November 2018 Envision Equity

jcpsdep

J E F F E R S O N C O U N T Y P U B L I C S C H O O L S

DIVERSITY, EQUITY, AND POVERTY DEPARTMENT

NOVEMBER 2018 | ISSUE 55

RESOURCE

TEACHER

SPOTLIGHT

Lamanda Moore-Rodriguez

& Matt Ammerman

COLLEGE ACCESS

for Students in Foster Care

THE MODEL

Recognizing Culturally

Responsive and

Innovative Classroom

Teachers

And More!

COMMUNITY

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1


College Access

for students in

foster care

By Lindsay Bale

JCPS Foster Care Coordinator

It’s FAFSA time!! According to national data

from the Legal Center for Foster Care and

Education, between 70% and 84% of foster

youth want to go to college, but only

31%-45% enroll in college (April, 2018). Of the 11.6

million jobs created since the Great Recession,

11.5 million have gone to workers with at least

some college education. The weekly income of

someone with a bachelor’s degree is more than

double that of someone with less than a high

school diploma, with these income trends holding

true over the course of one’s lifetime.

One of the ways we can help students continue on

to post-secondary education is by making it

affordable for them! Did you know that students

in foster care or who were in foster care any time

after the age of 13 can file an independent status

on the FAFSA? This means they do not have to

include parental income in their application, in

many cases allowing them to qualify for the

maximum financial aid award.

The FAFSA application window opened October

1 st . Awards are made on a first come, first serve

basis so it is best to complete the FAFSA as soon as

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Photo, google images


possible. If you know a student in

foster care who will graduate in

2019, help him/her complete the

FAFSA!

Be sure to talk to students about

the importance of grants versus

loans. Students may not need to

take out any loans if they are

eligible for the college tuition

waiver, tuition assistance, or

educational training voucher.

In Kentucky, students who age

out of foster care or are adopted

from foster care (and meet

certain requirements) are

eligible for additional support

Photo, Abdul Sharif

provided by the tuition waiver, which allows them to attend any public university in Kentucky and have their

tuition waived. Students who are in foster care and remain committed to the child welfare agency beyond

their 18 th birthday qualify for tuition assistance. Find detailed information here: http://

manuals.sp.chfs.ky.gov/chapter4/12/Pages/4284HigherEducationAssistance.aspx. In addition to the

tuition waiver and tuition assistance, students who were adopted after the age of 16 or students who exit

foster care after their 18 th birthday may be eligible for Educational and Training Voucher funds to help with

the cost of a job training program or post-secondary education costs not covered by the tuition waiver. Find

detailed information here: http://manuals.sp.chfs.ky.gov/chapter4/12/Pages/

4285EducationalTrainingVoucherforAgedOutYouth.aspx.

While students in foster care want to attend college, many of them do not enroll because of financial

concerns, needing to work, and lack of housing. The supports afforded by the state and federal governments

could help alleviate some of these barriers. Be a champion for a youth in foster care! If a student in foster

care or who has been in foster care is in need of assistance with FAFSA completion, contact your Regional

Independent Living Coordinator, Jeff Culver, at 595-4504 ext. 5704 or one of your KHEAA Outreach

Counselors, Candice Johnson 541-7445 and Steven Held 352-5697. Visit fafsalouisville.org for more

information. As always, contact your JCPS Foster Care Liaison for any educational needs you have for

students in foster care. You can reach Lindsay at 485-6358 or Lindsay.bale@jefferson.kyschools.us


The Model

Recognizing Culturally Responsive and Innovative Classroom Teachers

Name: Cynthia Fields

School: Newburg Middle School

My name is Cynthia Fields. This is

my 8th year of teaching, and my

fourth year at Newburg Middle School.

This year I am teaching 6th grade

Language Arts. I have a Bachelor’s of Arts

Degree in English and a Master’s of Arts in

Teaching. I was a recipient of the Hilliards

Lyons 2015 Excellence Award. My passion is

establishing a positive classroom

environment with procedures, daily

routines and engaging lessons. Each

month at Newburg, I develop and facilitate

the Effective Classroom Management

Professional Development.

I recently retired from the United States

Postal Service, where I worked for 33 years.

I believe that creating a positive classroom

is paramount if students are going to have

an equitable and safe learning

environment. In order to do this, first you

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Photo by Abdul Sharif


must have high expectations for students. Teachers must acquire a mindset that all

students can learn. I truly believe that my students are distinguished scholars of

integrity and honor. I speak this to them every day. I explain that distinguished

means you are set apart from everyone else. You are special. Scholar means that

you are smart,

and smart doesn't

mean you get all

“As.” It means

that you must

give your best

effort every day.

Integrity means

you are honest

and trustworthy.

You will do the

right thing when

no one is

watching. Once

they know who

they are… their behavior, posture, and conversation changes.

My classroom is a community where scholars are willing to support and help each

other. We celebrate each other successes and failures. Yes, we celebrate failures. My

students know the positive mindset of failing means that we have the opportunity to

learn from our mistakes. Therefore, every scholar speaks with confidence because

they know their classmates will celebrate them by shouting out “We celebrate you!”

and “You are learning!” The whole class celebrates by clapping. They even celebrate

me when I make mistakes and I smile and say “thank you.” It is an amazing positive

learning environment.

How do I make this happen? There are many reward systems in place. First, there is a

tiger (school’s mascot) dollar that students can earn. When a student is observed

doing an act of kindness, I may or may not give them a tiger dollar. My scholars know

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that showing kindness is what we should do. Every so often, I may show my

appreciation by giving them a tiger dollar. Students can redeem this tiger dollar

from the Integrity Store every Friday. In this store, they can buy erasers, notebooks,

lead pencils, and snacks. Everything in the store is worth one tiger dollar. Another

reward system is the competition

with the teacher’s marble jar and

the student’s marble jar. For

example, if students come into

the room meeting all

expectations, they can get a

handful of marbles in the

student’s jar. However, if they

choose not to meet expectations, I

will get the marbles in my jar. The

jar that fills up first will win. If the

teacher’s jar fills up first, the

student’s jar will be emptied and they will have to start all over. On the other hand,

if the students jar fills up first, they will earn a reward of their choice.

Once I establish a respectful and

safe classroom environment,

students are ready to learn. To

capture and keep their attention,

my lessons must be engaging,

relevant and culturally responsive.

My most recent lesson was on Dia

De Los Muertos (Day of the Dead).

Students annotated the article

“Day of the Dead Sweets and

Treats” from Newsela. After reading

the article, students had a performance test to show if they understood the article.

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Scholars had four choices to show their learning: 1. Popplet - a mind mapping

app; 2. Shadow Puppet EDU- a media app for videos; 3. Hands-on activity of

building an

ofrenda (altar)

or 4. making a

mask skull.

Surprisingly,

every student

chose the

hands-on

activities. After

completing

the projects,

students must

defend their

project by

explaining the

historical

tradition from the article and how it relates to their project. Students will defend

their answer by completing a Google Slide and by giving a presentation before

their classmates. They will take this Google Slide and upload it in Shadow

Puppet, a media for creating videos through pictures. This will be uploaded to

their Backpack to show their skills of communicating, creating and using higher

level thinking.

Click here for video story.

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ENVISION EQUITY NOVEMBER 2018

2018 JCPS Hip-Hop

Summit Recap

By Abdul Sharif, Generalist—Diversity, Equity, and

Poverty Programs Department

Photo, Abdul Sharif

On October 18, DEP hosted the second annual Hip-Hop Summit at the Academy @

Shawnee. The Hip-Hop Summit helps students use their voices; provides JCPS

educators with the tools to use Hip-Hop, poetry, and movement to build rapport with their

students; and gives students an opportunity to display their talents. During the Hip-Hop Summit,

teachers attended breakout sessions that provided them with methods and strategies to use Hip-

Hop to engage their students. These breakout sessions included such topics as “Black Girls:

Living, Thriving, Resisting, and Being Carefree,” which was facilitated by Dr. Ahmad Washington,

an assistant professor at the University of Louisville, and Cassandra Webb, a planning and

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programs associate

at Cities United. In

this session,

participants

examined and

considered how

Black girls and Black

women successfully

negotiate and resist

institutionalized

sexism and misogyny

in academic settings

through a number of

ingenious rhetorical

and kinesthetic

practices (e.g.,

ratchedness, Black Girl Magic). Additionally, Dr. Damien Sweeney, a JCPS counselor,

facilitated a breakout session titled “The Warm-Up: A #HipHopEd Exemplar.” This session

was intended to

show educators

how to bring Hip-

Hop to the

classroom or to a

group counseling

session. Attendees

participated in this

breakout session

from the lens of a

student in order to

learn unique ways

they can reach

kids through Hip-

Hop.

Above, Dr. Brandon McCormack speaks during the

opening of the Hip-hop Summit.

Above, Dr. Ahmad Washington speaks during the opening

of the Hip-hop Summit.

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In addition to breakout

sessions, attendees of

the 2018 Hip-Hop

Summit also heard from

keynote speaker Dr.

Brandon McCormack,

enjoyed live music

provided by AMPED and

The ELITEgiance DJ

Mentoring Program,

and received a live

performance from

students in the Saffiyah

Dance Program.

This was our second Annual Hip-Hop Summit, but it will not be our last. According to

JCPS Chief Equity Officer John Marshall, DEP hopes to expand the future Hip-Hop

Summits to “address some of the racial disparities and inequities in JCPS and to be

more innovative in what we do.” Dr. Marshall stated that “We are teaching in the same

way we taught in the 1980s, and this must change.” And through innovative professional

developments like the Hip-Hop Summit we believe this change will happen.

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The Model

Recognizing Culturally Responsive and Innovative Classroom Teachers

Name: Kevin Ashford

School: Crosby Middle School

M

y name is Kevin Ashford. I

was born in Wilson, North

Carolina. My family

moved to Hopkinsville, Kentucky

when he was 8 years old. There I

graduated from Christian County

High School. I earned my bachelors

in Art Education from Kentucky

State University and my Masters in

Education from Spalding

University. I has been working

for JCPS as an art teacher at Crosby

Middle School for 19 years. As an

educator, I have also worked with

the Louisville Urban League and

the Louisville Art Society after

school programs.

Click here for video story.

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Continue on next page

Photo by Abdul Sharif


DEARTH OF BLACK MALE

TEACHERS DISCUSSED AT

COLLOQUIUM

By Jamal Watson

Executive editor of Diverse: Issues In Higher Education.

Reprinted with permission from Diverse: Issues In Higher Education, www.diverseeducation.com

Written October 25, 2018.

Colleges and universities should be much more aggressive in recruiting and

preparing Black males to become school teachers.

That was one of the many sentiments expressed on Thursday among scholars and

practitioners who gathered at the International Colloquium on Black Males in Education in

Dublin.

The number of Black males in the U.S. teacher workforce continues to hover at about 2

percent – a dismal number — that former U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan tried to

tackle back in March 2012 when he launched a national initiative aimed at recruiting and

training 80,000 new teachers.

In other countries across the globe, the numbers are equally troubling.

Dr. Chance W. Lewis, the Carol Grotnes Belk Distinguished Professor of Urban Education at

the University of North Carolina-Charlotte said that colleges and universities in the U.S.

could do more to steer Black male athletes at their institutions to consider pursuing

teacher education programs.

Dr. Chance W. Lewis speaking at the International Colloquium on Black Males in

Education.

“This is the opportunity for recruitment,” said Lewis. “All it would take is a conversation

across campus.”

That conversation — between faculty, athletic advisers and coaches — is critical to

increasing the numbers, said Lewis, whose book Black Male Teachers: Diversifying the

United States’ Teacher Workforce that he co-wrote with Dr. Ivory A. Toldson, has been

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hailed as a roadmap for preparing

administrators on how best to train Black

male students for a career in education.

Lewis said that he’s witnessed an

increased in the number of education

majors among Black males once an

institution has created a pipeline and has

made this issue a top priority.

“There is tremendous opportunities on

your campus,” Lewis told those at the

colloquium, adding that Black male

graduates of teacher education programs

have a strong track record of gaining

employment post-graduation and can also

coach a sport in addition to teaching in

their subject area.

Now in its seventh year, the colloquium

has become a meeting place for

interdisciplinary scholars and

practitioners from across the world to

commune and discuss critical outcomes

for young Black males and boys.

“This year’s colloquium has been

emotionally and psychologically

transformative,” said Dr. James L. Moore,

III., Vice Provost for Diversity at The Ohio

State University and co-chair of the

colloquium. “This year we attracted the

right stakeholders, thought leaders,

researchers and students to advance the

work around Black males beyond the

continental divide.”

Dr. Lemuel W. Watson, the dean of the

School of Education at Indiana University

and Dr. Gregory J. Vincent, the CEO and

chairman of Sigma Pi Phi are among some

of those prominent stakeholders.

Dr. Jerlando F.L. Jackson, the Vilas

Distinguished Professor of Higher

Education at University of Wisconsin-

Madison and the chair of the colloquium,

said that the decision to examine

Frederick Douglass’s time in Ireland in a

year that the world is celebrating his

200th birthday, is particularly meaningful.

“The 2018 Colloquium has been a

tremendous learning experience that has

drawn important and critical connections

between Ireland and Black America,” said

Jackson. “Participants have gotten to hear

about the origins of the term ‘political

blackness” and the times and

contributions of Frederick Douglass.

He said that the first three years of the

gathering was intentionally smaller and

participation was by invitation only.

Since then, there has been a steady and

growing interest in the colloquium.

“I certainly have appreciated the growth,

the committed returnees and the new

participants each year,” said Jackson. “I’m

delighted that folks saw value in the

Colloquium being in Ireland and how

Frederick Douglass provides us a platform

to clarify the impact that Black males have

had internationally for quite some time.”

Jamal Watson can be reached

at jwatson1@diverseeducation.com. You

can follow him on Twitter

@jamalericwatson

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Diversity, Equity, and Poverty Department

The Model

Recognizing Culturally Responsive and Innovative Classroom Teachers

Name: Jeramiah Elsner

School: The Academy @

Shawnee School

MR. Elsner is a graduate of Purdue

University with a B.S. in Biology. He

also graduated from the University

of Louisville with an M.A.T. in Secondary

Education and a Ed.S. in Educational

Administration. Mr. Elsner’s teaching career

stands more than 15 Years—with 10 years

teaching with the Archdiocese of Louisville, and

the last 5 years at The Academy @ Shawnee

Mr. Elsner’s favorite subject is AP

Environmental Science. He believe PBL projects

are the most influential at students achieving

the mastery of standards. With student choice,

students are motivated and engaged in the

learning environment.


"My philosophy? Simplicity plus variety."

—Hank Stram

Click here for video story and check out

Mr. Peters’ article on the next page.

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Photo by Abdul Sharif


Resource

Teacher

Spotlight

Ms. Lamanda Moore-

Rodriguez

ENVISION EQUITY SEPTEMBER 2018

L

aManda Moore Rodriguez is an

Equity and Inclusion Resource

Teacher for the Department of

Equity and Poverty Programs in JCPS.

She earned her Master of Arts in

Teaching from Bellarmine University

and is currently continuing her

education at Spalding University in the

Instructional Leadership program. Her

background as a former Literacy Coach

and Reading Recovery teacher has

given her the opportunity to present at

both the district and national level.

She has presented at the Reading

Recovery National Conference as well

as the Literacy for All Conference in

Providence, Rhode

Island. LaManda has a passion for

literacy and believes that it, and a

quality education is the key to ending

the cycle of poverty.

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Photo, LaManda Moore-Rodriguez


Resource

Teacher

Spotlight

Mr. Matt Ammerman

ENVISION EQUITY NOVEMBER 2018

Matt Ammerman is in his seventh year working in education and first as an Equity &

Inclusion Resource Teacher with the Diversity, Equity, & Poverty Programs. He has

held a variety of roles within the school setting including data manager, College &

Career Readiness coach, middle school ECE

teacher, and most recently as an EBD

resource teacher at the elementary school

level. He received his B.S. in Sport

Administration from the University of

Louisville and his MAT with a focus in Special

Education from the University of the

Cumberlands.

As an educator, Matt strives to ensure

all students have a voice in the

classroom and are treated as valued

members of their school. Matt and his wife

Kara have three kids, oldest son Charlie (pre-

K student at Farmer Elementary) and

one year old twins, Madelyn and William.

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Photo, LaManda Moore-Rodriguez


Coaching Students with DACA

College Access

DACA and undocumented students can go to

KY colleges and universities.

Per CPE policy KRS 13:0245 Section 8:

• An undocumented student who graduates

from a Kentucky high school can enroll at

Kentucky colleges/universities as in-state

residents for tuition purposes.

Need help navigating the application process?

Contact Assistant Director, Diversity

Recruitment- Aimee Huffstetler

502.852.1295, aimee.huffstetler@louisville.edu

Scholarships

These scholarships and resources are

open to DACA, and in some other cases,

undocumented students:

» Migrant Network Collection

» Hispanic Scholarship Fund

» SHPE Foundation

» Latino Student Resource Guide (LLEO)

Resources

» United We Dream (UWD)

» Dream Educational Empowerment Program

(DEEP)

» Scholarships A-Z

» My (Un)Documented Life

Programs & Organizations

The Latino Leadership and College Experience

Camp is a local, community based program

that provides college coaching and leadership

development to Latinx and immigrant youth

including undocumented and DACA students.

For more information visit www.thellcec.org

Kentucky Dream Coalition is an immigrant

youth led organization focused on supporting

the undocumented and DACA-mented youth

and students in the state through organizing,

workshops and mentoring.

For more information visit www.facebook.com/

kentuckydream/

FAFSA

Unfortunately, undocumented and DACA-mented students cannot

receive state or federal financial aid.

DACA students can complete the FAFSA for scholarship purposes.

Step 1: Like all applicants, your first step should be to create an FSA

ID for yourself and your family. If parents do not have a SSN do NOT

create an FSA ID with an ITIN (individual tax identification number).

Undocumented parents and students cannot create an FSA ID or use

an ITIN on FAFSA forms at https://fsaid.ed.gov/npas/index.htm

Step 2: There are 6 sections on the FAFSA: Student Demographics

(which includes student eligibility), School Selection, Dependency

Status, Parent Demographics, Financial Information and Sign & Submit.

The two sections that are most confusing for DACA recipients are

the Student Demographic section (particularly, the student eligibility

questions) and Parent Information (if parents are undocumented).

Step 3: Students can enter their income information manually or

through the IRS retrieval tool if they filed taxes.

Step 4: If the parents of a DACA recipient are undocumented, they

must also not misrepresent themselves. When reporting parental

information, do not use an ITIN in place of a Social Security Number.

Parental information should be entered as follows:

» A parent can complete FAFSA using “000-00-0000” for PARENT

I SSN AND “999-99-9999” for PARENT II (Note: if parent holds

ITIN to file taxes, do not use in place of SSN)

» Parents’ income info must entered manually. Do not try to use the

IRS Data Retrieval tool.

» Because parents don’t have a SSN, they cannot create an FSA ID.

Therefore, parents must print, sign, and mail in signature page.

There is a bar code on the signature page that will match your

parent’s signature to your specific application once the signature

page is mailed into the FAFSA office listed on the signature page.

There is no need to print the entire application. Just send in the

signature page.

Step 5: On the signature/submission pages, students can sign with

their FSA ID. The parent must sign and mail in the signature page. For

the 2019-2020 school year, send the parent signature page to:

Federal Student Aid Programs

P.O. Box 7652

London, KY 40472-7652

Step 6: You will be able to check the status of your FAFSA online

via www.fafsa.ed.gov with the same FSA ID and PIN number you

created when you filed the FAFSA. Once the parent signature page is

processed, you will be able to access your Student Aid Report (SAR)

to view your EFC (expected family contribution), which is the number

that demonstrates your need This information is important for needbased

scholarships.

Adapted from BCTC Latinx Outreach “Coaching Students with DACA”

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Books for Young Readers

ENVISION EQUITY NOVEMBER 2018

A Card for My Father

By Samantha Thornhill

Illustrated by Morgan Clement

Penny Candy Books, 2018

Ages 5-11

Go Show the World: A Celebration of Indigenous Heroes

By Wab Kinew

Illustrated by Joe Morse

Tundra Books, 2018

Ages 5-9

A Card for My Father is the first book in a planned trilogy about

how a father’s incarceration impacts his school-aged daughter,

Flora. Flora has never met her father and her mother does not

like to discuss him. She has so many questions about who he is

that remain unanswered. One thing Flora knows for sure is that

Father’s Day celebrations at school are painful and

uncomfortable. How will Flora manage when her teacher assigns

a project about fathers?

Go Show the World celebrates Native heroes from many different

cultures, including several people who are not popularly

represented in children’s biographies. The stories are brief, no

more than a few sentences, but for each group Kinew reminds us,

“You’re a person who matters. Yes, it’s true. Now go show the

world what a person who matters can do.” Although directed at

the important figures in the book, the lines read two ways. They

are also clearly intended to speak to Indigenous children and to

remind them of their proud history and their people’s

contributions to American (not just U.S.) history.

How to Be a Lion

By Ed Vere

Doubleday Books for Young Readers, 2018

Ages 4-8


Leonard the lion is not like other lions. He doesn’t like to crunch and chomp. Leonard is

gentle. He likes poetry and walks. When Leonard meets Marianne the duck, they become

fast friends but a pack of fierce lions tells Leonard he must be FIERCE to be a lion. Fierce

lions chomp ducks. They do not write poems with them. Are the fierce lions right? Can

Leonard be gentle and still be a lion?

Images obtained from Google Images..

Book list provided by the LFPL.

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ENVISION EQUITY NOVEMBER 2018

Community Announcements

Looking For Lilith Theatre Company

continues to offer middle and high schools

subsidies for their updated bullying

prevention program, CHOICES: An

Interactive Play on Cyberbullying and

Suicide. They also have new performances

available addressing issues of equity and

diversity that can be brought to your

students, faculty and staff. These include

We. Are. Here., which puts the country’s

current socio-political environment under

a critical lens, exploring how “hot button”

issues such as immigration, education,

white privilege, gun control, and

institutional racism affect several families

from different backgrounds, centering

around high school students' experiences

in particular. The Theatre Company is also

improving their fan-favorite, What My

Hands Have Touched, which explores the

experiences of a group of women friends

during World War II, to include

experiences of a wider diversity of

women. For more information visit http://

www.lookingforlilith.org. To book a

Looking for Lilith Touring Progam,

contact Trina Fischer at (347) 228-6438 or

trina@lookingforlilith.org.

Pride and Passion: The African-

American Baseball Experience

This nationally traveling exhibition

examines the challenges faced by African-

American baseball players as they sought

equal opportunities in their sport

beginning in the post-Civil War era,

through integration of the major leagues in

the mid-20th century. The exhibit was

organized by the National Baseball Hall of

Fame and Museum and the American

Library Association, with funding from

the National Endowment for the

Humanities: great ideas brought to life.

View a PDF of this traveling exhibit here.

Daughters of Greatness: Doris Kearns

Goodwin

Throughout the year, the Daughters of

Greatness breakfast series invites

prominent women engaged in social

philanthropy, activism, and pursuits of

justice to share their stories with the

Louisville community. The Daughters of

Greatness series provides a place for

dialogue and discussion on current issues

of justice, community engagement, and

social movements within the Louisville

area and beyond.

December 7, 2018. 8:30 am - 10:00 am..

Muhammad Ali Center

Have Fun and Get Fit with LUL

The Louisville Urban League is offering

weekly fitness opportunities. Come join

our staff for quick workout or mindfulness

activity. FREE to the public. Please RSVP

here if you can.

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JEFFERSON COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS

2018

Giveaway!

Saturday, December 8, 2018

10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

TM

Clothing Assistance Program (CAP)

319 S. 15th Street

Louisville, KY 40203

The 15th District Parent Teacher Association (PTA), in

conjunction with Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS), invites

community residents—especially those residing in the Louisville Metro Government

Zones of Hope Neighborhoods: California, Newburg, Parkland, Russell, and

Shawnee—to the Take What You Can Tote! Clothing Giveaway.

This event will provide each household representative with empty bags. Tables and

racks of gently used clothing and accessories for men and women will be available

on a first-come, first-served basis.

This event will also include books and other special items that will be distributed on

a first-come, first-served basis. Once all items are depleted,

no more will be available.

No uniform or children’s clothing will be included in this giveaway.

If inclement weather cancels this event, it will be moved to Saturday, December 15.

For more information, call CAP at 485-7062.

every child. one voice. ®

Diversity, Equity, and Poverty Division

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W.E.B. DuBois Academy is excited to share their P.R.I.D.E.

with the Louisville community on November 15, 2018 at

8: 30 a.m.

DuBois Days tours allow individuals, businesses, and

organizations to get a firsthand glimpse at how we’re

raising our Young Lions into the kings they are meant to

become through an innovative approach to education.

On DuBois Days, you will:

• Discover why we begin each day with dedicated

P.R.I.D.E. time.

• Tour W.E.B. DuBois Academy, led by student

ambassadors.

• Visit classrooms to see students engaged in rigorous

learning activities.

• Learn more about our curriculum.

• Hear real testimonials from parent ambassadors.

• Learn how you can help create a brighter future for

young men in Louisville through our Lions to Leaders

program with Metro United Way

Organizations interested in booking a tour can email

Telva Hogan at telva.hogan@jefferson.kyschools.us

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J E F F E R S O N C O U N T Y P U B L I C S C H O O L S

Diversity, Equity, and Poverty Programs Department

With NyRee Clayton-Taylor, 2019 Kentucky Elementary School Teacher of the Year

For more information, please contact Telva Hogan at 485-7318 or telva.hogan@jefferson.kyschools.us.

To RSVP for the community conversation online, please visit http://bit.ly/nctspeaker. 23

To register for the PD, please visit pdCentral (JCPS Staff).


J E F F E R S O N C O U N T Y P U B L I C S C H O O L S

R A C I A L

E Q U I T Y

P O L I C Y

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J E F F E R S O N C O U N T Y P U B L I C S C H O O L S

D I V E R S I T Y , E Q U I T Y , A N D P O V E R T Y P R O G R A M S D E P A R T M E N T

G I R L S TO

GALLOWS

Dr. Cherie Dawson-Edwards, a criminal justice and social

change professor, in partnership with the Jefferson

County Public Schools Diversity, Equity, and Poverty

Programs Department, will present a series of pd events,

and a community conversation that focus on the

marginalization, resilience, and brilliance of girls of color.

The scaffolding pd will focus on the school system and

how inequities and the lack of restoration for girls (of

color) perpetuate a lower sense of belonging and

contribute to negative academic outcomes.

PD Dates:

November 28, 2018 (PD # 18-1999067) | January 23, 2019 (PD # 18-1999072)

March 27, 2019 (PD # 18-1999073) | April 17, 2019 (PD # 18-1999074)

May 15, 2019 (PD # 18-1999106)

Time: 4:45–6:45 p.m.

Location: C.B. Young Jr. Service Center, 3001 Crittenden Drive, Louisville, KY 40209

Community Conversation:

Date: April 18, 2019 | Time: 6–8 p.m. | Location: C.B. Young Jr. Service Center, 3001

Crittenden Drive, Louisville, KY 40209

For more information, please contact Telva Hogan @ telva.hogan@jefferson.kyschools.us or 233-1808.

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ENVISION EQUITY NOVEMBER 2018

Title Session Code Date & Time Location Contact

Special Education and

Inclusivity

Book Study: Black

Male(d) By Tyrone

Howard

(Administrators

Only)

Equity and Inclusion

Institute (Morning

Session)

18-1996503 November 1

4:30 to 5:30 p.m.

18-1998247 November 1, 15, and 29

4:00 to 6:00 p.m.

18-1998114 November 5, 2018

8:00 to 11:30 a.m.

Olmsted Academy

South

Google Classroom

Kentucky International

Convention Center

Dr. Monica Lakhwani

(502) 485-7269

Charles C. Davis, Jr.

(502) 485-7898

Charles C. Davis, Jr.

(502) 485-7898

Equity and Inclusion

Institute (Afternoon

Session)

18-1998118 November 5, 2018

1:00 to 4:00 p.m.

Kentucky International

Convention Center

Charles C. Davis, Jr.

(502) 485-7898

Student

Empowerment and

Inclusive Pedagogy

18-1997702 November 12, 2018 Farmer Elementary Telva Hogan

(502) 485-7318

Hip Hop Helps and

Heals

18-1997224 November 13

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Diversity Summit 18-1996515 November 14-15

4:00 to 6:00 p.m.

Atherton High

Atherton High

Vanessa Posey

(502) 485-3631

Dr. Monica Lakhwani

(502) 485-7269

A Mile In My Shoes.

Homeless Education

18-1993455 November 20

9:00 to 11:00 a.m.

VanHoose Education

Center

Giselles Danger

(502) 485-3650

Culturally Responsive

Classroom

Management:

Disruption That

Leads to Engagement

18-1998626 November 28

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Meyzeek Middle

Equity and Inclusion

Unit

(502) 485-7269

Push In: Pulling

Girls of Color Into

Learning

18-1998620 November 28

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Meyzeek Middle

Equity and Inclusion

Unit

(502) 485-7269

Racial Equity

Analysis Protocol

(REAP)

18-1998608 November 28

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Meyzeek Middle

Equity and Inclusion

Unit

(502) 485-7269

Reaching and

Teaching Black Boys

Through Literacy

18-1998614 November 28

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Meyzeek Middle

Equity and Inclusion

Unit

(502) 485-7269

Windows and

Mirrors: Who Do

Your Students See

18-1998632 November 28

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Meyzeek Middle

Equity and Inclusion

Unit

(502) 485-7269

To view a complete list of DEP professional development sessions, visit https://www.jefferson.kyschools.us/node/1350

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ENVISION EQUITY NOVEMBER 2018

Announcing...

"The Model"

Starting in the September edition of

Envision Equity, we will highlight sample

lesson plans and videos of Jefferson

County Public Schools (JCPS) classroom

teachers who are culturally responsive and

innovative. This new section of Envision

Equity will be called “The Model.”

If you are a JCPS teacher or know of a

JCPS teacher who should be highlighted as

a model of culturally responsive and

innovative classroom practices, please

submit his or her contact information to

abdul.sharif2@jefferson.kyschools.us by

the 15th of each month.

Editor—Catherine Collesano

Editor, Photo Contributor—Abdul Sharif

Credits

Special thanks to all of our community partners and educators who helped make this special edition of

Envision Equity possible.

Envision Equity is a publication of the JCPS Department of Diversity, Equity, and Poverty Programs. All

submissions should be sent to Catherine Collesano at catherine.collesano@jefferson.kyschools.us or Abdul

Sharif at abdul.sharif2@jefferson.kyschools.us. If you are interested in becoming a subscriber or a

contributor to Envision Equity, please contact one of the editors at the above email address.

www.jefferson.kyschools.us

Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer Offering Equal Educational Opportunities

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