West Newsmagazine 11-7-18

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Local news, local politics and community events for West St. Louis County Missouri.

Vol. 23 No. 30 • November 7, 2018

westnewsmagazine.com

Soldiers Memorial reopens

in time for Veterans Day

PLUS: Prime Real Estate ■ Plan the Perfect Party ■ Mature Focus


2 I

November 7, 2018

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RANDOM THOUGHTS

A Community Conversation

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I OPINION I 3

CELEBRATING 150 Years OF SERVICE

EST. 1868

By JESSICA MESZAROS

This week, West Newsmagazine is celebrating

Veterans Day by talking with

Harold Ross, a 93-year-old World War

II veteran. Ross grew up in East Lansing,

Michigan, which he said was “kind of

normal” though he did recall a tricycle accident

with a twinkle in his eye: “When I was

a kid on a tricycle, there was a neighborhood

girl who had a two-wheeler. Somehow, we

collided. Just wrecked my little tricycle. It

didn’t hurt me any, but it was kind of bad. I

didn’t even have my tricycle license.” Ross

enlisted in the Navy in 1942 at age 17. He

has three children – Cheryl, Brett and Scott

– and resides in Ellisville.

Have you ever saved somebody’s life?

No. I never have. I never had to do any

tourniquets on people, or things like that. I

never had to really be sent to a place where

we had to set up a [medical unit] like in

that one show, with the people during the

Korean War. M*A*S*H, that’s it. That was

almost kind of like the set-up we had in

Okinawa. We didn’t have that many crazy

people, but they were old enough, I guess.

What’s the most historic thing that’s

occurred in your lifetime?

I guess that was when we were overseas

when the war ended … Getting to see

China and getting to see what was going on

there. I also saw Gen. Douglas MacArthur

once when I was in school. We were sitting

just about as close as we are. He was there

speaking, I guess he wanted to get out and

meet the students, but we were really close.

He was a big deal. Also, the place where

we were located [in the Navy] was actually

near Buckner Bay, where Lt. Gen. [Simon

Bolivar] Buckner Jr. was killed. [Buckner

died on June 18, 1945 in Okinawa Prefecture,

Japan.]

What is the best day on the calendar?

I guess it was my 90th birthday. April 26,

about three years ago [2015.] I’m 93 right

now, but I thought my 90th birthday was

really special. I didn’t think I’d get to see

more than that, but here we are ... strangely.

There are other highlights. I think another

one would be the day the war was over.

Are there any songs that hit you with a

wave of nostalgia when you hear them?

So many come to mind. “Don’t Sit

Under the Apple Tree” [a song made

Harold Ross

famous by Glenn Miller and the Andrews

Sisters during World War II]. Also, I have

memories of marches by John Philip Sousa.

“Stars and Stripes Forever” I think was the

name of one.

What is something from the present you

think could stand the test of time?

I think that a lot of people recognize the

U.S. flag, but a lot of people didn’t act as they

do now, including our leader. I don’t know

how many veterans feel like I do, but we’ve

seen him [President Donald Trump] take

out all the ambassadors around the world

that really know what’s going on. He comes

along with his pen and just writes them all

out. As far as letting people in [to the United

States], I think he’s mutilated that. It should

be under control, but not shut down.

What are some personal rules you try to

never break?

I think being a good citizen would be

one. I try to be open to all religions and

all types of people. You find out that we’re

all kind of the same underneath everything.

What is an accomplishment of which

you are most proud?

I think getting a college degree was

pretty good. I was out of school nine years

before I started [college]. So, that was a big

one ... I’ve had kids that have stayed out of

jail. So, that must be good. They didn’t go

for drugs either.

Which way should toilet paper hang?

Over or under?

My god, that’s a deep question. I like it.

I’ve had people come in where I live and

try to switch it around. Over. I hesitate to

tell you why I say that. It has something to

do with washing your hand.

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4 I OPINION I

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Regarding ‘Coming Soon’

To the Editor:

I found Bonnie Krueger’s article “Town

Square project inches toward completion

as budget expands” [West Newsmagazine,

Sept. 12] to be one-sided and misleading

in several respects.

To begin with, the article seems to

espouse the viewpoint of only one alderperson

[Lindsey Butler]. While it is often

that the vocal minority are those heard in

the news, the process required a majority

of the alderpersons to approve the project

each step of the way. The items Ms. Butler

claims were “taken out” were never part

of the approved project. I believe most

of the alderpersons are satisfied with the

project, and all are well aware of the city’s

requested changes, which have resulted in

an extended schedule and increased costs

– all at a value sure to be enjoyed by the

citizens of Town & Country.

Additionally, the article intimates

that Brinkmann is getting some sort

of “sweetheart” deal. As a reminder, the

Town Square project was the result of an

extensive city process, which included a

comprehensive study by the city of Town

& Country [and consultation with a task

force comprised of city residents] regarding

the city’s wants and needs, which then

resulted in a public request for proposals

[RFP] regarding development. The entire

process was public and open to proposals.

Brinkmann was the successful candidate

chosen by the city in response to the

RFP. The price Brinkmann paid for the

land was approximately twice as much as

the competing offer. To suggest that Brinkmann

is getting rich on the back of the

taxpayers is completely unfair. Furthermore,

Butler’s stated concern that Brinkmann

underpaid for the property because

the “city prepared the pad…and…paid for

the property’s stormwater improvements,

parking lot and surrounding green space”

is also inaccurate. All grading, stormwater,

parking lot and greenspace costs

In this Issue

11

Wildwood Econ

Wildwood welcomes new

restaurants, businesses in

existing vacancies.

were allocated to the parties [the city

and Brinkmann] separately, and the city

would have incurred such costs regardless

of the chosen developer, to deliver a

pad ready site. Notably absent from the

article is Brinkmann’s contribution to

the site security infrastructure, as well as

many other improvements from the original

RFP. The city will be the beneficiary

of a private developer’s contribution to

the public safety when visiting its Town

Square. There were other inaccuracies

in the article as well, which will likely

mislead the public, but this letter does not

attempt to address them all.

We are very proud of the work to date

on the project and believe that the city of

Town & Country and its residents will be

thrilled with the Town Square project for

many years to come.

Bob Brinkmann

Replying to Jean Evans

To the Editor:

Rep. Jean Evans states in her Oct. 17

letter that “in true form, those on the left

are taking this opportunity to place blame

on Republicans” for the “failure” of the

Affordable Care Act [ACA]. What she

doesn’t state is that, in fact, Republicans

are to blame for the “failure” of the ACA.

Thom Hartman from the Independent

Media Institute and salon.com wrote on

March 22, 2017:

“Marco Rubio and a number of Republicans

succeeded in gutting the risk corridors.

The result was that, just in 2015, risk

corridor payments to insurance companies

that were supposed to total around $2.9

billion were only reimbursed, according to

Rubio himself, to the tune of $400 million.

“So insurance companies did the only

things they could. In [mostly red] states

with low incomes and thus poorer health,

they simply pulled out of the marketplace

altogether. In other states, they jacked up

their prices.”

Quoting Michael D. Tanner in National

Review on July 31, 2013:

“The CR to keep the government funded

after Sept. 30 may be the last chance to

stop Obamacare.

“Sen. Ted Cruz and Rep. Tom Price are

expected to introduce an amendment that

would prohibit the use of any funds authorized

by the CR ‘to carry out any provision

of the ACA.’ In addition, a dozen Republican

senators have signed a letter pledging

not to vote for any CR that includes funding

for Obamacare.”

“Those on the left” are justified in placing

the “blame” for the status of the ACA on

Republicans. Recent history shows that.

I agree with Rep. Evans that we need a

better healthcare system, but she doesn’t

say anything about what that might be.

But, rather than sabotage the ACA, Republicans

ought to work with Democrats, and

figure out ways to fix it.

Terry Altepeter

Regarding pre-existing conditions

To the Editor:

OK Hawley, which is it? As a U.S.

Senator candidate your ad said you fully

support the government requiring health

insurers to cover pre-existing conditions

[PEC]. However, you don’t say why, as

Missouri Attorney General, you filed a

lawsuit to allow insurance companies to

exclude PEC and you don’t say that you

are withdrawing that lawsuit.

Could it be that you really didn’t care

about Missourians with PEC until you

found out, as you reveal in your ad, that

one of your own children now has a PEC?

That tells me a lot about your level of

maturity and experience. You don’t care

enough about Missourians unless they are

Hawley family members.

Young man, you are not ready to be my

senator and you have a lot of work to do to

get the state attorney general job right.

Bill Howard

Want to express your opinion?

Submit your letter to: editor@newsmagazinenetwork.com • 636.591.0010

12

Remembering Tom Shaw

Local businessman and civic

leader Tom C. Shaw Sr. passed

away on Oct. 24 at the age of 88.

28

Plan the Perfect Party

Planning a holiday party?

Check out these tips for

making it perfect.

32

Say Hello to ‘The Minis’

The Rolfe family cares for

miniature horses at its ranch

on Wild Horse Creek Road.

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© Copyright 2018.

A PUBLICATION OF

Ellen Hartbeck

Linda Joyce

Joe Ritter

Sheila Roberts

Bonnie Krueger

Warren Mayes

Jessica Meszaros

ON THE COVER: The Soldiers Memorial reopened on Nov. 4 after undergoing extensive renovations that kept it closed for two years.

[Photo courtesy of the Soldiers Memorial/Missouri Historical Society]


6 I OPINION I

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

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EDITORIAL

Stops and starts

Have you bought a new car in the last

couple years? If you have, chances are it

comes with something called a “stop-start”

feature.

For the uninitiated, stop-start engine

technology is a feature that will automatically

shut your car’s engine off when you

come to a stop, and automatically restart

it once you disengage the brake pedal and

start again. According to the Environmental

Protection Agency, this has a positive

impact on both gas mileage and emissions.

Here is the thing: a lot of people hate the

start-stop feature. It’s awkward. It seems

counterintuitive. This has led automakers

to also add a button that allows the

driver to turn off the technology. Not permanently,

but on a per use basis. In other

words, every time a driver gets into a car

that has both start-stop technology and the

ability to disable it, they make a conscious

choice.

The metaphors abound.

For the environmentally conscious, this

means that a human being is getting into

a car every day and pushing a button that

says either “I love nature” or “I hate nature,

and by pushing this button I hereby reject

you, Mother Nature!” For the bureaucratically

suspicious, a human being gets into

a car every day and pushes a button that

says either “I will not bow to the overreach

of the EPA” or “I will blindly follow state

mandates at the expense of free will!”

If you think these statements are hyperbole,

then you haven’t been following the

news very much. Intentionally or not, the

EPA and automakers have created a magical

button that allows for the daily expression

of your personal worldview.

We think … well, we think this is awesome.

We think other manufacturers should

get in the game.

What if a gallon of milk came with

stop/start technology? It could be used

to express your views on farm subsidies.

Press this button, and an extra ounce of

milk automatically spills out. You’re helping

dairy farmers! Don’t press the button,

and you get a little less milk than expected.

Down with corporate farming!

We’re not sure why Mark Zuckerberg

hasn’t thought of this yet, but how is it

possible that Facebook doesn’t have stopstart

technology? Every time you log on or

open the app, there should be a button that

lets you choose between only seeing posts

that completely support your worldview or

posts that might expand your thinking a bit,

but that are likely to make you quite irate.

Here is the other thing to know about

stop-start technology and customer adoption.

It is a uniquely American problem.

Car buyers in Europe and Japan are fully

accepting of the feature and have been for

years. No need to add a disable function

over there. Once again, that’s awesome.

Americans demand choice. Americans

demand free expression. Americans

demand another thing to argue about and

write editorials about.

Ulrich Muehleisen is head of marketing

for Robert Bosch, an auto parts manufacturer

that sells an awful lot of stop-start

systems. He was quoted in the New York

Times saying, “At some point, virtually

every vehicle will have stop-start. Once

you get used to it, you’ll wonder why the

engine is running when you’re stopped. It’s

like brushing your teeth with the water on.”

Oh, Mr. Muehleiesen, if you think that

all Americans agree on the proper way to

brush their teeth, then you’ve got another

thing coming.

IN QUOTES

“... there’s nothing

easy about Alexa.”

– Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos

“... we will remember

that he did more than

his share to make this

area a better place

in which to live.”

– John W. Hammond, speaking

about Tom C. Shaw Sr.

FOLLOW US ON

West County really got into the spirit of Halloween –some examples being a skeleton wedding at the home of Maria Hussmann in Ballwin and Manchester Police

Lt. Craig Smith’s Thin Blue Line Donut Shop “trunk-or-treat” offering.

[Facebook photos]


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November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I 7

Planning for Young Clients

Law Matters

A friend

recently called

me. He has two

daughters in

their 20’s. They

recently got

jobs, and they

were in the process

of applying

for benefits. They were asked about

whether they had a will, whether they

had a power of attorney, and who

should be called to handle medical

emergencies. That got them thinking,

and they turned to their dad for

advice. That was nice.

It may seem strange that a 20-

something single person needs to

think about a will. At that age, dying

is one the last things people think

about, but it makes sense. With a will,

you get to say where your property

goes when you die. You can cover

that with pay-on-death and transfer

-on-death beneficiary designations,

but those can be of limited value, and

people miss things. So a basic will

makes sense.

In addition to saying where things

should go, you get to pick who is going

to go through your stuff and administer

your estate. Even a 20 year old

(or maybe particularly a 20 year old)

doesn’t want just anyone going

through their stuff, even when they’re

dead.

So even if you think you’ve done all

of your planning, it is possible to have

missed something, and a will is a good

safety net. If you don’t have kids, the

will can be very simple, but if you have

kids, you want to say who is going to

be their guardians, and you probably

want to plan to avoid having the

court administer their money sort of

like in a Dicken’s novel.

In addition to a will, a young

person certainly would want to have

a durable power of attorney. A

durable power of attorney (and the

word durable needs to be in it)

allows someone to handle business

matters when you can’t.

And finally, a young person needs

to have a medical directive of some

sort. These do several things. First,

they are a medical power of attorney

to authorize someone to make

medical decisions whey you can’t.

Second, they need to include

HIPAA authority so that a doctor

can talk to your family. Finally, they

need to include a living will so you

can be allowed to die naturally.

So when my friend called and

asked what his daughters should do, I

told them they needed to do some

planning. It can make a lot of difference

if the unthinkable happens.

For more, please see the rest at

www.law-matters.net.


with estate planning is


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Fred L. Vilbig is an attorney with over 30

years of experience in the areas of wills

and trusts, small businesses, and real

estate. This column is for informational

purposes only. Nothing herein should be

treated as legal advice or as creating an

attorney-client relationship. The choice

of a lawyer is an important decision

and should not be based solely upon

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8 I NEWS I

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

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Serving St. Louis & surrounding communities

Taylor Duncan [center] recently met and ate ice cream with 22 Municipal League mayors including Gail Winham of Winchester

[yellow shirt], Scott Douglass of Clarkson Valley [front row, third from right], Bob Nation of Chesterfield [second from right], and

Mike Roemerman of Ellisville [far right].

news

briefs

Ice cream for all

On Oct. 25, the Municipal League of

Metro St. Louis hosted Taylor Duncan, a

5-year-old from Waynesville, at its monthly

membership meeting.

Duncan is on a mission to have ice

cream with every mayor in the state.

Thanks to the Municipal League, she

was able to meet, greet and eat Doozle’s

Frozen Custard with 22 St. Louis area

mayors, including Mayor Gail Winham

of Winchester, Mayor Scott Douglass of

Clarkson Valley, Mayor Bob Nation of

Chesterfield and Mayor Mike Roemerman

of Ellisville.

The meeting was held in the city of Florissant’s

municipal courtroom.

“We were delighted to meet Taylor, a

smart and inquisitive young lady who is

already working to achieve her goals,”

said Pat Kelly, executive director of the

Municipal League of Metro St. Louis. “It is

wonderful to meet a person who is thinking

about civic involvement at such a young

age. We think she will make a wonderful

mayor someday!”

The mayors took a group photo with

Taylor and issued a Proclamation recognizing

her aspiration.

BALLWIN

City amends

excavation ordinance

Ballwin has streamlined its ordinance

governing applications and permit fees for

excavation permits.

In a unanimous vote at its Oct. 22

meeting, the Ballwin Board of Aldermen

approved a measure lowering the permit

fee to $50. The charge formerly was $100,

with half the amount refunded if the city

was notified before completion of the work

covered by the permit to enable the city to

conduct necessary inspections.

A provision retained in the revision still

requires a permit holder to reopen the

excavation for inspection at their cost if

the city isn’t notified before the work is

completed.

The amendment also eliminates the

requirement for contractors to post bonds

in connection with work that disturbs pavement,

sidewalks, curbs or gutters and a

specific requirement for a permit for landscape

sprinkler and irrigation systems.

Andy Hixson, assistant city administrator,

noted the bond requirement involved

considerable paperwork and record keeping

and was not needed. If a project isn’t

done properly, the city can use in-house

personnel to fix it according to city standards

and bill the property owner or contractor

for the work.

With its other permit requirements, the

provision specifically addressing sprinklers

and irrigation systems is not needed,

Hixson said.

A related ordinance deletes references to

the city engineer in grading, erosion and

sediment control regulations and substitutes

the verbiage “the city’s representative”

for added flexibility.

CHESTERFIELD

Council considers pay

raise, deer count

The Chesterfield City Council has given

preliminary approval to placing a 2.5-percent

merit pay increase for employees in its

2019 budget.

Meeting as a committee of the whole Oct.

22, the council’s Finance and Administration

Committee [F&A] voted 7-1 for the

pay hike after defeating, on a 1-7 vote, an

amendment proposal from Councilmember

Barbara McGuinness [Ward 1] to limit the

increase to 2 percent.

McGuinness, who chairs the F&A, was

the sole supporter of the amendment and

the only vote against the higher pay boost.

As per the city’s practice, the hike will

not go into effect until July 1, 2019. A similar

increase approved for the 2018 budget

was effective July 1 this year and will continue

until the new increment goes into

effect. Two years ago, the council did not

approve an employee pay increase.

Action on the employee pay issue came

after the council also signed off on miscellaneous

general fund budget cuts totaling

some $195,600, the biggest of which

coming from lower spending projections

for the city’s program to eliminate trees

infected by the emerald ash borer. Another

$48,000 in reductions came from the Parks

Department. City officials recommended

the cuts, noting they were a one-time

opportunity.

Final action on the 2019 budget will

come after a public presentation held in

connection with a council meeting later

this year.

Before acting on the pay issue, the council

also discussed at some length the issue

of whether or not Chesterfield has a deer

problem and what to do about it. Specifically,

they discussed the question of conducting

a deer census.

Ultimately, the council agreed to refer

the matter to the Public Health and Safety

Committee for more study.

CREVE COUER

Local soldier killed in action

Lt. Joshua Goetz, U.S. Navy, of

Creve Coeur, was killed in a diving

accident in Guam on Sunday, Oct. 14.

He received a military funeral Mass on

Sunday, Oct. 28 at Incarnate Word Catholic

Church, 13416 Olive Blvd. in Chesterfield

and was buried with full military honors

at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery.

Goetz was a graduate of the U.S. Naval

Academy class of 2015. He is survived

by his parents David and Michelle [Hoyt]

Goetz, brother Morgan and sister Isabel.


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WILDWOOD

Champs again

Wildwood once again won the annual

tug-of-war competition at the Woodchoppers

Ball.

Held at Bill Ballard’s Balmar Farms in

Wildwood, the Woodchopper’s Ball is a

country fair-style event that raises money

for BackStoppers Inc. and pits Chesterfield

residents against those in Wildwood. The

prize – a hatchet in a log designed and created

by Bob Clausen, of Chesterfield – will

reside in Wildwood until next fall.

Free Speech passes

At its Oct. 22 meeting, the Wildwood

City Council gave a second reading and

approval to Bill No. 2403, nicknamed the

“Free Speech Amendment.”

The ordinance was spearheaded by

Councilmember Steve Taylor [Ward 4]

with the twofold goal of allowing individuals

attending city council meetings to ask

specific councilmembers direct questions

at the podium during the public comments

portion, and also allow councilmembers to

issue direct replies to those questions. It

passed on a 12-4 council vote.

Although residents could always ask

councilmembers questions from the

podium during public comments portion of

[Left to right] Mike Kane, Mayor Jim Bowlin and Larry McGowan celebrate Wildwood’s victory

at the Woodchoppers Ball.

council meetings, prior to the amendment,

councilmembers answered questions after

the meeting or posted answers to the city’s

official website.

Also according to Taylor, the so-called

Free Speech Amendment changed the

official language in the city code that

stated questions posed at the podium

during public comment had to be directed

to the mayor. Following the legislation’s

passage on Oct. 22, public commenters

can now direct questions to specific councilmembers,

and time will be set aside at

the end of each meeting’s public comment

period for councilmembers to respond

accordingly if they wish or have the capability

to do so.

Taylor thought the passage of the bill

was an example of “civil discussion and

debate” within the city.

“I think, in the long run, there was a tremendous

amount of support,” Taylor said.

“Twelve councilmembers in favor is a lot

of support.”

On Oct. 22, some councilmembers

expressed concern due to a sentence added

to the amendment that states: “The Council

may, by majority vote, suspend or change

the procedures and rules for public participation

for a particular meeting and or

future meetings.” The concern was that the

sentence would prompt changing public

participation rules at every meeting or

prompt potential unfairness.

“My concern for that [sentence] was the

fact that I could see that having us, having

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I NEWS I 9

the council, in the position of potentially

being looked at as having shown favoritism

one way or another,” Councilmember

Larry McGowen [Ward 1] said. “… If I

was sitting in the audience, I would want to

see consistency with how generally the city

conducts its meetings …”

A motion made by McGowen to amend

the proposed ordinance by deleting the

sentence failed on an 11-5 vote.

WEST COUNTY

Operation Christmas

Child seeks donations

On Nov. 12, multiple locations throughout

the St. Louis metropolitan area will

open to collect shoeboxes filled with toys,

school supplies and hygiene items for the

Samaritan’s Purse project.

In West County, the following churches

serve as collection sites:

• Lifepointe Church, 1400 Babler Park

Drive in Wildwood

West Hills, 13250 S. Outer 40 Road in

Town & Country

• First Evangelical Church, 1375 Carman

Road in Manchester

Instructions for packing a shoebox,

including suggested items and those that

are prohibited, can be found online at

samaritanspurse.org/occ.

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The Reopening of Soldiers Memorial:

Commemorating service through the lens of St. Louis

By SUZANNE CORBETT

Eighty years ago, St. Louis gathered at

the intersection of Chestnut and North 13th

streets to witness the opening of the city’s

latest architectural masterpiece, Soldiers

Memorial. On Nov. 3, 2018, the crowds

returned to witness its reopening.

Officially dubbed Soldiers Memorial

Military Museum, the $30 million

reboot – a cost covered entirely by anonymous

donors – has transformed the once

neglected monument into a world-class

museum. Stewarded by The Missouri

Historical Society, the public-private

partnership focused on preservation of

the memorial’s architectural integrity and

art-deco elements that Historical Society

President Dr. Frances Levine called “a

labor of love.”

“Great attention was given to restore the

building to its original character,” Soldiers

Now open after a two-year renovation is St. Louis’ Soldiers Memorial Military Museum.

[All photos courtesy of the Soldiers Memorial/Missouri Historical Society]

Memorial Director Mark Sundlov said.

“While everything has been updated, it

doesn’t look like it. Great care was taken

during its preservation to match elements

that were added to the restoration. For

example, [from] the terrazzo floors to

the marble to decorative grate coverings

that were added, [everything] seamlessly

matches the originals. The original art

deco light fixtures have been cleaned and

rewired. The mahogany-lined elevator

with its art deco steel doors is now fully

operational. And the Gold Star Mothers

mosaic on the loggia’s ceiling, which was

missing hundreds of small tiles has been

matched and replaced.”

Restoration included cleaning the iconic

Walker Hancock statues, which have stood

as the museum’s sentries since its 1938

opening. Military history and art enthusiasts

may know Hancock, a native St. Louisan,

as one of the Monuments Men, artists,

art historians and curators who were sent to

save European art treasures during World

War II.

With the restoration came an expansion

of gallery space and meeting rooms on

the lower and upper levels, resulting in a

doubling the memorial’s exhibition space

without enlarging its footprint. Another

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I NEWS I 11

World War II Monument by Hilis Arnold

standout expansion is the updated Court

of Honor, which was originally dedicated

after World War II. Redesigned, it now

includes a Five Branches Fountain and

reflecting pool along with the city’s Korea

and Vietnam war memorials.

Chestnut Street also has been revamped

into a single lane that bisects the Court of

Honor and the Memorial, creating a visual

connection that inspires a welcoming feel

in spite of its enormous size.

Although immense, the memorial has

the amazing ability to convey a feeling of

intimacy through its unique exhibit design

See VETERANS MEMORIAL, page 52

Wildwood welcomes new restaurants, businesses in existing vacancies

By JESSICA MESZAROS

The city of Wildwood is growing, but

the where and how is creating discussion

among city staff, councilmembers and residents

alike.

At a meeting last month, the Wildwood

City Council discussed a motion to prepare

legislation that would create a standalone

department for economic development.

The creation of the separate department, by

municipal code, would include establishing

its own budget so that expenditures can

be tracked separately. The city’s Economic

Development Committee previously

motioned to move the item forward to the

council with a 4-3 vote.

Economic development was added to the

city’s Master Plan in 2016. The creation of

the existing committee led to the development

of the city’s Economic Development

Guide and the hiring of a full-time economic

development director. However, the

current economic development program is

a component of the department of administration

and finance and is included in that

department’s budget.

The motion discussed last month ultimately

was split into two items: the separation

of the committee’s costs into a ledger

for better transparency, and the creation of

a separate economic development department.

The council voted in favor of the first

item but voted 11-4 against the creation

of an economic development department.

Councilmember Joe Garritano [Ward 8]

was absent for the vote.

Ongoing development

While decisions of how to handle economic

development in Wildwood are

sometimes divided, the economic development

committee is continuing to examine

economic development options, particularly

within the Town Center area in Ward 8.

“We want to make sure we obtain and

retain businesses that are going to stay

within the city of Wildwood,” said Councilmember

Katie Dodwell [Ward 4], who

also serves as the economic development

committee chair.

According to a Sept. 25 memorandum

by Economic Development Director Julian

Jacquin, the economic development committee

has conducted over 170 visitation

meetings with existing businesses while

also working with entities like the Wildwood

Business Association and West St.

Louis County Chamber of Commerce.

Jacquin said Wildwood’s economic

development plan has three parts: business

retention, business expansion, and business

recruitment or attraction.

“It’s kind of an order of priority, starting

with the businesses you have – helping the

businesses you already have to succeed,

helping them grow where appropriate – and

then helping recruit new businesses to the

The Miller Haus See WILDWOOD, page 14


12 I NEWS I

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

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By KATE UPTERGROVE

If you’ve ever had the privilege of sitting

in a room and swapping stories with Tom

C. Shaw Sr., you’ll understand why this

man who helped to develop much of West

St. Louis and St. Charles counties will be

so very sorely missed. Shaw knew everyone.

Or at least that’s how

it seemed.

His father, Charles A.

Shaw, and Joseph Francis

founded Shaw-Francis

Inc. in 1922. Later, Tom

took over the company,

changed its name and

moved it from Clayton to

Chesterfield. In an interview

with West Newsmagazine,

Shaw said his love

of horses encouraged his

move to West County. He

enjoyed cutting horses [trained in separating

cattle from a herd], both raising them

and showing them. His daughter Debbie

Shaw Franke and his son Tom Shaw Jr.

were champions in the field.

With the company’s westward expansion,

the business of listing horse ranches

and farms became a major company focus.

In the ensuing years, thousands of acres

were sold and developed into Beacon

Hill, Forest Green Estates, Cheri Acres,

Westbury Manor, Village of Green Trails,

Christmas Valley, Shepard Ridge, Deepwoods

and numerous others.

Shaw was one of the founders of Chesterfield

Area Civic Progress [CACP], an

organization that sprang up in 1987 and

continues today as Progress 64 West,

whose mission is to promote the responsible

growth of commerce in West St. Louis

and St. Charles counties, with particular

emphasis on the I-64 corridor from I-270

westward to I-70. Shaw was exceedingly

proud of the progress brought about by the

collaboration and collective efforts of this

group of local leaders, whom he counted

among his friends and neighbors.

“Tom and I have been friends for over 30

years,” said John W. Hammond, recounting

how they were part of a group of local leaders

who got together for lunch once a week

to talk about ways “to make West County a

better place to live, work, play and drive.”

In an October 2012 article in West Newsmagazine,

Shaw said of Progress 64 West:

“The idea was to create some kind of entity

that could cross all the boundaries and

bring people together on issues that had

a broad impact.” Shaw had that effect on

people.

“He really cared about this part of town,

@WESTNEWSMAG

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

Remembering Tom C. Shaw Sr.

A civic leader who did ‘more than his share’

Tom C. Shaw Sr.

and I think he did everything he could

to try and make it a better place. He was

involved in so many things,” Hammond

said. “You walk into a restaurant or something

like that with Tom and he knows half

the people that are there. I don’t think he

ever forgot a face.

“I’m going to miss Tom, but we will

remember that he did

more than his share to

make this area a better

place in which to live.”

Shaw passed away on

Oct. 24 at age 88.

He is survived by his

wife, Katherine Shaw [nee

Bova] of Defiance, Missouri;

his five sons, Tim

[Jeri] Shaw of Las Vegas,

Nevada; Tom Shaw Jr. of

O’Fallon, Missouri; John

[Sue] Shaw of Wildwood;

Adam [Cynthia] Williams of Sunset Hills;

Bradley Williams of Defiance; and his two

daughters, Cathy [Bill] Shaw Connely of

Wildwood; and Debbie [Jim] Shaw Franke

of Ellisville.

Shaw was a proud grandfather to Matthew

John [Erin] Shaw, Patrick Shaw, Baby

Billy Ray Connely, Ravin Williams, Riley

Williams, Elizabeth Franke, Alexandra

Franke, Elise Williams, Corinne Williams,

Sheena Mulhall and Becky Kronauge; and

great-grandfather to Millie Ray Mulhall.

He was preceded in death by his father,

Charles A Shaw; his mother, May Shaw

[nee Sutcliffe]; son, Steve Shaw; brothers,

Charles Major Shaw and Jimmy Shaw; and

sister, Betty Prouty.

Memorial remembrances may be made

to: The Alzheimer’s Association, 9370

Olive Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63132, or St.

Louis Family Church directly or in care

of Pitman Funeral Home, 1545 Wentzville

Parkway, Wentzville, MO 63385.

Tom Shaw with then County Executive Charlie

Dooley at the opening of Route 141 through

Chesterfield.


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Groundbreaking set for

Chesterfield SportsComplex

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I NEWS I 13

By JIM ERICKSON

The Chesterfield Hockey Association

[CHA] will break ground for its

SportsComplex at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday,

Nov. 10 at the building site in western

Chesterfield Valley.

Work at the site began in September

and is expected to take 11 months to

complete. A grand opening is estimated

for late next summer.

In addition to CHA board members,

Chesterfield city officials, developers

and contractors for the project club

members and donors are expected at the

groundbreaking.

The 84,000-square-foot facility will

feature two NHL-sized rinks, seating for

2,000 spectators, a second-floor viewing

area, locker rooms, team meeting rooms

and offices.

The estimated cost for the facility is

$21.5 million. Funds have come from

charitable contributions, bank financing

and the voter-approved extension

of a 3/8-cent sales tax administered by

the Chesterfield Valley Transportation

Development District for public infrastructure

improvements related to the

project.

CHA and Maryville University have

joined in a long-term partnership that

includes underwriting from Maryville

and an agreement for the university’s

men’s and women’s hockey teams to

make the SportsComplex their home.

According to CHA officials, the university

was instrumental in helping the

project come to fruition and will help

with the sustainability of the complex

due to its use of the ice during non-peak

hours. CHA describes Maryville as the

largest leaseholder of the complex.

“Partnering with CHA on this complex

is a win-win,” said Dr. Mark Lombardi,

Maryville’s president. “Our new collegiate

hockey teams need ice where they

can both practice and compete. Having

a state-of-the-art facility nearby gives

them a convenient and welcoming place

to call home.”

In addition to the university and CHA,

other local high schools committed to

using the new facility include Marquette,

Lafayette, Parkway West, St. Louis

Priory and Fort Zumwalt West.

CHA will continue its fundraising

efforts during the construction phase to

raise an additional $800,000 before next

year’s grand opening.

The association was founded in 1995

as a not-for-profit corporation for the

development and operation of amateur

youth hockey in West St. Louis County.

According to association officials, CHA

enrolls about 400 players each season

and hundreds more in spring and summer

leagues.

Mark Krause, CHA board president,

said he looks forward to recognizing at

the ground-breaking ceremony the many

people and organizations involved in

supporting the new facility.

The Chesterfield SportsComplex site

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WILDWOOD, from page 11

city as well. I think the other side is trying

to recruit more of the professional, officetype

users that will fill available office

spaces in town but are also here during the

day from the typical 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and

help contribute to the local economy as

more of a business user than anything else,”

Jacquin said.

Five existing Wildwood businesses

have relocated and expanded since August

2016, or plan to do so. In 2018, businesses

that have already successfully relocated

include CrossFit Wildwood into the previously

vacant Dau Furniture building

[March 2018] and Subway at 2430 Taylor

Road [June 2018] from its former location

within Village Plaza.

Since October 2016, approximately 20

new businesses have opened or expect to

open in Wildwood, creating about 105 new

full-time jobs and 22 part-time jobs.

“Through our economic development,

I think we’ve gotten our landowners, our

property owners and the businesses to

communicate a little bit more openly with

each other,” Dodwell said. “I’m in my

second year as chair of the committee, and

after my first year, I had phone calls and

emails from several different businesses

just saying, ‘Thank you for providing us

with a single resource, so we don’t have to

go from person to person within the city to

try and find answers.’”

According to Jacquin, the of city’s goals

with business recruitment and retention

are “… more service-oriented [operations],

including restaurants, boutique shops and

businesses that provide a certain service to

Wildwood.”

As of 2018, the list of new businesses

and their open dates includes:

• Edward Jones: Jason Huntley, 16750

Main St., February 2018

• The Color Bar: Going Glam Cosmetics,

174 Plaza Drive, February 2018

• AdvantaClean of West County, located

at 17384 Manchester Road, May 2018

• Stonecrest of Wildwood, 251 Plaza

Drive, May 2018

• Salon Bellissimo [at Stonecrest], 237

Plaza Drive, June 2018

• Dollar Tree, 16552 Manchester Road,

July 2018

• Aegis Therapies [at Stonecrest], 231

Plaza Drive, July 2018

• Premier Business Advantage, 16759

Main St., August 2018

• Media Center [at Stonecrest], 251 Plaza

Drive, August 2018

Nine businesses also recently have

renovated facilities within Wildwood,

including the Village Plaza Shopping

Center, the Pure by Jen boutique located

in Town Center, the former dance studio

located at 2612 East Ave., the Pond Inn &

Hall off Manchester Road, the Wildwood

@WESTNEWSMAG

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

Family YMCA, Schnucks Markets, the

New Community Church off Manchester

Road, Directory Publishing Solutions

[DPS Media] off State Route 109 and the

La Salle Retreat Center located off Rue de

La Salle Drive.

“Obviously, the city can’t run somebody’s

personal business, but if there are

additional resources that we might be able

to bring to bear to help ease their implementation

or the growth of their business,

we certainly want to be in the position to

do that,” Dodwell said.

Incoming businesses

Multiple other developments tentatively

are planning to open inside the city limits

before the end of 2018. According to Jacquin,

many of those are not being built

from the ground up but are instead filling

vacancies.

“More often than not, our primary effort

is attracting businesses to fill the existing

spaces that we already have,” Jacquin said.

“I think when my position was created

[in 2016], people went around town and

they noticed several available spaces that

weren’t being filled. I think that usually is

one of the first few items people mention,

filling those available retail spaces before

even considering building anything new.”

Since 2016, the number of vacancies in

the city has declined.

In mid-2016, the total vacancy rate for

shopping centers in Wildwood was about

19.4 percent, which equates to about

70,000 square feet of vacancy out of about

363,000 square feet of overall space.

As of October 2018, Jacquin said the

total vacancy dropped to about 30,000

square feet, which caused the vacancy rate

to decline to about 10.27 percent.

“In those two years, we went from a

vacancy rate of almost 20 percent down to

a vacancy rate of almost 10 percent,” Jacquin

said.

One development currently working to

fill a vacancy is The Miller Haus, under

construction at 2612 East Ave. in Ward

8. The building will house a dog-friendly

coffee shop, lounge and coworking space

that also will host pet adoptions and rescue

events. The facility has sat vacant for four

years and previously served as the home of

Wildwood Dance and Arts.

According to Jacquin, owner Ande

Miller received all paperwork from the city

of Wildwood earlier in 2018 and is currently

awaiting a few more permits from St.

Louis County. The business plans to open

its doors before the end of the year.

“People are very excited, who live in the

neighborhoods around it, that they will

have someplace where they can walk to get

a quick bite,” Dodwell said.

Also in Ward 8, Clinical Bioenergy Services

has opened at 16759 Main St. The

office is on the building’s second floor,


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November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I NEWS I 15

above the Table Three restaurant

located at 16765 Main

Street. According to Jacquin,

the move-in date was Nov. 1.

Another development

coming to the city is Code

Ninjas, a new franchise opening

in the former Lindenwood

University extension campus

at 16747 Main Street. The

business offers coding classes

for kids to teach video game

development alongside other

math and technology skills.

According to Jacquin, two

franchise owners signed a

lease in mid-October.

“Hopefully, they’ll be open

or built out before the end of the year,” he

said.

Premier Martial Arts will be moving to

2418 Taylor Road, between Bentley’s Pet

Stuff and RE/MAX One. The location was

previously the site Wines of Wildwood

before its closure.

In the former Big Bear Grill, located at

16524 Manchester Road, will be Craft, a

new restaurant from the owners of 1356

Public House, located at 1356 Big Bend

Road in Twin Oaks. Big Bear Grill has

sat vacant since the restaurant’s closure in

October 2017. Craft is expected to open in

December.

The former site of Lindenwood University at 16747 Main Street

“[The owner] wants to make an expanded,

updated patio with about 35 craft beers on

tap,” Jacquin said.

Potential developments

At an Oct. 22 council meeting, the city

conducted a public hearing on a development

known as “The Prime.”

The apartments would be located along

16700 Main St. in the city’s Town Center

area. The lot is currently vacant and located

immediately east of the Wildwood B&B

movie theater. The structure would be a fourstory,

mixed-use complex and consist of two

interconnected buildings. The development

would occupy about two acres

out of the 5.3-acre space.

The first floor would be

dedicated to commercial use,

including retail stores and a

restaurant facility, with the

three stories above housing an

estimated 48 residential units.

The commercial spaces would

be located beneath a canopy

on the first floor and would be

open to the public.

The proposal also includes

100 parking spaces in the rear, a

restaurant with an outdoor seating

area, a private courtyard, a

rooftop terrace, a bio-retention

area, an accessible breezeway, a

multi-use trail and land dedicated for the east

half of a new section of Eastgate Avenue.

The proposal received a favorable recommendation

from the Planning & Zoning

Commission at its Oct. 1 meeting. A public

hearing on the development was held by

the commission on Aug. 20.

While the apartments were to be targeted

to a senior audience, Joe Vujnich, director

of planning and parks, said that, following

conversations with P&Z, it was determined

the apartments would be open to tenants of

any age group willing to pay the specified

rates and agree to any and all conditions

attached to the living area.

The council voted unanimously on Oct.

22 to prepare legislation for the development

for a future meeting.

“I think this is an encouraging project,”

Councilmember Tammy Shea [Ward 3]

said at the Oct. 22 meeting. “I think it hits

all the marks of new urbanism ...”

While some businesses coming to the

city are completely new, other openings are

expansions of already existing businesses.

Cherry Hills Family Eyecare, currently

located at 16978 Manchester Road, will

relocate into a larger space at 16508 Manchester

Road in December 2018. That location

is the former St. Louis Bread Co. site in

the Schnucks Wildwood Crossing area.

The filling of vacancies mostly in and

around Town Center is not an accident.

According to Dodwell, it is part of the

committee’s process and emphasis on

intentional development in specific areas.

“We, as a city, know that we don’t want

to put huge, big-box stores into our Town

Center,” Dodwell said. “We don’t want to

have pockets of retail and/or office space

throughout the city … We’re not looking

to be St. Charles. We’re not looking to be

O’Fallon. We still want to be able to have

the open country [and] the parks and recreational

types of activities that everybody

moved to Wildwood for, but we also want

to be able to give resources to our residents

in the area.”

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16 I NEWS I

BEFORE

November 7, 2018

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Town & Country resolves Town

Square change order No. 11

By BONNIE KRUEGER

Change order No. 11 for revised landscaping

for Town & Country’s developing Town

Square found resolution in an amended form

on Oct. 22 after being on the aldermanic

agenda for three consecutive meetings.

As originally proposed, change order No.

11 would have increased, by $92,439, the

previously approved landscaping budget

of $287,229.75. Included in the original

change order were unforeseen costs not

budgeted for the removal of 15 dead trees

[approximately $30,000], revised drainage

grading [approximately $23,000], and

abandoned rubble and debris removal

[approximately $18,000] as well as a threeyear

honeysuckle stewardship program

that would remove invasive honeysuckle

on 11 residential and commercial properties

adjacent to Town Square.

On Oct. 8, after the change order’s second

reading, the Board of Aldermen passed a

motion to continue the change order vote

until its Oct. 22 meeting and asked city

staff to provide a revised landscape site

NIM OITA TAERT plan RON within the previously approved landscape

budget.

Prior to the board’s Oct. 22 meeting,

Craig Wilde, director of planning and public

works, emailed the aldermen a revised

landscaping plan that used $85,029 of the

original budget to cover the cost of the items

included in change order No. 11. The majority

of the cost savings was accomplished by

removing 65 canopy trees, 33 ornamental

trees, 23 Norway spruces and 19 pines from

the original plan and eliminating the threeyear

honeysuckle stewardship program proposed

in change order No. 11.

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However, on Oct. 22, several aldermen

objected to the loss of the trees in the retail

and plaza areas of Town Center and as a

buffer for neighboring residential properties.

Alderman Lindsey Butler [Ward 2]

said that action was in direct conflict with

what neighboring residences were promised

and that it did not line up with Metropolitan

Sewer District’s recommendation

and guidelines.

Alderman Fred Meyland-Smith [Ward 3]

said, “There is a strong consensus among

the board that the plan represented by the

email is unacceptable because it violates a

number of principles we have established

for ourselves not the least of which is

making promises to the residents which is

consistent with the way the city has managed

itself in a number of other projects

and I think it detracts from the overall quality

of the project.”

Alderman Tiffany Frautschi [Ward 2], in

making a motion to amend and approve

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change order No. 11 in the amount of $71,000,

said, “It makes sense to amend the ordinance

we have before us to reflect the actual work

that needs to be done [the dead tree removal,

drainage grading and tree removal].” Alderman

Skip Mange [Ward 1] seconded the

motion and the board approved the amended

ordinance by a vote of 6 to 1.

Alderman Jon Benigas [Ward 4] was

absent and Alderman Matt Reuter [Ward 3]

voted “no” on the measure.

Meanwhile, Wilde assured the board that

the provisions for tree plantings and landscape

buffers, included in the original landscape

plan that was approved on April 25,

would remain intact in the landscape plan

as amended on Oct. 22.

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West County Fire & EMS celebrates fire

prevention month with pizza deliveries

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I NEWS I 17

By BONNIE KRUEGER

Lights … sirens … pizza! Three lucky,

unsuspecting local residents had pizzas

delivered with all the bells and whistles

by West County Fire & EMS Station 1’s

A Team on Wed, Oct. 17.

For the fifth year, the fire department

has teamed up with Domino’s Pizza, 667

Big Bend Road in Ballwin, as a fun way

to engage the community during Fire

Prevention Month.

In addition to delivering the pizzas,

the crew verifies that the home receiving

the delivery is equipped with smoke

detectors and that they are working

properly. If not, the homeowner

receives a new 10-year, hardwired battery,

photoelectric smoke detector for

their home. If their home was properly

equipped, the pizza is free.

“With daylight savings time ending

[Nov. 4], it is a great time to change

your smoke detector batteries,” suggested

Capt. Brandon White. “Change

the clocks, change the battery.”

Kelly Cobb, executive director of the

Safety House Foundation, added, “This

year, all three families had working

smoke detectors, which is not always the

case.”

According to statistics provided by

West County Fire & EMS, three out of

five home fire deaths occurred in homes

without working smoke detectors. The

risk for death in a home fire is cut in half

with properly installed detectors.

White suggested having one photoionization

smoke detector on each level

of the home [such as a hallway] as well

as one photoelectric smoke detector in

each bedroom. Area city codes require

the installation of smoke detectors in

bedrooms for new construction. Similarly,

carbon monoxide detectors should

be installed on each level of the house

and should be replaced every seven

years. Smoke detectors have a lifespan

of 10 years.

“Check your manufacturer’s date

when you change the battery to make

sure it is not past its replacement date,”

White suggested. Some smoke detectors

today have a built-in, 10-year, lithium-ion

battery, which does not require

battery monitoring over the lifetime of

the detector. Like traditional detectors,

if the battery fails, a warning chirp is

emitted.

A final important tip regarding fire

safety: Sleeping with your door closed

can help keep smoke and flames at bay

to allow for extra time to escape safely

through a window.

“Sleep with your door closed. There’s

a rhyme: Close before you doze,”

shared Cobb.

West County Fire & EMS Station 1’s A

Team [from left)] Zach Absolon, Capt.

Brandon White, Tim Fleig, Josh Woolums,

Virgil Shivers and Jared Lickerman

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November 7, 2018

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Wildwood votes to investigate campaign

complaint dismissed by prosecutor

By JESSICA MESZAROS

At the Oct. 22 City Council meeting, the

city discussed reports from special prosecutor

Tim Englemeyer regarding complaints

made by Wildwood resident Tony Salvatore

against Mayor Jim Bowlin and Councilmember

Ray Manton [Ward 2] dated

Sept. 14, 2018. According to an official

report to the Wildwood City Council from

Engelmeyer & Pezzani, LLC dated Oct. 12,

Salvatore’s complaints against both parties

have been officially dismissed.

Salvatore filed complaints against Bowlin

and Manton claiming both violated Sec.

3.4[c] and Sec. 11.3 of the city charter following

multiple instances where police

were reportedly sent to Salvatore’s campaigning

locations in the city.

Sec 3.4[c] states that, with a few exceptions

stated in the charter, councilmembers cannot

interfere with administrative city officers or

employees who are subject to the direction

and supervision of the city administrator,

and councilmembers also can’t issue orders

to any such officer or employee publicly or

privately. Sec. 11.3 states that no city officer,

board member, councilmember, commission

member or employee can use official authority

or official influence to affect or interfere

with the result of a city office election.

Salvatore ran for a Ward 2 city council

seat in the April 2018 election against

Manton, who was the incumbent.

According to Engelmeyer’s report, Salvatore

argued that Bowlin violated the city’s

charter after allegedly speaking with City

Administrator Ryan Thomas following

the receipt of an email complaint made by

Manton about Salvatore’s campaign tactics

in March 2018 citing concerns about public

right-of-way and traffic. Salvatore stated

Bowlin contacted Chesterfield Mayor Bob

Nation to inquire if Chesterfield had ordinances

prohibiting the holding of campaign

signs on or near a roadway.

For evidence, Salvatore supplied a copy

of a transcript of a taped interview with City

Administrator Ryan Thomas, emails, text

messages, phone records and official St.

Louis County police reports.

According to Engelmeyer, Salvatore’s

charter violation complaint s against Bowlin

and Manton were ultimately dismissed

under Sec. 125.140[c][2] because there was

“no probable cause” to believe the charter

was violated.

Engelmeyer also stated that Sec. 3.4[c]

did not apply to the Bowlin or Manton

accusations or the overall situation because

it applies to interference with officers or

employees who are subject to the direction

of and supervised by the city administration.

Bowlin’s call to Thomas regarding Salvatore’s

campaigning went directly to the

city administrator, not to anyone supervised

by the city administrator. Also according to

Engelmeyer’s Oct. 12 report, additional evidence

was needed to ultimately prove Bowlin

used official authority or influence pursuant

to Sec. 11.3 when contacting Thomas about

possible campaign and ordinance violations

by Salvatore. Thomas also testified that

Manton and Bowlin’s inquiries were handled

like any other complaint received.

The submitted evidence didn’t change

Engelmeyer’s opinion that Bowlin did not

violate Sec. 11.3 by reaching out to Nation to

inquire about Chesterfield ordinances about

living signs or signs in the right-of-way.

“Simply put, the mayor, like any citizen,

is free to inquire about or report a perceived

ordinance violation, both of his own city

administrator or of a neighboring city,” the

report stated.

In addition, Engelmeyer determined that

Sec. 3.4[c] did not apply to Manton because

the evidence provided by Salvatore didn’t

show he was using official authority or

influence when he contacted Thomas about

the possible ordinance violations.

The council took a 14-1 vote in favor

of extending an invitation to Engelmeyer

to attend the next city council meeting on

Nov. 13 to answer questions regarding the

dismissals. Manton abstained from the vote.

Following a discussion of Engelmeyer’s

reports, Councilmember John Gragnani

[Ward 1] made an additional request to

the council to investigate the allegations

made by Salvatore. Some councilmembers

expressed concern with Engelmeyer’s decision,

specifically with the interpretation of

Sec. 3.4[c] in relation to Manton, the issuance

of police officers to handle the complaint

as well as findings by Engelmeyer in

the Oct. 12 report that state not all of Salvatore’s

campaign locations or living signs

violated city ordinances.

“Every year that I run, somebody puts a

sign in the right of way, and I will email Joe

[Vujnich, director of planning & parks] or

I’ll call him,” Councilmember Tammy Shea

[Ward 3] said at the Oct. 22 meeting. “Code

Enforcement goes out there, checks it out,

picks it up and it’s over.”

Gragnani suggested that the item be

moved to the city’s Admin/Public Works

Committee to decide and return to the council

mechanisms that would assist in an independent

investigation to determine alleged

city charter or ordinance violations.

“The council has to own this,” Gragnani

said regarding the motion. “We have to

decide how we’re going to take charge of

this, and we have to do this and get it done.”

The vote for the investigation passed 14-1,

with Manton abstaining from the vote.


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November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

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20 I SCHOOLS I

November 7, 2018

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Children served by Kingdom House find their perfect costume

for Halloween.

bulletin

board

By BONNIE KRUEGER

Halloween party for

Kingdom House families

Whitfield School’s Community Service

Club hosted its annual Halloween party for

Kingdom House families on Saturday, Oct.

20. More than 100 costumes were donated

during the school’s month-long costume

drive leading up to the event. Young guests

had fun picking out a costume.

During the party, Whitfield students

helped distribute costumes and facilitated

fun activities with the children including

face-painting, decorating pumpkins and

playing games.

Kingdom House helps the economically

disadvantaged achieve economic independence,

self-sufficiency and a path out of

poverty.

Eureka High student named

city’s first Citizen of Distinction

Lauren Jeffress, a senior at Eureka High,

was named the city of Eureka’s first-ever

Citizen of Distinction. The honor came

Lauren Jeffress, the city of Eureka’s first

Citizen of Distinction

after some inspiring

things she has done

in the community.

After she lost

a close loved

one, Jeffress’ high

school community

rallied around her. Now, she is paying it

forward by helping others who have experienced

similar losses.

“I tried to turn tragedy into inspiration

and learned to take what happened and

channel it into helping others,” Jeffress

said.

Some examples of how Jeffress helps

her community include raising money for

The BackStoppers organization, starting

a grief support group at a middle school,

and collecting money and supplies for

families experiencing the loss of a loved

one.

Eureka Mayor Kevin Coffey said the

new Citizen of Distinction award recognizes

young adults for their enthusiastic

leadership and dedicated support designed

to improve the lives of others.

“It’s important that we appreciate and

recognize young people who are building

leadership in our community,” said Coffey.

In college, Jeffress hopes to start a nonprofit

organization to help people who

have lost a loved one.

Local student featured

in national blog

Miriam Academy student Devlin Riney

recently was featured in the

Newmanitarian blog, sponsored

by the Newman’s

Own Foundation.

As part of the blog’s

Road Trip segment, representatives

from the Newman’s

Own Foundation

leave the headquarters and

visit places across the country

that are making a difference

in people’s lives.

In October, the Newman’s Own Foundation

visited Miriam Academy where they

received a tour given by Riney and his

mother, Heather.

Devlin Riney and his mother, Heather,

recently were featured on the Newman’s Own

Foundation’s Newmanitarian blog.

“St. Louis is most famous for the Gateway

Arch, but for local children who have

learning differences, Miriam School and

Miriam Academy are landmarks of even

greater significance,” the blog wrote.

The blog post talks about how Riney was

diagnosed with autism, ADHD and anxiety,

but that it’s evident he feels “happy and

comfortable” at Miriam.

“When I drop Devlin off, I sometimes

find myself tearing up because I am so

thankful for Miriam,” Heather told the

Newman’s Own Foundation. “The staff

not only understand him, they embrace

him.”

To read the full blog post, visit newmanitarian.org/category/road-trip/.

Miriam Academy serves high school

students with learning challenges in an

environment designed to help them excel.

Miriam School does the same thing for

students in grades pre-K through eighth

grade.

Parkway adds two nationally

certified school nurses

Parkway school nurses Kimberly

Morelli, West Middle, and Karen Malik,

Green Trails Elementary, have earned the

Nationally Certified School Nurse [NCSN]

credential, which validates their specialized

knowledge and expertise as a school

nurse.

Parkway now has 22 nationally certified

school nurses, the most in the state.

The NCSN credential is granted to

registered nurses who meet educational,

employment and other criteria, and who

have successfully passed the national

examination managed by the National

Board for Certification of School Nurses.

The NCSN process is accredited by the

American Board of Nursing Specialties,

whose rigorous standards ensure that the

credentialing process of the NBCSN meet

or exceed industry standards for certification

and that its examination is reflective of

the knowledge expected of the proficient

school nurse.

Parkway Central Middle band

teacher named semifinalist

Paul Holzen, a band teacher at Parkway

Central Middle, has been selected as a

semifinalist for the 2019 Grammy Music

Educator Award. Holzen was chosen as

one of 25 semifinalists nationally, out

of 2,800 nominations, and was the only

teacher selected from Missouri.

The teachers are recognized for making a


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WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I SCHOOLS I 21

Paul Holzen engaging with students through the Parkway Central Middle band program.

lasting impact on students and music education.

Each year, one recipient is selected

from 10 finalists and recognized for their

impact on students’ lives. The winner will

be flown to New York to attend

the Annual Grammy Awards

and a range of Grammy week

events. Nine additional finalists

will receive a $1,000 honorarium,

and the schools of all

10 finalists will receive matching

grants. Fifteen semifinalists

will receive a $500 honorarium

with matching school grants.

The Grammy’s Music Educator

Award is supported by

Rainey

the NAMM Foundation and the National

Association for Music Education

New head of school for MICDS

After an eight-month search, the MICDS

Board of Trustees has appointed Jay Rainey

as MICDS’ next head of school.

Rainey comes to MICDS from Randolph

School, a K-12 independent school,

where he has served as head of school

since 2014. Prior to Randolph School,

Rainey spent 12 years at

Norfolk Academy, where he

served as a math and English

teacher, coach and college

counselor before being promoted

to director of studies

and then assistant head of academic

affairs.

Rainey has eight years of

entrepreneurial and business

experience. He earned a master’s

degree from the College

of William & Mary and an undergraduate

degree from Princeton University.

Current MICDS Head of School Lisa

Lyle announced in January that she will

leave her position at the end of the 2018-

19 school year when her contract expires.

Rainey begins his position July 1, 2019.

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It’s an early morning for barista Erin

Clay and student manager Pierce Burns as

they prep for the morning coffee rush at

Parkway West High.

Clay and Burns are part of the Blue Brew

Crew, which operates the in-school coffee

shop each morning from 6:40-7:20 a.m.

Also on the team are Garrett Walker and

Clay’s twin sister, Alison. The Blue Brew

coffee shop made its school debut on Aug.

20 as a Marketing 2 venture.

“In our Marketing 1 class, the students

learn the basics,” explained marketing

teacher Holly Weber. “In Marketing 2, it’s

about taking what we learned and putting it

into practice. Blue Brew is designed to be

an extension of the classroom through promotions,

product development, campaigns

and accounting.”

Burns participates in Blue Brew’s daily

operations but it is the advertising aspect of

marketing that interests him most.

“We only get to advertise about once a

week, so the coffee shop itself is really the

advertising,” he explained. Advertising has

included an article that ran in the Pathfinder

school newspaper as well as a full-length

infomercial. The visibility is paying off.

Essential Skills student Vivi delivers coffee to

teacher assistant Matt West, with support from

her speech language teacher Michelle Stein.

All profits are put back into the business

and into West Chest, which is designed to

meet academic or physical needs of the

student body. The Blue Brew Crew hopes

to collect at least $1,000 to give to West

Chest this school year.

In the classroom, marketing students

assess each day’s sales, inventory supplies

and determine if any products should be

added. Recently, the students added hot

chocolate and the seasonal favorite pumpkin

spice latte to the coffee shop’s menu,

which also includes mocha and vanilla

lattes and iced or hot tea.

Working in the shop also has practical

applications.

Clay, a senior, applied for the volunteer

position to earn community service hours

for the National Honor Society. Similarly,

students, such as Burns, may use the volunteer

hours for the A+ program, which

provides post-secondary education scholarship

money.

Weber successfully ran a similar program

at Parkway North High before transferring

to West two years ago.

“Not only are they learning back-office

operations, but this provides an authentic

work experience,” Weber said. “Workers are

learning to be nimble and quick on their feet.”

Weber’s marketing students aren’t

the only ones involved with the coffee

shop. Special Education teacher Wendy

Zieleskiewicz uses it as a training ground

for students in her essential skills class.

The coffee shop offers a platform for students

to practice workplace and life skills

by filling and delivering drink orders for

teachers during the first period of the day.

“I like the activity,” said Geoff, an essential

skills student. “I get to talk to the people

who I deliver to, and it’s fun to deliver.”

For nonverbal student Vivi, the coffee

shop gives her an opportunity to engage with

adults using an interactive voice touchpad.

“This is such a great program that can

touch many lives,” Weber said. She added

that the next step for the Blue Brew is to

expand and build a permanent structure in

the school.


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Tune in: Local musician part of Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade

By BONNIE KRUEGER

The Macy’s Great American Marching

Band, featuring 185 high school

musicians and 40 flags and dancers, is a

12-year tradition that’s part of the Macy’s

Thanksgiving Day Parade. This year, Isabelle

Hefele will be among those stepping

off from Central Park.

Hefele is the only local student selected for

the parade, now in its 92nd year. A junior at

Parkway South High, she has devoted much

of her life to music, starting with the violin

in third grade and cello in fourth and fifth

grades. She also plays the piano and percussion.

But it wasn’t until she heard a mariachi

band while on a mission trip that she found

her true love – the trumpet – which she’s

been playing since middle school.

Hefele admits she’s technologically

challenged and nearly missed the deadline

for submitting the Great American Marching

Band’s online video audition, but her

friend and classmate Aaron Zoellner came

to her rescue. On a chilly day in March,

Hefele marches across a football field,

demonstrating her mastery of basic steps

and showcasing that she can play while

marching forward and backward [no easy

task]. Playing in a marching band takes

Isabelle Hefele

precision as well as musical skill as Hefele

proved in her audition video.

While technology may not be her friend,

her talent is evidenced by her musical

achievements thus far. Hefele is the trumpet

section leader in both the school’s

concert and marching bands. She won top

honors in a state competition last school

year, playing in a trumpet quartet with

fellow South High classmates Darren Farnsworth,

Joe Novak and Joachim Kasper.

“To me, music is a way to communicate

in a way that words cannot. Music takes it

further. Every year, I tip my hat to God and

use it as a way to praise Him,” she said.

Playing in the Manchester Community

StCharlesCVB_Nov_18_CT_MidRiver_West_1_2page.pdf 1 10/29/18 4:16 PM

[Rick Zoellner photo]

Band is another way Hefele furthers her musical

pursuits. The band is made up of mostly

older adults, which she said challenges her to

be on her A-game. She was inspired to join

the band because of her admiration for its

director – Chris Becker, her former South

High band director. Becker has been music

director and conductor of the community

band since its inception in 2013. He taught in

Missouri public schools for 40 years – 36 of

which where in Parkway and all but five of

those years were at South High.

“[Isabelle] is a talented and enthusiastic

young musician, with a very outgoing personality,”

Becker said of his former student.

“Isabelle is one of those young people who

is so eager to participate and contribute

that it is really a pleasure to have her in

the group. It was the same way when she

was in the band at Parkway South during

my last year of teaching. I think we made

a very positive connection there, and it has

continued through her involvement in the

Manchester Community Band.

“I am very grateful that she chooses to

play in the band and flattered that she still

wants to perform in a group that I conduct.”

While a few high school students have

participated in the Manchester Community

Band, Hefele is one of the youngest musicians

in its history.

“This past summer, Isabelle was the only

rising junior to play the concerts, and she

did so very, very well. I think the experience

helped her develop confidence in her

playing and also improved her playing

skills,” Becker said.

To prepare for the Macy’s parade, Hefele

will travel to New York on Nov. 17, the

Saturday before Thanksgiving, to attend

rehearsals, leadership seminars and speaking

engagements. But it’s not all work and

no play. As part of the week, Hefele will

attend “Wicked” on Broadway and tour

Radio City Music Hall. Her mom, Amie;

stepdad, Jim; and two sisters will join her

in New York on Monday, Nov. 19.

“It’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for us

to go as a family, although we are mostly on

our own until the parade,” Amie explained.

The family will conclude the trip with a

visit to the 9/11 memorial site.

“Isabelle is incredibly patriotic. She is a

witness of her faith and patriotism,” Jim

said. “It shines through her smile, her

words and her faith in her country.”

Tune in to watch Hefele perform in the

Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade from

8-11 a.m. on Thursday, Nov. 22 on NBC.

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K


24 I SPORTS I

November 7, 2018

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By WARREN MAYES

High school softball

For the first time since 2014, the Westminster

Christian Academy softball team

won a district championship.

Westminster, the No. 2 seed, faced topseeded

Incarnate Word Academy for the

Class 3 District 4 title. Westminster scored

a 7-5 victory over the Red Knights. Incarnate

Word, a Final Four team in 2017, finished

at 13-10-1.

“Incarnate Word is an excellent softball

team and was coming off a trip to state last

season,” Wildcats coach Dan Petke said.

“They can pitch, play defense and hit very

well. We are fortunate to be playing our

best softball at the right time and were able

to beat a very good team.”

The Wildcats were thrilled to win the

championship.

“The girls were very excited,” Petke

said. “They have become a family over the

course of this year, and it is great for us

to see them believe in themselves and pick

The Westminster Wildcats, District 4 softball champions

each other up in difficult games like this.”

Westminster’s season ended in the sectional

round. The St. Louis Notre Dame

Rebels scored a 14-1 victory in five innings

over Westminster. The win was the second

for Notre Dame over Westminster this

season. Back on Sept. 14, the Rebels won

10-5 at Westminster.

The Wildcats ended their season with a

13-12-1 record.

High school boys cross country

The Parkway Central Colts cross country

boys team are district champions for the

Parkway Central Colts, District 3 cross country champions

first time in 47 years.

The Colts won the Class 4 District 3 race

that Parkway Central hosted. Parkway

Central finished with 31 points.

“The kids had an amazing regular

season,” coach Brian Guilfoyle said. “As

a coach, I am very proud of the boys. They

all worked together to accomplish a team

title in a sport that emphasizes individual

times and places.”

Senior captain Gottlieb Gerstenecker

was the medalist with a time of 16 minutes,

47.93 seconds.

“This was his best time on our course,”

Guilfoyle said. “He ran very relaxed and

tried to help the other kids on the team with

pace.”

Colts teammate Andrew Ahrens came in

second in 17:03.30.

“This was a fantastic race for him,” Guilfoyle

said. “He showed tremendous grit.”

The other top 10 finisher for Parkway

Central was junior Jackson Sniff. He came

in sixth at 17:30.60.

High school girls cross country

The Parkway West Longhorns captured

the girls cross country district championship

and senior Chloe Hershenow won

medalist honors with her best time ever.

The Longhorns won the District 2 meet

at Francis Park in south St. Louis. Parkway

West finished first with 69 points. Hershenow

was the medalist with a winning time

of 18 minutes, 33.46 seconds.

Eureka was second with 72 points. Marquette

wound up third with 76 points and

Nerinx Hall came in fourth with 107.

It was the 10th district title in Parkway

West history.

“We have won two times out of the last

three years,” coach Charlie Cutelli said.

“Before that, we had not won a title since

the early ‘90s.”

Hershenow ran well to lead everyone in

the meet.

“Chloe is rounding into form as we roll

into the end of the season,” Cutelli said. “I

know she was eager to compete on Saturday

and she ran her style of race and came

out on top. It [her score] is her PR [personal

record] for her four-year high school

career.”

The Longhorns’ Claire Smout was seventh

in 19:21.44.

“Claire ran great. I think she sometimes

gets lost in the shuffle, but we would not

be where we are as a team without her,”

Cutelli said. “She has been our No. 2 or No.

1 in every meet she has raced in this year

and always comes up big when we need

her.”

High school girls golf

The St. Joseph’s Academy Angels won

their third consecutive Class 2 state championship.

The victory ended an undefeated

season for the Angels in dual matches,

regular season tournaments and three postseason

tournaments.


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November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I SPORTS I 25

Parkway West Longhorns, District 2 cross country champions

St. Joseph’s posted a 36-hole team score

of 627 in the two-day tournament played

at Swope Park Golf Course in Kansas City.

Finishing second again this year behind St.

Joseph’s was Kansas City’s Notre Dame

de Sion, who came in four strokes off the

Angels’ pace with a 631.

It was the eighth state championship

overall for St. Joseph’s. Coach Carol Fromuth

said she was proud of her team.

“They were all very determined. That’s

all they thought about was to be ready for

state and win it,” Fromuth said. “I knew

they could do it. We all did, but it comes

down to playing. We had the talent to do

it. We had to accomplish it and we were

lucky to do so.

“This was their goal all season – to threepeat

at state. They were under pressure. It’s

harder to win when you’re favored, I think.

On paper is different from performance on

the golf course. The girls had to go out and

get it done.”

All five St. Joseph’s players finished

in the top 12. Girls who finished in the

top 15 individually are awarded all-state

medals. So every Angel became an allstate

golfer.

The finish was remarkable. It marked the

first time, in girls or boys state play that

the score of an all-state medalist was not

used in the team score. A state team consists

of five players and the top four scores

are counted.

“They told me that’s the first time it’s

ever happened in boys or girls state tournaments,”

Fromuth said. “They all did a great

job. We’re deep. Any of them could be the

low scorer in a tournament. We have a lot

of versatility. They were well prepared for

tournament golf.”

Junior Grace Aromando led the Angels

with a 153 over the 36 holes of play. She

finished in a tie for fifth overall. Sophomore

Nicole Rallo was a stroke back in

sixth place with a 156. Senior Lauren Gallagher

tied for ninth with a 160. Freshman

Mia Rallo claimed 11th place with a score

of 161. Sophomore Drew Nienhaus shot a

162 to finish in a tie for 12th.

• • •

The MICDS Rams finished third in the

Class 1 state girls golf tournament and

junior Parker Perry came in third overall.

“This season marked the sixth year in a

row of taking a team to state,” coach Steve

Johnston said. “Don’t know the record

books at MICDS, but [I] have to believe

our streak of six years in a row has to be a

school record.”

This fall, the Rams were put back in

Class 1 by the Missouri State High School

Activities Association. MICDS has played

in Class 2 for the past two years.

See SPORTS BRIEFS, page 31

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26 I SPORTS I

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

City of Ellisville

Notice is hereby given that the Council of the City of Ellisville will hold

a public hearing on Wednesday, December 5, 2018, at 7:00 P.M. at the

Ellisville City Hall, #1 Weis Avenue, Ellisville, Missouri, which will deal

with all facets of the CITY BUDGET FOR THE PERIOD OF JANUARY

1, 2019 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2019. This hearing will give the

Ellisville residents an opportunity to become familiar with the entire

budget for this accounting period. The budget summary information

is available for inspection at the Ellisville City Hall, #1 Weis Avenue,

Ellisville, Missouri during normal business hours of 8:00 A.M. to 5:00

P.M. Monday through Friday.

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By WARREN MAYES

For a couple of “nobodies,” Erin Slutzky

and Elyse Duffie showed they could compete

with anyone in the nation. Now, they

get to help represent it.

The pair turned heads the 2018 National

Junior Olympic Championships this past

summer in Des Moines, Iowa, where they

both played well.

“One of the tournament workers, who is

friends with Elyse, told us when we got to

the tournament that we were nobodies – not

in a condescending way, [just] because our

names weren’t out there since we didn’t

play many intense tournaments,” Slutzky

said. “I think Elyse and I coming out and

doing so well was definitely a shocking

result for the people at the tournament

since nobody knew who we were.

“Honestly, it was hilarious playing people

that everyone knew because the whole

place would be cheering for them. That

happened during my match with Heather

[Mahoney, a two-time champion at the

event] and it just motivated me more.”

Slutzky’s and Duffie’s next goal is to

bring some gold home to West County.

Parkway West junior Slutzky and Parkway

South graduate Duffie are representing the

United States in the Junior World Championships

in San Luis Potosi, Mexico, this

month.

“When I came home from nationals, I

truly thought about what the position on

the team meant,” Slutzky said. “I was honored

to represent my country and to be part

of such a great organization [and] among

such amazing racquetball players. These

past four months I have put a lot of pressure

on myself to earn that position. Being

on the [World Championship] team has

motivated me more than any other tournament,

so I’ve pushed myself hard to

become a completely different player.

“Being a part of an Olympic organization

is something that very few people get to

say in their lives.”

Duffie, now a sophomore at Purdue, also

was happy to be part of the team.

“I was so excited to hear that I had made

the Junior National Team,” said Duffie,

who is majoring in industrial engineering.

“It is an amazing opportunity and I can’t

wait to represent Team USA in Mexico.

Being able to represent my country in the

sport I love is an incredible honor.”

Slutzky won two silver medals at the

national tournament in Des Moines. In

16U singles, she was the No. 6 seed and

finished second. She also was second in

doubles with Duffie.

“I definitely surprised myself with the

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Racquetball standouts Slutzky and

Duffie to play for Team USA

way I played against [No. 3 seed] Heather

Mahoney in the quarters,” Slutzky said. “It

was by far the best I had ever played and

truly one of my all time favorite games. I

think that game was what proved to me

that I could actually be a part of the worlds

team, that it wasn’t some far off hope.”

Duffie was glad they represented St.

Louis well.

“I was very happy with how Erin and I

performed,” Duffie said. “The competition

is very tough at Junior Nationals so I was

proud of the success we had.”

This summer, the pair trained at the

Olympic Training Center in Colorado

Springs, Colorado.

Elise Duffie [left] and Erin Slutzky at the

National Junior Olympic Championships.

“The Olympic Training Center was

amazing. The equipment was all top-notch

and it made my membership on Team USA

feel more real than it had felt previously,”

Slutzky said. “We were actually part of

the Olympic organization, which blew my

mind.”

The training helped the athletes improve

their overall games.

“It was awesome to see how fast our

game improved over only a few days,”

Duffie said. “Having two St. Louis players

there was awesome and was a great

representation of how impressive our high

school team was.”

Duffie will be playing 18U singles in the

tournament.

At the world tournament, Slutzky will be

playing in 16U singles and 16U doubles

with Annie Roberts, who won the high

school national tournament last year by

beating Slutzky. Roberts attends Barlow

High School in Gresham, Oregon.

“I’m looking forward to spending time

with the team since a lot of them live really

far away and to playing some really tough

matches,” Slutzky said. “The whole experience

will be one I will never forget.


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The Kaufman Fund gears up for fifth

annual Trees for Vets program

Have you heard?

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I 27

By JESSICA MESZAROS

The Kaufman Fund, a local 501[c][3]

non-profit organization, is gearing up for

its fifth annual Trees for Vets project to

help provide veterans in need across the St.

Louis area with a free Christmas tree and

stand to help families celebrate the holiday

season.

The event is put on

by The Kaufman Fund,

a local nonprofit headquartered

in Creve Coeur

that has worked with

veterans’ and children’s

organizations across St.

Louis and the state of

Missouri since 1990. In

addition to the Trees for

Vets program, the organization

offers other yearround

support to local

veterans and at-risk children

coping with abuse

and poverty. The organization

also provides services

such as accessing

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder [PTSD]

therapy, assisting with honor flights to

Washington, D.C. and securing housing

opportunities for veterans. The nonprofit

has raised about $1 million for local charities

in the past 20 years.

In 2017, over 325 trees were donated to

the Trees for Vets program.

In 2018, the organization intends to

give away about 350-400 trees to veterans

and veterans’ organizations in surrounding

areas. Overall, the Kaufman Fund has

provided about 1,400 trees through the

program. The trees and stands are free of

charge to all participating veterans. The

event will be held from noon-4 p.m. on

Sunday, Dec. 9 at a location only disclosed

to participating veterans and their families.

The event will feature appearances by

Santa Claus and Mrs. Claus, and appearances

by multiple vendors that will offer

free coffee, hot chocolate, pretzels, Bundt

cakes and more. Official therapy dogs will

be on-site for children and adults.

“We like to make it a really nice, family

affair,” Al Finkelstein, board member of

The Kaufman Fund, said.

The fourth annual Trees for Vets event was held in 2017.

The Kaufman Fund also works with local

entities like the St. Patrick Center, University

of Missouri-St. Louis, United Service

Organizations, Catholic Charities, various

reserve units and more to obtain the names

of veterans to receive trees. Veterans

selected to receive a tree through the program

will receive a confirmation email in

November advising them of the tree pickup

time and location.

“So far, we haven’t had to turn a veteran

away,” Finkelstein said.

Veterans interested in applying for a free

tree should name, email and phone number

to Finkelstein at al@thekaufmanfund.org.

For more information about the organization

or how to donate, visit thekaufmanfund.org.

Circle of Concern seeks holiday donations

The Circle of Concern food pantry in

Valley Park is seeking donations for its

Thanksgiving and Holiday Baskets.

This year, over 500 turkeys and boxes of

seasonal foods will be shared with families

in need. The Thanksgiving food drive takes

place through Nov. 16.

Circle of Concern also is in need of hosts

for its Holiday Family Adoption program. In

2017, 600 client families were adopted by

community members who donated food, gifts

and necessities listed in the family’s wish list.

To view a Thanksgiving items shopping

list, register to adopt a family or learn

about other year-round volunteer positions,

visit circleofconcern.org

• • •

The Boy Scouts of America also will

conduct its annual Scouting for Food collection

drive, with much of the proceeds

benefitting Circle of Concern.

Scouts of all ages will go out on the

weekend of Nov. 10 and place hangers on

the doors across the community and return

to collect donated canned goods and nonperishable

food items on Nov. 17.

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

CITY OF WILDWOOD

PROPOSED MUNICIPAL BUDGET FY 2019

A Budget Hearing will be held by the City of Wildwood on NOVEMBER 26,

2018 AT 7:00 P.M. for all interested citizens of the City of Wildwood. The

Hearing will be held at 16860 Main Street, Wildwood Missouri, 63040 for

the purpose of discussing the Proposed Budget for the Fiscal Year ending

December 31, 2019. Preliminary General Fund, Capital Improvements,

and Special Revenue Fund Expenditures total $27,850,229. The Proposed

Budget may be examined beginning November 19, 2018, on weekdays at

City Hall between 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M. or on the City’s website at www.

cityofwildwood.com. All interested citizens will have the opportunity to

give written and oral comments. All citizens are encouraged to attend and

comment.

BY ORDER OF THE CITY COUNCIL

November 1, 2018, Ryan S. Thomas, City Administrator

The City of Wildwood is working to comply with the Americans With

Disabilities Act mandates. Individuals who require an accommodation to

attend a meeting should contact City Hall, 636-458-0440, at least 48 hours

in advance.


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WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

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damper on the host’s ability to enjoy their

own party.

If you are playing the role of host

this year, remember that you should be

enjoying the party alongside your guests.

Whether this means catering in food so

you don’t have to cook, or hosting the

party in a venue outside of your home –

there are plenty of options for stress-free

holiday hosting.

When it comes to planning the perfect

party, our advice to you is simple: stick

to what you do best and let others do

the rest.

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at you do best and let others do the rest

taken care of professionally.

Forget any possible stressful recipe blunders

or “Pinterest fails.” Having your party

catered will leave a positive impression on

your guests by ensuring the food is warm,

tasty and plentiful.

Restaurants who cater typically have

menu options to suit all ages and dietary

restrictions, making it easy to order a selection

that everyone will enjoy.

The restaurant will be able to make recommendations

on how much food to order

based on your number of guests, so you

don’t have to fret about running out of food

or having loads of leftovers.

If you are a wizard in the kitchen and

plan to take on the task yourself, our best

advice is to prep everything you can in

advance and, again, stick to what you

know best. Sticking to tried-and-true recipes

reduces and the chances of a mistake,

and it can actually make cooking quite

pleasant – perhaps evoking a sense of

nostalgia while baking grandma’s famous

pie or reading her cherished, weathered

recipe card.

Venue

Want to host but don’t want to do it in your

home? Consider hosting an “off-site” party.

Many restaurants have rooms for private

See PERFECT PARTY, page 30

Let the Dalie's Family

Let the Dalie's Family

Do the Cooking this Thanksgiving!

Do the Cooking this Thanksgiving!

Thanksgiving Packages

Thanksgiving Smoked Whole Turkey or

Packages

Bacon-Wrapped Ham

(12-14 lb. avg.)

(6 lb. avg.)

Smoked Whole Turkey

or

Bacon-Wrapped Ham

Green Bean (12-14 Casserole lb. avg.) * Sweet Potato (6 lb. & avg.) Peach Casserole

Green Bean Casserole * Sweet Potato & Peach Feeds 10-12 People $84.99

Casserole

Feeds 10-12 People $84.99

Add an additional Ham for $49.99 or 3 lb. Turkey Breast for $39.99

Add an additional Ham for $49.99 or 3 lb. Turkey Breast for $39.99

Whole Whole Turkey al a carte also also available available for $49.95 for $49.95

Order by 11/16. Pick up Tuesday 11/20 or Wednesday 11/21.

Order by 11/16. Pick up Tuesday 11/20 or Wednesday 11/21.

Call 636.529.1898

Call to 636.529.1898

place your order!

www.daliessmokehouse.com

to place your order!

www.daliessmokehouse.com

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

“WHERE EVERYDAY IS MARDI GRAS”

BREAKFAST

Bones’ Omelet

Tuesday

Wednesday

$2 Burgers Fried Chicken

$2 Wings $7.99 2 sides

$2 Drinks 11am - 9pm

Hump Night Party

Every Wednesday

I PLAN THE PERFECT PARTY I 29

Eggs Benedict

Daily 7am - 10:30am

Sat & Sun 7am - 1pm

Karaoke and $3 Pitchers and $3 Shots

14766 Manchester Rd

Ballwin, MO. 63021

FQSTL.COM 636-391-8293

Market

& Catering Co.

6750 Mexico Rd.

(636) 970-2992 | www.valentismarket.com

Let Us Cater Your

Holiday Home or Office Party

Cranberry-Orange Glaze Pork Loin, Peppered Beef Tenderloin with Brandy Cream

Sauce, Baked Ham with Honey Glaze, Traditional Roasted Turkey with Brown Gravy,

Brisket Marcella w/ Full comliment of sides

Pick Up Party Trays

Steak Gift Boxes

Our pick up party trays are sure to satisfy

all your guests!

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CALL ASHLEY FOR DETAILS

BARTENDER AND CLEAN UP FEE EXTRA

MUST PURCHASE ALL FOOD AND ALCOHOL FROM FQ


30 I PLAN THE PERFECT PARTY I

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

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The Best in Steaks, Seafood,

Pasta & Mediterranean Cuisine

Call us for any of your

Catering Needs

We bring our kitchen to you fresh,

hot and cooked to order on the spot!

Call for details

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Two Beautiful Banquet Rooms Seating Up To 50 People.

Rehearsal Dinners, Birthdays, Anniversary, Holiday Parties

Great Accommodations, Great Service, Great Price!

1054 N. Woods Mill, Chesterfield, 314.878.4449

Buy two dinner entrees ($14.99 and up) and Appetizer

get A Bottle of House Wine

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Please offer your server a tip on the total bill before discount. NOT valid with the

Early Bird Special, Happy Hour or any Major Holiday. Dine in only. Expires 11/30/18.

parties, which create the perfect intimate

space for your group complete with superb

food. You can still play the role of “host”

in a space like this by bringing in your own

décor and providing entertainment such as

a group game.

This saves all the hassle of having to

cook or clean in your own home, yet you

can still have the satisfaction of planning a

memorable party.

And, if you’re looking for something

beyond the traditional restaurant, consider

alternative venues such as a bowling alley!

Cater your favorite food there while enjoying

an activity in which the whole family

can participate.

Décor

Part of hosting a holiday party is creating

a warm and festive atmosphere for your

guests. Pro tip: decide on two or three main

colors for your holiday décor for a professionally

coordinated look.

No matter how many stores you stop in

to or whatever assortment of items you buy,

your décor items will complement each other

beautifully if their color schemes coincide.

For example, try a warm bronze/gold,

forest green and white ensemble for “evergreen”

décor. These colors transition nicely

from fall through Christmas and stay relevant

through the rest of winter as they are

not tied to one specific holiday.

Having a color palette in mind for décor

makes shopping easier as you can pass

right by the items that don’t fit.

No winter ensemble is complete without

soft candle lighting. But consider swapping

real candles for battery-operated ones,

which can function on a convenient timer

setting and offer a safer way to set the mood.

M E A L P A C K A G E S

BIG CHIEF PACKAGE

FEEDS APPROX. 8 PEOPLE

SMOKED OR ROASTED

WHOLE TURKEY

MASHED POTATOES & GRAVY

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PUMPKIN PIE

$175

LITTLE CHIEF PACKAGE

FEEDS APPROX. 4 PEOPLE

SMOKED OR ROASTED

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A LA CARTE

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PERFECT PARTY, from page 29

View the Full Dinner Menu at

www.spirosrestaurant.com or call 314.878.4449

636.458.3200

www.bigchiefstl.com

17352 Manchester Road


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I SPORTS I 31

SPORTS BRIEFS, from page 25

The Rams finished at state with a team

score of 739 on rounds of 366 and 373.

John Burroughs won state with a 701.

Springfield Catholic came in second at 703.

Perry wound up third with a 164. Her

rounds were 84 and 80.

“Parker is a heck of a player. She will

be competitive at the college level,” Johnston

said. “After medaling at districts and

sectionals, my only words of inspiration

and advice at state was to just be Parker

Perry. She came in third at state and felt she

could’ve done better.

“Parker is an accomplished golfer. Like

former Ram Shannon Gould, Parker leads

by example with her play and navigation

around the courses. She’s hard on herself,

but her maturity is beginning to break

through, helping and continuing to build

her confidence.”

Junior Garrett Goltermann finished 13th

and earned a state medal. The top 15 individual

finishers earn a medal. Goltermann

shot a 178 on rounds of 86 and 92.

High school girls tennis

Lafayette had two athletes compete in

the Class 2 state singles tournament at the

Cooper Tennis Complex in Springfield and

both earned state medals.

MICDS Rams jump for joy at the Class 1 state meet.

Mehlville’s Alyson Piskulic defeated

Lafayette’s Katie Ferguson 6-1, 6-0 in the

third-place match.

Lafayette’s Erin Davis defeated Summit’s

Ella Kinder in three sets in the seventh-place

match.

In Class 1 play, the MICDS doubles team

of Caleigh McClain and Journee White

captured the consolation title. The girls got

past John Burroughs’ Ainsley Heidbreder

and Kathryn Stengel 7-5, 6-2 in the fifthplace

match.

High school hockey

The high school hockey season has just

begun, but already teams are hoping their

seasons will end in early March with an

appearance in either the Challenge Cup or

Wickenheiser Cup championship games at

the Enterprise Center.

Westminster Christian Academy has won

the Wickenheiser Cup for the past two seasons.

“This season will be a real test for

us,” coach Dean Penberthy said. “We

have several players that have conflicting

schedules that will force them to

miss games. We have a young group of

kids who will continue to improve and

get acclimated to playing against bigger

stronger players. At times we will have a

short bench and those kids will be forced

to step up, compete and grow as players as

the season progresses.”

De Smet Jesuit finished second in the

Challenge Cup last February, losing to St.

Louis University High. Coach Chris Durso,

who is entering his second year as head

coach, said his team has one goal: To win

De Smet’s 15th championship.

“Based on what I’ve seen in the preseason,

there should be a lot of parity

among the top six to seven teams in the

league,” Durso said. “It could be anyone’s

to win. I’m confident we will put ourselves

in that conversation and hopefully make

another run at getting to Enterprise Center,

this time with a better result.”

One team will not be returning. Whitfield

is not fielding a team this winter. Gary

Wesolowski, the club president, said there

were not enough players for the Warriors to

put a team on the ice.

“Unfortunately, Whitfield will not

be fielding a varsity team this year,”

Wesolowski said. “The head coaching

position remains vacant at this time. [We

are] short on players this year. Hoping to

rebuild for next year.”

Whitfield’s program has had its successes

in the past with two Wickenheiser Cup

titles [2012 and 2008] and three Founders

Cups championships. The Warriors won

the 2018 Founders Cup earlier this year.

Previously, Whitfield won the Founders

Cup in 2011 and 2014.

- 2018 -

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Cocoon Home Consignment

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636.778.0090

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OPEN HOUSE:

Nov. 10

10:00 am - 5:00pm

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272 Lamp & Lantern Village

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636.207.7131

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OPEN HOUSE:

Nov. 10 • 10:00 am - 4:00 pm

Nov. 10-11

Timberwinds Nursery

54 Clarkson Road

Ellisville, MO 63011

636.227.0095

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OPEN HOUSE:

Nov. 10 • 9:00 am - 5:30 pm

& Nov. 11 • 10:00 am - 5:30 pm

Nov. 17

Restoration Alley

15626 Manchester Road

Ellisville, MO 63011

636.386.5957

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Noon - 7pm

Nov. 18

Union Furniture

and Flooring

21 South Washington Avenue

Union, MO 63084

636.583.3133

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OPEN HOUSE:

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Nov. 29

Nothing Bundt Cakes

159 Lamp and Lantern Village

Town and Country, MO 63017

636.220.6087

www.nothingbundtcakes.com

OPEN HOUSE:

Nov. 29

Noon - 5:00 pm

Happy

Holidays

from


32 I

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

@WESTNEWSMAG

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

R&R Ranch: A scenic sanctuary in Wildwood

By LISA RUSSELL

growing menagerie of miniature

horses and donkeys

– affectionately known as

“the minis” – which have

been rescued from abusive

and neglectful living

conditions in Missouri and

surrounding states. They

now number 17 in all.

Located off Wild Horse Creek Road just

east of its intersection with Hwy. 109 in

Wildwood is a large, white, absolutely stunning

home, designed in a unique Cape-Codmeets-classic-Southern

architectural style.

Connected by a picturesque arched bridge

to an equally gorgeous barn surrounded

by a large paddock, the fenced and gated

property is postcard-perfect. It looks as if

it belongs somewhere in the rolling hills of

Kentucky rather than in West County.

If you’re driving through the area for

the first time, the property’s sheer beauty

is enough to make you slow down for a

double take. But depending on the time of

day, you may actually hit the brakes when

you see more than a dozen miniature horses

grazing, resting and playing out front.

This wonderfully scenic property, called

R&R Ranch, is the realization of a dream

for longtime area residents David and

Stacy Rolfe and their three children. The

Rolfes have lived on the 30-acre property

since late 2015. They developed the land

and the buildings on it to meet a number of

specific goals.

“From day one we had a vision … we

wanted a house, a barn and a bridge connecting

the pieces together. We wanted it to feel

like it was in a very secluded country setting

even though we have this pretty major road

that runs along the front,” said Stacy.

The Rolfes selected veteran St. Louis area

builder Brett Hardesty to help them bring

that vision to life. Their other requirements

included an expansive freestanding garage

that houses David’s large vintage car collection,

a beautifully landscaped backyard

pool, and acres of trails weaved carefully

through the surrounding woods.

Of primary importance to Stacy and

her daughter Belle were the animals that

occupy the ranch’s barn, which was completed

in 2016: two full-size horses previously

owned by the family, along with a

Stacy Rolfe cuddles with Lucy, a miniature

horse raised by the Rolfes after her mother

rejected her at birth. [Stacy Rolfe photo]

A passion for rescue

A lifelong horse enthusiast, Stacy said

she got into adopting the minis a bit by

accident. Years before construction on

R&R Ranch began, she purchased her first

two, Sherman and Miss Mackenzie, on

Craigslist. She learned that, although they

were only 2 years old, she was their fourth

owner.

She said she quickly received a “crash

course” in miniature horse ownership.

That early experience opened her eyes to

the fact that many other minis were being

neglected or even abandoned by their

owners, and physically harmed by riders

The Rolfe family often posts banners on their corral fence from the “minis” to people passing by.

A view of the house and garage from the R&R Ranch entrance located on Wild Horse Creek Road.

[Stacy Rolfe photo]

too heavy for their small bodies. So she

began rescuing more, even though they all

had to be boarded off-site until the barn

was completed.

“These guys are so cute that everyone

says, ‘I want one,’ without realizing how

much work they are. They are all the work

of a regular-size horse and then some,”

Stacy explained. “Their digestive systems

are different, so their diet has to be different.

They tend to eat so much that they get

fat very easily, which causes a lot of health

problems.”

For example, Stacy said one of the little

horses, Chloe, had hooves that “looked

like elf shoes” when she was first rescued.

Chloe has Cushing’s Disease as well as

chronic laminitis – an inflammatory foot

condition – and is insulin-resistant. She

now wears special boots to protect her feet,

takes 32 pills a day and is fed a customized

diet.

“We wanted her because other people

don’t want horses with health issues,”

Stacy said.

Two of the minis, sisters Ella and Sophie,

came in already pregnant, which added

quickly to the growing “herd.” They and

several of the others were saved from

a lifetime of being hitched to pony ride

attractions.

One of those was Banks, an adorable

all-white horse standing just 30 inches tall,

[Stacy Rolfe photo]

rescued from terrible living conditions in

Arkansas.

“When we got Banks, it changed everything.

His feet were long, his teeth were in

terrible shape, and his hair had been mostly

chewed off by other horses … but we

could immediately see his sweet nature,”

Stacy said.

While many of the minis have started out

in mainly feral condition, unable to trust

humans or other horses and requiring many

months of slow, patient training, Banks

did not. After about six months of nursing

him back to health, Stacy started working

on getting Banks certified as a therapy

horse. He now serves as an “ambassador”

for R&R Ranch, which includes regular

visits to the Stonecrest of Wildwood senior

living community [see “A little visitor” in

Mature Focus on page 38].

Several of the rescued minis came to

R&R via Longmeadow Rescue Ranch, a

Humane Society facility for farm animals

located in Union, Missouri. Others have

come through word of mouth, when people

reach out after hearing about Stacy’s passion

for rescue and the outstanding care

she is able to provide for the minis.

A routine of kindness

Inside the elegant R&R barn, where the

minis live two to a stall, the meticulous

attention paid to every detail attests to the

loving care they receive.

A small pipe installed overhead releases

fly spray for 45 seconds, six times a

day. Although it wasn’t a building code

requirement, a large pipe spanning the

beamed ceiling houses a sprinkler system

for the horses’ safety. Cameras mounted

on the wall over every other stall allow

them to be checked on around the clock.

Large overhead fans and heated automatic

water bowls are other “creature comforts”

that these once-neglected animals now

enjoy.

The minis’ day starts at 5:30 each morning,

when their stalls are cleaned and they

receive their first hay. A few hours later,


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November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I 33

after breakfast, the stalls are cleaned again

while the horses are turned out in the paddock.

Each day continues in a similar fashion

until “bedtime” at around 7 p.m. They

are kept on a strictly regimented schedule,

which both comforts them and helps them

to thrive physically, Stacy said.

Caring for the minis is a lot of painstaking

work, which can no longer be done

without considerable help.

“Everything about them is very timeconsuming.

If I had to do it all myself, I

wouldn’t have a single minute to do anything

else,” Stacy said. Managing the barn

is nearly a full-time job in itself, though,

and she also continues to spend several

hours there on most days, brushing, visiting

and playing with the minis.

A mission of education

As she tells the stories of all 17 little

horses, Stacy’s devotion to each one of

them is evident. However, caring for them

over a lifetime comes with an extremely

long list of expenses, including barn help,

feed, supplies and frequent veterinary

visits. For that reason, she is currently in

the process of applying for 501[c][3] nonprofit

status for R&R Ranch as a miniature

horse rescue. A website, dedicated Facebook

page and children’s book also are in

the works. “Our whole purpose is education,”

she said.

To that end, Stacy has begun to host area

Scout troops and other groups about once a

month for tours of the ranch and barn. She

also helps Scouts earn merit badges related

to helping animals and caring for pets.

An educational seminar also is being

planned for February 2019, a sort of “miniature

horses for dummies,” she said. Its

purpose will be to help prevent others from

making the same mistakes as the previous

owners of her adopted minis. “People have

to understand what they’re getting themselves

into as far as [a mini’s] health, the

finances and all the other obligations that

come with owning one.”

A commitment to community

From the outset, one of the Rolfes’ main

goals when developing R&R Ranch was

not to hide it from others, but to make its

beauty visible to anyone in the community

who might also appreciate it.

“At first, our landscape architect wanted

to grade the property up in front, make a

big berm with lots of trees to obscure the

view of it from the road. I said ‘No, that’s

not what I want. I don’t want to shield it,’”

Stacy said. “When we first moved in, I got

notes and gifts left in the mailbox, from

people telling us how beautiful they think

our home is and to welcome us to the

neighborhood.”

In that same spirit, the family threw an

appreciation party for all the contractors

who had worked in and around their home

Has Gone Holiday

The three most recently rescued miniature horses, known as “The Girls,” must be housed

separately while the Rolfes work with them to overcome issues related to abuse and neglect.

[Stacy Rolfe photo]

during construction, and their families,

shortly after they moved in. They’ve held

similar community events for the nearby

Chesterfield and Wildwood police and fire

officials they have worked with, and for

employees of their trash and recycling contractors,

“because of all the special things

they’ve done for us,” she said.

“Honestly, we sort of pinch ourselves …

It’s a blessing to be here. We want to share

it,” Stacy said, adding that the minis seem

to feel the same way. “Right now, when

visitors come over and people enter the

barn, every head comes out of the stall and

they’re ready for company.”

• • •

Individuals, families and groups interested

in touring the barn and grounds

of R&R Ranch can email Stacy at stacyrolfe@me.com;

include “tour” in the

subject line. Advance appointments are

required.

JOIN US

Holiday Open House

November 8 thru November 11

Candy Cane Discount 20%

THREE FRENCH HENS

ST LOUIS’ MOST BEAUTIFUL FURNITURE STORE HAS GONE HOLIDAY

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TFHstl

Refreshments everyday.

*Discount excludes all MacKenzie-Childs collections, previous purchases, gift

certificates, shipping fees and custom design services.


1. 34 I

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

Remember

Special Instructions:

The header “Remember” can also be changed to say either

“Salute to Veterans” or “We Support Our Troops”.

By JESSICA MESZAROS

@WESTNEWSMAG

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

Local women band together to ‘Hug’ children with special needs

1.

AUTO • HOME • LIFE

Remember

Steve Downs

®

142 Enchanted Pkwy #101

Manchester, MO

Call 636-391-9111

for your free quote.

AUTO • HOME • LIFE

®

We’re your Shield. We’re your Shelter.

ShelterInsurance.com

We’re your Shield. We’re your Shelter.

ShelterInsurance.com

A group of local women is working

every day with sewing machines, glue

and more to create weighted blankets for

St. Louis County students. So far, “Project

Hug” has supplied over 200 weighted

therapy blankets Special Instructions: to Special School District

[SSD] The classrooms header 2. “Remember” across the can region. also be changed to say either

The blankets “Salute help to Veterans” children or “We cope Support with Our Troops”.

conditions like anxiety, autism and more.

The idea for making the blankets began

Remember

with Patty Benner, an SSD audiology

®

assistant who serves on the Special Education

Foundation [SEF] board, a nonprofit

whose mission is to assist children

(Address)

(Agent Name)

with disabilities in areas not supported by

(Phone No.)

tax dollars. 2.

We’re your Shield.

charity.

We’re your

She

Shelter.

also has sewn handmade

Benner pitched the idea for creating quilts for St. Louis Children’s Hospital

the blankets after noticing a demand in and the Ronald McDonald House. “I’ve

classrooms across the county. Remember been involved with charities my entire

“One day, Patty said to the board in life,” she said.

®

general, ‘Do you know anybody who Soon, other women were joining

sews?’” explained Chesterfield resident DiFranco. Mary Ann Raghebi, who lives

03-2015 Holiday 7.3c

Ann DiFranco. “My daughter [SEF board

member Nan Murch] raised her hand and

said, ‘My mother sews.’ So, Patty came

over and showed me what she had in

mind.”

Project Hug isn’t the first time

DiFranco has used her sewing skills for

Project Hug team members [from left] Patty Benner, Ann Di Franco and Mary Ann Raghebi

(Agent Name)

in the same complex as DiFranco, was

(Address)

introduced (Phone No.) to the initiative at a Chesterfield

Women’s Roundtable event where

DiFranco was showing the blankets.

Raghebi now makes the weights that

go into the blankets. An average of 15

weighted packets are used per blanket,

We’re your Shield. We’re your Shelter.

meaning Raghebi has handmade over

3,000 weights in three months. In addition,

she uses a weighted blanket herself

for multiple sclerosis and recommends

the blankets to family members.

“My niece Amy, her husband’s brother

has a child who is autistic,” Raghebi said.

“When my sister was here, I [gave her] a

blanket and said, ‘Send this to Amy to

give to them,’ because they were just at

their wit’s end. That woman called me

crying. She said she couldn’t get their

See PROJECT HUG, page 47

Holiday

OPEN HOUSE

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03-2015

Season

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with Us

Saturday, November 10

9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Sunday, November 11

10 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

refreshments, snacks, and raffle

Open House Special:

25% off one regular price gift store item

One coupon per household. In stock items only. While supplies last. Cannot be combined

with any other discounts or promotions. Not valid on prior purchases.

Must present coupon to receive discount. Valid 11/10/18 & 11/11/18

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WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I MATURE FOCUS I 35

Many seniors who could benefit from using online patient portals to access their medical

records never do so, according to a University of Missouri study.

N

News & Notes

By LISA RUSSELL

Passing on patient portals

University of Missouri researchers

have found that many people who could

benefit the most from online patient portals

connected to their electronic medical

records don’t use them at all, even after

signing up for them.

Online portals allow patients to have

secure, immediate access to their detailed

test results and other medical records.

For patients dealing with multiple health

conditions, the portals can be especially

useful in monitoring their health status,

so they are encouraged by doctors to

use them. However, the MU researchers

found that 35 percent of people who

registered for electronic patient portals

never even logged in.

“We were troubled to see that so many

patients never used the portal,” said Kimberly

Powell, a post-doctoral fellow in

aging, informatics and quality research

at MU’s Sinclair School of Nursing.

“We only looked at registered users, and

registering for the portal is a two-step

process that suggests a degree of commitment.

The fact that many people who

took the time to register never logged in

to the portal indicates there is still work

to be done.”

The MU study included patients who

were at least 45 years old, had registered

for an electronic patient portal and had

at least two chronic conditions. Although

previous studies have measured the success

of patient portals by the number of

people who registered, this study looked

at how many registered users actually

logged in afterward.

Researchers also identified several

See NEWS & NOTES, page 36

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94

40

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Is it time for Mom and Dad to move out of their home?

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36 I MATURE FOCUS I

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

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NEWS & NOTES, from page 35

factors that influenced portal use among

those who did utilize them. In particular,

patients who lived farther from their primary

care providers were more likely to

use the portals, as were those diagnosed

with heart failure.

Powell said patient portals have the

potential to improve shared decisionmaking

in care facilities such as nursing

homes, but providers must first integrate

portals more seamlessly into clinical

care, and also help guide patients in how

to use them.

On the calendar

Victorian Gardens hosts a Senior

Health Fair on Thursday, Nov. 8 from

9 a.m.-noon at the independent living

community, located at 15 Hilltop Village

Center Drive in Eureka. Get valuable

information from experts on downsizing,

Medicare and veterans’ benefits, independent

living, home health/hospice care

and more. Refreshments and door prizes

will also be offered at this free event. To

learn more, visit victorian-gardens.com

or call (636) 587-3737.

• • •

St. Louis OASIS presents a free program,

Kick the Achiness of Arthritis,

@WESTNEWSMAG

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

on Tuesday, Nov. 13 from 11:30 a.m.-

1:30 p.m. at The Timbers of Eureka, 1

Coffey Park Lane in Eureka, in Meeting

Room 1. Arthritis is one of the most

common diagnoses, encompassing at

least 200,000 new cases a year. This

course is designed to help you learn the

best ways to manage arthritis with exercise.

A trained physical therapist will

direct you through minimal load exercises

and activities to maximize your

function and minimize your pain, focusing

on the lower body. Attendance is free.

Register online at oasisnet.org.

• • •

Missouri Baptist Medical Center presents

a monthly class for caregivers, Home

Care Choices and How to Find Assistance

at Home, on Tuesday, Nov. 13 from

1-2:30 p.m. at the hospital, 3015 N. Ballas

Road, in Auditorium 1. Learn more about

private duty services, home health care

services, and home medical equipment

and supplies. Attendance is free. Register

online at classes-events.bjc.org.

• • •

Missouri Baptist Medical Center hosts

a free OASIS program, How to Become

a Highly Motivated Diabetic, on

Wednesday, Nov. 14 from 10 a.m.-noon

at Missouri Baptist’s Clinical Learning

Institute, 3015 N. Ballas Road, Room

420. Learn the seven healthy habits of a

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“motivated” diabetic, including extensive

nutrition and exercise specifics, which

promote a better quality of life through

better disease control. Register online at

classes-events.bjc.org.

• • •

An AARP Smart Driver Course is

offered on Thursday, Nov. 15 from 9

a.m.-1 p.m. at the Dielmann Recreation

Center, 11400 Olde Cabin Road in Creve

Coeur. This program will help tune up

your driving skills, update your knowledge

of the rules of the road, learn about

normal age-related physical changes and

ways to adjust for these changes. The

cost is $15 for AARP members and $20

for non-members. To register, call (314)

442-2075.

• • •

The Better Business Bureau presents

a free program, Identifying Scams

Targeting Seniors, on Friday, November

16 from 10:00a.m.-12:30p.m. at the

St. Louis County Library Daniel Boone

Branch, 300 Clarkson Road in Ellisville.

The session will explore how scams

work, what scammers say and do, and

what seniors need to remember to avoid

becoming victims of scams. Registration

must be received at least 48 hours prior

to the program. To register, call (314)

994-3300 or visit aginginmissouri.org.

• • •

St. Luke’s Hospital offers a free quarterly

program, From Failure to Success:

Strengthening Your Heart’s Function,

on Tuesday, Nov. 27 from 1-2:30 p.m. at

the Desloge Outpatient Center, 121 St.

Luke’s Center Drive in Chesterfield, in

Building A. The word “failure” can be

a wake-up call for those who have been

diagnosed with heart failure. It can also

See NEWS & NOTES, page 41

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I MATURE FOCUS I 37

Showers Rebuilt-Bathrooms Remodeled

“Water Damaged Showers a Specialty”

Tub to Stall Shower Conversions

Grab Bars/High Toilets/Personal Showers

Floors/Vanities/Barrier Free Showers

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Senior Discounts Available

Tile & Bath Service, Inc.

36 Years Experience • At this Location 27 Years

Visit Our Showroom • 14770 Clayton Road • 63011

636-394-0315 • www.tileandbathservice.com

Thank You

Veterans

Write your own epilogue

By RICHARD BROCKMANN

Do you want to go out in style? If

your answer is yes, then the idea of

leaving an epilogue for your loved

ones to read after you are gone may

appeal to you.

Generally speaking, an epilogue is

something that provides some commentary

or insight after an event

has ended. It is usually brief, and

contains some additional thoughts or

reflections.

So why not leave an epilogue as a

parting gift to your family and close

friends? They will be reminiscing

about you anyway, so you may

as well add your own two cents. It

would be a great way to provide a

nice finishing touch to your life.

Writing an epilogue does not mean

writing the story of your life. An

epilogue would typically be only a

couple of handwritten pages where

you would share some thoughts that

were especially important, meaningful

or significant to you. It could

even include your philosophy of how

you lived your life, or show appreciation

for some folks who made your

life better.

You can put anything in it that you

want, but please don’t use it to settle

any scores with people. That would

best be handled in other ways. An

epilogue is intended to be read by all

of your loved ones, and is a nice way

to say goodbye and provide them

with some food for thought by which

to remember you.

It would be best to write it in your

own handwriting to make it even

more personal and meaningful. A

good time to write it would be sometime

in your retirement years when

you feel at peace with your life. You

may be surprised how easy it is to

write once you get started.

When it is finished, just write

“Epilogue” on the envelope and seal

it up, warts and misspellings and

all. Then put it with your will and

other important papers for storage

until the time comes for others to

open it and enjoy reading it. Oh, and

remember that it is top secret. Don’t

give anyone any indication of what

it contains, or you will spoil all the

fun. Enjoy!

• • •

Richard Brockmann is a West

County resident who says the idea of

writing an epilogue about one’s life

for family and friends “just occurred

to me.” Once the idea struck, it

became one that Brockmann wanted

to share exclusively with West Newsmagazine.

During November, which

marks National Hospice and Palliative

Care Month, seniors are encouraged

to take advantage of these

services, which enable people to live

the last part of their lives as fully as

possible and control their end-of-life

care decisions. It seems to us that

Brockmann’s idea would be another

great way to gain some control – in

a completely positive way – over

the legacy we all eventually leave

behind.

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Join us for these FREE Seminars

Stop in for refreshments

Indoor Swimming Pool

Movie Theatre

Senior Health Fair

November 8, 2018 • 9:00 am - Noon

Gain knowledge on: Downsizing, Veterans Benefits, Independent Living,

Home Health/Hospice, Medicare Benefits and many other vendors.

Veteran’s Benefits

November 15, 201811:00 am

Experts from Levesque Elder Law, LLC will discuss how to avoid the

devastating costs of long term care by pre-planning for Veterans’ Benefits.

RSVP by November 12th • 636-587-3737

Chef prepared meal to be served after seminar

www.victorian-gardens.com

Be thankful for your life, spend time in nature, breathe deeply, let go of your worries,

forgive yourself and others, and build your life around what you love.

15 Hilltop Village Center Dr. • Eureka MO 63025 • 636-587-3737


38 I MATURE FOCUS I

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

@WESTNEWSMAG

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

A little visitor:

Therapy horse helps brighten Wildwood seniors’ days

By LISA RUSSELL

When Stacy Rolfe first met Banks, she

knew he was special.

One of 17 rescued miniature horses

that now live on her family’s sprawling

suburban property, R&R Ranch in

Wildwood, the little white horse was

in terrible physical shape when he first

arrived from Arkansas, where he was

used for pony rides. He had been badly

neglected by his owners and abused by

other horses. But she could clearly see

that poor treatment had not changed his

affectionate, peaceful disposition.

Once he had regained his good health,

Rolfe began the process of having Banks

certified as a therapy horse by the American

Miniature Therapy Horse Association

[AMTHA]. Horses are evaluated

according to a list of health, grooming

and behavior standards, including being

desensitized to loud noises, having the

ability to be approached from any side,

being able to navigate around obstacles

and equipment, and maintaining a calm

demeanor in a wide variety of stressful

situations.

Banks’ owner, Stacy Rolfe, gets him ready to greet the community.

After many weeks of training, Banks

passed his AMTHA qualification tests.

Rolfe soon arranged his first therapy visit

to Stonecrest of Wildwood Senior Living,

shortly after the community opened its

doors this April.

She now takes Banks to Stonecrest

twice a month, where he interacts oneon-one

with residents in both the assisted

living and memory care areas of the

community. The residents pet him, talk

to him and brush his mane and forelock.

Some residents sing to him.

One man, who is nearly 100 years old,

See LITTLE VISITOR, page 41

Bethesda Meadow

SALUTES ALL WHO HAVE SERVED!

fall

inlove

with Stonecrest Senior Living

Stop by our Community in

November for a Warm Drink,

Slice of Pie and Tour!

Please join us for our annual Living Avenue of Flags,

Monday, November 12, at 10:30 a.m.

We honor all veterans on this day.

The sacrifice you made to make the lives

of others better is not forgotten!

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322 Old State Road, Ellisville, MO 63021 • Just South Of Manchester Rd.

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40 I MATURE FOCUS I

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

@WESTNEWSMAG

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

You want the

best for them.

Every day.

Call 636.893.4194

Tami Barnes, Director of Sales and Marketing

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tbarnes@youroasisadvisor.com

So do we.

At Mason Pointe, we feel that older adults

deserve the very best we can give them.

So that’s what we strive for. Every day.

• Outstanding caregiver-to-resident ratios

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ATTORNEY AT LAW

• Estate Planning and Elder Law

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• Wills, Trusts, Powers of Attorney,

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• Helping families with long term care

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• OFFERING FREE -- Long-Term Care

guidance through ElderCareAdvisors

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• Principal office located in West County

Call our office for a free consultation to discuss your family’s solution

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• Beautiful, inviting living and gathering spaces

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Give those you love the very best.

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A LUTHERAN SENIOR SERVICES

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Chesterfield, MO 63017

MasonPointeLiving.org

MP Ad for West Mag - 10/2018 - Size: 4.916” x 11.375” - Due: 9/21/18


FACEBOOK.COM/WESTNEWSMAGAZINE

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I MATURE FOCUS I 41

Medicare Open Enrollment is Coming!

Stonecrest of Wildwood resident Ray Smith visits with Banks, a miniature therapy horse.

[Stacy Rolfe photos]

LITTLE VISITOR, from page 38

tells the same story every time she and

Banks visit, about riding up and down

nearby Wild Horse Creek Road on his

own horse many decades ago. “Just for

that period of time, the residents are

able to recall these special memories,

and it really gives them a bright spot in

their day … That, to me, is huge,” she

said.

“It’s very therapeutic for the residents

to have Banks come in,” agreed Patty

Durfee, Stonecrest of Wildwood’s life

enrichment director. “The hands-on

interaction is wonderful for both their

emotional and sensory needs. Seeing

Banks sparks a lot of memories for

many of them, either from where they

grew up on farms or raising their own

children.”

The visits also stimulate the horse’s

NEWS & NOTES, from page 37

be motivation to do something about it

and be successful at taking care of your

heart. Join a multidisciplinary team of

health professionals (nurse, dietitian,

pharmacist and exercise physiologist) to

discuss proven strategies that will help

you to take control of your health and

minimize your risk of complications.

Register online at stlukes-stl.com.

• • •

BJC Missouri Baptist Medical Center

sponsors a Today’s Grandparents

mind and give him something different

to do, Rolfe said. At this point, though,

Stonecrest is Banks’ only therapy commitment

away from home – both because

of the preparation required and for his

own well-being. Before each visit, he

gets a bath and extensive grooming, is

fitted with special non-slip shoes and

a “potty bag,” and is transported in the

ranch’s custom van.

“It’s a big endeavor to get over there

and to come back, and I don’t want to

overextend him … he gets bored and

worn out. We are very respectful of his

time, too,” she explained.

However, the Stonecrest residents’

visits with Banks may soon include one

to his home as well. Durfee said a future

outing is in the planning stages, potentially

early next year, for residents to

visit Banks and the Rolfe barn’s other

occupants at R&R Ranch.

Class on Tuesday, Dec. 11 from 6:30-9

p.m. in Building D of the hospital, 3023

N. Ballas Road, Suite 400 [participants

should park in the North Garage below

Building D]. Grandparenting is truly a

joy! This two-hour class serves as an

update for grandparents-to-be. It focuses

on current trends in infant care and provides

tips on local and distant grandparenting.

Discussion is encouraged. A

tour of the hospital’s OB division is also

included. The cost is $20 per person;

please register each grandparent online

at classes-events.bjc.org.

DON’T MISS THE DEADLINE!

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Oct. 15th thru Dec. 7th

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42 I HEALTH I

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

@WESTNEWSMAG

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

The Experts in Finding the Right Senior Living Community, For FREE!

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Senior Care Advisor

Transitions For Senior Living has done the legwork of local Assisted, Skilled Nursing and Independent Living

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(314) 207-8630 | www.STLsenior.com

World Kindness Day on Nov. 13 reminds people of the many benefits of doing

good deeds, no matter how small.

health

capsules

By LISA RUSSELL

Kindness … it does a body good

World Kindness Day will be celebrated

this year on Nov. 13. On that day, people

in the U.S. and around the globe are asked

to attempt to make the world a better place

by doing and promoting good deeds and

pledging acts of kindness, either as individuals

or as organizations.

In addition to its obvious benefits for the

mind, heart and spirit, kindness has been

shown in multiple studies to benefit the

body as well. In adults, it has been shown

to increase overall physical well-being

while decreasing pain, anxiety levels and

blood pressure. In children, making conscious

efforts to be kind is also related to

increased physical well-being as well as

greater peer acceptance, a more positive

self-image and even academic success.

World Kindness Day was first launched

in 1998 by The World Kindness Movement,

an organization formed at a Tokyo conference

of like-minded organizations from

around the world. More than 28 nations are

now involved in this annual observance,

which is not affiliated with any particular

religion or political point of view.

At a time when kindness, and even basic

civility, often seem to be the exception

rather than the rule, World Kindness Day

represents an opportunity to highlight the

kindness that does still exist, carry out

random acts of kindness ourselves, and

commit to being kind more frequently.

New outbreak of Salmonella

caused by raw chicken products

According to an Investigation Notice published

in late October by the U.S. Centers

for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC],

a recent nationwide outbreak of illness has

been traced to Salmonella Infantis bacteria

found in a variety of raw chicken products.

As of Oct. 17, 92 people infected with

Proper handling of raw chicken is especially

important due to a recent nationwide

outbreak of illness caused by Salmonella.

the outbreak strain had been reported in

29 states, including Missouri. Of those

who have become ill, 21 people have been

hospitalized to date, but no deaths have

been reported.

The CDC’s evidence indicates that many

types of raw chicken products from a variety

of sources may be contaminated with Salmonella

Infantis. In interviews, people who

have become ill reported eating different

types and brands of chicken products purchased

from many different locations.

To date, the outbreak strain has been

identified in samples taken from raw

chicken pet food, raw chicken consumer

products, and live chickens. Evidence collected

so far indicates that the outbreak

strain of Salmonella might be widespread

in the chicken industry rather than originating

with a particular chicken supplier,

according to the CDC.

In addition, antibiotic resistance testing

conducted by the CDC also shows that the

strain is resistant to multiple antibiotics.

With this notice, the CDC is not advising

that consumers stop eating properly

cooked chicken, or that retailers stop

selling it. Taking the proper steps of thoroughly

washing hands, utensils, counters

and cutting boards when preparing raw

chicken – and cooking it thoroughly to kill

harmful bacteria – will effectively prevent

the spread of bacteria.

However, the agency recommends

against feeding raw diets to pets. Germs

like Salmonella in raw pet food can make

pets sick, and family members also can be

infected by handling the raw food or caring

for ill pets.

Low-dose aspirin may decrease

risk of two deadly cancers

Two separate studies have recently connected

taking a regular dose of aspirin with

a reduced risk of both ovarian cancer – the

deadliest form of gynecological cancer –

and the most common form of liver cancer,

called hepatocellular carcinoma.

First, a new study led by researchers at

Moffitt Cancer Center in Florida found that

women who reported taking a low-dose

aspirin daily – equivalent to about one

baby aspirin – had a 23 percent lower risk

of ovarian cancer, compared to those who

did not take aspirin.

The study included data from more

than 200,000 women who took part

in the Nurses’ Health Studies based at

Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

Researchers looked at the participants’ use

of standard dose aspirin [325 milligrams],

low-dose aspirin [100 milligrams or less],

and non-aspirin NSAIDs such as ibuprofen,

and acetaminophen.

They found that low-dose aspirin use

was associated with a significantly lower

risk of ovarian cancer, while standard-dose

aspirin use was not. At the same time, the

St. Luke’s Hospital receives

top cardiac surgery ranking

St. Luke’s Hospital in Chesterfield

has been named one of America’s 50

Best Hospitals for Cardiac Surgery by

Healthgrades ® in its 2019 nationwide

survey. St. Luke’s was the only Missouri

hospital to achieve this distinction.

The honor places St. Luke’s

among the nation’s best, for superior

results in coronary artery bypass grafting

procedures and heart valve surgery.

“This prestigious recognition illustrates

the dedication of our entire St.

Luke’s Hospital Heart & Vascular

Institute team to improving the quality

of life for our patients,” said Christine

M. Candio, St. Luke’s president and

chief executive officer. “Our alliance

with the nation’s No. 1 heart hospital,

Cleveland Clinic’s Heart & Vascular

Institute, further demonstrates St.

Luke’s commitment to excellence in

heart care.”

Healthgrades is an independent

healthcare ratings organization. Hospitals

cannot opt out of the Healthgrades

analysis, and no hospital pays

to be rated. The organization’s 2019

report evaluated Medicare inpatient

records from 2015 through 2017 for

about 4,500 short-term acute care hospitals

nationwide, and assessed each

hospital’s performance related to more

than 30 of the most common inpatient

conditions and procedures.


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I HEALTH I 43

data also showed that women who took

non-aspirin NSAIDs often – at least 10 tablets

per week for many years – actually had

an increased risk of developing the disease.

The findings were published online

in JAMA Oncology.

“We’re not quite at the stage where we

could make the recommendation that daily

aspirin use lowers ovarian cancer risk,”

said study leader Shelley Tworoger, Ph.D.

“We need to do more research. But it is definitely

something women should discuss

with their physician.”

The simple step of taking a baby aspirin daily

possibly could lower one’s risk of two deadly

types of cancer, according to new research.

• • •

A second long-term study of both male

and female health care professionals

regarding aspirin use also have linked it to

a much lower risk of hepatocellular carcinoma,

which accounts for about 75 percent

of all liver cancers.

The research included a combined analysis

of two large studies: the Nurses’ Health

Study and the Health Professionals Followup

Study. More than 130,000 health professionals

self-reported information about their

aspirin use, including dosage, frequency

and duration, dating back as far as 1980.

Individuals with a cancer diagnosis when

the surveys began [except nonmelanoma

skin cancer] were excluded from the results.

A detailed analysis found that taking a standard

dose [325 mg] of aspirin at least two or

more times per week was associated with a

large 49 percent reduction in the participants’

risk of liver cancer. This benefit was dependent

on both dose and duration of aspirin use,

appearing when they reported taking aspirin

for five years or longer, at a dose of 1.5 or

more standard tablets per week.

The authors said of their findings that use

of at least 1.5 standard aspirin tablets per

week may represent a feasible strategy for

primary prevention against hepatocellular

carcinoma. However, these potential benefits

must be carefully balanced with hazards

of regular aspirin use, which may include

internal bleeding and stomach ulcers.

On the calendar

BJC St. Louis Children’s Hospital offers

a Babysitting 101 class on Saturday, Nov.

10 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m.at the St. Louis Children’s

Specialty Care Center, 13001 N.

Outer Forty Road in Town & Country. In

this introductory babysitting class, kids

learn how to entertain the children in their

care; topics include the business of babysitting,

child development, safety and first

aid, and fun and games. A workbook and

snack also will be provided. The course fee

is $30 per child. Registration is available

online at classes-events.bjc.org.

• • •

St. Luke’s Hospital hosts a special event

for new and expecting parents, Mom &

Baby Expo: Fallin’ for Baby, on Sunday,

Nov. 11 from 1-4 p.m. in the hospital’s

Emerson Auditorium, 222 S. Woods Mill

Road in Chesterfield. This free event

featuring physician experts, informative

breakout sessions, baby product vendors

and more, is designed to help parents in

pregnancy planning through the transition

to parenthood. To register, visit stlukes-stl.

com or call 314-205-6478.

• • •

Missouri Baptist Medical Center presents

a Family & Friends CPR course on Tuesday,

Nov. 13 from 6:30-9 p.m. on the hospital’s

campus, 3005 N. Ballas Road, on the

fourth floor of the Clinical Learning Institute.

This course offers instruction and hands-on

practice for parents and child care providers

for adult hands-only CPR; infant and child

CPR with breaths; introduction to adult and

child AED use, and relief of choking. Cost

is $25 per person [10-15-year-olds must be

accompanied by an adult]. Register online by

visiting classes-events.bjc.org

• • •

St. Luke’s Hospital presents a special free

program, Mindful Eating for the Holidays,

on Wednesday, Nov. 14 from 6:30-8

p.m. at the Desloge Outpatient Center, 121

St. Luke’s Center Drive in Chesterfield, in

Building A. Participants will learn several

techniques to help them understand their

eating habits and how to modify them to

reach nutrition goals while enjoying food

more. To register, visit stlukes-stl.com; call

(314) 542-4848 for more information.

• • •

St. Luke’s Hospital sponsors an annual

Spirit of Women event, All Decked Out,

on Thursday, Nov. 15 from 5:30-8 p.m. at

the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel, 16625

Swingley Ridge Road in Chesterfield.

Before the holidays get into full swing,

spend an evening enjoying appetizers,

beverages, shopping, holiday mini-makeovers

and tips to stay healthy through the

holidays and beyond. The fee of $25 per

person includes health screenings, minimassages,

a swag bag, appetizers, desserts,

drink tickets and more. Visit stlukes-stl.

com to register; call (314) 205-6706 for

more information.

This is YOUR time.

Join today for FREE!

Tennis. Fitness. Family.

ChesterfieldAthleticClub.com

636.532.9992

Hwy 40 & Chesterfield Parkway

Chesterfield, MO 63017

First month’s on us plus a personal

training session to get you started.

*12 month initial contract required.

Indoor/Outdoor Tennis Courts | Aerobics, Cycle/Yoga Rooms | Indoor/Outdoor Swimming Pools |Tennis Clinics, Lessons & Leagues

Cardio Theater/Weight Rooms | Pilates, Aqua/Fitness Classes | Racquetball / Pickleball Courts |Basketball/Volleyball Court

Personal Training | Locker Rooms & Towel Service | Starbucks Café | Tot Drop | Massage Therapy


44 I PRIME REAL ESTATE I

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

@WESTNEWSMAG

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

FEATURED LISTINGS

real estate

2918 Fairborn Place

22 Muirfield Lane

1510 Homestead Summit

Will rising rates slow home sales?

Town & Country | $1,645,000

755 Babler Park Drive

Wildwood | $950,000

16182 Wilson Manor Drive

Chesterfield | $825,000

1108 Windridge Estates

Chesterfield | $735,000

575 Deer Valley Court

Saint Albans | $625,000

1715 Baxter Forest Valley Ct

Chesterfield | $519,000

14556 Chellington Court

Chesterfield | $324,900

1347 Parkview Estates Drive

# 1

Ellisville | $239,900

Locally Owned Real Estate

Company in St Louis!

Town & Country | $999,995

1041 Arbor Grove Court

Chesterfield | $940,000

901 Town & Country Estates

Town & Country | $779,000

17725 Drummer Lane

Wildwood | $689,500

14330 Bramblewood Court

Alliance

Real Estate

Chesterfield | $550,000

656 Spyglass Summit

Chesterfield | $435,000

16560 Thunderhead Canyon

Wildwood | $315,000

338 Waterside Drive

Wildwood | $199,900

Wildwood | $999,900

18127 Melrose Road

Wildwood | $889,000

18502 Red Tail

Wildwood | $749,900

536 Woodcliff Heights Drive

Wildwood | $649,500

1208 Wildhorse Meadows Dr

Chesterfield | $549,999

411 Sunnyslope Drive

Ballwin | $330,000

15344 Braefield Drive

Chesterfield | $279,900

12010 Glengrove

Maryland Heights | $164,900

For information on area Open Houses visit

www.STLopens.com

8077 Maryland Ave | Clayton | 314-997-7600

17050 Baxter Rd #200 | Chesterfield | 636-537-0300

www.bhhsall.com

©2018 BHHS Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchises of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity

It’s been a familiar refrain in the housing

market for the past year: There’s strong

demand, but limited supply. That dynamic

appears to be changing as interest rates inch

upwards to 5%.

The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged

4.86% last week, up one basis point, mortgage

finance provider Freddie Mac reported.

The 15-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged

4.29%, up from 4.26%.

A 5% mortgage rate isn’t that high by historic

standards. But a return to more normal

lending rates won’t feel normal to many

buyers who have become accustomed to getting

a mortgage loan at 4% or lower, and they

could experience sticker shock at what they

would have to pay now for a home loan.

Here’s what’s new in new homes:

‘Best prices of the year’ on move-inready

Fischer & Frichtel homes

Fischer & Frichtel is gearing up for 2019,

and that means savings for buyers in the

market for a move-in-ready home.

Headlining the sale in Chesterfield, Warwick

on White Road has a lavishly appointed

Arlington II ranch with a three-car garage

and finished lower level, owner-ready and

offered for $899,900 – a savings of $35,854.

Across Hwy. 100 from Wildwood Town

Center, Fischer’s single-family Woodland

Collection has wowed homebuyers in The

Villages at Brightleaf. Although likely to sell

fast, a three-bedroom Woodside ranch is currently

available and reduced by $25,228 to

$649,900.

In Affton, Mackenzie Valley is on the verge

of closeout in less than year, and the 1½-story

Parker display is now for sale at $459,900, a

savings of $8,443.

Overlooking the grounds of prestigious

St. Albans, Luxury Villa buyers will find a

Campton newly completed in Village View.

This ranch has a finished lower level and

is sale-priced at $669,900, with savings of

$21,300.

Off I-44, the scenic, privately gated Manors

of Pevely Farms is showcasing savings of

$35,996 on a four-bedroom Woodside ranch

with finished lower level, $769,900.

And more big news from Chesterfield: In

August, Fischer & Frichtel opened for sales

in Orchard Village, the firm’s second phase

at Brightleaf. Homebuyers looking for a lowmaintenance

lifestyle in this master-planned

community now have the choice of detached

villas and cottage designs, offered with

numerous luxury options and starting from

$319,900.

This month, on-site information centers will

open at Fienup Farms, a new multi-builder

community off Wild Horse Creek Road in

Chesterfield, and pre-construction sales are

expected to begin in December. A hint of

what’s coming, this amenity-packed development

is planned to include a 26-acre lake,

paddleboat and fishing docks, walking trails,

pavilions, community gardens and much

more. For complete details and updates on

Fienup Farms, visit fandfhomes.com.

McKelvey Homes opens sales at Bur

Oaks off Wild Horse Creek Road

McKelvey Homes recently celebrated the

opening of its sales office at Bur Oaks, the

builder’s new community off Wild Horse

Creek Road in Chesterfield.

Offering panoramic views to the west,

Bur Oaks is a richly wooded enclave of

35 homes, with oversized homesites backing

up to open space, common ground and

many lined with mature trees, creating a

scenic backdrop for the builder’s expansive

ranch, 1.5-story and two-story plans.

McKelvey is offering its Designer Series

portfolio, reflecting the builder’s centuryplus

reputation for superior design and

craftsmanship. Priced from the upper

$500’s, the homes feature high-end amenities

including side-entry three-car garages,

sophisticated brick-and-stone elevations

with four sides of masonry and James

Hardie siding.

Innovative three- and four-bedroom floor

plans provide 2,600 to over 4,000 feet of

free-flowing living space, enhanced with

extensive hardwood flooring and premium

finishes. The deluxe island kitchens are

appointed with designer cabinetry, granite

countertops and stainless steel appliances.

Furnished with spa-like baths and vast walkin

closets, the spacious owner’s retreats are

the ultimate in privacy and relaxation, says

the builder.

Bur Oaks provides homeowners with

instant access to day-to-day conveniences

just miles from Hwy. 40/I-64, outdoor recreation

at the Chesterfield Valley Athletic

Complex, and shopping and dining in Chesterfield

Valley. Families with school-aged

children benefit from the acclaimed Rockwood

School District.

For details, visit www.mckelveyhomes.

com or call sales manager

Tim Knoche at

(636) 778-9061.

- Kevin Weaks


AFFTON

WILDWOOD

CHESTERFIELD

ST. ALBANS

Display Home

Finished Lower Level

Manors at MacKenzie Valley

Parker - 1.5 Story

6229 MacKenzie Valley Ct. (Lot 37)

3 BR / 2.5 BTH / APX 2,590 SF

$468,343 - SALE $459,900

The Villages at Brightleaf

Woodside - Ranch

2453 August Grove Ct. (Lot 40A)

3 BR / 2.5 BTH / APX 2,689 SF

$675,128 - SALE $649,900

Warwick on White Road

Arlington II - Ranch

14340 Warwick Gate Dr. (Lot 1)

4 BR / 3.5 BTH / APX 4,137 SF

$935,754 - SALE $899,900

Village View of St. Albans

Campton - Luxury Villa

764 Village View Circle (Lot 5)

3 BR / 3.5 BTH / APX 3,319 SF

$691,368 - SALE $669,900

FEATURED HOME OF THE MONTH

ST. LOUIS COUNTY

Pevely Farms - 344 Stonewall Dr. (Lot 124)

Woodside - Ranch, 4 BR / 3.5 BTH / APX 4,064 SF

$805,896

SALE $769,900


• A beautiful enclave

of 35 homes located off

Wild Horse Creek Road,

just 1.25 miles from

Long Rd.

• Rockwood Schools

• Homes from the $570’s

• Hurry in now for

Preconstruction Prices!

Sales center now open!

Tues-Sunday 10 AM-5 PM;

Mondays Noon-5 PM

636-778-9061


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PROJECT HUG, from page 34

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I 47

child to calm down, but as soon as Amy

walked in with that blanket, Amy put it

on [the child’s] shoulders and she just

went on the floor, cuddled up and calmed

down. It makes you feel so good to do

this. It makes such a difference.”

First, the fabric is sewn into a pillowcase

shape. Then, DiFranco marks the

locations of the weights. Next, she sews

the weights into the “tunnels” she has

marked.

Each blanket can weigh between three

and nine pounds. As Benner explained,

it’s important that the overall blanket

weight be about 10 percent of the user’s

body weight, plus one extra pound. “It’s

more like a lap cover, just to feel confined

and secure,” Benner said. “It’s like

a hug.”

The blankets come in small, medium

and large. “I don’t waste an inch [of

fabric]. I sit here and mathematically

figure it out,” DiFranco said.

Sometimes the materials are purchased

out-of-pocket, but tax-deductible donations

also are graciously accepted online

at sef-stl.org. According to Benner, a

mini-grant from the SEF is coming in

December 2018. In September, the group

was recognized with an Active Kindness

distinction from RedKey Realtors.

Teachers in need of the blankets are

encouraged to reach out to Benner, who

compiles those requests.

“I’ve gotten 20 requests just in the last

two days, and we still have about 100

blankets waiting to go out,” Benner said

on the day of the interview. “[The teachers]

get very excited, very happy and

very grateful.”

The positive reception hasn’t been limited

to the school districts.

“I have a friend who has Parkinson’s

and I took a blanket over to her one

A student uses a blanket made by “Project

Hug.”

[Photo provided by Benner]

night just to show her what I was doing,”

DiFranco said. “She put it on her lap and

the next thing I knew, she said ‘Ann, I

want to keep this. This is wonderful.’”

DiFranco also shared a memorable

moment when she met a young woman at

Bible study whose daughter had autism.

“I said, ‘When this is all over, we’ll

meet for lunch and I’m going to bring

you a blanket,’” DiFranco said. “Now, is

that a God moment? Some days, I think

to myself, ‘Am I going to get tired of

doing this?’

“But I don’t. I get up in the morning,

get my cup of coffee and start sewing.

Before my husband wakes up, I may

have made two blankets.”

Project Hug shows no signs of slowing

down.

“It’s just the type of thing that gets you

through life,” Raghebi said.

The only thing we’ll leave HIGH & DRY...is your home!

Services we offer:

Crack Injection • Waterproofing

Wall Stabilization • Piering

Exterior Drainage &

Downspout Extensions

FREE ESTIMATES!

Life of the Structure Warranty

an ESSENTIAL part of your

DAILY ROUTINE

Previous

Awards

2016-2013,

2009-2004

“A+ Rated”

636.273.1150

www.highanddrystl.com

WestNewsmagazine.com

is updated daily

with the local news,

events and information that

impact your world.

I LIKE TO LOOK

GOOD FOR YOU,

BUT I LOVE TO LOOK

GOOD FOR ME.

YOUR FIRST WAX IS ON US *

*

This fab offer expires 11/30/18

Ann DiFranco shows off a blanket in progress.

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COTTLEVILLE | 636 447 9299

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RICHMOND HEIGHTS| 314 646 0777

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*See waxcenter.com for complete details. Restrictions apply. © 2017 EWC Franchise, LLC. All Rights Reserved.


48 I BUSINESS I

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

YOU CAN PUT A SMILE ON A

CHILD’S FACE THIS CHRISTMAS!

Every year, Whole Kids Outreach distributes toys to over 1,100 families who live in

poverty in rural Missouri. Your gifts provide shining hope and joy to these children,

and make the holiday season special.

Drop off your toys and join the celebration at

Kirkwood Station Brewing Co. Toy Drive on Sat. November 24 at 1-5pm!

Or drop off toy donations at these locations by November 29th, 2018:

Chesterfield Chamber of Commerce • Dancing Thru Life – Ballwin

Madison’s Dancewear – Chesterfield • Pets & Company – Chesterfield

Sports Fusion – Chesterfield • St. Louis Wine Market and Tasting Room Chesterfield

Triad Bank – Frontenac

YOU CAN PUT A SMILE ON A CHILD’S

FACE THIS CHRISTMAS!

Every year, Whole Kids Outreach distributes

toys to over 1,000 families who live in

poverty in rural Missouri. Your gifts provide

shining hope and joy to these children, and

make the holiday season special.

We need your help!

Visit wholekidsoutreach.org for more information

Or call Connie at 573-604-2275

Department of Public Works

Maintenance Worker

Position Opening

We need your help!

The Department of Public Works for the City of Wildwood, Missouri is seeking candidates for

these full-time locations position by November of Public 30th:

Works Maintenance Worker. The selected individual will be

involved Chesterfield with Chamber the of inspection Commerce and maintenance of the City’s public infrastructure and rightsof-way,

and will also assist in City Hall building maintenance, litter removal, tree inspection

Dancing Thru Life – Ballwin

Devine Performing Arts—Wildwood

removal Madison’s and Dancewear-Chesterfield

replanting, and winter snow removal. Qualified applicants should be familiar with

Renee Johnson Dance Studio - Ellisville

general street maintenance procedures, including both concrete and asphalt paving, or have

Renee’s Dance Floor - Chesterfield

training, Pets & Company knowledge – Chesterfield or experience working as an arborist. Candidate must also be proficient

Sports Fusion – Chesterfield

in Microsoft Office and possess a valid Missouri Driver’s License. Hourly Pay Range: $15-$22/

Three French Hens – Wildwood

hour DOQ. Triad Bank A letter – Frontenac of interest and accompanying resume for this position must be submitted to

the City of Wildwood, by November 19, 2018 at 5:00 pm. This information must be e-mailed to

For more information visit

rbrown@cityofwildwood.com. www.wholekidsoutreach.org Please note “Attention – Maintenance Worker Position” in the

title bar Or call of Connie the e-mail at 573-604-2275 transmission. The City of Wildwood is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Drop off your toy donations at any of

Holiday

GIFT GUIDE

business

briefs

PLACES

Synergy Wealth Solutions at Mass

Mutual is now open at 16150 Main

Circle Drive, Suite 400, in Chesterfield.

Synergy’s goal is to help its clients leave

a legacy by providing comprehensive

solutions, offering the highest quality

products, and delivering the highest value

of service. Learn more online at synergywealthsolutions.com

or by calling (636)

728-2400.

• • •

The Lash Lounge, located in Dierberg’s

Market Place at 1728 Clarkson Road in

Chesterfield, is now open. Specializing

in customized eyelash extensions, the

Lounge is open Monday through Friday

from 9 a.m.-7 p.m. and Saturday from 9

a.m.-6 p.m. Learn more at thelashlounge.

com/salons/chesterfield.

• • •

Ultimate Ninjas St. Louis opened

to the public on Saturday, Nov. 3 with

festivities that included open gym, giveaways

and opportunities for the public

to meet numerous America Ninja Warrior

competitors and watch them run

obstacles. Pro Ninja Kirsti Pratt, who

competed on three seasons of American

Ninja Warrior, is general manager of the

new location at 140 Long Road, Suite

130, in Chesterfield.

AWARDS

@WESTNEWSMAG

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

Synergy Wealth Solutions President Mike Fleming [center, left] and CEO Brian M.

Roberts [center, right] cut the ribbon to officially open their Chesterfield office.

The Drug Enforcement Administration

has awarded its 2018 Community Drug

Prevention Award to the National Council

on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse-St.

Louis for its “Talk About It” campaign.

The honor recognizes community-based

groups that are working to address local

drug problems.

• • •

Operation Food Search, a nonprofit

hunger relief organization, raised more

than $83,000 recently at its 25th annual

golf tournament. Proceeds will go toward

ending childhood hunger and family food

insecurity in the St. Louis bi-state region.

The day-long event, which was presented

by Ascension Health at WingHaven

Country Club, included lunch and dinner,

as well as live and silent auctions. Sponsors

included Ameren, Enterprise Bank &

Trust, Miller Lite, Russo’s Catering, St.

Louis Community College-Forest Park

and Seeger Toyota.

Coming again

Nov. 21 • Dec. 5 • Dec. 12 • Dec. 19

Call 636.591.0010 to reserve

your advertising space.

Members of the Parkway Central Colts cheerleading squad and Fredbird help to celebrate the

opening of The Lash Lounge in Chesterfield.


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November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I BUSINESS I 49

Progress 64 West hosts 31st Annual Awards Banquet

Civic partnership group Progress 64

West, a nonprofit alliance of area citizens

and business leaders that promotes

development along the I-64 corridor

from I-270 westward to I-70, holds its

31st Annual Excellence in Community

Development Awards Banquet at 11:30

a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 21 at the DoubleTree

by Hilton Hotel, 16625 Swingley

Ridge Road in Chesterfield.

John Nations, president and CEO of

Bi-State Development Agency, is the

keynote speaker. The theme of this

year’s banquet is Roads, Rivers, Runways

& Railroads.

Innovation and entrepreneurial leadership

are core objectives of Progress

64 West and are reflected in the collective

experiences in the 2018 Excellence

in Community Development honorees:

NorthPoint Development, St. Charles

County Road Board, St. Louis Regional

Freightway and the Terminal Railroad

Association.

The Lifetime Achievement Award

will be given to R.B. Clark III, retired

banker and financial planner, community

volunteer and philanthropist, and

founder of the Chesterfield Chamber of

Commerce and Chesterfield Kiwanis

Club.

In addition to honoring already successful

business leaders, Progress

64 West also will recognize area high

school students whose business plans

have earned them a Louis S. Sachs

Scholarship award. The annual scholarship

awards program is sponsored

by Doster, Ullom & Boyle, American

Direct Marketing, and Stinson Leonard

Street.

Tickets, which are $85 per person,

and sponsorship information are available

online at progress64west.org.

PEOPLE

St. Louis-based PGAV Destinations Vice

President and Senior Planner/Designer Tom

Owen recently was honored by joining The

Institute for Learning and Innovation [ILI],

the foremost think tank for free choice.

Owens has worked with some of the world’s

must-see education attractions, including

Niagara Falls, the Missouri Botanical

Garden, the Saint Louis Zoo and others.

• • •

Winco Windows, a St. Louis-based

manufacturer of architectural and heavy

commercial aluminum windows sold

across the United States, has promoted

Kurtis Suellentrop to vice president of

sales and marketing.

EVENTS & NETWORKING

The Chesterfield Chamber of Commerce

hosts its general membership meeting

at noon [doors open at 11:15 a.m.] on

Wednesday, Nov. 14 at Persimmon Woods

Golf Club, 6401 Weldon Spring Road in

Weldon Spring. Admission is $30 for

members; $35 for guests. A $5 discount

applies for registrations through Friday,

Nov. 9; a $5 surcharge applies to day-of

walk-ins; walk-ins will not be guaranteed

a meal. Register online at chesterfieldmochamber.com

or by calling (636)

532-3399.

• • •

The West St. Louis County Chamber of

Commerce’s general membership meeting

is from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. on Thursday,

Nov. 15 at The Wildwood Hotel, 2801

Fountain Place in Wildwood. Admission

is $25 for members; $30 for non-member

guests. There is a $5 surcharge for registration

less than 48 hours prior to the luncheon

and for walk-ins. To register, call (636)

230-9900 or visit westcountychamber.com.

Operation Food Search tournament winners [from left] Art Kerckhoff, Rick Baur, Wayne

Schroeder and Mark Norman.


50 I EVENTS I

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

@WESTNEWSMAG

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

You never know what you’ll find

at a Fair Trade Market. Don’t

miss the one at Manchester

UMC, 129 Woods Mill Road, on

the weekends of Nov. 17-19 and

Nov. 23-25.

local

events

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

The 40th Annual St. Louis Jewish Book

Festival continues through Nov. 16 at The

Jewish Community Center, 2 Millstone

Campus Drive in Creve Coeur. An annual

celebration of authors, books and ideas,

with additional bookend events year-round.

The range of author topics includes business,

cooking, economics, family, fiction,

history, music, religion, sports and more.

For more information, visit jccstl.com.

• • •

Marquette Theater Company presents

“Into the Woods” at 7 p.m. Thursday,

Nov. 15 through Saturday, Nov. 17, with

a final matinee at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Nov.

18 at Marquette High School Theatre, 2351

Clarkson Road in Chesterfield. “Into the

Woods” features beloved storybook characters

such as Cinderella, Rapunzel, Jack

and the beanstalk, Red Riding Hood and

others. For tickets, visit ticketsource.us/

event/272361.

• • •

St. Luke’s Spirit of Women event - All

Decked Out is from 5:30-8 p.m. on Thursday,

Nov. 15 at DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel,

16625 Swingley Ridge Road in Chesterfield.

Ladies can spend an evening with family and

friends before the holidays. Appetizers, beverages,

shopping, holiday mini-makeovers

and tips to stay healthy through the holidays

and beyond. Fee is $25 and includes health

screenings, mini-massages, swag bag, appetizers,

desserts, drink tickets and more. Visit

DoubleTreeChesterfield.com for directions.

To register, visit stlukes-stl.com. For questions,

call (314) 542-4848.

• • •

Fair Trade Market is from 9 a.m.-3 p.m.

on Saturday, Nov. 17 and Sunday, Nov. 18

and Friday, Nov. 23 through Friday, Nov.

25 at Manchester United Methodist Church,

129 Woods Mill Road in Manchester. The

Fair Trade Market offers holiday gifts,

international crafts, exquisite foods and

food samples, educational presentations

and giveaways.

• • •

An Artist Critique Group is from

10-11:30 a.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 20 at

Chesterfield City Hall, 690 Chesterfield

Parkway West. Each artist can bring one

artwork, photograph, painting, sculpture,

sketch, or proposal to the event. Participants

take turns presenting the artwork

and receiving feedback from the group.

The event is part of a series. For future

dates or more information, email smani@

chesterfield.mo.us.

BENEFITS

Trivia Night is from 6-10 p.m. on

Friday, Nov. 16 at Ballwin Golf Club,

333 Holloway Road in Ballwin. Teams of

eight will compete in 10 rounds of trivia.

The evening will include complimentary

beer and soda. Bring your own snacks.

For more information or to register, visit

ballwin.mo.us.

• • •

The Saint Louis Crisis Nursery’s Young

Professional Board hosts “Nursery

Night at Napoli” from 5:30-7:30 p.m. on

Thursday, Nov. 15 at Bar Napoli in Clayton.

All proceeds benefit the Saint Louis

Crisis Nursery. Admission of $50 [$40 in

advance] includes select open bar, appetizers,

raffle tickets, music and networking

opportunities. To be entered in a special

raffle bring an unwrapped toy for the Saint

Louis Crisis Nursery.

• • •

Assistance League of St. Louis’ annual

gala, “A Night of Hope and Dreams,”

is at 6 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 17 at The

Atrium at Edward Jones, 12555 Manchester

Road in St. Louis. The event features

dinner, an auction and commentary from

auctioneer/emcee Rene Knot, KSDK-TV’s

morning anchor.

• • •

Chesterfield Family YMCA hosts a Step

Up to the Plate Trivia Night at 7 p.m.

[doors open at 6 p.m.] on Saturday, Nov.

17 at Barat Academy, 17815 Wild Horse

Creek Road. Table and dress will be sportsthemed

but trivia rounds will not. Free onsite

child care with advance registration.

Free soda and water in limited quantity.

$25 per person; maximum 10 players per

table. Sign up at gwrymca.org or call (636)

532-3100.

FAMILY & KIDS

Books & Butterflies, a themed story

time featuring special guest hosts is at 11

ORDER ONLINE

a.m. Tuesdays through Fridays each week

Download Talayn’as App

at the Sophia M. Sachs Butterfly House

in Faust Park in Chesterfield. For details

and guest schedule, visit butterflyhouse.org.

Included with regular admission.

• • •

STLCC-Wildwood’s STEM Night is at

6 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 9 at St. Louis Community

College, 2645 Generations Drive in

Wildwood. The hands-on event is focused

on promoting science, technology, engineering

and math and is free and familyfriendly.

With the exception of rooftop star

gazing, all activities will be held indoors.

• • •

Winter Jewels is daily from 10 a.m.-3

p.m. through Dec. 31 [closed Mondays]

at the Sophia M. Sachs Butterfly House

in Faust Park in Chesterfield. Visit a

fierce dragon and noble knights, discover

tropical jewel-toned butterflies and fairies

in the Conservatory and make new

friends in the Gnome Forest. For details,

visit butterflyhouse.org.

• • •

The Wildwood YMCA, 2641 Route 109,

hosts a themed-based Kids Night Out

for children ages 5-12 from 6:30-10 p.m.

on Saturday, Nov. 17 while parents get a

night to themselves. Swimming, games,

sports, dinner, crafts and friendship are

featured. Concessions are available for

purchase. Kids must wear gym shoes and

bring a swimsuit and towel. Advance registration

appreciated online at gwrymca.

org/wildwood, in person, or by phone at

(636) 458-6636. Cost is $20 per child for

non-members; $15 per child for members.

$5 sibling discount [not available through

online registration].

• • •

The 2018 Chesterfield Turkey Trot is

at 8 a.m. on Thursday, Nov. 22 at Chesterfield

Amphitheater, 631 Veterans Place

Drive. Start Thanksgiving Day the right

way. Sign up for the 5K or Kids Fun Run.

For more information or to register, visit

chesterfield.mo.us.

See EVENTS, page 55

>

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68 Four Seasons Center | Chesterfield, MO | www.Talaynas.net


FACEBOOK.COM/WESTNEWSMAGAZINE

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

Nicoletti’s

STEAK & PASTA

DINING

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I 51

Dinner Mon-Sun Starting at 4pm

$5 .00 Off

with minimum purchase of $25 .00

Carry Out or Dine In

CLIP

THIS

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or on Holidays. Expires 2/7/18.

1366 BIG BEND ROAD

(Highway 141 and Big Bend Road)

636.225.4222

Sunday & Monday Night Walleye Festival

Sharp Cheddar & CraCkerS

165 Lamp & Lantern Village

Town & Country

636-207-0501

*all fish subject to availability

Add a Side Salad $1.50

Not available with aNy other offers

or coupoNs

or carry-out. No substitutioNs

Party Room Available

at Big Bend Location

www.LazyYellow.com

Gift Certificates Available

636.591.0010

Country potatoeS

homemade Slaw

Walleye Fillets $ 13.95

House Basa Fillet $ 11.95

A Taste of “The Hill”

Thanksgiving Buffet

11:00am-5:00pm

Adults $24.99

Kids $8.99 (10 & Under)

(Kids under 4 eat free)

Reservations Required

Live Music

631 Big Bend Rd.

Manchester

636-207-1689

Full Service Holiday Catering

• Holiday Parties

• Corporate Events

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Online Delivery & Carryout

NOVEMBER SPECIAL

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Buy 1 Large

2-topping pizza

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and get one FREE

Thursday - Saturday • 6:30-9:30pm

100 Holloway Road • Ballwin 63011

636.220.8989•www.candiccis.net

AD PROOF is reduced in quality to be email compatible, making some images appear blurry. Colors displayed here will not match the

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THE LINKS AT WILDWOOD PUB AND GRILL

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52 I

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

@WESTNEWSMAG

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

an 8” or 10” Decorated Cake

St. Louis - Chesterfield

159 Lamp and Lantern Village

Chesterfield, MO 63017

(636) 220-6087

NothingBundtCakes.com

Expires 11/30/18. Limit one (1) coupon per

guest. Coupon must be presented at time

of purchase. Valid only at the bakery(ies)

listed. No cash value. Coupon may not be

reproduced, transferred or sold. Internet

distribution strictly prohibited. Must be

claimed in bakery during normal business

hours. Not valid for online orders. Not valid

with any other offer.

FINALLY...NO MORE ELECTION ADS

18-JN-0142-1004-3

Bakery #: 142

Trim: 4.916” by 2.72”

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I don't know who won, BUT I do know I'm glad it's over with.

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print

Let's Celebrate with a cocktail! It's on me!

Use this ad for $6 OFF

Any Drink You Want

(I usually only give $5 off, but a friend (Jim) told me I should do more)

Hibachi Grill

One Of The Largest & Most Elegant Chinese, Japanese & American Cuisine Restaurant

$

8 99

LUNCH

Supreme Buffet

Weidman Rd.

S. Mason Rd.

15310 Manchester Road

636-391-3700

14312 South Outer 40 Road

314-485-8800

10%

DISCOUNT

AND

SENIORS

MILITARY

TEACHERS

ALL

DAY

$

11 99

DINNER

$

1.00 OFF

ADULTS ONLY. LIMIT 4 PER TABLE.

MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY

OTHER OFFER. EXPIRES 12/5/18.

Sunday - Thursday 10:30 am - 9:30 pm • Friday and Saturday 10:30 am - 10 pm

1282 Old Orchard Center | 636-527-5488

Ballwin, MO | Manchester Rd. behind Burger King and Arby’s

VETERANS MEMORIAL, from page 11

and presentations that focus on St. Louis

and its people.

Unlike other military

memorials across the country,

including the National

World War I Museum and

Memorial in Kansas City,

Soldiers Memorial’s interpretation

and preservation

of American military history

is presented through

what Sundlov calls “the

lens of St. Louis.”

“Soldiers Memorial

interprets all U.S. military

from a St. Louis

lens. Looking at St. Louis’

involvement in conflicts

throughout U.S. history from the revolution

to present day conflicts, ” Sundlov said.

“It’s a holistic look, highlighting St. Louis

stories that occurred during those conflicts

along with stories of service from those who

fought [and] those who made contributions

from the home front. This is not a museum

about war. It’s a museum about people and a

memorial to the people who served.”

Mikall Venso, Soldiers Memorial military

and arms curator, explained how those

stories are told via the museum’s long-term

exhibit “St. Louis In Service.”

“We start in the East Gallery, which

begins with St. Louis’ only American Revolution

battle, Battle of Fort San Carlos,

which stood downtown at what is now

the intersection of Walnut and 4th Street,”

Venso said. “From there, we go through the

conflicts through World War I. The West

Gallery picks up with the story with World

War II and goes through current conflicts.

During a visit you can interactively build

your own gunboat or search for individual

stories from the 1,075 names listed on

memorial’s cenotaph, the centerpiece of

the loggia that rests under the Gold Star

Mother’s ceiling mosaic.”

Venso explained how the museum’s goal

is to help people connect to personal stories,

especially those of civilians, whose work

ranged from victory gardens to making

ammunition in St. Louis plants.

“Courage” by Walker Hancock

Court of Honor at the Soldiers Memorial in St. Louis

Commemorating the centennial of the

end of World War I, the war touted as “the

war to end all wars,” is the first special

exhibit presented in the newly renovated

Soldiers Memorial Military

Museum. “World War

I: St. Louis and the Great

War” tells the story of what

life was like in St. Louis

during a time of great

change, both domestic and

abroad. Featured are 200

never-before-displayed

artifacts, including the

French 11th Field Artillery

uniform of Lt. Joseph

Desloge, ca. 1916; a trench

periscope; and an American

Red Cross canteen in

St. Louis, ca. 1918.

A perfect time to visit Soldiers Memorial

and see those items and more is Veterans

Day weekend, Nov. 10-12.

Saturday, Nov. 10

The city of St. Louis, St. Louis County

and the U.S. Department of Veteran

Affairs celebrate the 35th Annual St. Louis

Regional Veterans Day Observance and

Welcome Home Ceremony. The U.S. Postal

Service will conduct a stamp cancelation

commemorating the 100th anniversary of

the Armistice [November 1918] from 11

a.m.-1 p.m. Food trucks will be available

from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

The 35th Annual Veterans Day Parade

will step off from Chestnut Street and

Tucker Boulevard at noon, with a review

stand in front of Soldiers Memorial.

Sunday, Nov. 11

The American Legion 11th and 12th

districts will present a veterans ceremony

and wreath laying at 10:55 a.m. at Soldiers

Memorial.

Monday, Nov. 12

Soldiers Memorial Military Museum is

open with regular operating hours from 10

a.m.-5 p.m. on Veterans Day.

In addition to celebration activities happening

at Soldiers Memorial, community

partners are hosting events throughout

the region such as author James

Wright discussing his book

“Enduring Vietnam: An American

Generation and Its War” as

part of the Missouri History

Museum’s Primm Lecture Series

at 7 p.m. at the Missouri History

Museum, 5700 Lindell Blvd. in

Forest Park. Books will be available

for purchase.

For information on grand

reopening week events and the

assistance programs offered to

veterans, visit mohistory.org/

memorial/reopening-week-events.


FACEBOOK.COM/WESTNEWSMAGAZINE

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November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I 53

WEST HOME PAGES

®

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54 I

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

COMPASSIONATE CAREGIVERS

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3 cushion sofa; Recliners; Oak dresser w/mirror; 3 pc oak 2.5" end table,

lamp table set; 4 pc brass & glass end table set; Oak washstand; Entry

hall mirror; Set crystal table lamps; International Silver Company tea

Overnts; Pick Up Extra Hrs; 1 yr

HAULING

set; Patio table & 4 chairs; 1950’s blonde oak sewing machine cabinet;

Exp reqd; Pers Care, Housekeep,

Hoover Wind Tunnel self propelled vacuum; Repo Slag glass parlor

Meal Prep, Transp, etc; Apply at

J & J HAULING

lamp; Harmony House china; Black & Decker 12” pizza Toast-R-Oven;

www.WestplexHomeCare.com

WE HAUL IT ALL

Lot Christmas decorations; Lot pots, pans, bake ware; Lot kitchen RUN Service IN WEST 7 days. UNTIL Debris, FURTHER furniture, NOTICE

appliances; Lot Corning Ware DOLL COLLECTION; POOL Office & PING-

HOME IMPROVEMENT

PONG TABLE: 1970’S Brunswick pool table; Ping-pong table BUNDY

Notes:

CLEANING SERVICES

CLEAN AS A WHISTLE

Weekly • Bi-Weekly • Monthly

Move-In & Move-Out

$10 OFF

New Clients

AFFORDABLE

PRICING

Family Owned & Operated

Your Satisfaction Guaranteed

Insured/Bonded

314-426-3838

CLEANING SERVICES

DECKS

1"

1.5"

2"

EVERYTHING DECKS:

Construct, Repair,

Upgrade, Clean / Stain

MarkHicksLLC.com

Since 1982, no money up front

warranty, insured, free estimates

Discounts • BBB A+ • Angie’s List

636-337-7733

West Classifieds Work!

636.591.0010

St. Louis MO 63129

314-892-1003

CARPET REPAIRS

Restretching, reseaming

& patching. No job too

small. Free estimates.

(314) 892-1003

GARAGE DOORS

DSI/Door Solutions, Inc.

Garage Doors, Electric Openers.

Fast Repairs. All makes & models.

Same day service. Free Estimates.

Custom Wood and Steel Doors.

BBB Member • Angie's List

Call 314-550-4071

www.dsi-stl.com

HELP WANTED

TEACHERS NEEDED!! - F/T, P/T

& SUBS Med size Preschool – but

GROWING!! Great Environ; Must

Love Kids! $ based on exp; Lots

of opportunities WILDWOOD

EARLY LEARNING CENTER; 1 mi

E of 109 on Manchester Rd; Send

res to apply@wildwoodELC.com;

or call Mollie at 636-273-5000.

All Around Construction LLC

All interior & exterior remodeling

& repairs. Historic restoration,

molding duplication. Finished

basements, kitchens, baths & decks.

24 years experience.

314-393-1102 or 636-237-3246

EVERYTHING DECKS:

Deck Restoration

Clean / Stain

MarkHicksLLC.com

30 years exp., no money up front

warranty, insured, free estimates

BBB A+ rating • Angie’s List

636-337-7733

Total Bathroom Remodeling

Cabinetry•Plumbing•Electrical

21 Years Experience

Trimming, Fall planting, Drainage MAY 04

work, Leaf Removal, MAY Fence 18

Repair and more! References MAY 25

available. FREE Estimates. Call

Anytime! 636-237-5160.

JUN 08

MORALES LANDSCAPE JUN LLC 15

• Clean-Up • Mowing • Mulching JUN 22

• Planting • Aeration • Sod Install

• Leaf/Tree Removal • Paver JUL Patios 06

• Trimming/Edging • Stone JUL & Brick 20

• Retaining Walls • Drainage JUL Work 27

- FREE ESTIMATES -

636-293-2863 AUG 10

moraleslandscape@hotmail.com AUG 17

AUG 24

M I E N E R

LANDSCAPING SEP 07

Retaining Walls • Patios • Pruning SEP 14

Chainsaw Work • Seasonal Clean SEP 21 up

Honeysuckle Removal

Friendly service with attention OCT to detail 05

Call Tom 636.938.9874 OCT 12

www.mienerlandscaping.com OCT 19

JACK'S LANDSCAPING NOV 02

Total lawn maintenance for NOV your 16

home or business. Mowing, NOV 23

mulch, planting, sod, retaining

walls, brush removal. More DEC services

available upon request. DEC Please 14

07

call for a FREE and PROMPT DEC estimate.

21

314-330-9040

RETAINING WALLS • PAVER PATIOS

MOWING & ALL LANDSCAPING NEEDS

STAINING DECKS BY BRUSH

Free Estimate

314-280-2779

FALL OVERHAUL!

LANDSCAPE

+ REHAB +

REPAIR, REDO, OR ALL NEW!

Walls - Stairs - Walks - Patios - Pits

clean it all up or out!

Beds - Bushes - Trees - Dirt - Rock - Mulch

• FREE ESTIMATES •

636-775-5992

X # of issues: ________________

= TOTAL: $ _______________

KEVIN'S PAINT JUN 08SERVICE

Professional & Expert interior/

exterior painting, JUN 22 drywall & ceiling

repair, and powerwashing.

30 years painting JUL 06 experience.

Low rates and JUL Free 20Estimates.

Call Kevin at 636-322-9784.

ADVANTAGE

AUG 10

PAINTING CO.

Interior AUG & Exterior 24

Painting

Drywall Repair SEP 07• Taping

Powerwashing • Wallpaper Stripping

Top Quality Work • FREE Estimates

SEP 21

636.262.5124

INSURED

MENTION AD & OCT RECEIVE 05 10% OFF

West Classifieds Work!

636.591.0010

PLUMBING

GVM PLUMBING

Can't beat my prices!

Greg Miller

636-288-7002

gvmplumbingstl@gmail.com

• ANYTHING IN PLUMBING •

Good Prices! Basement

bathrooms, small repairs & code

violations repaired. Fast Service.

Certified, licensed plumber - not

a handyman. Call or text anytime:

314-409-5051

• WEST CLASSIFIEDS • CLASSIFIEDS@NEWSMAGAZINENETWORK.COM • 636.591.0010 •

TFN

@WESTNEWSMAG

- PUB WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

DATES -

WEST MID RIVERS

2016

2016

• WEST CLASSIFIEDS • CLASSIFIEDS@NEWSMAGAZINENETWORK.COM • 636.591.0010 •

- PAYMENT METHODS -

AUCTION

ELECTRICAL

HELP WANTED

LANDSCAPINGJAN 13

PAINTING JAN 13

MC ❑ ERIC'S VISA ELECTRIC ❑ AMEX • CUSTODIAL ❑ POSITIONS DISCOVER • ❑

JAN 27

GARY JAN 27SMITH

Licensed, Bonded and Insured: for Rockwood School District

Chris' Lawn &

PAINTING & REPAIR

Service Four upgrades, Seasons

fans, can lights,

40 hours/week Tree ServiceFEB LLC 10

FEB 10

Locally owned & operated Interior Painting • Wallpaper

switches, outlets, basements, To apply please go to:

FEB 17 Dry Wall • Crown Molding & Trim

code violations fixed, we do it

www.rsdmo.org FALL LEAF REMOVAL FEB 24 - 25 years FEB Experience 24 -

all. Emergency (UNCHANGED)

calls & back-up or call 636-733-3270

& CLEAN-UP

Fully Insured • Owner/Operator

generators. No job too small.

EEOC

SHRUB & TREE TRIMMING, MAR 09 Call Gary MAR 314-805-7005

09

Competitively priced. Free Estimates.

& BED CLEANUP

05/18

MAR 16

Just call 636-262-5840

RESIDENTIAL•COMMERCIAL

Wendy’s is now hiring

MAR 23

MAR 23

636-265-7007

Interior and

D-K ELECTRIC Crew Members and 314-482-3707 APR O6

APR exterior 06 painting

Residential - Commercial

New Service - Repair Shift Supervisors! PEDRO MARTINEZ LANDSCAPING APR 13

Deck staining

Remodeling - CATEGORY - Troubleshooting HEADING -

- A Cut Above! Mowing APR and 20

APR 20

For our St. Louis Market Clean-Up. Aeration, Bush/Tree - Insured & Free estimates -

Free Estimates - No job too small

10% discounts for

— Including —

MAY seniors 04 and veterans

Licensed - Bonded- Insured

Dickspainting.com

Electrician answers your calls at:

• Ballwin,

MAY 18

636-458-1559

• St. Charles

314-707-3094

• Chesterfield

FLOORING

• St. Peters

THORNHILL AUCTION

Due to the passing of our mother, we will sell all the following

Personal Property at

Public Auction on

Friday November 9, 2018 Beginning at 9:30 A.M.

SALE SITE: 1025 Cla Ter Ri Dr.; Ballwin, MO 63001

DIRECTIONS: From Wentzville go south on US-61 approx. 30 miles to

MO-340/Olive Blvd./Clarkson Rd. Exit 19B, turn right on Clarkson Rd./

MO-340 and go 3.72 miles to left on to Clayton Rd. and go ½ mile to

left on Cla Ter Ri Dr. to home on left #1025.

CAR SELLS AT 1:00 P.M.: 2005 Elco Malibu LT V6 automatic, 4 door

w/sunroof, leather interior, teal, 1 owner, 39,000 actual miles TRI

HULL BASS BOAT SELLS AT 1:00 P.M.: 1993 Stratos Model 280

SF 18’10” fiberglass hand laid hull w/Johnson 150 V6, Star Series

outboard & trolling motor, Stratos Trail single axle trailer bought

new, nice ANTIQUES AND COLLECTIBLES: 1940’S cedar chest;

Singer Treadle sewing machine; 1970’s Columbia BMA-6 girls bike;

1930’s mahogany bedroom set; 1950’s #301 Singer sewing machine;

L F Scout pedal tractor; 1950’s Drink Coca Cola in Bottles, soda

cooler; Apple Watt pottery cookie jar; Bubble glass framed deer

scene; White wicker child’s rocker; 4 walnut cane bottom chairs;

Cuckoo clock; 1950’s canister set; Wooden key; Blue band crock

pitcher; 1950’s child’s organ; 1950’s tin ware; Lot cups & saucer;

1960’s Micromatic console stereo; GE fan; Bingham rollers wooden

shipping box; Croquet set; Bradford exchange plates; 3 milk cans, 1

Phillip Meyer, Chesterfield; Lot 1960’s-70’s games; Blown glass Easter

eggs; Fenton glass; Canning jars; Milk glass; Art glass; Echt Critallerie

Zwiesel German stem ware; Hot Shot hockey game in box; Cast iron

bucket; Red Coleman lantern; Galvanized water can; Royal typewriter;

1950’s sofa & chairs; 1950’s chrome kitchen table; Retro pole lamp;

1950’s luggage; 1940’s Motorola B&W TV; Victorian dresser lamps;

Gold frame wall mirror; Retro light fixtures; 2 mahogany Inlay lamp

tables; Quilt frames; Mink coat SCUBA GEAR; HOUSEHOLD &

MISC.: Whirlpool electric dryer; Maytag Centennial automatic washer;

CLARINET; LAWN – GARDEN – SHOP TOOLS: Troy Bilt 6.75 hp, 21”

cut high wheel lawn mower; McCulloch Super Air Stream 2 cycle

blower; Ridgid pipe vise on stand; Lot yard & garden tools; Assorted

wrenches & tools; Partial list LOT CAMPING SUPPLIES – COLEMAN

STOVE – ETC.

OWNERS: NORMAN & LILLIAN JACOB TRUST,

RANDY JACOB TRUSTEE

AUCTIONEERS

DAVID THORNHILL

314-393-7241

DUSTY THORNHILL

314-393- 4726

BILL UNSELL

573-470-0037

FRANKFORD, MO

TROY, MO

TROY, MO

All buyers will be photographed.

Terms: Cash or Good Check with Current Photo I.D.

Announcements made day of sale take precedence over any

advertisement!

Troy Office: 636-366-4206. For full listing & terms of this auction –

www.thornhillauction.com

$100 Cleaning Special

On Mondays and Tuesdays we

are here to cater to your needs.

Let us know what you need help

with. Offering residential cleaning

& home decorating. Never stress

over cleaning or decorating again!

Kim's Cleaning & Decorating

(314) 503-8176

~ LORI'S CLEANING SERVICE~

Choose a cleaner who takes

PRIDE in serving you and is

grateful for the opportunity.

Call Lori at 636-221-2357

appliances, household trash,

yard debris, railroad ties, fencing,

decks. Garage & Basement Clean-up

Neat, courteous, affordable rates.

Call: 636-379-8062 or

email: jandjhaul@aol.com

SKIPS HAULING & DEMOLITION!

Junk hauling and removal. Cleanouts,

appliances, furniture, debris,

construction rubble, yard waste,

excavating & demolition! 10, 15

& 20 cubic yd. rolloff dumpsters.

Licensed & insured. Affordable,

dependable & available! VISA/MC

accepted. 22 yrs. service. Toll Free

1-888-STL-JUNK (888-785-5865)

or 314-644-1948

Assistant Cook: Senior Center

Manchester, MO

7:30a-11:30A M-F $10.91/hr.

6 paid holidays, Vaca & Sick time

H/S Diploma Or Equiv. 1yr exp. w/

Commercial food prep. Pre-emp.

B/C & Drug Test. EOE

For more information:

call Laura at 636-207-4231

or e-mail

LREICH@AGINGAHEAD.ORG

Apply online at

www.BFCareers.com

PART TIME DRIVER

FOR LIGHT DELIVERY

2 days per week, 4-6 hours per

day, 10 am start, $9 per hour.

Clean driving record required.

Company car. EOE

Call: 636-256-8021

LINDSEY'S CUSTOM

PAINTING & CONSTRUCTION

For any and all home repairs

or updates that you may need!

Commercial and Residential

Interior and exterior painting,

landscaping, power-washing,

siding, dry wall, flooring, decks,

deck staining, retaining walls

(block, tie & concrete)

For a free estimate call:

636-208-3285

LEAF CLEAN UP

CURBSIDE

PICK UP

AVAILABLE!

636-293-2863

LEAF CLEAN UP

Tree and Bush Trimming/Removal,

Mulching, Landscaping Make-overs

and Clean ups, Powerwashing.

Now accepting lawn cutting

customers for 2019 season.

FAST & FREE ESTIMATES

TWO MEN & A MOWER

636-432-3451

OCT 19

PAINTER

DAN VOLLMER

NOV 02

• I AM INCORPORATED INC. •

INTERIOR NOV SPECIAL 23 2018

$75 Per DEC Avg. 07 Rm Size

(12'x12' Walls 3 Room Minimum)

FOR

DEC

35 YEARS

21

FREE ESTIMATES: CALL DAN

(636) 577-8960 11.05.15

exterior painting!

PET CARE

CONVENIENT

Dog Grooming

Full service grooming

in your home...

Reasonable Rates • Free Consultation

All Services Available

Keep Your Pets Stress-Free at Home

~ Great for Older Dogs ~

Ask about discounts for rescues!

Call for appointment

314-591-0009


FACEBOOK.COM/WESTNEWSMAGAZINE

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

November 7, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I 55

WEST CLASSIFIEDS • 636.591.0010 •

PLUMBING

LICENSED PLUMBER

Available for all plumbing needs.

No job too small. Free estimates.

25 years experience.

Senior citizen discount. 24 hours.

Call 314-808-4611

REAL ESTATE

I BUY HOMES

ALL CASH - AS-IS

I have been buying and selling

for over 30 years.

$ $

No obligation.

No commission.

No fixing up.

It doesn't cost to find out

how much you can get.

Must ask for

Lyndon Anderson

314-496-5822

Berkshire Hathaway Select Prop.

Office: 636-394-2424

RECYCLING

RECYCLE PAINT

and HOUSEHOLD CHEMICALS

Must be in original container

with label intact. We charge 30¢

a pound, can & all. We recycle

electronics, buy scrap metal & buy

non-fiction books with a bar code.

Earthboundrecycling.com

25 Truitt Dr., Eureka, MO 63025,

636-938-1188 Open 9-5 Mon-Sat.

Your Message

LOUD & CLEAR

West classifieds work!

636.591.0010

TREE SERVICES

• COLE TREE SERVICE •

Tree and Stump Removal.

Trimming and Deadwooding.

Free Estimates.

636-475-3661

www.cole-tree-service.biz

GET 'ER DONE TREE SERVICE

Tree trimming, removal, deadwooding,

pruning and stump

grinding. Certified arborist.

Fully Insured • Free Estimates

A+ BBB • A+ Angie's List

Serving the Area Since 2004

314-971-6993

DORSEY TREE SERVICE

Trees trimmed or removed,

stumps removed. Bucket truck

service. Fully insured.

In business for 30 years.

Call 314-355-5115

PHIL'S TREE SERVICE

FREE Estimates - FULLY Insured

Topping, Trimming, Removal

Landscaping, and Pruning.

25 Years Experience.

ASK ME ABOUT FIREWOOD!

Call today 636-466-2888

Whatever your message

West Newsmagazine classifieds work!

Contact us today by phone at

636.591.0010 or by email at

classifieds@newsmagazinenetwork.com

TUTORING

1 – on – 1 Math Tutor

Math Jitters? Can’t cope with class

assignments? Need assistance for

high school or college level math?

Individual tutoring • 30+ years of

teaching.

Call after 5:00 p.m. for

appointment: 314-698-2232

WANTED

WANTED TO BUY

• SPORTS MEMORABILIA •

Baseball Cards, Sports Cards,

Cardinals' Souvenirs and

Sports Memorabilia

Pre-1975 Only. Private Collector.

314-302-1785

WATERPROOFING

TOP NOTCH Waterproofing &

Foundation Repair LLC

Cracks, sub-pump systems, structural

& concrete repairs. Exterior

drainage correction. Serving Missouri

for 15 years. Finally, a contractor

who is honest & leaves the

job site clean. Lifetime Warranties.

Free Estimate 636-281-6982

WEDDING SERVICES

MARRIAGE CEREMONIES

Full Service Ministry

314-703-7456

WEST CLASSIFIEDS • 636.591.0010 •

Life

Celebrations

Celebrate the life of your loved ones

with our community, family and friends!

- Serving West St. Louis County since 1996 -

- Delivered to more than 67,000 mailboxes -

For more information on obituaries contact:

636-591-0010 | obits@newsmagazinenetwork.com

EVENTS, from page 50

HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS

Santa’s Magical Kingdom opens Nov.

16 and runs nightly from 5:30-10:30 p.m.,

including all holidays, through Jan. 6 at

Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park in Eureka. A

drive-through holiday light display featuring

animated scenes, special effects

and more than four million lights. Photos

with Santa, train and wagon rides, Kringle’s

General Store and the Stack Santa’s

Sack toy drive, sponsored by West Newsmagazine,

add to the holiday fun. Toys

will be donated to the Salvation Army.

Admission is $23 per car, truck, minivan,

up to 8 passenger van or SUV. Admission

for wagon and train rides is $13 per

person. For reservations, call (636) 938-

5925; visit SantasMagicalKingdom.com

for details.

• • •

The 11th Annual Holiday Shopping

Extravaganza takes place from 1-6 p.m.

on Friday, Nov. 16; 9 a.m.-6 p.m. on Saturday,

Nov. 17; and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on

Sunday, Nov. 18 at the St. Charles Convention

Center. Over 200 booths with

unique gift items, gourmet goodies and

holiday home décor are featured. Free

admission and parking. For details, visit

treasurechestshows.com.

• • •

A Holiday Walk is from 10 a.m.-2:30

p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 17 at the Kirkwood

Train Station, 110 W. Argonne in

Kirkwood. Beginning at 9:30 a.m., there

will be activities for children, holiday

shopping, free entertainment and refreshments.

Santa and Mrs. Claus will arrive by

train to pose for photos. For details, visit

downtownkirkwood.com.

• • •

St. Charles Christmas Traditions on

Historic Main Street opens on Nov. 23

and continues through Dec. 24. Festivities

include costumed characters, carolers,

a Santa Parade each Saturday and Sunday,

holiday foods, unique shopping experiences

and more. For additional details and

event times, visit discoverstcharles.com.

SPECIAL INTEREST

Bone Builder/Therapeutic Yoga is

from 10-11 a.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays

and Fridays, now through Dec. 7 at

St. Luke’s Outpatient Center [Desloge]

Building B, 111 St. Luke’s Center Drive

in Chesterfield. For people with osteoporosis/osteopenia,

cardiopulmonary

disease or orthopedic conditions. This

seven-week class aims to improve flexibility,

increase core strength and manage

stress. To register, visit stlukes-stl.com.

For questions, call (314) 205-6881.

• • •

“Atheism & Faith in Today’s World” is

at 7 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 11 at Manchester

United Methodist Church, 129 Woods Mill

Road in Manchester. Gain a better understanding

about why some people don’t

believe in God, and why others do. Stereotypes

of both atheists and believers will be

overturned through honest and respectful

dialogue. Questions from the audience will

be accepted. For more information, visit

manchesterumc.org.

• • •

Manchester’s Parks, Recreation and Arts

Department hosts a free breakfast for

vets [sausage, eggs, pancakes and more]

for all active, inactive and retired military

personnel from 7-10 a.m. on Monday, Nov.

12 at American Legion Post #208, 225 Old

Sulphur Spring Road in Manchester.

• • •

The city of Ellisville and AARP Driver

Safety offer an AARP Smart Driver

Course for drivers over age 50 from 9

a.m.-1 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 13 in the

Park Administration Building in Bluebird

Park, 225 Kiefer Creek Road in Ellisville.

Cost is $15 for AARP members; $20 for

non-members. Completing the course

could result in a discount on your car

insurance. For details or to register, visit

our website at ellisville.mo.us

• • •

The Ballwin Historical Commission

meets from 2:30-3:30 p.m. on Tuesday,

Nov. 13 at the Old Ballwin School House,

308 Jefferson Avenue. The goal is to educate

and illustrate the history of the city

of Ballwin, including its settlement and

other historic topics. The meetings are

open to the public for individuals 21 and

up. The commission meets on the second

Tuesday of every month. The event is

free to attend.

• • •

Living Word Church hosts a Service of

Remembrance at 6 p.m. on Sunday, Nov.

18 at 17315 Manchester Road in Wildwood.

This service is for all those who

are dealing with the grief and loss of a

loved one. For more information, visit

livingwordumc.org.

• • •

Introduction to Photography is from

6-9 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 19 in Room

C of the Manchester Park Building, 359

Old Meramec Station Road. Artist Kat

Douglas teaches attendees about the

basics of photography during daytime

or evening hours, indoors and outdoors.

Lessons are provided on how to shoot

landscapes, portraits and family events.

Equipment and lighting are provided.

Attendees must bring their own cameras.

Participants must be 18 or older to

attend. The event costs $15. Registration

for the event is open until Nov. 16. For

more information and registration, visit

manchestermo.gov.

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