CPFMagazine_Fall-2018_Issue

cpfnational

A national network of volunteers, parents and stakeholders who value French as an integral part of Canada. CPF Magazine is dedicated to the promotion and creation of French-second-language learning opportunities for young Canadians.

FALL 2018

Magazine

$6.95 • FREE FOR MEMBERS

CANADIAN PARENTS FOR FRENCH

HOW TO WOO

TEACHERS TO

STAY IN CANADA’S

SCHOOLS

HOW TO

TEXT IN

FRENCH

BECOMING

a YOUTH

AMBASSADOR

for BILINGUALISM

INCREASING THE

OPPORTUNITIES

TO STUDY LAW

IN FRENCH


Magazine

CANADIAN PARENTS FOR FRENCH

FALL 2018

www.cpf.ca

FALL 2018

Table of Contents

EDITORIAL COMMITTEE

Michael Tryon, Nicole Thibault,

Towela Okwudire, Denise Massie

EDITORIAL MANAGER

Clémence Charruyer

CONTRIBUTORS

Nancy McKeraghan, Clémence Charruyer,

and other authors and organizations,

as noted in their articles.

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Stripe Graphics Ltd.

PRINTING

Trico Evolution

SUBMISSIONS

Editorial: Clémence Charruyer

Canadian Parents for French

1104 - 170 Laurier Ave. W.

Ottawa, ON K1P 5V5

(613) 235-1481, www.cpf.ca

Email: ccharruyer@cpf.ca

Advertising: Cathy Stone

Canadian Parents for French

Email: advertise@cpf.ca

CPF Magazine is published three times per

year for members of Canadian Parents for

French. Our readership includes parents

of students learning French as a second

language, French language teachers,

school board or district staff, and provincial,

territorial and federal government staff

responsible for official languages education.

CHANGE OF ADDRESS

To signal a change of address,

contact Canadian Parents for French

at (613) 235-1481, or email:

cpf.magazine@cpf.ca

Editorial material contained in this

publication may not be reproduced

without permission.

Publications Mail Agreement No. 40063218

Return undeliverable mail to Canadian

Parents for French at the address above.

To become an online subscriber, email

cpf.magazine@cpf.ca. For an online version

of this issue, visit www.cpf.ca.

FEATURES

3 5 Tips for English Speaking Parents

10 Engaging Youth Voices Across Canadian Parents

for French

16 Becoming a Youth Ambassador for Bilingualism

21 How Do You Sound?

REGULAR ARTICLES

2 PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

6 EDUCATION

How to Woo French Teachers to Stay in Canada’s Schools

8 PARTNER LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

French Library

12 TECH & MEDIA

10 Practical Tips to Enrich Your French Vocabulary

How to Text in French

14 LEARNING

Increasing the Opportunities to Study Law in French

18 EVENTS

Local Youth Forums: From Cost to Coast to Coast

Recognition from our Partner, CASLT

19 KEY CPF CONTACTS ACROSS CANADA

20 OUR ADVERTISERS

This issue of CPF Magazine is printed

on 70lb Endurance Silk, using vegetable

based inks. The paper is FSC certified by the

Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC®), meaning

it comes from well-managed forests and

known sources, ensuring local communities

benefit and sensitive areas are protected.

Canadian Parents for French is a nationwide, research-informed, volunteer organization

that furthers bilingualism that promotes and creates opportunities to learn and use French

for all those who call Canada home.


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

W

elcome to the autumn issue of the CPF Magazine. Regardless of how enjoyable

the summer has been, I always look forward to the routines of fall. The beginning

of the school year, the excitement of reconnecting with old friends and meeting

new ones. A new classroom or school, a potential new teacher. A fresh start to after-school

activities. I also look forward to enjoying the fruits of our Canadian harvests and the colours

that come with the change in seasons.

Your children might also be excited about the return to school. Others might be anxious

as they start new FSL programs. Fortunately, you are members of an organization that can

help to weather these concerns. CPF National and Branch websites offer wonderful resources

for parents and teachers. Many of you may have attended orientation meetings hosted by

fellow CPF members. You will find there are always people willing to answer questions and

provide proven advice on easing the way for your child/ren.

We hope that you enjoy reading this edition of our magazine. Some of the articles will

illustrate how learning French not only can, but is already shaping the lives and futures

of young Canadians. Anjana Balachandran, a Grade 12 student from Ottawa, shares her

experiences as a French Youth Ambassador. Emilie Josh and Guillaume Fleury are members

of Branch Boards of Directors and share their tips for keeping up your French. Me Magnan,

assistant professor/director of the Pan-Canadian French Common Law Program at the

University of Ottawa, shares some of the opportunities that French speaking students

have to study and practice law in French.

I am also looking forward to our CPF Network Conference in Halifax. I hope that, if you

are able to attend, you will seek out opportunities to speak to others from across the country,

to share your own experiences. The National Board and I are hopeful that you will take the

time to speak with us as well, and to enjoy the many sessions available that the Conference

Committee has provided. n

Nancy McKeraghan, CPF National President

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To subscribe:

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2 CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2018


HELP! Should we take our child out of French immersion?

TIPS

FOR ENGLISH

SPEAKING PARENTS

The article was first published on June 11, 2018 on http://www.halifaxlearning.com.

BY ERYN STEELE, HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA

This is a question we are so often asked

when a child in a French immersion

program is struggling to develop

efficient reading skills. Like most difficult

questions there is no standard response

and requires a lot of proactive inquiry

and research on the part of a parent. Our

mission is to support students and families

achieve their goals, so if your goal is to

succeed in French immersion, keep reading!

CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2018 3


Here is the good news, children have a natural capacity to acquire new

languages and there are many strategies parents can use to support

their child without giving up on French immersion all together.

HERE ARE 5 TIPS TO KEEP YOUR CHILD

ON THE PATH TO BILINGUALISM:

1Be enthusiastic and positive!

Even though we said it, this goes without saying and

we’re here to remind you that you’re doing a great job!

Your encouragement is critically important to your child’s

success and how you react to challenge is more important than

your prior knowledge in a subject area. We know it may seem

daunting when you struggle to interpret your child’s homework

assignment, but if they see you model confidence, enthusiasm

and joy in the learning process you’re teaching them the most

important skill of all, resiliency!

2

Put

your first-language first.

English speaking families are often concerned that

spending time practicing English will confuse their child’s

work in French, but research shows the opposite to be

true. Having a strong foundation in English is key to grasping

additional languages. The sooner a child can feel confident in

their first language, the sooner their brain can make space

for a second.

If your child has a strong foundation in the English

phonetic code, they are more likely to succeed in a French

immersion classroom. Read our blog, “What is Phonics?”

(www.halifaxlearning.com/blog/what-is-phonics) to learn

more about this code and why it’s critical to reading success.

Did you know there are 37 speech sounds in French

versus 44 in English. 10 French consonant sounds are directly

transferable from French to English and vice versa and 4

consonants require some slight variation. Watch this short

video (www.youtube.com/watch?v=83sTgHd5Iw0) from Fluent

Forever – Learn Any Language to learn more about the French

phonetic alphabet.

3

Compare

and contrast vocabulary.

Make vocabulary development a deliberate activity at

home. Position your child as the teacher simply by asking

them questions you know they can answer. Confidence

is key! There is no more effective teaching strategy then having

the student be the teacher. You don’t have to be an expert in

French (or calculus, or physics, or ancient history ...) to help

your child succeed.

Quick tips for success at home:

• Label objects in your home with sticky notes in English

and French. Compare commonly used English and

French words like “banana” versus “banane”.

• Play the French and English version of classic board

games like Scrabble, Taboo and Pictionary.

• Choose books that are slightly below your child’s

reading level.

For your postsecondary studies in French

www.uab.ca/csj

4 CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2018


4

Make reading fun!

Another universally effective teaching strategy! Children

learn best when they are having fun and feel confident.

It’s important to differentiate learning to read and

reading for pleasure.

• Children spend hours at school developing their reading

and writing skills and teachers do a fantastic job creating

a safe, conducive learning environment where it’s

okay to make mistakes. To little people, school is their

full-time job, their profession, their career. Reading at

home should feel like vacation!

• If you’re concerned with your child’s progress, take

mental notes during story time and record them as soon

as possible. Reach out to your child’s teachers in private for

confirmation, support and recommendations. Be proactive

and have your child’s skills assessed by a professional.

5

Use tech support!

You know there’s always an app for that. If you have

an iPhone, download iSpeech, a text to speech app, or

spend as few as 5 minutes a day practicing your French

using Duolingo (www.duolingo.com).

• Is there an app out there that you love? Share it

with us! n

SpellRead is a Gold-standard reading program trusted by experts and

parents alike in Halifax Regional Municipality for over 20 years. SpellRead’s

proven, science-based reading program has transformed the lives of over

3000 students in Halifax.

Halifax Learning offers many different programs to suit everybody’s needs – it’s

more than just tutoring! JUMP Math (www.halifaxlearning.com/jump-math) is

a flexible, targeted intervention program designed to prepare students for

success with grade-level content and beyond. Our Writing Connections program

(www.halifaxlearning.com/writing-connections) is designed for higher grade

students who need excellent writing skills fast, while the University and ESL

programs target he special needs of those populations. To give your pre-schooler

a head-start on reading, check out our Sound Foundations program

(www.halifaxlearning.com/soundfoundations)! Find on halifaxlearning.com a

comprehensive list of all our programs.

We have locations (www.halifaxlearning.com/about-us/locations) in Halifax,

Tantallon, Dartmouth, and Bedford. For more information on our programs

please call 902-453-4113 or email: reception@halifaxlearning.com

Canadian Parents for French - Saskatchewan présente/presents

French-Second-Language Education Week

February 4-8, 2019

Apprenez le français...

nourrissez votre cerveau!

Learn French... feed your brain!

sk.cpf.ca

cpfsask@sasktel.net

306.244.6151

CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2018 5


EDUCATION

How to Woo French Teachers

to Stay in Canada’s Schools

BY MIMI MASSON, LECTURER, UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

French-English bilingualism is a

star act on the stage of Canadian

multiculturalism. French language

programs in Canadian schools — which

consist of core French, extended French

and French immersion — are renowned

throughout the world.

And yet the top performers are

fleeing the circus. French as a Second

Language (FSL) teachers are losing their

classrooms to budget cuts. Many express

feelings of disconnection, isolation and

exclusion in the workplace. It is common

to hear stories of teachers who speak

French but adamantly refuse to teach

French in their schools.

The show-stopping question is:

can innovative professional learning

communities reverse this trend?

As a doctoral student in the Ontario

Institute for Studies in Education (OISE)

at the University of Toronto, I know that

professional learning communities (PLCs)

show a lot of promise in Canada. They

help promote leadership, support and

community among teaching professionals.

A French and English language teacher

myself, I have developed curriculum

for new language programs and trained

teachers to implement these programs in

their classrooms. Now, I am investigating

how PLCs can help mitigate what I call

“FSL teacher flight.”

In the first study of its kind to explore

the evolving professional practice of

Canadian French teachers, I am analysing

the participation of two FSL teachers in

the innovative Virtual PLC project. I am

working with data collected over four

years by Dr. Mary Kooy from a group

of 17 teachers working across different

subject matters. This study captures the

complexities of teachers’ daily life in

hundreds of hours of recordings, blog

posts, pictures, teacher resources, school

visits and surveys.

The Virtual PLC project community

was geared towards helping dissatisfied

teachers. What is most interesting about

it is that, over time, teachers who were

thinking of leaving the profession have

stayed — and many have become leaders

in their schools. In my own study, I am

interested in finding out how this played

out for the teachers themselves and then

applying these findings to FSL teacher

professional learning in Canada.

Teaching “à la cart”

Up to 63 per cent of French as a

Second Language teachers are teaching

“à la cart.” This term, coined by the

teachers themselves, refers to the

experience of running harried from

classroom to classroom pushing a cart full

of teaching materials (#FSLNoMoreCarts).

6 CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2018


EDUCATION

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Things are so bad for FSL teachers that large numbers have

considered or actually left the profession. Many of them move

out of teaching French and into English language classrooms as

soon as possible.

This has become a real problem for schools in Canada

desperate to find French teachers to teach a subject that 85

per cent of Canadian children study. This year, one school

board considered the situation so dire in Ontario, that it made

a formal request to the Ministry of Education to look into this

matter.

I’ve found that parents and children alike are keen to learn

French. The story we share across the world of “Canada the

Bilingual” has touched many of the new families who come to

settle here and want to be a part of Canadian multiculturalism.

Learning French is a way to assume that Canadian identity

and legitimize any additional languages they bring with them.

After all, if we accept French, we can surely accept Chinese,

Italian, Urdu and other languages. Families who have been

established in Canada for longer also feel that learning

French can help their children have a competitive edge

in the global market.

Professional learning communities

Teachers come together in professional learning communities

to develop their practice with the aim of improving student

learning. They meet and discuss issues that matter to them

and their students and they develop solutions to try out in

their classrooms.

PLCs are an important form of professional development

because learning with peers is engaging. It stimulates creativity

and camaraderie. Supportive learning networks also bring out

the unique skills of everyone in the group and let them shine.

Teachers who feel good about themselves have less

feelings of stress and alienation. Imagine a room full of teachers

honing their skills, sharing their knowledge and pushing each

other to do their best. Not only does this make for happier

teachers, but better schools and better learning for the

students as well.

Collaborative and continued professional development for

FSL teachers are the tent poles of successful bilingual schools

in an education system where schools receive provincial and

federal funding for French-language programs.

But so far, there is little research about how FSL teachers

fare in these kinds of networks. Findings from the Virtual PLC

project suggest that opportunity, time, distributed membership,

active learning, relationship development, trust, shared

motivations and mutual decision-making are all essential to

cultivating a successful teacher learning community.

Perhaps this approach to professional development could

improve the outlook, performance and retention rate of FSL

teachers across Canada?

A new learning landscape for French

teachers in Canada

I hope to continue working with French as a Second Language

teachers to develop a professional learning model in schools

across Canada to help them take ownership of their learning

and their status as bilinguals. I want to help them explore what

it means to be bilingual representatives and advocates of French

and English in Canadian schools by using the findings to create a

musical podcast.

Using art and music to share the findings from the research

would offer a way to (re)imagine the narrative about FSL

teachers and transform the learning landscape in schools to

include collaborative learning networks. I also want to think

about the way we understand learning, to include collaborative

and social aspects, and how to bring that to FSL teachers’

colleagues, administrators, parents and students.

My study challenges current French teacher professional

learning models and working conditions by repositioning

teachers as active, self-directed learners in their own

professional learning. It offers potential to contribute to the

advancement of the field of FSL teacher professional learning. n

This article is also available in French: “Quand les enseignants canadiens de français

langue seconde innovent pour résister” at www.theconversation.com.

Réputée pour sa qualité

d’enseignement

Résultats scolaires

supérieurs

Le plus haut taux de

diplomation en Ontario

Le choix de sept

parents sur dix

#MeilleureEducation

EcolesCatholiquesOntario.ca

CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2018 7


PARTNER LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

French Library

BY INÈS VINSOT, COMMUNICATION & MARKETING, ALLIANCE FRANÇAISE

The Alliance Française is a vast international network created in

1883. Its mission is to spread the French language and promote

French and Francophone cultures throughout the world.

In the 134 countries where they have

a presence, the Alliance Française

branches are local, non-profit

organizations.

AF VANCOUVER

In Vancouver, the Alliance Française of

Vancouver has been actively promoting

interest in the French language and

culture since 1904. With more than

2000 students, more than 60 events

per year and more than 11 000 items in

our multimedia library, AF Vancouver is

aiming to raise awareness of French and

French-speaking world cultures, in all of

their dimensions.

www.alliancefrancaise.ca

AF CALGARY

With close to a 1,000 students and more

than 100 cultural activities every year, AF

Calgary, established in Calgary since 1947,

is proud to serve Calgarians in two great

campuses: in the heart of downtown and

in the beautiful historical building of the

old King Edward School in the SW of the

city. Our beautiful French media library

with more than 8 000 resources is the

premier place to access Francophone

culture in the city.

www.afcalgary.ca

AF EDMONTON

The AFE has more than 600 students

per year, all courses combined. The AFE

also offers business courses at many

Edmonton companies. Its media library

offers a wide range of magazines, books,

DVDs and CDs as well as children’s

material. In addition, the AFE organizes

many events including film screenings,

concerts, plays, readings and lectures.

www.af.ca/edmonton

AF MANITOBA

The Alliance Française du Manitoba

(AFM) has been operating since 1915 and

receives more than 1,100 registrations a

8 CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2018


PARTNER LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

year. The Alliance Française du Manitoba

in Winnipeg offers a comfortable open

space where lovers of French language and

culture can enjoy contemporary literature,

cinema, music and news. The Media

Centre’s wide range of resources includes

over 1,500 books, 1,000 DVDs, 500 CDs

and a learning corner with language

materials especially dedicated to

students and teachers.

www.afmanitoba.ca

AF TORONTO

AF Toronto with more than 6,500

students enrolled each year on its 5

campuses, is a dynamic cultural center

offering more than a hundred shows

of all kinds. From September to June,

the Alliance organizes many cultural

events and invites nearly 200 artists

representing all the Francophonie of

the world each year.

www.alliance-francaise.ca/fr

AF OTTAWA

AF Ottawa, established in 1905, offers

a library: a space in which you can feel

comfortable, study and discover our

variety of books, movies, CDs, audio

books, as well as additional material for

you to learn French! With more than

1 000 students and 40 events each year,

AF Ottawa aims to inspire learning,

curiosity and connect people…

All in French!

www.af.ca/ottawa

AF HALIFAX

The Library holds more than 10,000

books, CDs, DVDs and magazines

suitable for all ages and levels of

French. La Mondiathèque is open to the

general public, with borrowing privileges

reserved for members of the French

Cultural Center.

www.afhalifax.ca

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CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2018 9


Engaging Youth Voices

ACROSS CANADIAN PARENTS FOR FRENCH

BY CLÉMENCE CHARRUYER, COMMUNICATION, DIGITAL MEDIA & MARKETING COORDINATOR AT CPF NATIONAL

Emilie Josh

CPF Alberta Branch

Youth Director

Guillaume Fleury

CPF Nova Scotia Branch

Director

How did you become involved with CPF?

I’ve been involved with CPF Alberta since May 2017, so

E

about a year and a bit. I was between two post-secondary

programs (one being an undergraduate degree and the other

a diploma) and had a friend direct me to Young Canada Works

to find a summer job. I think she actually forwarded me the job

posting for a summer student at the CPF Alberta Branch. I worked

there for four months (May - August 2017) alongside another

summer student.

After I went back to school, Michael Tryon (ED of CPF Alberta

Branch) encouraged me to consider a board position as a Youth

Director, and I jumped on it, and here I am! It involves something

I’m passionate about (French education), tons of fun people and

it’s a great opportunity to be involved in the Albertan community

specifically, and potentially have an impact nationally.

I am actually a very recent member of CPF. French is my

G

mother tongue, and I have always been very passionate

about French and its promotion. I worked for the Explore*

program as an facilitator this past summer, and was invited last

year to a CPF retreat by one of my university teachers who also

happens to be the VP of CPF Nova Scotia Branch, Jan Claes.

Even if she had mentioned CPF to me in the past, I always

thought that it wasn’t for me as I am not Canadian or a parent.

But I was wrong! There is so much that can be done for French,

and I am now happy to contribute to CPF’s efforts as a member

of the Board of Directors.

* Explore is a five-week intensive French immersion bursary program

that is offered during the spring or summer for people with any skill

level in French. For more information, visit www.myexplore.ca.

10 CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2018


Speaking French opens many doors —

economically, culturally and socially.

Il faut continuer! – Guillaume Fleury

What do you feel the

ability to speak French has

brought to your life so far?

Oh, so much! The list covers

E a myriad of advantages, from

somewhat mundane aspects - like

the ability to read, write and listen in more

than one language - to the deeper, more

insightful features, such as a broader

view of culture and a more extensive

understanding of certain aspects of social

commentary.

I’ve found travelling to be incredibly

rewarding (especially in France, obviously!)

with the ability to speak French, but it

has also saved me randomly, in places

like Sweden and Spain, where the main

language is neither French nor English,

but the second language chosen by the

individual to learn is French.

Within the vein of culture, multiple

languages (beyond French) provide access

to so much more in terms of literature,

insight and humour, and offer an entirely

different perspective of life and living.

This, of course, fits into the concept

of “brain plasticity,” and while I won’t

go all science-y, each language frames

understanding slightly differently and

provides a distinct outlook on society

and life in general.

I’m originally from France, so you

G can imagine that speaking French

was essential in every aspect of

my life. Now that I live in Canada, I realize

how valuable it is to speak French. Many

people have told me about the advantage

it is when it comes to job opportunities.

Speaking French here in Canada also

allowed me to expand my social network

and become acquainted with a great

diversity of French speakers. It is always

a pleasure to meet Acadians, Quebecois,

Franco-Ontarians, Franco-Manitobans and

Franco-Albertans (I never knew there were

French communities in Alberta until I met

someone from Alberta)!

What are your future plans

– and how would keeping

up your French figure

into it?

I will hopefully never leave behind

E my French. Currently, I work in the

communications industry, and while

I love my job, I am considering returning

to school for graduate studies. Despite not

explicitly looking for a Canadian school,

options in Quebec are very tempting

(looking at you, Montreal!) for the field of

study in which I’m interested.

There are numerous ways to keep

up with the language, even without living

in a wholly-French-speaking community

- books, news and music are some

methods, and my personal favorite are

podcasts, as many offer unique views

from Francophone and French individuals.

They’re also usually pretty “local” in

that the people behind them put tons of

thought and care into the production of

the episodes. Two of my favorites are

Le Tchip (Arte radio) and En roue libre

(RTL radio).

I’m completing my last year of

G education, so hopefully next year

I will be teaching French. Keeping

up with my French would be necessary

because it is my main teachable and I hope

to teach French immersion or French core.

I also would love to become a member of

the Conseil scolaire acadien provincial.

As for keeping up with my French, I

love tutoring and I am always happy to

help my Anglophone friends improve their

English! And as previously mentioned, I am

also an facilitator for the Explore program.

I truly believe that those experiences are

and will be very beneficial to my goal of

becoming a French Teacher.

What advice would

you give to a student

considering dropping

out of French?

Does “don’t drop out of French”

E count?! Think about what (at

least) two languages do for your

future - especially given the increasing

integration of every country with this

“age of information” and the immediacy

in which content is created and shared

by people all around the world. All the

opportunities available to a unilingual

person are doubled with bilingualism,

which, especially as a student, is an avenue

to so many potential choices that could

affect the student’s future in a plethora of

incredible ways. Two languages gives you

access to two worlds, and what could be

better than that?

DON’T! French is useful and it’s a

G

beautiful language if you give it a

chance (yes, the grammar can be

tricky, but that’s a minor detail!) Speaking

French opens many doors - economically,

culturally and socially. Il faut continuer!

And because I know that learning

a new language can sometimes be a

challenge, I’m going to share my secret

weapon: Audio Books. They are great for

everyone in the process of learning a new

language because often reading is what

comes to you first, but listening or talking

can be harder. Audio books allow you to

work on that, and to make it easier you can

even follow what is being said by having

the book in front of you at the same time.

It helps you learn pronunciations, and you

can even choose the accent you prefer

(Canadian, US, UK). There are a lot of free

options available online, as for example on

the Radio-Canada website! n

CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2018 11


TECH & MEDIA

The article was first published on April 16, 2018, in the Language Portal of Canada’s Our Languages blog. A Translation Bureau initiative, the Language

Portal provides Canadians with a wide range of resources to help them communicate more effectively in English and French, and publishes weekly

articles by language lovers on the Our Languages blog. www.noslangues-ourlanguages.gc.ca/en/blogue-blog/enrichir-vocabulaire-enrich-vocabulary-eng

10 Practical Tips

TO ENRICH YOUR FRENCH VOCABULARY

BY LORRAYNE G. CAMPER, TEACHER, TRANSLATOR, RESEARCHER AND BLOGGER

2

When we learn a language,

Make French the display

especially at school, we study

language on your

grammar rules and verb

electronic devices

conjugations, we memorize sentences Change the language setting to French on

and sometimes even word lists. But your computer, cellphone or tablet.

when the time comes to speak, we may

feel unable to express our ideas clearly.

Read the news

Maybe we don’t have enough vocabulary 3 in French

to do so, or maybe the vocabulary we do When you read a French newspaper,

have isn’t useful in that situation.

choose a news article, pick out the

For example, let’s say you have to important words, and look them up

give your opinion on city traffic. You in the dictionary.

know what your view is, but you lack the

specific vocabulary to express it. Or let’s

Write a page in your

take a simpler, everyday example. After 4 journal for each of your

many hours of studying French, you want daily activities

to explain how to prepare one of your For example, if you go to the gym, at the

favourite recipes. You know the verbs you end of your workout, write up a summary

need for the steps, but you don’t know the to learn the French words for the machines

words for the ingredients. Or vice versa: and the muscles you used, and the

you know the words for the ingredients, exercises you did.

but not the verbs for the steps. So what

can you do to enrich your vocabulary

Check the weather

in a practical way, without creating or 5 forecast in French

memorizing word lists?

Break the ice with any Francophone by

Through my experience as a French using the appropriate words to describe

teacher and also as a foreign language the weather in each season.

learner, I’ve discovered a few simple but

6

effective strategies for learning new words.

Find out the French

Here are some everyday tips you may

name for your favourite

find helpful:

Read the French version

1 of product labels

Here in Canada, we have the wonderful

advantage of having the labels of many

products written in both official languages,

English and French.

12 CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2018

articles of clothing for

every season

This way, each time you wear those items

of clothing, you’ll think of their French

name. And you’ll find shopping easier

when you visit a Francophone province.

Create a Twitter account

7 in French

Even if you don’t like social media very

much, you can still learn vocabulary for

topics that interest you by following

the accounts of people, groups and

organizations (like the Language Portal

of Canada) that matter to you.

8

Add French captions

to your photos

Why not create an Instagram account

specifically to write French captions under

your photos? You can also ask your (new)

Francophone friends to suggest captions.

9

Enrich your vocabulary

through play

Click on Jeux sur le vocabulaire (vocabulary

quizzes) on the Resources of the Language

Portal of Canada website, and you’ll find

a variety of quizzes that will help you

discover new French words or refresh

your memory of old ones.

10

Research vocabulary

related to a topic that

interests you

TERMIUM Plus®, a terminology and

linguistic data bank, lists numerous

terms by subject field. That really helps in

retaining concepts and applying them in

everyday life.

Now, it’s your turn! What tips would

you add to this list? Share your ideas (or your

friends’ ideas) for learning new vocabulary.

Thanks in advance! Visit: www.noslanguesourlanguages.gc.ca/en/blogue-blog/enrichirvocabulaire-enrich-vocabulary-eng.

n


TECH & MEDIA

How To Text In French

BY CAMP TOURNESOL

Remember when you had to click a number on your

cellphone keypad three times just to type one letter?

Maybe your child isn’t even aware that it was ever so

frustrating to text, but they’ve kept the tradition of shortening

every. Single. Phrase. ‘I don’t know’ becomes ‘idk’, ‘to be

honest’ becomes ‘tbh’, and of course ‘laugh out loud’

becomes the classic ‘lol’.

Texting has become a

convenient way of

communication, but does

your child know how to

text in French? Maybe

they’ve made a friend

at camp with whom

they can keep in touch

with through texting…

en français of course!

Here’s a fun list of texting

abbreviations and slang

to use. n

DEPUIS 1983

CAMPS D’IMMERSION EN FRANÇAIS

• Pour étudiants de 7 à 17 ans

• Centre-ville de Montréal

• Camp de jour et résidence

www.mwscamps.com

Pour information:

à Toronto: (416) 921-6998

à Montréal: (514) 531-4193

office@mwscamps.com

CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2018 13


LEARNING

Increasing the Opportunities to

Study Law in French

BY CAROLINE MAGNAN, B.A, LL.B, LL.M

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR / DIRECTOR OF THE PAN-CANADIAN FRENCH

COMMON LAW PROGRAM, UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA, FACULTY OF LAW

Despite recent Census data showing

that the English-French bilingualism

rate in Canada has reached

record rates at 17.9%, French-speaking

communities outside Quebec continue

to experience barriers when accessing

justice in French. Many Francophones

remain unaware of their right to French

language services or uncertain as to how

to exercise those rights. While courts

are making progress in certain areas of

the country, the judicial apparatus is not

always user-friendly for Francophone

litigants and lawyers. Proceedings in

French tend to be long, difficult and

costly. As a result, Francophone parties

often hesitate to exercise their right

to proceed in French because there

is a lingering perception that it would

somehow annoy the court and thereby

undermine their chances of getting a fair

hearing in a legal system that sometimes

appears unwelcoming to the other

official language.

Part of the challenge is ensuring that

Canadian lawyers from coast to coast

understand the importance of our official

languages in the practice of law in Canada

and their corresponding professional

obligations to bilingual clients. Law schools

throughout Canada are increasingly rising

to this challenge and recognizing that

many of its students are bilingual, having

been through French immersion programs

for example, they have the requisite

capabilities of taking law courses in French

and subsequently practising law in French.


Tava Burton, a third-year

student enrolled in the CCLF program

at the University of Saskatchewan,

College of Law, states:

The CCLF program has allowed me to

continue my education in French – an

asset that becomes of greater importance

in our ever-increasingly diverse cultural

landscape. Having completed my primary

and secondary schooling in the French

immersion program not only allows me to

communicate in both of Canada’s official

languages, but will allow me to contribute

to my community going forward.


The University of Ottawa French

Common Law Program offers courses

en français at the Faculties of Law of the

University of Saskatchewan, the University

of Calgary, the University of Alberta,

and the Peter Allard School of Law of

the University of British-Columbia. The

more robust program, the Certification

de common law en français (CCLF), gives

14 CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2018


LEARNING

bilingual students of participating law

schools the unique opportunity to

obtain a Certification in French

Common Law from the University of

Ottawa during the completion of their

three-year Juris Doctor. This project took

flight thanks to the collaborative effort

of many important stakeholders that

are members of the Réseau national

de formation en justice, an initiative

supported by the Association des

collèges et universités de la francophonie

canadienne (ACUFC). Students gain

valuable skills in French legal writing and

advocacy as well as a deep understanding

of the important issues surrounding

language rights in Canada. Students

complete an exchange in Ottawa, compete

in a moot court competition with teams

from across Canada, are paired with

experienced French-speaking mentors

in the legal profession, and have the

Law schools throughout

Canada are increasingly

rising to this challenge

and recognizing that

many of its students are

bilingual, having been

through French immersion

programs... they have the

requisite capabilities of

taking law courses in

French and subsequently

practising law in French.

opportunity to complete a credited

internship with law firms, organizations

and government offices that work in both

official languages. The CCLF gives students

the chance to develop practical skills all

while contributing to the vibrancy of their

local linguistic communities.

Since 2016, more than 40 law students

in Western Canada have taken these new

French-language common law classes and

the demand for more similar opportunities

is steadily increasing. A large majority

of these students have participated in

French immersion programs throughout

elementary and high school.

Equipped with important knowledge

of the law in both official languages and

a richer understanding of language rights

in Canada, CCLF students stand out on

the job market and are poised to become

the bilingual lawyers and judges that the

Canadian legal system requires. n

COME LEARN FRENCH

IN QUEBEC

AT THE CENTRE LINGUISTIQUE DU COLLÈGE DE JONQUIÈRE

PROGRAMS

FOR EVERYONE

Youth

Adult

Customized

Online

3 to 5 weeks French

immersion

Including workshops

& socio-cultural

activities

Home-stay

(3 meals day)

Experience

Quebec Culture

in a

100%

French

environment

langues-jonquiere.ca

1-800-622-0352

centrelinguistique@cegepjonquiere.ca

CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2018 15


Becoming a

Youth

Ambassador

for Bilingualism

ANJANA BALACHANDRAN

GRADE 12 STUDENT AT

LONGFIELDS DAVIDSON HEIGHTS, OCDSB

BY CLÉMENCE CHARRUYER, COMMUNICATION, DIGITAL MEDIA

& MARKETING COORDINATOR AT CPF NATIONAL

16 CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2018


In August 2018, 30 students from across Canada

went to Montreal and participated in the National

Ambassador Youth Forum (FNJA), organized by

French for the Future.

French and hope to inspire the future

generation. I want other French students

to be proud of being bilingual. I hope that

by sharing my story and experience in

discovering myself, other young Canadians

are able to find the meaning and value of

having the ability to express themselves in

both official languages.

The free program trains bilingual

students enrolled in French programs

(Core French, extended French,

French immersion and Francophone

schools) to become FFF ambassadors.

Their mission is to promote the French

language and official bilingualism in their

schools throughout the year by organizing

activities related to French.

Anjana Balachandran, a Grade 12

student enrolled in a French immersion

program at an English high school in

Barrhaven, Ottawa, was one of them and

agreed to share her experience with us.

1. How did speaking French during the

French for the Future National Ambassador

Youth Forum experience differ from

speaking French in the classroom?

The National Conference was an experience

I will never forget where we were

able to immerse ourselves in the French

culture! I got to spend time with other

young people like me who were passionate

and inspired. The chance to live our

lives in the rhythm of our passions - the

French language. This year’s location was

Montreal, Quebec - the capital of French

in North America. In the classroom, we

often learn the theory but during the

conference, we were able to authentically

put our knowledge to practice. This

allowed for a total immersion into French

while discovering different parts of the

Quebec heritage and culture.

2. What leadership knowledge or skill did

you gain from the experience?

Every Youth Ambassador was a leader

already, whether that be in their school

or community. The forum allowed us to

grow further as leaders through various

workshops and leadership training in addition

to the amazing support networks.

It was truly astonishing to learn the

different ways each of us are leaders in

our community. Additionally, each person

has their own path in respect to being

a leader and the FNJA emphasized the

importance of paving your own path.

3. What did you learn about yourself?

More than meeting new friends and

attending excellent workshops I think the

biggest takeaway for me was the shift

in perspective. This forum has changed

my perspective in a way that, learning

languages opens the window to different

cultures and enables one to learn about

the journey and life experience of others.

This opportunity for personal growth

would not be possible by merely being

unilingual. To elaborate, because I am

fluent in French, I am able to connect with

someone else who is merely unilingual,

learn their life journey and share my own…

essentially connect on a personal level.

4. Did anything happen during this

experience that you were surprised

at or didn’t anticipate?

One of the factors that made this experience

unforgettable is making new friends

from around the country. I was so blessed

to have the opportunity to meet 30 young

driven individuals from all across Canada,

all very accomplished and driven to

make a change. I am so proud to say that

through FNJA I was able to meet other

like-minded young people from coast

to coast to coast. As a result, I had the

opportunity to gain insight into the various

different aspects of French culture,

from White Rock, British Columbia to

Hampshire, Nova Scotia and everywhere

in between.

5. What follow up activities are you

planning or implementing at your

school this year?

French, both linguistically and culturally,

has become a valuable part of my life. By

sharing my experience with other students

I hope to emphasize the importance of

6. How has this experience changed your

attitude towards being bilingual?

My ability to communicate in French has

enriched so many of my experiences.

The realization of being able to fluently

engage with other students from different

provincial, linguistic and cultural backgrounds

was truly a moment of personal

growth. I became increasingly aware of

the importance young Canadians place on

being bilingual and I am grateful for being

able to show my appreciation for French

as it has shaped my identity as a young

Canadian.

I also learned a lot in regards to the

struggles of the preservation and promotion

of French. In Canada, French is the

second official language but often times

it is not acknowledged as so. By means of

programs such as French for Future, young

Canadians are not only able to grow as

young leaders in their community but able

to come to the realization of the devastating

reality of the diminishing language.

7. What advice would you give to other

FSL students who have not had an

opportunity to have an experience

like this?

Keep exploring – this would be the advice

I would give to FSL students. Continue

seeking opportunities to grow as a French

student, whether it is through cultural

opportunities, pursuing postsecondary

studies or social network. Being open to

new experiences allowed me to grow

culturally and linguistically, this is an

incredibly valuable part of my life.

More than the grammar, I believe the

cultural experience is more important, its

to be able to walk on the streets of Quebec

and connect with others. Moreover, the

ability to communicate in French enhances

and redefines the meaning of being Canadian

- so never lose sight of that. To those

who are hesitant to continue in the French

program, I assure you that it’s worth it! n

CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2018 17


EVENTS

Local Forum: Yellowknife

Organized by our partner French

for the Future, Local Forums

are events that gather French

Second Language and French First

Language students from Grade 9 to 12

for a full day of activities in French.

Thanks to the presence of stakeholders

and artists from the Francophone

community, students are given the

opportunity to learn more about the

cultural and professional value of being

bilingual. It is also the occasion to facilitate

dialogue between French as a Second

Language (FSL) and French as a First

Language (FFL) students, while

celebrating Francophone cultures.

Hosted in over fifteen cities across

Canada, Local Forums welcome thousands

of students every year. And these events

are free for all participants!

On Tuesday October 23, French for the

Future’s Ottawa Local Forum will be taking

local forums

place at the University of Ottawa, with

keynote speaker Daniel Richer and a show

from Improtéine.

And in 2019, CPF Northwest Territories

Branch will be coordinating a Local Forum

taking place in Yellowknife! We are looking

forward to bringing together the FSL

and FFL students, as well as featuring the

strong francophone presence and artists

of the community.

Keep an eye on www.french-future.org/

programs/local-forums for all the details!

Recognition from our Partner, CASLT

On September 28, 2017, the Canadian Association

of Second Language Teachers awarded the Robert

Roy Award to Vice President of the CPF National

Board of Directors and Professor in the Faculty of

Education at UBC, Dr. Wendy Carr. The Honorary

Lifetime Membership Award was awarded to current

Treasurer of the CPF National Board of Directors,

Valerie Pike.

Congratulations to both!

18 CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2018


KEY CPF CONTACTS ACROSS CANADA

National office

1104 - 170 Laurier Ave. W., Ottawa, ON K1P 5V5

T: 613.235.1481 F: 613.230.5940

cpf@cpf.ca cpf.ca

Quebec office & Nunavut support

qc.cpf.ca

British Columbia & Yukon

227-1555 W 7th Ave., Vancouver, BC V6J 1S1

T: 778.329.9115 TF: 1.800.665.1222 (in BC & Yukon only)

info@cpf.bc.ca bc-yk.cpf.ca

Alberta

211-15120 104 Ave. NW, Edmonton, AB T5P 0R5

T: 780.433.7311

cpfab@ab.cpf.ca ab.cpf.ca

Northwest Territories

PO Box 1538, Yellowknife, NT X1A 2P2

T: 867.873.2054

cpf-nwt@northwestel.net nwt.cpf.ca

Saskatchewan

303-115 2nd Ave. N., Saskatoon, SK S7K 2B1

T: 306.244.6151 TF: 1.800.561.6151 (in Saskatchewan only)

cpfsask@sasktel.net sk.cpf.ca

Manitoba

101-475 Provencher Blvd., Winnipeg, MB R2J 4A7

T: 204.222.6537 TF: 1.877.737.7036 (in Manitoba only)

cpfmb@cpfmb.com mb.cpf.ca

Ontario

103-2055 Dundas St. E., Mississauga, ON L4X 1M2

T: 905.366.1012 TF: 1.800.667.0594 (in Ontario only)

cpfont@cpfont.on.ca on.cpf.ca

New Brunswick

PO Box 4462, Sussex, NB E4E 5L6

T: 506.434.8052 TF: 1.877.273.2800 (in New Brunswick only)

cpfnb@cpfnb.net nb.cpf.ca

Nova Scotia

8 Flamingo Dr., Halifax, NS B3M 4N8

T: 902.453.2048 TF: 1.877.273.5233 (in Nova Scotia only)

cpf@ns.sympatico.ca ns.cpf.ca

Prince Edward Island

PO Box 2785, Charlottetown, PE CIA 8C4

T: 902.368.3703 glecky@cpfpei.pe.ca pei.cpf.ca

Newfoundland & Labrador

PO Box 8601, Stn A, St. John’s, NL A1B 3P2

T: 709.579.1776 ed@cpfnl.ca nl.cpf.ca

TF: 1.877.576.1776 (in Newfoundland & Labrador only)

Université d’Ottawa | University of Ottawa

FRENCH IMMERSION

at uOttawa

Arts Engineering Health Sciences Management Science Social Sciences

A unique opportunity with unparalleled support!

• French immersion available in 86 undergraduate programs

• Open to core, extended and French immersion students

• Special courses to make the transition to bilingual university studies

• An extra $1,000 per year for studying bilingually

• An authentic bilingual environment in Canada’s capital

immersion@uOttawa.ca

www.immersion.uOttawa.ca

CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2018 19


OUR ADVERTISERS

AQEFLE

T: 418.832.6244 E: info@aqefle.com

W: www.aqefle.com

Campus Saint-Jean – University of Alberta

T: 780.465.8763 F: 780.465.8760

E: alary@ualberta.ca W: www.csj.ualberta.ca

Canadian Parents for French – Saskatchewan

T: 306.244.6151 F: 306.244.8872

E: cpf.sk.ed@sasktel.net W: www.sk.cpf.ca

Canadian Parents for French – Ontario

T: 905.366.1012 TF: 1.800.667.0594 (in Ontario only)

E: cpfont@cpfont.on.ca W: on.cpf.ca

Centre linguistique du Collège de Jonquière

T: 418.542.0352 TF: 1.800.622.0352 F: 418.542.3536

E: centrelinguistique@cegepjonquiere.ca

W: www.langues-jonquiere.ca

Collège Boréal

T: 705.521.6024 Ext. 1062 F: 705.521.6039

E: publicite@collegeboreal.ca W: www.collegeboreal.ca

Les écoles catholiques de l’Ontario

W: www.ecolescatholiquesontario.ca

La Cité Universitaire Francophone

T: 306.585.3226 E: celine.galophe@uregina.ca

W: www.lacite.uregina.ca

MWS Camps

T: 514.531.4193 E: vanessa@mwscamps.com

W: http://mwscamps.com

Oxford Learning

T: 519.473.1207 E: info@oxfordlearning.com

W: www.oxfordlearning.com

RK Publishing Inc

T: 416.785.0312 E: frenchtextbooks@rkpublising.com

W: www.rkpublishing.com

University of Ottawa

T: 613.562.5800 (1346) E: nlauzon@uOttawa.ca

W: www.uottawa.ca

University of Sudbury

T: 705.673.5661 E: se_noel@usudbury.ca

W: www.usudbury.ca

Watermelon-Works

T: 519.539.1902 E: jgray@watermelon-works.com

W: www.watermelon-works.com

20 CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2018


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