to establishing

Brasserie SLO on the Central Coast dining scene. I am also excited

to celebrate the elemental cooking methods of our wood-fired grill and

oven as a signature of the Brasserie SLO experience”, said James.

Refining practices such as nose-to-tail butchery, root-to-fruit and wild

coastal and forest foraging, Chef James crafts dishes succinctly of the

highest quality, and preferably with a good glass of Central Coast wine!

Brasserie SLO coming soon;

1125 Garden Street www.hotelserra.com

The Dogs of Garden Street

PROGRESS REPORT

As Garden Street moves closer to being

completed, Hotel Serra would like to thank all

of our neighbors for their continued support and

combined efforts towards truly making this the

best street in Downtown SLO. Over the past few

weeks, the team at Hotel Serra has been busy

making improvements not only to Garden Street

but to the surrounding walkways and crosswalks.

Work on the two historic buildings that will become

the hotel entrance and the restaurant, Brasserie

SLO, continues, and the recent installation of

the rooftop pool went off exceedingly smooth

and garnered a very positive response. Most

importantly, Garden Street is now fully open!

Finnegan // Beagle Mix // 9 years

Rescued at only 3 months old, this kind soul loves spending

most days working as a senior jewelry ambassador at

Garden Street Goldsmiths. When not working he gains

inspiration by hiking and perfecting his cuddling skills with the

family toddler. He hopes you’ll stop by to pet his tummy and

become a proud member of the FFC (Finnegan Fan Club).

GARDEN STREET - The Heart of Downtown San Luis Obispo

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 71


pop

corn

lung

| HEALTH

What

you

must

know

about

vaping

before

it’s too

late.

Ahighly informal and decidedly most unscientific poll

conducted here at SLO LIFE Magazine a few weeks ago

led to some disturbing findings. The question was this:

How many of our local kids at places like SLO High and

Mission Prep and AG High vape? We found very quickly

that it would have been much easier to ask the inverse:

Who doesn’t vape?

For those unfamiliar, vaping has evolved quickly in recent years. The term first arose when

someone figured out how to smoke marijuana using an old Volcano vaporizer. Instead

of burning the buds and inhaling the smoke, however, the steam from the heated water

liberated the cannabinoids, such as THC and CBD, filling an attached balloon, which

was then passed around as if it were a joint at a Rolling Stones concert. For many, the

experience felt “cleaner” and somehow “healthier” because the smoke was removed.

Innovation was brisk, and soon the technology was applied to cigarette smoking.

Entrepreneurs saw a massive market of untapped potential. Since cigarettes were so

unhealthy, what if you could remove the smoke? The result was the now ubiquitous

“e-cigarette.” Initially, it was a clunky miniature version of the Volcano vaporizer filled

with ground-up tobacco leaves, however, the latest technology is so discrete that it is

practically undetectable—and it is permanently damaging our kids.

The problem, as it turns out, is not tobacco. When Uncle

Louie lit up his pipe back in the day, he was smoking a

mostly pure, unadulterated form of the plant. He was

getting a nicotine buzz that is naturally occurring. The

stuff that was so harmful to our health came about when

cigarette manufacturers began adding things to extend shelf

life and introduce flavoring. Modern-day cigarette smoke

now contains thousands of chemicals, and at least 70 are

known carcinogens.

Enter vaping. Consider e-cigarettes, or vape pens, the

advanced version of a cigarette. They are what MP3s are to

vinyl records; iPhones are to rotary phones. The difference

is that the substrate—the thing that is smoked—is not

tobacco leaves, but a concentrated laboratory-made liquid

called “e-juice.” Through the use of innovative chemistry,

manufacturers are able to entice young people with flavors

more commonly found in the candy aisle than next to the

Marlboro Lights. The problem with inhaling those quixotic

brands, such as Unicorn Milk and Smurf Cake, is that they

damage lungs—permanently and irreversibly. >>

72 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 73


#1

KNOW THIS WORD:

DIACETYL

Over the years, scientific words have become

popularized, things like carcinogen, and caffeine, and

metastasize. Brace yourself for a new one: Diacetyl.

This word, diacetyl, is the short version of the alphadiketone,

2,3-pentanedione, which was first used as

a flavoring agent in microwave popcorn. That was

before the workers, who diligently punched in and

out of the factory every day expertly filling those little

tri-fold microwaveable bags with kernels and their

secret sauce, started experiencing strange symptoms.

They came on slowly, but, to this day, have not gone

away: lethargy, shortness of breath, dry coughing, and

wheezing. Diacetyl is no longer allowed as a flavoring

agent for food, but the vape industry now uses it to

create all of those innocent-sounding flavors, such as

“Blueberry Cheesecake,” that our kids draw directly

into their lungs.

#2

WHAT IS

POPCORN LUNG?

The phenomenon, named for those microwave

popcorn workers, put in its simplest terms, is the

obliteration of the tiny blood vessels—alveoli—

in our lungs that do the magic that happens

when we unconsciously transfer the oxygen in

the air into oxygen in our blood. And that word,

obliteration, is appropriate, as the medical term

for popcorn lung is bronchiolitis obliterans.

Diagnosis is problematic because the symptoms

appear slowly and do not present in the same

way that traditional cigarette coughing—

smokers hack—comes on with a clear cause

and effect. In other words, “I smoked a bunch

of Camels yesterday, and today I am coughing

my brains out.” And, unlike cigarette smokers,

where research shows that abstinence for a

period of about seven years will clear the lungs,

that is not the case for diacetyl exposure. There

is no cure. The damage is permanent.

#3

FAMILY JUULS

Mention the word “jewel” in the presence of a high school teacher or

administrator and watch their reaction. Their face will likely be a boiling stew

of frustration, anger, and terror. Why so much baggage attached to such an

innocent little word? That word, jewel, is also the trendy brand name for a tiny

e-cigarette, or vaping pen, known as a JUUL. To the untrained eye, a JUUL

appears identical to the ubiquitous thumb drive, those little, portable external

hard drives that can plug into a computer’s USB port. Once used to transport

essays and book reports from home to school, those little devices, thumb

drives, are now mostly banned in high schools because teachers cannot tell

the difference between the real thing and the e-cigs. Still, they are very easy to

sneak onto campus, and unlike cigarette smoke that leaves a billowing cloud

overhead, the effect of taking a hit on a vape pen is a very fast disappearing

vapor. Ask any local high school kid, and they will tell you that they have

witnessed their classmates smoking a JUUL in class, inhaling discretely the

moment the teacher turns their back to write on the whiteboard.

74 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


䰀 漀 挀 愀 氀 䔀 琀 栀 椀 挀 愀 氀 䨀 攀 眀 攀 氀 爀 礀 匀 椀 渀 挀 攀 㤀 㜀 㐀

䘀 甀 氀 氀 匀 攀 爀 瘀 椀 挀 攀

䌀 甀 猀 琀 漀 洀 Ⰰ 一 攀 眀 Ⰰ ☀ 䔀 猀 琀 愀 琀 攀 䨀 攀 眀 攀 氀 爀 礀

㐀 ☀ 㠀 䜀 愀 爀 搀 攀 渀 匀 琀 ⸀ 䐀 漀 眀 渀 琀 漀 眀 渀 匀 䰀 伀

㠀 㔀 ⸀ 㔀 㐀 アパート⸀ 㠀 㠀 㘀 ⴀ 眀 眀 眀 ⸀ 䜀 愀 爀 搀 攀 渀 匀 琀 爀 攀 攀 琀 䜀 漀 氀 搀 猀 洀 椀 琀 栀 猀 ⸀ 挀 漀 洀

Enjoy 10% OFF any Facial AND Ayurmedic & Jadience

Skincare Products in October and November

Use Promo: FallFacial

(exp. 11/30/18)

Healthy Skincare & Luxurious Facials Only At East

Tea, Salads, Acai Bowls & On-Site Parking!

1238 MONTEREY ST SUITE 110 | SAN LUIS OBISPO | (805) 542-9500 | WWW.EASTWELLBEING.COM

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 75


#4

SMOKIN’ IN THE BOYS’ ROOM

ATTENTION

ATHLETES

The most insidious thing about vape pens may be their cultural acceptance, and

dismissive claim by many parents who reason, “It’s probably not as bad as smoking

a real cigarette—I did that once in a while when I was in school.” In 1985, the

band Mötley Crüe popularized the song, “Smokin’ in the Boys’ Room,” which,

in many ways, became a rite of passage. We recall those days sneaking a drag on

our buddy’s Lucky Strike, the one he swiped from his dad’s pack at home, with

fondness. Those days are long gone. The risk now is not stinky clothes, possible

detention, and a little bit of next-day smoker’s hack. Instead, it is permanent

and irreparable lung damage. No, you’re right, it’s not as bad as smoking a real

cigarette, it’s worse. Much worse.

TRAIN WITH FORMER

PROFESSIONAL

ATHLETES

FOR MORE INFORMATION EMAIL

US AT INFO@REVSLO.COM

VARIOUS CLASS OFFERINGS

SPIN & ABS, SPIN & GUNS,

BOOT CAMP, TNT (GROUP TRAINING),

TURN & BURN, TABATA BOOT CAMP

755 Alphonso Street . SLO

[off Broad Street]

8420 El Camino Real . Atascadero

805.439.1881

revslo.com

76 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018

#5

MADE IN CHINA

We imagine tobacco grown on pastoral hillsides in Virginia. Not e-juice. Nearly all of it comes

from factories in China and is subject to virtually zero governmental oversight. A recent study

conducted by Harvard University found that of the top 51 e-cigarette brands it analyzed, 39 of

them contained diacetyl—in other words, 76%. In addition to the agent that causes popcorn

lung, the researchers also found other dangerous compounds, such as the highly toxic chemical

known as acetoin, in 92% of the cases. Because e-cigarettes have been branded by their makers

as smokeless and, therefore safe, and since popcorn lung is difficult to diagnose, regulators have

been slow to respond to what has the potential to mushroom into a health care crisis unlike

anything we have seen before. Imagine an entire generation of Americans toting oxygen tanks

around with them someday. It’s not hyperbole: with continual and direct exposure to diacetyl,

it may not be a matter of if, but when. SLO LIFE


VARICOSE & SPIDER VEIN TREATMENT

Love your legs again and wear shorts with confidence!

Covered by most

insurance

No hospitalization

Local anesthesia

No down time

Kenneth Spearman, M.D.

Timothy Watson, M.D.

TAKE A 1-MIN.

SELF SCREENING TEST

Healing

Happens

THE FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTISTS, SLO,

INVITES YOU TO JOIN OUR SERVICES.

At our Wednesday evening services, you will hear

testimonies of healing and ideas shared on how

Christian Science is applied to every challenge in the

daily lives of our members. The laws of harmony and

health revealed in the Bible apply today.

You will be inspired. Healing through prayer is possible.

www.ccveins.com

info@ccveins.com

880 Oak Park Blvd.,

Suite 201

Arroyo Grande , CA

93420

Wednesday Testimony Meeting

7:00 p.m.

Sunday Church Services

10:00 a.m.

If you checked any of these symptoms,

call today for a FREE consultation!

805.473.VEIN (8346)

prayerthatheals.org

1326 Garden Street, SLO

christianscience.org

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 77


| TASTE

FALAFEL

Mediterranean Comfort Food

This pillar of Middle Eastern cuisine comes in all shapes and

sizes across the Central Coast and tastes better than ever.

BY JAIME LEWIS

“Wait one moment, please.”

My husband Jake and I had stopped off at a roadside kebab stand on

England’s M11 on our way to see my brother, who lives in Norwich. At

the counter, a handful of olive-skinned men sipped thick black coffee

despite this summer’s punishing heat wave. Several sets of dark eyes

turned to look at us, squarely, unrelenting. The middle-aged man behind

the counter carried himself like a rugby player; his cheeks wore several

days’ stubble.

I ordered a falafel sandwich and watched as our host unceremoniously

pulled pita bread from a bag and plopped uncooked falafel balls in oil to

fry. He paused to look up at me and I realized that, unlike his patrons, his

eyes were bright green against his dark skin. Now I was the one staring.

“Where are you from?” I said, gracelessly attempting to cover my tracks.

“Turkey,” he said, and turned his back to me, moving falafel from the

fryer to an open half-moon of pita bread. It appeared our talk was over,

and I mentally kicked myself for being the clueless American, striking up

conversation without reading the room.

It was only after we paid and held our sandwiches, wrapped tightly in foil

and emanating a garlicky perfume, that he asked us to wait. Did I hear

him right? I thought as he walked to the back of the shack and out of

view. My mouth watered at the scent of falafel: dinner called. But there he

was, returning to the counter with his wallet. He leaned over and opened

it to a photo of three teenagers, their features unmistakably like his, their

smiles wide.

“These are my children,” he said. “This one,”

his finger pointed to the face of a young

woman, “is at university now.” He beamed

silently. I remarked how proud he must be.

After a quick flip through the rest of his

photos, we thanked him and walked back to

the car. Jake pulled back onto the motorway

and I unwrapped my dinner, steaming beneath

a drizzle of tahini sauce. The ingredients for

the sandwich were nothing revolutionary—

ground chickpeas, blended with herbs and

spices, fried and wrapped with vegetables in

pita bread—but, one brief human connection

had brought its flavors vividly to life. >>

JAIME LEWIS writes about

food, drink and the good

life from her home in San

Luis Obispo. Find her on

Instagram/Twitter @jaimeclewis.

78 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


BRAHMS | Symphony No. 3

CABANISS | “Double Rainbow” Concerto

for Two Pianos and Orchestra

COPLAND | El Salon Mexico

BARBER | Violin Concerto

DAUGHERTY | Strut for String Orchestra

BERNSTEIN | On the Waterfront

Grow your very own

home entertainment center.

visit gardensbygabriel.com -or- call 805.215.0511

An activity of Gardens by Gabriel, Inc. · License No. 887028

www.slosymphony.org

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 79


PETRA SAN LUIS OBISPO

Back home in San Luis Obispo County, I’m happy to report

that options for falafel abound, in many cases featuring

locally-sourced and house-made ingredients.

At Petra in SLO, falafel can be found in sandwiches, on

plates—even on pizza, consistent with the restaurant’s

collegiate hangout vibe and popular happy hour. The falafel

itself remains authentic, though, as Jordanian owner Todd

Aburashed and his son, manager Rammy Aburashed, explain.

“We make it daily using our family recipe, from scratch,” says

Todd, adding that most people mix eggs into falafel for a

fluffy appearance, but not at Petra. “They make it look nice,

but we don’t use that here. It’s all about taste.”

At the bustling counter, I order the falafel plate, served with

hummus, tzatziki (a classic salted yogurt sauce), and a puff of

house-made pita bread. I love how seedy and crisp the falafel

are against the cool tzatziki. I look around: On a Monday

morning, the place is already hopping with people in business

clothes, moms with strollers, and students. I ask Todd how

Petra found such a loyal following.

“If you make food with love and care, if you make something

you’re proud of, you will do well,” he says. >>

80 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


smart, eclectic, art to live on

Eat SLOcally

Direct from our farm,

Fresh to your home.

Variety of Quality Fruits & Vegetables in

Every Talley Box (2 Sizes Available)

Flexible Schedule, Convenient Local Pick-up,

Home Delivery Available, No Commitment

New Customers First Box

$15 OFF

Use Code: SLO18

1599 Monterey Street, San Luis Obispo

(at the corner of Grove Street, across from Pepe Delgados)

805.544.5900 | sloconsignment.com

Open Monday - Saturday 10-6pm

See What’s in Season at

TalleyFarmsFreshHarvest.com

805.489.5401 • FreshHarvest@TalleyFarms.com

Upgrade your

holiday traditions to 4K

AUDIO • VIDEO • LIGHTING • CLIMATE CONTROL • SURVEILLANCE • SHADES

(805) 540-5116

www.abovegradeautomation.com

245 Higuera Street, San Luis Obispo

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 81


HAPY BISTRO PISMO BEACH

Heading south to Pismo Beach, Hapy Bistro serves falafel in

a completely different setting, albeit with similarly delicious

results. Situated at the end of a strip mall, the eatery surprises

me when I walk inside: Duke Ellington pipes through the

speakers, a glass door reveals a cigar room, and hundreds of

bottles of wine from all over California stack in racks across the

dining room—not to mention a wall of craft beer in cold cases.

“The wine is my thing,” says Samer Georges, who immigrated

from Syria six years ago, along with his managing partner, Nabil

Fadel. They opened Hapy Bistro, named after the Egyptian god

who brings agricultural fertility to the Nile River, in 2016.

Make no mistake: Hapy really is a bistro, with upscale Eurostyle

fare prepared from fresh California ingredients with a

Middle Eastern twist. I opt for the falafel burger on a pillowy

potato bun, drizzled with tart tahini sauce, and served alongside

a side salad with capers, red onion, and an herbal vinaigrette.

Munching on my sandwich, I glance around at the wine and

beer: Which would pair best with this meal? I wonder. When I

look back down at my plate, I’m shocked to realize it’s too late.

I’ve already gobbled down the whole thing. >>

82 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


WIRELESS INTERNET FOR THE CENTRAL COAST

NO CONTRACTS . NO DATA LIMITS

INSTALLATION ONLY $99

805.556.4065 | peakwifi.com

We Service ALL Makes and Models.

We have THE EXPERTISE.

We have THE TOOLS.

And YOUR WARRANTY

stays intact.

Mention this ad to RECEIVE $10 OFF

your next service.

MAINTAINING EXCELLENCE FOR 40 YEARS

San Luis Obispo 805.242.8336 Santa Maria 805.316.0154

RIZZOLISAUTOMOTIVE.COM

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 83


GRAPE LEAF MARKET & DELI

MORRO BAY

Perhaps the most surprising falafel purveyor I’ve met on the Central

Coast is Ibrahim “Abe” Abuhilal of Grape Leaf Market & Deli in

Morro Bay. With a PhD in agriculture and a thriving farm that

produces sheep’s milk cheese, Abuhilal opened 18 months ago

on Main Street. As we talk, he says hello to every single passerby,

pressing them to enter (“We have a door! Please walk in!”), and

offering samples of anything he has. Inside, a Palestinian flag hangs

beside a poster showing Middle Eastern farm equipment.

“Palestinians eat falafel any time of day: for breakfast, lunch, dinner,”

he says with a smile. “It’s like our peanut butter and jelly!”

He attributes the light and crispy texture of his falafel to the purity

of locally-grown ingredients and freshness of the oil. “We use only

chickpeas, parsley, cilantro, garlic, and onion,” he says, plus something

he calls “mama touch,” which I presume to be a lot like love.

I tell Abuhilal I’ve read that some folks argue over the origins of

falafel. “Where did it come from?” I ask him.

“Does not matter to me, history,” he says without skipping a beat.

“Falafel comes from Morro Bay now.” SLO LIFE

84 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


First Presbyterian Church is committed

to expressing our love of God through

inspirational worship.

First Service: 8:45am

Education Hour: 10am

Second Service: 11am

childcare available

We Are

Moving!

981 Marsh Street

(corner of Marsh and Morro)

fpcslo.org

3076 Duncane Lane . San Luis Obispo

805 549 0100

Creators of bench

built lighting fixtures

by local artisans.

The jewelry for

your home.

HANS

DUUS

BLACKSMITH INC

2976 INDUSTRIAL PARKWAY . SANTA MARIA

805-570-0019 . HANSDUUS@GMAIL.COM

HANSDUUSBLACKSMITH.COM

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 85


| KITCHEN

BOLOGNESE SAUCE

Bolognese sauce is a meat-based sauce believed to originate

from Bologna, Italy. Here, Chef Jessie Rivas shares his version

of the recipe passed down from his wife’s Italian grandmother.

BY CHEF JESSIE RIVAS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JENNIFER PALLIAN

86 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


JESSIE’S TIP:

This meat sauce can be used as a topping

for creamy polenta or fried polenta

squares. Top the polenta with the

Bolognese and Pecorino Romano cheese,

one of my favorite cheeses. The polenta

!dish is great as a side or a main.

BOLOGNESE SAUCE

1 lb ground pork

1 lb ground beef

3 Tbs olive oil

2 cups (packed) finely chopped yellow onions

1 ½ cups (packed) finely chopped celery

½ cup finely chopped carrots

3 Tbs minced garlic

2 dried bay leaves

3 ½ Tbs Italian seasoning

3 – 28oz cans tomato sauce

2 Tbs tomato paste

salt and pepper to taste

1lb spaghetti

1 Tbs kosher salt

Parmesan cheese

Italian chili flakes

OPTIONAL

½ cup red wine

1 Tbs ground allspice

2 tsp ground fennel

In an 8-quart stockpot add 1 Tbs oil and heat just until

hot. Add beef and pork and sauté until well browned

and fat is rendered. Remove most fat and add the rest

of the oil, carrots, onions, celery, garlic and cook for 10

minutes, just until the onions are translucent. Add bay

leaves, Italian seasoning, tomato sauce (and red wine if

desired) and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer.

Stir in tomato paste 1 Tbs at a time and add water if

sauce becomes too thick. Simmer for an hour stirring

occasionally. Season with salt and pepper to taste (add

allspice and fennel if desired). Simmer for another ½

hour stirring occasionally.

Taste for seasoning before

serving.

JESSIE RIVAS is the owner

and chef of The Pairing Knife

food truck which serves the

Central Coast.

In another stockpot bring 4

quarts of water to a rolling

boil. Add 1 Tbs Kosher salt

and pasta. Cook until al

dente, drain water, and return

to pot. Add 2 cups of the

pasta sauce to the pasta and

stir well. Serve pasta and top

with more sauce as desired.

Finish with Parmesan cheese

and Italian chili flakes. SLO LIFE

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 87


| WINE NOTES

Setting the Scene

Similar to a theatrical performance, from its musical score to costume and set design,

wineries have a way of telling a story. The tasting room is the stage where the

presentation takes place and the tale unfolds. The product of hard labor yearns to be

shared. How that happens is as much an art as the winemaking itself.

BY ANDRIA MCGHEE

Whether the goal is to make guests

feel warmly welcomed like a family

member or treating them with the

authority and respect given to a

visiting dignitary—whatever the

goal—from the moment you arrive

on the grounds of a winery, to those aching goodbyes, your

experience is being considered every step of the way.

While out wine tasting with my mom recently, we stopped into

a winery which set up a great stage and made it easy to have

a good time. AronHill overlooks Highway 46 and Vineyard

Road in Paso Robles. They have made an art of welcoming

people, being informative, having a high standard of wine,

food, and scenery, yet maintaining a reasonable price.

From the entrance to the exit, you can tell that details were at

the heart of every decision. As we meandered up their treelined

path, we waved to veteran worker Lupe Lopez who was

pruning the trees. As a cornerstone of this winery, he always

has a project on his hands. He has been around since Day One.

We pulled into a well-manicured parking lot that overlooks

a beautiful view, which we would later enjoy while sitting

on the deck. As we walked in, the winery warmed us with

dark browns that indicated we were entering an old world

lounge with new age styling. Kathryn Aron, daughter of the

winemaker, Judy Aron, greeted us along with head chef Kara

Massey. We enjoyed a pleasant, thoughtful conversation. >>

88 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


HOME TO EDNA VALLEY’S MOST

.

DRINK IT ALL IN.

EXPERIENCED.

BALANCED.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE.

CHAMISALVINEYARDS.COM

7525 ORCUTT ROAD • SAN LUIS OBISPO, CA

805-541-9463

TASTING ROOM OPEN 10AM-5PM DAILY

I am grateful to have served on the City Council for the past

five years. In that time, I’ve delivered on my promises: integrity,

transparency, and a no-nonsense attitude coupled with a calm,

balanced and thoughtful approach to the city’s challenges. I remain

strongly committed to San Luis Obispo’s fundamental values of

environmental protection, cultural richness, economic vitality and

fair, sensible government. I ask for your vote on November 6.

CarlynForCouncil.com

Paid for by Carlyn Christianson for City Council 2018

FPPC #1407264

Locally Owned and Operated

— Serving san luis obispo county for over 15 years —

(805) 489-6979

Audiovisionslo.com

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 89


Kathryn shared the story of how she had moved there with her whole family as a little

girl. Her mom was a horse lover and soon caught a passion for farming. Eventually,

Judy roped in Lupe to start growing grapes. She found that their plot of land—the

slope, soil, and weather—produced great wine grapes.

We were offered wine and food. Who can say no to that? The wine was delectable.

AronHill was an early planter of primitivo (the European Zinfandel). They also grow

(Californian) Zinfandel and Bordeaux varietals like Cabernet Sauvignon. Richard

Sauret, who is deeply missed at the winery, taught Judy the art of dry farming, which is

a tough gig. Mikel Olsten also joined the family to help in winemaking. The small team

produces a good product.

The wines ranged from easy drinking white wines and a flavorful rosé, to some deeper

red wines. Some reds tasted slightly peppery with dark cherry flavors, while other reds

danced with blueberry and raspberry. I reveled in every one. Next, we sampled their

bruschetta. This is a dish that must have flavor-packed ingredients because they are

few. It was exquisite. The vine-ripened tomatoes, which are grown on their land, burst

with flavor and were balanced by the warm, comforting, locally baked bread. This was

followed by a pear and pesto chicken sandwich for my mom, while I enjoyed a bacon

and brie hamburger. Are you drooling yet? They were amazing. Whoever thought of

pesto, pear, and onion has won my heart.

Not only was the wine great, the food enjoyable, and the people charming, but the little

things made it a special place to return. The summation of

those little thing for us: The perfectly timed refill; the missing

napkin that magically reappeared before us in the hand of

the observant proprietress; the expertly polished wine glass

performed tableside before every pour. Together they created

a memorable experience that will bring us back—again and

again. Now, combine those little

things with a compelling story and

you have a winner. However, as the

old saying goes, “Deeds are more

powerful than words,” all you really

need to know is that my mom,

well, she has already returned for a

second visit.

Each of our many hundreds of

wineries here on the Central

Coast have a different story to tell.

AronHill reminded me of this, and

did so with flair. As for now, I can’t

wait to get out there to explore

more wineries, and meet the people

bringing them to life. SLO LIFE

ANDRIA MCGHEE received

her advanced degree on

wines and spirits from

WSET in London and enjoys

travel, food, wine, and

exercise as a means to enjoy

those around her.

90 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


NEXT CONCERT

10th

Anniversary

Celebrating Women’s Voices

Favorite songs

from Canzona’s

first decade

chosen by our

patrons, singers

and directors.

Songs We Love Best

Sunday, November 4, 2018 · 3 p.m.

United Methodist Church · San Luis Obispo

CRICKET HANDLER & JILL ANDERSON

Artistic Directors

Tickets: canzonawomen.org

CONCERT SPONSOR

WITH GENEROUS SUPPORT FROM

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 91


| BREW

LOCAL

SCENE

BY BRANT MYERS

The year is 1988 and the dirt roads of San San Francisco. Well, not really, but SLO might have well been a one-horse town

Luis Obispo are torn up from countless when it comes to breweries thirty years ago. Having just attended the SLO Brew

hooves pulling carts up and down the 30th Anniversary Party held after Labor Day weekend this year, I thought it would

main drag while a lone saloon door be an apt time to reflect on where we were, where we are, and where we may be

slowly pulls away from its last hinge, going in the recent craft beer boom that has seen massive growth in the previous

moved ever so further away by the slight three decades.

breeze passing through like a wayward

straggler traveling between Mexico and Talk to any of the industry veterans and they can recall with great fondness >>

92 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


FINN PLUMBING Inc.

old school quality

Serving the Central Coast since 1964

805-544-8000

hamonohd.com

Water Heaters/Water Savings

Re-pipes/Remodels

Service and Repair

All Plumbing Services

805.544.LEAK

805.528.4693

License #725487

Lic#390619

...print a $50 off coupon

at our website finnplumbing.com...

Life Moves Too Fast for Traditional Braces!

Invisalign offers a quicker, easier way to achieve

the beautiful smile you’ve always wanted,

delivering life changing results in months.

the clear alternative to braces

Cosmetic | Laser | Metal-Free Dentistry

FREE TEETH WHITENING

WITH COMPLETED INVISALIGN® TREATMENT!

CALL TODAY!

1250 Peach Street • Suite E • San Luis Obispo

(805) 250-0558 • www.slotownsmiles.com

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 93


like a roadie talking about their band touring, when the boom came rolling

through the streets of San Luis Obispo. According to most, this is the third

they’ve experienced, but we can all agree that it is by far the largest. The three

grandfathers of the Central Coast brewing scene most of us know by now—SLO

Brew at 30 years, Firestone at 21 (22 in November), and Central Coast Brewing

coming in at the drinking age of 21 years old next spring. As all things small

town, these breweries are interconnected but none as much as SLO Brew and

Firestone. Having chatted with David Walker, co-Founder of Firestone-Walker

Brewing Company, and the more gregarious of the partners, he relayed just how

close they came to opening up their brewery in Buellton. Apparently, a red tape

delay by Santa Barbara County officials of just a couple of days led them to hear

rumors of SLO Brew’s Paso production facility shuttering. They checked out

the facilities and decided going turn-key to save time and money was just smart

business. The rest, as they say, is history.

Continuing this interconnectedness, I grabbed a beer or eight with the SLO

Brew-master, Steve Courier, who spent his time brewing at Firestone and SLO

Brew concurrently for many years. Like most alumni of larger breweries, he’s

enjoying being master of his own domain. Like all things in life, however, with

more power comes more responsibility. He has taken over the helm of a purposebuilt

brew system and has been striving to learn the intricacies of new equipment

and new recipes. I’ve often heard people in the industry refer to certain

equipment as the “Ferrari of ___” and much like an exotic car they all have their

quirks. It takes a mechanic and an artist to be able to understand the correct pitch

of when their equipment is running properly or the smell of something brewing

at the wrong temperature. Steve is extremely proud of the progress that he’s made

in both the quality and the scope of the beers that they are making at their new

flagship brewery. As a consumer, I particularly enjoyed the Still Frothy double

IPA with extremely fresh notes of tropical fruit and a very quaffable mouthfeel

despite it’s nearly 9% abv. Mimicking the Australian and American roots of their

two owners, their special anniversary Imperial IPA release

has hops from both countries and I hope that, if you didn’t

get a chance to enjoy it on draft directly from the source,

then you were able to grab one of their beautifully styled

matte gold and black 4-pack cans.

With the continuing growth of these three storied

breweries it is worth noting that three more will soon be

added to the repertoire. To the North is Kilo Kilo Brewing

and their unique Hawaiian style helmed by Ryan Putney

known best for his involvement at Firestone’s Barrelworks

and incredible palette. Another Ryan (Fields), this one

coming from acclaimed Beachwood Blendery out of Long

Beach, is returning to his home of

SLO County to open Wild Fields

Brewing in Atascadero at the site

of the original city hall complete

with kitchen and bowling alley.

And here in San Luis Obispo, the

long awaited There Does Not Exist,

founded by yet another Firestone

alumnus, Max Montgomery, has

been a work in progress just off

Suburban Road with a very unique

and minimalist vibe. More to come

on these later as we explore the

future of brewing on the Central

Coast in the next installment. In the

meantime, drink in the history of the

finest suds SLO has to offer. SLO LIFE

BRANT MYERS is a 13-year

veteran of the Central Coast

craft beer industry who

enjoys sharing his passion

with anyone who doesn’t

put an orange in their

hefeweiezen.

94 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


“Early to bed, early to rise,

work like hell and advertise.”

- Ted Turner

on his secret to success

Call us. We can help your business grow.

805.543.8600

slolifemagazine.com/advertise

SLO LIFE

magazine

TO HAVE & TO HOLD BRIDAL SALON SPECIALIZES IN AIRBRUSH MAKEUP,

HAIR DESIGN, SALON SERVICES, AS WELL AS BRIDAL ROBES AND HAIR ACCESSORIES.

WE INVITE YOU TO EXPERIENCE OUR UNIQUE SETTING IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN SLO.

TUESDAY - SATURDAY BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

1075 COURT STREET, SUITE 204, SAN LUIS OBISPO

805.459.8323 | tohaveandtoholdbridalsalon.com

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 95


| HAPPENINGS

OCTOBER

A LITTLE BIT OFF... BROADWAY

Central Coast Follies—a fun, fantastic,

fabulous group of women and men who

love to dance and sing while raising

funds for meaningful causes—salute the

musicals of the on- and off-Broadway

stage with this production. Enjoy the

evening as it winds its way from moving

ballads to high-energy tap and jazz

numbers.

October 5 - 6 // eventbrite.com

96 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018

ART

How much would you pay for a white

painting? Would it matter who the painter

was? Would it be art? One of Marc’s

best friends, Serge, has just bought a very

expensive painting. To Marc, the painting

is a joke, but Serge insists Marc doesn’t

have the proper standard to judge the

work. Another friend, Ivan, allows himself

to be pulled into this disagreement, which

escalates to often hilarious proportions.

September 28 – October 14 // slorep.org

PISMO BEACH OPEN

Witness a men and women’s World Surf League event boasting great waves. This marks the second

annual WSL event to descend on Pismo Beach’s shoreline and its pier will play host to a critical final

event on the North America Qualifying Schedule that may ultimately decide its champion.

October 11 - 14 // pismobeachopen.com

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

THE MAGIC FLUTE

Mozart’s Magic Flute was an instant hit

at its premiere in 1791 and its popularity

and success has kept it on opera stages

throughout the world with growing love

ever since. The opera tells the story of

Prince Tamino’s quest to rescue Pamina,

the daughter of the Queen, from the

high priest, Sarastro. A powerful magic

flute and bells help Prince Tamino and

his friend Papageno the bird catcher

survive the trials of fire and water while

learning about brotherhood and justice.

This is Mozart at his comic best—rife

with an outpouring of famous melodies

cascading one after the other, packaged

in an irresistible opera perfect for both

opera aficionados and families of all ages.

October 13 - 14 // pacslo.org

DANNY COME HOME

Enjoy an original musical written

by Michael Kaplan and Mark Pietri,

inspired by San Luis Obispo headlines

from 8 years ago (Annie the Dog). It

is a homegrown Central Coast story

that playfully investigates the way the

animals we adopt help us awaken as

human beings. This event is part of the

2018 Coastal Awakening.

October 19 - 20

thecoastalawakening.org


| HAPPENINGS

WINTERMEZZO

At Festival Mozaic’s WinterMezzo chamber music

series, internationally-renowned artists present

educational events, culinary experiences, and intimate

concerts in spectacular venues on the California

Central Coast. This season, Music Director Scott Yoo

presents two weekends of great works of chamber

music and offers three sequential ways to connect to

the music and the musicians.

October 25 - 27 // festivalmozaic.com

HARVEST WINE WEEKEND

100+ wineries will celebrate harvest

across Paso Robles Wine Country.

Try your hand at harvest (including

stomping a few grapes), take in the

beautiful fall foliage, live music,

barbecues, barrel samples, and more.

October 19 - 21 // pasowine.com

PET COSTUME CONTEST

The Pismo Beach Veterinary Clinic

invites pet owners and animal

lovers from all over SLO County

to participate in their 10th annual

Pet Costume Contest. This free,

wholesome event is perfect for the

whole family.

October 27 // pismobeachvet.com

NOVEMBER

HARVEST ON THE COAST

The weekend kicks off with our “Crafted on the Coast” collaborative winemaker

dinner featuring Executive Chef Heidi Hornikle. Then on Saturday, hit the

coast at the Grand Tasting and Wine Auction, located beachside at Avila Beach

Resort featuring wine tasting, artisan foods, and live music by The Damon

Castillo Band. Grab your wineglass and wristband, and head out to the SLO

Wine Country tasting rooms for free wine tasting all day Sunday, during the

“Surf ’s Up Sunday”. Each tasting room will feature free tastings, wine specials,

live music, and more.

November 2 - 4 // slowine.com

THE GLASS MENAGERIE

A theatrical piece of distinct power,

with some of Tennessee Williams’ most

potent lyricism, The Glass Menagerie

is a memory play as told to us by Tom

Wingfield, a merchant marine looking

back on the Depression years he spent

with his overbearing Southern genteel

mother, Amanda, and his physically

disabled, cripplingly shy sister, Laura.

Williams’ intensely personal and brilliantly

tender masterpiece exposes the complexity

of our memories, and the ways in which

we can never truly escape them.

November 2 – November 18 // slorep.org

MARCHING BAND REVIEW

Marching bands from all over California come

to compete in this 40th annual event. Head to

Pismo Beach and listen to the musicians play.

Awards will be given out at the Pismo Pier.

November 3 // classiccalifornia.com

OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 97


| HAPPENINGS

Unforgettable Characters.

Extraordinary Stories.

Live theatre in downtown San Luis Obispo

slorep.org

SENIOR DISCOUNT . Mon & Tues 10 to 2 . $15

1351 Monterey Street . San Luis Obispo

(805)783-2887 . clippersbarber.com

Dr. Arnie Horwitz

HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS

Are you feeling overwhelmed

and confused? I can help.

Specializing in

- Relationship Conflicts - Parenting & Self-Esteem

- Separation and Divorce - Personal Life Planning

- Grief and Loss - Career Uncertainty

Therapy/Counseling/Coaching

Dr. Arnie Horwitz • 30 yrs. Experience

805-541-2752

www.doctorarnie.com

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

MORRO BAY TRIATHLON

Swim or kayak in the bay, run on the beach and bike along the coast for fun. Come

out and enjoy some of the finest multisport terrain on the West Coast.

November 4 // morrobaytri.com

NOVEMBER

STAR GAZING IN HARMONY

The town of Harmony is not only home to fabulous wines but also beautifully

dark skies. Enjoy an evening of live music by Tim Jackson, food truck fare, and

wine followed by guided star gazing on the hilltop patio with the Central Coast

Astronomical Society.

November 9 // harmonycellars.com

TALL SHIPS

The Lady Washington and Hawaiian

Chieftan will visit the harbor in Morro

Bay. This year, the gift of their visit comes

in the midst of the holiday season. There

are public tours during the week and

Adventure Sails on Saturday and Sunday.

November 30 - December 19 // morrobay.org

98 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018


OCT/NOV 2018 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 99


View our newest Distinctive Collection offering: 470Piedra.com

HAVEN

PROPERTIES

To learn more about our Distinctive Collection listings

visit www.havenslo.com/distinctive

100 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | OCT/NOV 2018

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines