West Newsmagazine 11-14-18

newsmagazinenetwork

Local news, local politics and community events for West St. Louis County Missouri.

Vol. 23 No. 31 • November 14, 2018

westnewsmagazine.com

The Art of

Sobriety

PLUS: The Holiday Wishbook – Gift Suggestions • Santa Sightings • Recipes • Fun & Games


2 I

November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

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November 14, 2018

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I OPINION I 3

RANDOM THOUGHTS

A Community Conversation

BEFORE

AFTER

By JESSICA MESZAROS

This week, West Newsmagazine talks

with Harry Hope, board chairman emeritus

of Greater Saint Louis Honor Flight.

Hope joined the Navy in 1947; in 1948,

he transferred to the U.S. Marine Corps.

He was involved in the Inchon Landing

[Korea] and the retaking of Seoul. In

November and December of 1950, Hope’s

unit was trapped for three weeks in the

“Chosin Reservoir” area of North Korea,

where he acquired injuries from frostbite.

He was discharged in 1958. Harry and his

wife of 54 years, Terry, live in Creve Coeur.

How do you relax?

I usually get home in the mornings after

seeing the veterans off [at Lambert Airport

at 2 a.m.] and take a nap from maybe 7 a.m.

to 11 a.m.; then, my wife and I have breakfast

or, actually, brunch. We just do the

normal things ... [but] we may only have

five or six days a month that we don’t have

anything scheduled ... This past Saturday,

I was at the Focus Marine Foundation [in

St. Charles County].[Local Marines and

veterans groups] bring in young veterans

suffering from PTSD; we put them up in

a lodge out there for classes. I speak one

day a week for them. [On Nov. 3, I was]

a guest speaker and guest of honor for the

Marine Corps Birthday Ball. It’s quite an

honor, really, from one Marine to another

Marine ... I speak at a lot of nursing homes

and to a lot of veterans groups. My wife

has to take care of the calendar because

she used to be an accountant. I tell people,

when I introduce her, she’s my accountant,

my secretary, my treasurer and my wife.

What profession does not get enough

credit or respect?

I don’t think veterans get enough respect.

When the Vietnam veterans came back

from war, they didn’t get a welcome home

... Korean veterans didn’t either. I came

home, went back to work and several of

my friends were like, “Hey, where have

you been? I haven’t seen you in a few

months.” I’d say, “I’ve been in Korea,” and

then, they’re like, “Where’s Korea?” They

didn’t even know where Korea was.

What is something everyone should do

at least once in their life?

Thank the veterans. That’s one answer.

When I came home from Korea ... I registered

for the University of California - Santa

Harry Hope with his wife, Terry

Ana ... They asked me, “What field do you

want to go into?” I said, “Real estate.” I

went for two weeks, and that was part-time

at nights when I was in the Marine Corps.

After two weeks, I was transferred to Japan.

So, that’s my college experience. So when

people ask me, “Did you go to college?”

I say, “Yes, I did.” I’ve been around the

world a couple times. When I was 17, I was

in Italy and Turkey and Greece, and Sicily

and Spain ... The lack of education, I really

don’t think has held me back ... I think

any college boy, and now women, should

spend two years in service or doing something

to help people, something to relate to.

When they get out after two years, they’ll

know what they really want to do. If they

want to become a firefighter or a policeman

or if they want to go back to school

and become a lawyer or a doctor. I think

everyone [who is] physically able should

do something. [President] Kennedy started

the Peace Corps. That was a great opportunity

for people to give back. I think we

should still have something like that.

Do you have any secret talents?

Talking. My wife says I talk too much. It

seems like I’m always ready to talk. I just

feel like I always have something to say,

and I don’t contribute that to any specific

education or any past job experiences. In

my lifetime, I also think I’ve done a good

job taking care of my family.

What are some life goals you want to

accomplish?

You know, I’ve never been one to set

goals. Anything that came along, I would

take care of it. My goal was for my wife

and my kids to have a very healthy life.

At 87, you never know what’s going to

happen ... The goal is to keep my wife and

me as healthy as we can be for the rest of

our lives.

Before

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grasscloth was added to the ceiling and matching light fixtures were installed.

The bold, pumpkin pie wall color was chosen to contrast with crisp, ivory trim

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4 I OPINION I

November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

@WESTNEWSMAG

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Leslie North

636-458-9797

16828 Manchester Rd.

Wildwood

leslienorth@allstate.com

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233596

Don’t blame the river

To the Editor:

My wife and I moved to Ballwin 28

years ago, and we have absolutely loved

being near one of the area’s “Crown

Jewels,” Castlewood State Park. Whether

hiking, picnicking, mountain biking or

hitting the beach, we have enjoyed all it

has to offer.

While the 16 drownings over the years

have been unfortunate, including the

most recent incident that took two lives,

they could have been prevented.

We go to that beach and we swim there

without incident. The park and beach are

safe if you use common sense. First and

foremost, learn how to swim – and if you

have children, get them swim lessons.

The majority of planet Earth is covered

in water. If you don’t know how to swim,

don’t enter unfamiliar water and, if you

feel compelled to wade in, wear a life

jacket if you’re not a swimmer. It’s a

pretty simple formula for survival.

Metro West Fire Protection has a tough

job and they get called in once disaster

hits. They do a great job.

Castlewood State Park has done what

they can and put warning signs up [you

can’t miss them!], and the recent life

jacket and equipment stations are good

ideas. Having said that, you can’t install

common sense.

Having park rangers driving up and

down the beach on ATVs seems a bit like

overkill to me.

We swam in the river the day before

the most recent drownings. We were

headed to the river the day of the drownings

and were turned back because the

accident had just happened. It’s very sad

and could have been prevented.

That beach is safe if you use the proper

precautions.

Don’t blame Castlewood State Park

and the Meramec River for those drownings

over the years. Blame it on throwing

caution into the wind.

Kevin R. Miquelon Sr.

Time to expand Medicaid

To the Editor:

Healthcare matters to Missouri voters,

and the opioid crisis cannot be ignored.

Attempts to repeal and sabotage

healthcare and protections of the Affordable

Care Act cost 128,000 Missourians

to lose their health insurance in 2017.

And, of course, Missouri’s uninsured

rate is already higher than in other states

because our state has not yet expanded

Medicaid. About 12 million Americans

have gained coverage under the expansion

in 33 states. About 352,000 Missourians

would gain access, according

to healthinsurance.org, if Medicaid was

expanded, and 700 lives would be saved.

In a bipartisan effort to target the U.S.

opioid crisis, now more than ever, is the

time to expand Medicaid. Under “Obamacare,”

Medicaid expansion is effective.

It already covers addiction treatment for

nearly everyone who is poor and needy,

according to the Associated Press.

In effect, Medicaid expansion states

had a running start on the opioid crisis,

while states without the extra Medicaid

funding play catch up.

Non-expansion states deal with more

uninsured populations and are more

likely to need addiction treatment coverage.

In contrast, states with Medicaid

expansion use the grants to create new

infrastructure asking providers to invest

in new personnel, new systems and new

ways of doing things. Medicaid covers

four out of 10 adults under age 65 with

opioid addiction, more than all private

insurance combined.

In November, Idaho, Nebraska and

Utah will decide whether their states

should expand Medicaid. Montana

voters will decide on maintaining that

state’s expansion.

The AP analysis found states that did

not expand Medicaid spent $2,645 per

patient on opioid addiction treatment.

Expansion states spent $1,581 per patient

for treatment. States that did not expand

Medicaid spent $1,170 per person served

on recovery support services. Expansion

states spent $446 per person served on

recovery.

Medicaid expansion helps stem the

opioid crisis.

Ed Shew

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© Copyright 2018.

A PUBLICATION OF

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6 I OPINION I

November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

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EDITORIAL

2018 Midterm Elections: What’s next?

President Donald Trump might not

have been on the Nov. 6 midterm ballot,

but he was far and away the most important

candidate.

Has a single individual ever so completely

dominated a political agenda as

President Trump right now? Trump has

remade the Republican party wielding

little more than a Twitter account, a brash

oratorical style and an unmatched will.

Consider immigration policy. Pre-

Trump [and remember that “pre-Trump”

extends back to Lincoln] the Republican

party was pro-immigration. In 1960, the

party platform stated: “Republican conscience

and Republican policy require

that the annual number of immigrants

we accept be at least doubled.” In 1980,

Ronald Reagan accepted his party’s nomination

in part with these words: “Can

we doubt that only a Divine Providence

placed this land, this island of freedom,

here as a refuge for all those people in

the world who yearn to breathe free?”

In 2012, the Republican National Committee

funded a study that concluded the

party must “embrace and champion comprehensive

immigration reform.”

Just four short years later, the force

of nature that is Donald Trump won

the presidency by promising to build a

“magnificent wall.” Two years after that,

a midterm election was dominated by a

caravan of refugees hundreds of miles

from our borders.

This singular ability to bend the

national conversation at his will begs the

question: What’s next? What happens

to the Republican Party when Donald

Trump is no longer its leader?

It’s hard to say. Currently, the Democrats

have no candidate or issue that

poses a serious threat to Trump’s 2020

re-election. The predicted “blue wave” of

2018 turned out to be more of a purplish

puddle. The progressive’s favored son,

Beto O’Rourke, had to spend an astonishing

$15 per vote received just to come

in a close second to Lyin’ Ted Cruz in

Texas. It was an impressive losing campaign,

but a losing campaign nonetheless.

It is difficult to imagine the Trump

agenda being viable without Trump but,

as we sit here today, that is a problem

Republicans will not have to worry about

for another six years.

A few notes on the local elections:

• Kudos to Missouri voters are called

for on two fronts. We showed up in

record numbers and traversed some

fairly complicated ballot initiatives

with few problems. The three competing

medical marijuana initiatives, for

example, combined to transform a

simple issue into one that was remarkably

complex. Despite that complexity,

our informed voters were able to clearly

state their preference without the issue

ending up in the courts.

• St. Louis County Executive Steve

Stenger was re-elected and rebuked in

equal measure. While his re-election was

preordained, the voters showed a clear

desire to add some checks and balances

to his authority by passing Proposition 2

and Proposition B.

• The so-called Clean Missouri initiative

passed resoundingly. Several of its

provisions will do some good for our

state, but the redistricting portion still

made the juice not worth the squeeze, in

our opinion. We will come to regret this

vote.

• In general terms, Josh Hawley did not

win so much as Claire McCaskill lost.

Any enthusiasm for Hawley was eclipsed

by the voters’ belief that McCaskill’s

time representing our state was simply

over.

IN QUOTES

“I think you should let

me run the country

and you run CNN.

And if you did it well,

your ratings would

be much better.”

– President Donald Trump

“We lose two [people]

in St. Louis every

single day.”

– Kathie Thomas, speaking

about opioid deaths

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8 I NEWS I

November 14, 2018

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Anusurya Gupta [left] with Mayor Bob Nation and Jeanne Clauson

news

briefs

CHESTERFIELD

Student honored as ‘green’ youth

Parkway West Middle student Anusurya

Gupta has received the Stellar Green Youth

Team Award from the Chesterfield Citizens

Environmental Advisory Committee [CCE].

The presentation came from Mayor Bob

Nation and Jeanne Clauson, of the CCE,

at the Chesterfield City Council’s Nov. 5

meeting.

The CCE program works with applicants

to foster a better understanding of recycling

issues and the organization’s role in

this and other environmental activities. To

qualify for the award, a person must participate

in three CCE events.

Zoning changes approved

for Downtown Chesterfield

The Chesterfield City Council has

approved changes in zoning provisions for

the 99-acre parcel known as Downtown

Chesterfield.

Located at the southwest corner of

the I-64 and Chesterfield Parkway West

intersection, the property is zoned for a

planned commercial and residential district

[PC&R], a mixed-use classification unique

in the city.

Parts of the requested change include the

addition of a nearly half-acre parcel to the

original tract and permission for separate

plans for one portion of the property north

of Wild Horse Creek Road and for the

remaining two parts south of that road.

Although the Chesterfield Planning Commission

recommended approval of the

request, the city council’s Planning and

Public Works Committee ultimately voted

to remove four permitted uses and four

ancillary uses from the PC&R ordinance.

The deletions were incorporated as proposed

amendments to the original zoning request.

However, when the measure came up

for a first reading at its mid-October meeting,

Michael Doster, a land use attorney

for Sachs Properties, presented a case for

retaining those uses. The council then

agreed to ask Doster to propose new wording

addressing their concerns.

Doster did so, councilmembers accepted

the revised verbiage and approved the

zoning revisions unanimously.

The planning and public works committee

had proposed deleting the rental and

leasing of new and used automobiles, film

processors, indoor sales of automobiles

from a retail-like operation as opposed to

a traditional dealership, and broadcasting

facilities for radio and television. Ancillary

uses set for exclusion were broadcasting

transmitting or relay towers and associated

facilities, drop-off and pick-up stations for

dry cleaning and film processing and satellite

dishes used by hotels and residential

developments for guests and tenants.

The revised wording contains more

detailed descriptions of what is and isn’t

allowed in the various use categories and

more specific review and approval authority

for the city.

CREVE COEUR

City administrator

Perkins resigns

Creve Coeur City Administrator Mark

Perkins has tendered his resignation with

the city. In January, Perkins will become

the Town Manager of Paradise Valley, Arizona,

a suburb of Phoenix.

“The decision to leave Creve Coeur is a

difficult one, but Paradise Valley represents

a new challenge for me in another great

community,” Perkins said in a press statement.

“It will also allow me to be close to

family who live in Arizona and California,

and my daughter and son-in-law will also

soon be moving west to Colorado.

“I have been truly blessed and honored to

work with an outstanding staff, dedicated

elected officials and engaged citizens for

these many years in Creve Coeur. I have

also been fortunate to work with so many

outstanding city administrators and other

regional leaders throughout the St. Louis

area.”

The Creve Coeur City Council held a

special work session on Monday, Oct. 29

to discuss plans for filling the vacancy.

“I would like to thank Mark Perkins

for his 19 years of service to the City of

Creve Coeur. His proactive management

style has contributed, immeasurably, to

the stability and betterment of our community,”

said Mayor Barry Glantz. “Mr.

Perkins’ expertise and guidance will be

greatly missed – and finding an equally

qualified candidate to fill this highly specialized

position is a task to which the

City Council and I will devote our immediate

time and attention.”

MANCHESTER

City seeks to establish audit

and finance committee

On Nov. 5, the Manchester Board of

Aldermen gave a first reading to legislation

that would establish an audit and finance

committee.

The committee, to meet at least quarterly,

would consist of five members: two

aldermen and three citizens. One alderman

would be appointed by the mayor and

approved by the board to serve as chair of

the committee. No more than two citizens

may live in the same ward and all must be

educated or employed in a professional

capacity as an accountant, financial advisor,

banker or broker, and qualify as a

financial expert as defined in the Sarbanes-

Oxley Act.

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act is a federal law

passed in 2002 that established auditing

and financial regulations for public companies.

The initial appointments would be

staggered with two members initially

appointed for a term of one year, ending on

Oct. 31, 2019, and the balance of members

appointed for full two-year terms ending

Oct. 31, 2020. Thereafter, the terms would

be for two years each beginning with a

Nov. 1 appointment and with no successive

term limits.

The purpose of the audit and finance committee

would include, but not be limited to,

the following responsibilities:

• Review the annual budget to determine

if the budget meets statutory requirements

of the state; that it is based on sound fiscal

policy; that revenue projections are reasonable;

that adequate reserves or emergency

funds are provided; that all financial obligations

such as bond payments are provided;

and that special funding or reserve

accounts as provided by the ordinance of

the city are satisfied; and to make recommendations

to the mayor and board of

aldermen as it deems necessary.

• Consider proposed budget amendments

during the fiscal year requested by departments

not included in the budget. The

committee may make necessary recommendations

for changes to the mayor and

city administrator.


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November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I NEWS I 9

• Review quarterly financial statements

with the director of finance for budgetary

control and sound management practices.

A second reading and vote are anticipated

at the board’s Nov. 21 meeting.

WILDWOOD

City administrator resigns

On Nov. 9, Wildwood

City Administrator

Ryan Thomas

announced that

he will be leaving

his position as

city administrator.

Thomas is resigning

from his position

to accept a new position at the St. Louis

branch of a consulting engineering and

project management firm.

“I’m excited for this new opportunity and

feel confident knowing that I am leaving

the leadership of Wildwood with a strong

foundation in place,” Thomas said in an

official release. “During my time at Wildwood,

I have had the pleasure of getting

to know thousands of great people in the

community and have found it very rewarding

to have had a direct role in helping so

many of them.”

A 1995 graduate of Washington University,

Thomas started with Wildwood in

March 1996 as the city’s first civil engineer.

He was then appointed to director of public

works in July 2001 before becoming the

city administrator in January 2015.

Thomas has been with the city for about

23 years. His resignation will be effective

Dec. 10.

WEST COUNTY

Thomas

Monarch to acquire

thermal cameras

The Monarch Fire District has approved

the purchase of eight thermal imaging

cameras that will be included on select

vehicles in its fleet.

The cameras are designed to show temperature

variations in burning structures

– differences that give firefighters information

on how best to focus their efforts, on

potential safety hazards that may exist and

even the presence of a person or persons

inside the building.

Bids on the cameras were opened at

an earlier meeting and given to staff for

review and a recommendation. Approved

by the Monarch Board of Directors at its

Nov. 2 meeting was the low bid of $50,240

from Sentinel Emergency Solutions of

Arnold. The district had budgeted $75,000

for the equipment.

The cameras will be on the district’s

pumpers, its rescue truck and in the battalion

chief’s vehicle. One camera will be

kept in reserve as a replacement if another

unit is out of service for repairs or maintenance.

Monarch Chief Cary Spiegel said the

cameras will be placed in service as soon

as they are received and personnel are

trained in their use.

ST. LOUIS COUNTY

Opioid grant received

The St. Louis County Department of

Public Health has received a grant totaling

$340,000 in new state funding as part of

the federal Centers for Disease Control and

Prevention’s 2018 Opioid Overdose Crisis

Cooperative Agreement.

The funds will be used to continue

implementation of key components of

the county’s opioid action plan, including

improved collection of public health data

related to opioid use and abuse as well as

education, rescue and treatment initiatives,

according to county officials.

A press statement released by the

county states that the county is working

with countywide partners to design a

reporting process for nonfatal overdoses,

the new data will be used to monitor

trends, ensuring patients most in need

are being treated.

“Streamlining overdose reporting will

create a comprehensive picture of the

burden of opioid overdoses in the region,”

Spring Schmidt, acting co-director of the

health department, said. “The expanded

tracking system will help identify changes

in overdose burden and help direct

resources effectively.”

The award is a one-year contract and

is administered at the state level by the

Department of Health and Senior Services.

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A public hearing is scheduled before the Planning and Zoning Commission of

the City of Ballwin on December 3, 2018 at the Donald “Red” Loehr Police

and Court Center, 300 Park Dr. Ballwin, MO 63011, at 7:00 P.M.

A petition for a Special Use Exception to Moonlight Bistro (d/b/a Yiro

Gyro) for operation of a restaurant with liquor by the drink for consumption

on the premises where sold.

For more information call:

The Ballwin Zoning Hot Line at (636) 207-2326 or the Ballwin Government

Center at (636) 227-9000 (voice), (636) 527-9200 (TDD), 1-800-735-2966

RELAY MISSOURI.

Residents of Ballwin are afforded an equal opportunity to participate in the

programs and services of the City of Ballwin regardless of race, color, religion,

sex, age, disability, familial status, national origin or political affiliation. If one

requires an accommodation, please call the above numbers no later than 5:00

p.m. on the third business day preceding the hearing. Offices are open between

8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Andy Hixson, Director of Development and Assistant City Administrator

14811 Manchester Rd.

Ballwin, MO, 63011

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Chesterfield Council splits on early debt retirement

By JIM ERICKSON

By JESSICA MESZAROS

At its Nov. 5 meeting, the Wildwood

Planning & Zoning Commission examined

a request to review existing sign regulations

for multiple districts within the city.

The goal was to gauge the commission’s

feedback regarding an examination of the

city’s current ordinances pertaining to temporary

signs and campaign signs, following

the April 2018 election.

The commission was asked to examine

any possible changes to certain existing

regulations; address comments and concerns

from community members regarding

the application of those regulations; and

review recent, relevant legal developments.

Vujnich said the main reason for the

request was questions posed about signage

during the April 2018 election, specifically

in regard to living and campaign signs

Chesterfield City Council [front row, from left] Mary Ann

Mastorakos, Mayor Bob Nation and Michelle Ohley

[back row] Barbara McGuinness, Michael Moore, Tom

DeCampi, Dan Hurt, Barry Flachsbart and Ben Keathley

On divided votes, the Chesterfield

City Council has added provisions

to its 2019 budget draft

to allocate $1 million from both

its general fund and parks fund

reserves for early debt retirement.

The money will be used for the

early retirement of bonds issued

years ago to finance the building of

city hall and for parks projects.

While the measure passed, councilmembers

split over whether to

earmark the funds now or wait

until the Missouri Supreme Court

rules in a Chesterfield lawsuit challenging

the way sales tax revenues collected in St.

Louis County are allocated. Expected in

December, the court’s ruling could have a

major impact on the flow of funds the city

receives.

One possibility is that the court could

rule in Chesterfield’s favor, saying that

legislation establishing how sales tax funds

are collected and allocated to governments

in St. Louis County is unconstitutional

because it amounts to a special law that

applies nowhere else in the state. Should

such a ruling also throw out the 1-cent

portion of the sales tax divided among St.

Louis County and its municipalities, that

source of revenue for Chesterfield would

disappear.

Older cities in the county likely would

not be affected due to their already having

much earlier voter approval for the 1-cent

sales tax levy for municipal purposes. When

Chesterfield became a city in 1988, the legislation

setting up the system that applies to

St. Louis County already was in place. As

a result, Chesterfield voters – unlike those

in older communities – have not had the

chance to vote on the 1-cent sales tax levy.

Other cities presumably could use their

earlier voter approval to continue collecting

that revenue.

In other words, Chesterfield could prevail

in its lawsuit but find itself in at least

a short-term money crunch until a sales

tax proposal to its voters. That wouldn’t

happen until next April at the earliest and

would not go into effect until much later in

the year if the levy was approved.

If a major source of revenue were cut

off for any length of time, Chesterfield’s

reserves likely would dwindle and perhaps

force the council to rescind its actions to

earmark some of those funds for early debt

retirement.

The scenario just described is but one of

any number of situations that could result

Wildwood invites public comment on city sign laws

from whatever the Supreme Court says in

its ruling. A lower court already has ruled

against Chesterfield in its lawsuit questioning

the constitutionality of the current

countywide sales tax system.

Among other possibilities, the state’s

high court could simply let the lower

court’s ruling stand. In that case, the system

now in place likely would continue.

Other rulings – each with its own set of

major or minor consequences – also are

possible.

As a major retail center in western St.

Louis County, Chesterfield has argued that

much of the sales tax generated in the community

ends up going to other cities under

the countywide distribution plan.

The motion by Councilmember Barbara

McGuinness [Ward 1] to earmark $1 million

in general fund reserves for early debt

retirement drew opposition from councilmembers

Dan Hurt and Michael Moore

[both of Ward 3] and Barry Flachsbart

[Ward 1] but won approval on a 5-3 vote.

McGuinness chairs the council’s Finance

and Administration Committee and has led

that group’s earlier meetings on the 2019

budget.

On a similar McGuinness motion calling

for using $1 million in parks fund reserves

for early debt retirement, Councilmember

Mary Ann Mastorakos [Ward 2] joined

Hurt, Moore and Flachsbart in opposition.

Mayor Bob Nation broke the resulting 4-4

split by voting in favor of the set-aside.

The council will hold a public hearing

on the 2019 budget in connection with an

upcoming meeting, and then will act on the

spending plan.

within city rights-of-way and other locations.

“It’s a very difficult set of circumstances

that the code enforcement personnel and

the director of the department are placed

in when having to make decisions relative

to campaign signs, political signs, etcetera,”

Vujnich said. “My promise to all [at] the

conclusion of that election is that, prior to

the next election in April 2019, there would

be some clarity and hopefully less interpretation,

and hopefully from that point

forward, everyone would have an understanding

of the playing field.”

Young cited no specific sign ordinance as

objectionable; however, he said a review of

the ordinances was “prudent.”

In addition to ongoing concern about

stifling free speech during elections, some

commissioners said they found the city’s

existing ordinances suitable.

“My understanding has been that campaign

signs have always been allowed

during campaign season,” Commission

Secretary Fran Gragnani [Ward 1] said.

“[After the election,] they’re supposed to

be gone. They’re not supposed to be in the

right-of-way. All of those criteria have been

covered, so I personally don’t see a need for

changes.”

Commissioner and City Councilmember

Tim Woerther [Ward 7] made a motion to

extend the public hearing until the first

meeting in December to provide more

opportunities for residential feedback.

Gragnani seconded the motion, which carried

on a majority voice vote from the commission.

Following the public hearing, the commission

and city staff will prepare a report,

by January 2019, on any future recommendations

regarding temporary signs and

campaign signs.

November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

By JIM ERICKSON

I NEWS I 11

Council ‘levels playing

field’ in Chesterfield

In atypical fashion, the Chesterfield

City Council has approved

an ordinance that immediately

gives a Chesterfield Valley home

improvement center permission to

have hours of operation similar to

a nearby competitor.

An ordinance giving the Lowe’s

Home Improvement Warehouse

of Chesterfield the right to have

its hours of operation the same as

the Home Depot down the street

on THF Boulevard received unanimous

approval at the council’s

Nov. 5 meeting.

What made the approval unusual

is that the council suspended its

rules requiring a first reading of

most ordinances at one meeting

and a second reading and final

action at a later session.

The ordinance affecting Lowe’s

operating hours originally was

scheduled only for a first reading

at the Nov. 5 meeting. However,

Councilmember Barbara

McGuinness suggested that fairness

required her colleagues to act

more quickly to “level the playing

field” that had given the Home

Depot store an advantage in when

it was allowed to be open.

Two different ordinances

approved at two different times

in the past unintentionally created

the disparity, which the new measure

sought to correct, commented

Mike Hejna, a local commercial

real estate executive who supported

the proposed change during

the council meeting’s public comment

period.

Councilmembers Tom DeCampi

[Ward 4] and Ben Keathley [Ward

2], who historically have opposed

suspending the governing body’s

rules on all but routine measures,

supported doing so in this instance

and the motion passed unanimously,

as did approval of the

ordinance.

With the change, Lowe’s retail

sales will be permitted from 6

a.m.-11 p.m. Sunday through

Thursday and 6 a.m.-midnight on

Friday and Saturday.

The Chesterfield Planning Commission

also had endorsed the

change at an earlier meeting.


12 I NEWS I

Coming

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November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

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Holiday

GIFT GUIDE

By BRIAN FLINCHPAUGH

Prior to the Nov. 6 election, officials say

it wasn’t unusual to see lines out the door

at St. Louis County’s four locations for

absentee voting – a situation that set new

records for the county and may be repeated

in coming elections.

County election officials said, as of

Wednesday, Nov. 7, there were 53,000

absentee ballots cast. That total, particularly

the number cast in person, surprised

both Republican Elections Director Rick

Stream and Democratic Elections Director

Eric Fey.

“The number of absentee ballots cast

in person exceeded that of the presidential

election of 2016,” Fey said. “But the

absentee ballots in the mail were a little

more normal, it was higher than the last

mid-term, but it did not exceed the presidential.”

That 53,000 total could reach as high as

70,000 once all mail, overseas and military

ballots are counted, Stream added. That’s

around 10 to 12 percent of the county’s

registered voters, Fey said. He added that

the county didn’t have time to count most

of the absentee ballots it received on Nov.

5 and 6.

To be included in the final vote, absentee

ballots had to be received by 7 p.m. on Nov.

6. The only exceptions are for military and

overseas ballots that had to be in hand by

Nov. 9. Under Missouri law, a postmark on

a mailed ballot is irrelevant. “They have to

be in our hot hands by 7 p.m. on election

night,” Fey said.

There are a few safeguards in place to

help determine if an absentee ballot is

valid. If it’s a mailed ballot, the person

voting has to have the ballot envelope sent

back notarized. However, disabled voters

do not have to have the envelope notarized.

“We verify the signature when it comes

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St. Louis County sees above-average

number of absentee ballots

back against the signature on file,” Fey

said. “Those things have to match up in

order for the ballot to count.”

Despite the crowds at absentee ballot

locations – the Board of Elections’ main

office on Northwest Plaza Drive in St. Ann

and the county’s government centers in

Chesterfield, South County and Clayton

– the state’s statutes regulating absentee

voting in Missouri remain among the most

stringent in this part of the country.

Stream and Fey said early and absentee

voting requirements vary widely, with

some states allowing early voting four

or five weeks before an election. “Some

states, like Illinois ... have no deadline to

register to vote,” Fey added.

“Missouri is in the minority now. We’re

one of only 13 states left that require people

to provide a reason for voting before an

election,” Fey said. “We are kind of an

outlier in that regard. All of Missouri’s

neighbors allow early voting of some sort

without providing any kind of reason.”

Missouri lists 10 reasons that allow

absentee voting. They include being absent

from the county on election day, being

incapacitated or disabled, being restricted

by religious belief, being employed by an

election authority, or being incarcerated, a

member of the U.S. Armed Forces, a civilian

authority working outside the United

States, or a voter registered in Missouri but

who moved to St. Louis County after the

fourth Wednesday prior to an election.

Fey said even with regulations, it’s hard

to enforce.

“It’s a very hard case to prove because

Missouri’s statutes say the voter ‘expects’

to be out of the county on election day,”

Fey said. “So [a voter] can easily tell the

judge ‘I thought I was going to be out of

town but my plans changed.’ It’s a very

hard thing to prove beyond a reasonable

doubt in court.”

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2018

HOLIDAY WISHBOOK

A Special

Advertising Section

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W2 I HOLIDAY WISHBOOK I

November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

@WESTNEWSMAG

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

Welcome to the

2018 Holiday Wishbook!

A

B

In West Newsmagazine’s annual Holiday Wishbook, you’ll find unique Christmas

gift ideas for everyone on your list; holiday event listings including all the best

places to meet Santa Claus; a children’s activity; and holiday-related articles for you

to reference all season long.

‘Quizzmas Carols’

Keep your eye out for 10 “Quizzmas Carols” scattered in teal boxes throughout the

Wishbook. Each contains a trivia question about a classic Christmas song, with the

answers listed in the back of the Wishbook on page W14. Test your knowledge and

then test others! Happy caroling!

Quizzmas Carol song bank: “Do You Hear What I Hear?” • “Hark! The

Herald Angels Sing” • “Jingle Bells” • “Joy to the World” • “O Holy Night”

• “Santa Claus Is Coming to Town” • “Silent Night”• “The Little Drummer

Boy” • “We Three Kings” • “What Child Is This?”

C

Out on the town

Sometimes the best gifts are the intangible ones – the experiences.

Tickets

Surprise that special someone with tickets to a musical, play, concert, performance,

comedy show or sports event. With nationally renown gems such as The Fabulous

Fox Theatre and The Muny nearby, you can’t go wrong! [C]

Gift certificates

We say this loud and clear: Gift certificates are not impersonal! Gift certificates are a

pre-paid day or night out to that special someone’s favorite restaurant or shopping venue.

What better way to appreciate someone than to treat them to their favorite thing? [E]

Cooking class

Attempting to cook with another person can tell a lot about your compatibility. Put

yours to the test with a cooking class! Sip wine, cook a gourmet meal and enjoy each

other’s company. Check your local grocery stores and culinary schools for class listings;

they’re perfect for a couple or a whole group. Bon appétit! [F]

D

E

1. What was the first

Christmas song to be

broadcast on the radio?

Painting or crafting with a twist

Several local businesses offer a way to channel your creative

side through either painting or making a craft such as a home

décor item. Endless laughs and good memories are guaranteed,

and each finished product has its crafter’s special spin on it. The

best part? Wine usually is involved! [D]

F

Weekend getaway

Missouri has so much to offer within just a few hours’ drive or less. Treat your

loved one to a weekend getaway. Take the train to Missouri’s wine country, stay in a

quaint bed and breakfast, and explore the historic sites,

outdoor activities and beautiful views in places like Ste.

Genevieve, Augusta or Hermann. Your grand romantic

gesture is sure to earn you some brownie points. [B]

Travel funds

Did you know you can gift someone travel funds such

as airline miles or an Amtrak train gift card? Not only

2. Which Christmas song

was first performed in

1818 and is the third bestselling

single of all time?

is it a practical gift, but it comes with the promise of an adventure. By leaving the

destination open-ended, the recipient gets to choose when, where and with whom to

take their next trip! [A]

Gift suggestions continue on page W8


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WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I HOLIDAY WISHBOOK I W3

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W4 I HOLIDAY WISHBOOK I

Santa

Santa’s Magical Kingdom opens on

Friday, Nov. 16 and runs nightly from

5:30-10:30 p.m., including all holidays,

through Jan. 6 at Yogi Bear’s Jellystone

Park, 5300 Fox Creek Road in Pacific. A

drive-through holiday light display featuring

animated scenes, special effects and

more than four million lights. Photos with

Santa, train and wagon rides, Kringle’s

General Store and the Stack Santa’s Sack

toy drive, sponsored by West Newsmagazine,

add to the holiday fun. Toys will be

donated to the Salvation Army. Admission

is $23 per vehicle. Admission for wagon

and train rides is $13 per person. For reservations,

call (636) 938-5925; visit Santas-

MagicalKingdom.com for details.

• • •

A Holiday Walk is from 10 a.m.-2:30

p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 17 at the Kirkwood

Train Station, 110 W. Argonne in

Kirkwood. Beginning at 9:30 a.m., there

will be activities for children, holiday

shopping, free entertainment and refreshments.

Santa and Mrs. Claus will arrive

by train to pose for photos. For details,

visit downtownkirkwood.com.

• • •

Holiday Festivities at St. Louis Premium

Outlets is from Nov. 19 through

Dec. 31 at St. Louis Premium Outlets,

18521 Outlet Blvd. in Chesterfield. Shoppers

visiting the center from 1-3 p.m. on

select weekends in December [Dec. 8, 9,

15, 16, 22 and 23] will be able to meet

with Old St. Nick and Mrs. Claus, who

will be strolling around the center handing

out candy canes and taking photos

with guests. For more information, visit

premiumoutlets.com/stlouis.

• • •

Eureka’s Holiday Tree Lighting celebration

is from 5-8 p.m. on Saturday,

Dec. 1 in Old Town Eureka on Central

Sightings

November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

Avenue. Attendees

can enjoy free children’s

activities, complimentary hot cocoa,

cookies, carolers and a special appearance

from Santa Claus.

• • •

Manchester’s Breakfast with Santa

is at 8:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. on Saturday,

Dec. 1 at the American Legion, 225

Old Sulphur Spring Road in Manchester.

This event typically sells out. Following

breakfast, children can share their

Christmas wish list with Santa. Cameras

are encouraged. Tickets must be

purchased in advance at

manchestermo.gov or at

the park office in Paul

A. Schroeder Park, 359

Old Meramec Station

Road. Children must

be accompanied by an

adult. Cost is $6 for nonresident

children; $7 for

non-resident adults. Discounts apply for

residents. Children under age 1 are free.

• • •

Town & Country’s Breakfast with

Santa is from 9-10:30 a.m. on Saturday,

Dec. 1 at Longview Farm House in

Longview Farm Park, 13525 Clayton Road

in Town & Country. Space is very limited.

Register online at town-and-country.org.

• • •

Cookies with Claus is from 9 a.m.-

noon on Saturday, Dec. 1 at The Lodge

Des Peres, 1050 Des Peres Road. Santa

will accept wish lists and smile for pictures.

Bring a camera. All children will

receive a special holiday cookie while

they last. This event is free; registration is

not required. For more information, visit

desperesmo.org.

• • •

Claus with Paws is from 1-3 p.m.

on Saturday, Dec. 1 at The Lodge Des

Peres, 1050 Des Peres Road. Bring your

well-behaved pet for a

picture with Santa

outside in front of

The Lodge. This

3. The original title of

this Christmas song

was “Carol of the Drum.”

What song is it?

event is free;

registration is

not required. Bring a

camera. Pets must be

kept on a leash. For

more information, visit

desperesmo.org.

• • •

Pizza with Santa is from

6:30-8 p.m. on Thursday, Dec.

6 and Friday, Dec. 7, and from 11:30

a.m.-1 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 8 at the

Wm. F. “Bud” Weber Community Center,

333 Bald Hill Road in Eureka. Kids can

enjoy pizza with Santa Claus, create holiday

crafts and sit on Santa’s lap. Bring a

camera. This event is free with the donation

of a non-perishable food item per

person. Space is limited; registration is

required. To register, visit The Timbers of

Eureka, 1 Coffee Park Lane.

• • •

Ellisville’s Breakfast with Santa

is from 9:30-10:30 a.m. on Saturday,

Dec. 8 at the Bluebird Park Administration

Building, 225 Kiefer Creek Road

in Ellisville. Kids are

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invited to breakfast,

crafts, music and pictures

with Santa. Cost is

$5 per person. Register

at ellisville.mo.us or by

calling (636) 227-7508.

• • •

The Say Cheese Wine

Trail is from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. on Saturday,

Dec. 8 and from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. on

Sunday, Dec. 9. The event is hosted

by seven wineries on the Hermann

Wine Trail. The Say Cheese Wine Trail

coincides with other holiday events

in Missouri Wine Country, including

Hermann’s popular Kristkindl Markt,

an Old-World holiday market. The

event costs $30 per person ticket price.

Advance purchase required. Includes a

souvenir wine glass. Tickets, menu and

more information can be found at HermannWineTrail.com,

or call the Hermann

Welcome Center at 800-932-8687.

• • •

Supper with Santa is from 5:30-7:30

p.m. on Fridays through Sundays, Dec.

14-16 and Dec. 21-23 at The Sophia M.

Sachs Butterfly House in Faust Park,

15193 Olive Blvd. in Chesterfield. Enjoy

a pasta dinner and take night strolls

through the Tropical Conservatory. Santa’s

workshop stations will offer children

the chance to make fun crafts, including

keepsake ornaments and act silly in the

photo booth. After dinner, visit Mrs.

Claus’s Cookie Kitchen for cookies and

hot cocoa. The event is free for children

12 months and under. For more information,

admission rates or to register, visit

missouribotanicalgarden.org.

• • •

Supper with Santa is from 5:30-7:30

p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 15 at The Pointe at

Ballwin Commons, 1 Ballwin Commons

Circle. Dinner will consist of pasta, salad

and rolls. The event features cookie decorating

and pictures with Santa. Registration

is required for all attending family

members. The VIP rate is $8; regular

registration is $10. Registration closes

Monday, Dec. 3. To register, call (636)

227-8950 or visit www.ballwin.mo.us

• • •

Santa and his elves bring North Pole

magic to Saint Charles’ Historic Main

Street at the annual St. Charles Christmas

Traditions festival, now through

Sunday, Dec. 24. Step inside the historic

Katy Depot in Frontier Park, 500 S. Riverside

Drive in St. Charles, to enter Santa’s

Cottage and Train Land. Have your

photo taken with Santa, visit with his

elves and explore the magic of Santa’s

Train Land courtesy of the Frenchtown

Heritage Museum.

• • •

Teddy Bear Tea from Around the

World is at 11:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m.

on Dec. 1, 2, 8, 9, 15, 16, 21, 22 and

23 at the Ritz-Carlton, 100 Carondelet

Plaza in St. Louis. The event features

storytelling, face painting, caroling, hot

cocoa, tea, sandwiches, pastries and a

festive teddy bear cookie decorating station.

Guests are encouraged to bring a

new teddy bear to donate to Friends of

Kids with Cancer. Admission is $55 for

adults; $45 for children ages 2-12. From

Dec. 14-16, visitors can stop by the front

drive for the Special Reindeer Weekend

and see Santa’s sleigh and Prancer the

reindeer. Official reindeer hours are 10

a.m.-4 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 14; and 9

a.m.-3:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 15 and

Sunday on Dec. 16.

• • •

Brunch with Santa is from 10 a.m.-1

p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 15 and Sunday,

Dec. 16 at The Ritz-Carlton, 100 Carondelet

Plaza in St. Louis. Santa and Mrs. Claus

will interact and visit with the guests over

brunch. Children can share their wish lists

with Santa, see his sleigh and meet Prancer

the reindeer. Admission is $69

for adults; $34.50 for children

ages 2-12.


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November 14, 2018

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I HOLIDAY WISHBOOK I W5

Gifts from the heart

By KATE UPTERGROVE

One of the best gifts of the holiday season –

whether you celebrate Christmas, Hanukkah or

Kwanzaa – is donating to a local nonprofit. You

can give to honor another or simply to more

fully embrace the spirit of the season.

It’s the perfect gift for the person who seems

to have everything or the recipient who says,

“You really shouldn’t have.” Often, “You really

shouldn’t have” actually means, “I don’t need

one more trinket to dust.”

But who can say no to helping a child in

need of medical care? St. Jude’s Hospital for

Children gets a lot of love this time of year,

but did you know that the children’s hospitals

in our own community also are nonprofits that

turn your gifts into critically needed research

and care?

What grandparent, parent, teacher or favorite

aunt or uncle wouldn’t want to be a Guardian

of Childhood? A donation in their name to St.

Louis Children’s Hospital can give them that

honorary title.

Food pantries such as The Harvey Kornblum

Jewish Food Pantry in Creve Coeur and Circle

Of Concern in Valley Park rely on the generosity

of the community to be able to provide food for

those in need 365 days a year. Circle of Concern

offers the opportunity to “adopt” a family and

purchase the gifts on someone else’s wish list.

It’s rewarding to imagine the joy that family will

feel opening those gifts, but the need does not

end when the holiday season does. A sustaining

gift can keep the holiday spirit alive all year long.

Are the kids begging for a puppy this Christmas?

Don’t shop. Adopt! Not only will it be a

Christmas to remember for the whole family, it

will be the best Christmas for your new fourlegged

companion.

Consider giving a gift that gives back, such

as a gift membership to the St. Louis Zoo, the

Science Center, the Missouri Botanical Garden

or the Sophia M. Sachs Butterfly House. These

are exceptional gifts for grandparents to give,

especially if those giving the gift are able to

enjoy the benefits of the membership with the

child or family who receives it.

One of the best gifts you can give someone

is your time. While the whole family is together

during the holidays, suggest taking a couple

hours out of the day and volunteering, or setting

up times to volunteer once a month.

The holiday season is so much more than

brightly wrapped packages under a tree, or the

glow of a menorah or a kinara. After all, Christmas,

Hanukkah and Kwanzaa are first and foremost

celebrations of community.

Gabriella

St. Louis Children’s

Hospital patient

your

gift

family

time

St. Louis Children’s Hospital is a not-for-profit hospital. Your contribution

supports groundbreaking research, exceptional pediatric care and health

outreach programs for kids throughout our community. Become a

Guardian of Childhood and donate today at StLouisChildrens.org/westnews.


W6 I HOLIDAY WISHBOOK I

November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

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Holiday Pet Safety 101

By JESSICA MESZAROS

Whether at home for the holidays, hitting

the road, or taking flight, pet owners

should take extra precautions to keep the

holidays safe and jolly for their four-legged

companions.

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(314) 772-8898

Visit us at www.charliegittos.com

Follow us on Facebook.

St. Louis’ Favorite

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A first class dining experience your guest will never forget!

Perfect for corporate events, wedding

rehersal dinners and family celebrations.

For a memorable event at the site of your

choice. Allow us to be your full service caterer.

We provide it all - experienced wait personnel,

food, flatware, service ware, full bar selections

plus tasteful decorative appointments.

When you need a little Charlie Gitto’s

delivered to your site. This affordable

menu offers options to feed 10 or

more people.

11776 Manchester Rd.

Des Peres, MO 63131

(1 mile east of I-270)

Phone: 314.984.0040

www.glennbetzjewelers.com

Make Your

Reservations Today!

At Hollywood Casino

777 Casino Center Dr.

Maryland Heights

(314) 770-7663

HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS

• Make sure any tree, real or faux, is secure

in its base so a pet cannot knock it over.

• Cover the tree’s water

basin and clean up

debris. Tree water and

fallen tree needles can

be harmful if ingested.

Tinsel, ornaments and

glittery objects can be

tempting and dangerous

for pets. Also, plastic

bags can become

a strangulation hazard,

and smaller decorations

like confetti may

require surgery for removal.

• Beware of your festive plants. According

to the American Society for the Prevention of

Cruelty to Animals [ASPCA], some seasonal

plants such as holly and mistletoe are not

safe for pets to ingest. Pet owners should

consider plastic or silk plants as safe alternatives.

• Keep electrical accessories such as wires,

batteries and light bulbs out of reach.

• According to the ASPCA, leftover bones or

table scraps that contain spicy or salty seasonings

should not be fed to any pet. Gristle

and fat can cause pets gastrointestinal distress,

and smaller bones can

cause choking.

• Don’t leave alcoholic beverages

unsupervised. Thirsty

pets do not know the difference

between “virgin” and

“spiked”!

• If you’re hosting for the

holidays, be sure to provide

a quiet space for your pet that includes a

pet bed, toys, litter box, fresh food and water.

Also, be sure your pets get some outdoor

time during the busy holiday season.

HITTING THE ROAD

• For longer holiday trips, prepare your pet

in advance by taking them on short drives,

gradually lengthening time spent in the car

with each trip. If you’re traveling across state

lines, bring along your pet’s vaccination

records. Some states require this.

• Always use a well-ventilated crate carrier

large enough for your pet to stand, sit, lie

down and turn around inside comfortably

4. A poem called

“The Manger Throne”

is the basis for

which carol?

when traveling. The crate should be secured

so it will not slide around or turn over in the

vehicle.

• Go over the checklist. Do you have food,

a leash if applicable, a water

bowl, waste bags, a first-aid

kit, any medication your pet

requires, travel documents,

etc.? To make your pet feel

more at home, pack a favorite

toy or blanket for the ride.

Avoid feeding your pet in a

moving vehicle as that can

cause nausea and choking. According to

the ASPCA, a travel-feeding schedule should

start with a light meal three to four hours

prior to departure. Bottled water is a safe

drinking alternative, as water from unfamiliar

areas can cause illness.

• Never leave a pet in a parked vehicle.

While animals and humans can suffer from

heatstroke in hot cars in the warmer months,

a car can act as a refrigerator in the winter by

insulating the cold and causing pets to suffer

from hypothermia.

For tips on flying with four-legged friends and

more information, visit westnewsmagazine.com


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Diamond Sponsors:

The Ste. Genevieve Municipal Band

Ste. Genevieve County Community Foundation

C.R.

Schweiss HVAC

Frank

& Plumbing

Popcorn & Supply

Le Techniques

Co.

Need a Last Minute Holiday Gift?

Stella & Me

White Cliff Manor

Give The Gift of Good Taste!

Gourmet

Popcorn

Tins Made

to Order

Platinum Sponsors:

Somewhere Inn Time

Gold Sponsors:

Rotary International

Citizens Electric

Mississippi Lime

L’Hoist North America

First Bank of Ste. Genevieve

The Ste. Genevieve Art Guild

Barley Automotive

In Memory of Denny, Denny Mike & Douglas Ramsey

GFWC Woman’s Club of Ste. Genevieve

Ste. Genevieve Museum Learning Center

MRV Bank

Steiger Jewelers, Inc.

Sirro’s

Treasured Memories

Myers Shoe Store

The Clip Joint

Megan Wade State Farm Ins. Co.

The County Do It Center

The Anvil

Odiles Linens & Lace, Etc.

Sweet Things Sweet Shop

Traden Post

Rosies Posies

Only Child Originals

Sandra S. Cabot

Mid-West Marketing

Rozier Ste. Genevieve Country Mart

Knights of Columbus, Council 1037

ASL Pewter

First Settlement Country Store

The Southern Hotel

Oberle Meats

Cotton’s Ace Hardware

Beanik Café and Pastry

High Caliber Graphics

Laurie A. Ebeling Ins. Agency, Inc.

Eden Farms

Loida Family Dentistry

Edward Jones-Matthew G. Trautman

Café Genevieve

Al’s Auto Body

Knights of Columbus Council 1037

Dr. Niranjana Raju, M.D.

Robert & Linda Mueller

Queen Anne’s Lace Boutique

Rhinehart & Rhinehart’s Gallery

Stuppy Auto Sales

Silver Sponsors:

The Ste. Genevieve

County

Lions Club

Annette and Frank Rolfe

European Entitlements

Daily Journal, St. Francois Co.

Audubon’s Grill and Bar

Bloomsdale Bank

CSA Advisors LLC

The Ste. Genevieve Herald

The Welcome Center

Equipment Pro, Inc.

Bob and Judy Gustafson

The Mattress Store

Show Me Shop

The Kozy/Dew Drop Inn

Douglas Apiary LLC

Ellie Douglas

Simple to Sassy Décor & More

Good News Community Church

Deb Says Sew

Women’s Int. Network of Utility Prof.

Quality Muffler

The Prism Hair

The 109 North Main Art Gallery

Watertower Winery

Downtown Ste. Genevieve

Martin Toma

HSB Advisors

James and Mary Beth Ferguson

Shelter Insurance-Steve Plati

Ste. Genevieve Vision Care

Dairy Queen

Old

Fashioned

Carmel Corn

Cheese Corn

Kettle Corn

Butter Corn

and our new

“Chicago

Mixture”

Marzuco Electric

Jack and Mickey Koetting

Donna Marler

Old Brick House

J Rissover Art & Graphic Design

Karl Kinskey

Tim Inman

Foundation for Restoration of Ste. Genevieve

Rage Hair Studio

Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War –

St. James Camp #326

John & Vernetta Heil-Orem

Donna Rausch

Wolk’s Insurance & Financial Services

Hardin & Schaefer, P.C.

Ernie Weiler Farm Bureau Insurance

Chelsi Montgomery

Dick’s Computer Repair

C. Diane R. & Wade Frank Wilson Popcorn & The Supply Type Inn Air B&BCo.

Basler Funeral Home

The Yellow Cottage Air B&B

Conveniently located 1 mile north of Hwy. 70 & Lindbergh at 5757 N. Lindbergh

Gray Hawk Fitness

314-731-4500 or 1-800-467-2653

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR - ANNETTE ROLFE

Mon-Fri: 8am-4:30pm • We Ship Anywhere

For more information www.CRFrankPopcorn.com

contact The Welcome Center 800-373-7007.

Thanks to the Community of Ste. Genevieve and the Chamber of Commerce.

November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I HOLIDAY WISHBOOK I W7

34th ANNUAL

Holiday

Christmas

Festival

in Ste. Genevieve

Bring the Entire Family!

• Free Parade

• Free Concerts

• Free Shuttle rides

• Free Photos with Santa

• See Schedule at VisitSteGen.com

Weekend highlights include:

Southeast Chamber Choir

Southeast Missouri String Quartet

The Isaac Lausell Jazz Trio

Adele Martin and Bluesette

Pipe Organ Concert

Children’s Christmas Crafts

Demonstrations and Holiday Open Houses

Christmas Tree Lighting & Carols

Art Guild Art Show and Sale

Saturday,

December 8, 2018

Sunday,

December 9, 2018

Historic District highlights:

Historic Sites & Museums

Galleries, shops & boutiques

Restaurants & Wine Tasting

Welcome Center open daily

Free parking!


W8 I HOLIDAY WISHBOOK I

Gift suggestions continued from page W2

Made in Missouri

Handmade, locally sourced, artisan –

shop local and give a gift you can’t

find in the big box stores.

Jewelry

Check your local boutiques for unique jewelry

finds such as a stack of Erimish bracelets. The

brand was started here in Missouri by two sisters.

Sometimes, the story behind local pieces is

just as beautiful as the piece itself. [J]

November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

5. This Christmas song

was originally written

for Thanksgiving. It

also was the first song

broadcast from space.

What is it?

A B C

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Wine

If you haven’t seen Missouri wine country, you’re missing

out. And if you haven’t tasted Missouri wine country, you’re

missing out even more! Treat

your age 21-plus loved ones to

6. The band Three Dog

Night covered this Christmas

song and turned it

into a No. 1 hit in 1971.

Which song is it?

a bottle of wine and pair it with

personalized wine glasses for a

special touch. [H]

Candles

Hand-crafted soy candles are

all the rage. Visit your local

farmer’s market or holiday

craft fair and you’re likely to

find them. Take it one step further and gift your out-of-town

loved one with a Missouri-scented candle – yes, it’s a real

thing. Variations can be found at HomesickCandles.com or

on Etsy.com. [D]

E

F

Body care items

While perusing the farmer’s market and holiday

craft fairs, stock up on locally made care

and relaxation items such as soaps, scrubs, bath

bombs, face masks and lotions. They make perfect

stocking stuffers, Secret Santa game contributions

or work gifts. [B]

7. Which Christmas

song was written by

Charles Wesley in

1739?

Clothing

The perfect gift for someone old or young, male or female

is a Missouri-themed clothing item. From favorite sports teams

to a state of Missouri design, to more niche items showcasing

specific cities or neighborhoods

8. It took composer John

Frederick Coots about 10

minutes to come up with

the music for this Christmas

song in 1934. The day after

it debuted on a radio show,

100,000 orders for the sheet

music were received.

Which song is it?

– local clothing brands have an

array of designs in the form of

tees, hoodies, hats, onesies and

more. [O]

Books

Support Missouri’s authors

and knock out your Christmas

shopping in one fell swoop.

From beautiful hardcover

books showcasing the state’s

history through photos, to children’s

books with exquisite

illustrations, to biographies on

native Missourians – people

will want to display these gems in their bookcases and on

their coffee tables. Local bookstores are the best place to find

local authors. [M]

I

L


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November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I HOLIDAY WISHBOOK I W9

Something for everyone

A smattering of ideas for those on your list

from young to old.

D

Camera

Looking ahead at what’s to come in 2019, make sure your

loved one doesn’t miss a moment. For high-definition memories

that will never fade, invest in a quality

camera. For the teens and young

adults on your list, consider a fun

Polaroid camera complete with the

old-school film – vintage is in! [C]

9. Which Christmas song

was inspired by the

Cuban Missile Crisis?

G

H

Games

There’s nothing quite like a good, old-fashioned board game.

Though cellphones are providing more and more entertainment

options, there’s no shortage of new board and card games out

there for the whole family. [F]

Thinking outside of the box

There is quite literally a subscription box for everything these

days. Dinner? It’s served. Work clothes? Athletic attire? Done

and done. Pet treats and toys? Purrfect. Adventures to discover?

You bet. You can get subscription boxes for neck ties, shaving

supplies, handbags, stationary, beauty essentials, snacks, vitamins,

books, kids’ toys and so much more. Talk about a superfun,

“out-of-the-box” gift! [E, N]

Wireless speaker system

Wireless home speaker systems such as Amazon Alexa and

Google Home are becoming more and more popular. Not only

do they work hands-free and on command, but they also can do

things such as control your lights or order you another package

of paper towels. [A]

J

K

10. Which Christmas

song is also known

as “The Quest of

the Magi”?

Something personal

Spice up any gift by adding a personalized touch to it, such as

an embroidered name or monogram. This can be added to purses,

shirts, baby clothes, pajamas, wine glasses, tumblers,

etc. Or, consider surprising your loved one

by having a hand-crafted scrapbook professionally

made with their photos and memories displayed in

chronological order. [G]

Something for their favorite hobby

There are all kinds of cutting-edge accessories

out there to suit people’s hobbies. Give them a gift to show you

recognize their interests. For example, for the yoga-lover in you

family, consider Yoga Paws, gripped socks and gloves that take

the place of a yoga mat. They’re perfect for yoga on the go! [K]

M

N

O

An instrument

For the right-brained person in your life, “wow” them with a

cutting-edge instrument like the Jammy. The Jammy is a portable

electric guitar that can be taken on the go, easily fitting into backpacks

or a carry-on bag. No more clunky guitar cases! [I]

Their own personal domain

Imagine the kids waking up on Christmas morning and being

stunned when they look out the window. Give them the jungle

gym of their dreams. A castle, pirate ship or space shuttle… a

place where their imaginations can run wild through endless

hours of fun. [L]


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November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I HOLIDAY WISHBOOK I W11

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W12 I HOLIDAY WISHBOOK I

November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

@WESTNEWSMAG

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

American Holiday Traditions: Where do they come from?

By ELLEN LAMPE

• Breaking the wishbone

The wishbone is a forked bone located

between the neck and breast of a bird.

Have you ever wondered why breaking

this odd bone is such a

classic Thanksgiving

tradition?

The origins

date back to the

Ancient Romans,

who saw the wishbone

as a symbol of

luck. They believed birds

were oracles who could predict the future,

and that saving the wishbone allowed

people access to the chicken’s powers

even after its death.

A chicken wishbone would be snapped

apart by two people while they were each

making a wish. The person holding the

longer piece was said to have their wish

granted.

The Romans brought the tradition to

the English, who referred to it as “merrythought.”

The tradition eventually

made its way overseas to America, where,

instead of chickens, Pilgrims broke the

wishbones of plentiful wild turkeys.

Americans were the ones to coin to the

term “wishbone” in the 1800s, around the

time President Abraham Lincoln declared

Thanksgiving a national holiday.

• Pumpkin everything

Pumpkins are native

to North America,

which explains the

pumpkin craze

here. However,

pumpkins were

not always such a

beloved commodity.

Pumpkins were plentiful

in colonial America, yet they were

viewed as a last-resort food option. Settlers

from Europe were unfamiliar with

pumpkins and found them unappetizing.

As time went on,

however, people began

experimenting with this

abundant fruit and it

began to grow on people.

A seasonal fruit, pumpkins

became synonymous

with autumn, as well as a nostalgic

symbol of America’s beginnings. Now,

with endless pumpkin-spice flavors and

scents, pumpkin décor and annual pumpkin

patch outings, pumpkins have made

one of the greatest comebacks

of all time.

• Black Friday

Likely, you either love it or

you hate it; but it’s undeniable

that Black Friday has become

nothing short of an American

phenomenon.

While there are several tales behind the

day, the commonly told history behind

Black Friday has to do with accounting.

Businesses operating at a loss are in the

“red;” while businesses earning a profit are

in the “black.” With the day after Thanksgiving

being a popular time for holiday

shopping, the heavy sales would put businesses

from in the red to back

in the black.

Unsurprisingly, businesses

saw immense value in this day,

and began opening their doors

earlier and earlier and hosting

blowout sales.

The one-day bonanza now has

turned into a four-day event, including

Small Business Saturday and Sunday and

Cyber Monday.

• Christmas lights

Did you know the first electric Christmas

lights appeared in America?

In the late 1800s, Edward H.

Johnson – Thomas Edison’s

friend and business

partner in Edison’s Illumination

Company – had the idea

to use string lights to decorate his

Christmas tree. Up until then, real candles

were used to illuminate trees, posing

a major fire hazard. Johnson’s high-tech

glowing tree mesmerized those who

passed by his New York City residence.

Years later, in 1895, President Grover

Cleveland introduced the first electrically

lit Christmas tree into the White House.

However, this new-fangled trend was

still reserved for wealthier folks, as string

lights were hard to come by and considered

highly advanced.

In 1903, the first pre-assembled kits of

Christmas lights hit the market and the

rest was history.

So, when you’re out looking at homes’

holiday lights this season, or decorating

your own house and tree, you can thank

Thomas Edison and Edward H. Johnson

for the novel idea!

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November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I HOLIDAY WISHBOOK I W13

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W14 I HOLIDAY WISHBOOK I

November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

@WESTNEWSMAG

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

Talking Turkey

Turkeys tend to have a bad reputation

for being dry unless they’re basted

or brined. Here are a few tricks to keep

your bird moist with little to no fuss:

Start fresh. Fresh turkeys will cook

faster and hold moisture better. Ice crystals

are the culprit. In frozen meat, they

cause cell damage that results in fluid

loss [aka dry turkey].

Thaw thoroughly. If you can’t buy

fresh, make sure you do thaw your bird

thoroughly. The USDA recommends

thawing your turkey in the refrigerator

to keep it at a consistent, safe temperature.

But this method takes time – about

one day for every four to five pounds of

meat. A 16-pound turkey will take about

four days to thaw. You also can thaw

your bird, in its original wrapping, fully

submerged in a sink or bucket filled

with cool water. This method takes time,

about eight hours for a 16-pound bird,

and attention. The water must be kept

consistently cool, which means changing

it about every 20 to 30 minutes.

Go small. Yes, a big bird looks impressive

as the centerpiece of a Thanksgiving

or Christmas dinner, but smaller is

better if you want a truly tasty turkey. A

16- to 20-pound turkey is ideal. But if

you’re feeding more than 10 to 12 people,

you’re going to need more turkey. Plan

on about 1.5 pounds per person, plus a

little extra for leftovers.

Don’t stuff. Unstuffed turkeys cook

more evenly.

By KATE UPTERGROVE

Do fill. Do loosely fill the turkey’s

cavity with aromatic vegetables

and [here’s a moisture trick]

an orange. Yes, you read that right.

A quartered orange inside the cavity

of a turkey releases moisture as it

cooks. As long as you stick to one

orange – and balance it out with a

similarly sized and quartered onion, a

few cloves of garlic [crushed to release

their flavor] and herbs such as fresh

Rosemary – you won’t taste the orange

in your turkey.

Cook upside down. For the first 40

minutes, try roasting your turkey breastside

down in a v-shaped roasting rack.

Then, flip the bird breast-side up. But be

careful; flipping a hot turkey with hot

vegetables inside is tricky.

Christmas Crossword answers

from page W11:

1. Mitten, 2. Present, 3. Bear, 4. Star,

5. [across] Snowflake, 5. [down] Santa,

6. Fireplace, 7. Cookies, 8. Snowman,

9. Tree, 10. Hat, 11. Bell, 12. Candle

Don’t overcook. Roasting time should

be about 15 minutes per pound in a 350ºF

oven, or until the bird reaches an internal

temperature of 165º. To test doneness,

use a meat thermometer inserted into the

thickest part of the breast.

Let it rest. Experts at the Food Network

suggest tenting the bird with foil

and letting it rest for about 25 minutes

before carving, or up to an hour without

tenting if you need time to finish

the side dishes.

With the turkey in the oven, it’s time to talk sides and, of course, dessert.

Here are three new takes on classic holiday fare.

MAPLE-SRIRACHA CARROT MEDLEY

[Courtesy of Dierbergs Cooking School]

Serves: 8

2 medium sweet potatoes [about 1 1/4 pounds], peeled and

cut into 3/4-inch cubes

1 carton [18 ounces] cubed butternut squash

1 pound carrots, peeled and cut diagonally into 1/2-inch pieces

3 tablespoons Dierbergs olive oil

1 1/2 teaspoons coarse salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

3 tablespoons pure maple syrup

2 to 3 teaspoons sriracha hot chili sauce

• Preheat over to 375ºF.

• Divide veggies between two foil-lined jellyroll

pans that have been lightly coated with no-stick cooking

spray. Drizzle olive oil over top and season with

salt and pepper; toss until well mixed. Arrange veggies

in single layer.

• Roast in oven stirring once until veggies are

tender, about 30 to 35 minutes. Place in serving bowl.

• In small bowl, stir together maple syrup and sriracha;

drizzle over veggies and toss until well mixed.

ROASTED BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH SAUSAGE

[Courtesy of Whole Foods Market]

Serves: 8

1 1/2 pound Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved lengthwise

if large

3/4 pound bulk pork or turkey sausage [Italian, sage, country

or breakfast]

3/4 teaspoon coarse sea salt

1/2 cup pecan halves, toasted and chopped

2 tablespoons chopped mixed fresh herbs [any

combination of parsley, sage, chives and oregano]

• Preheat the oven to 400˚F.

• On a large rimmed baking sheet,

combine Brussels sprouts, sausage and

salt and mix well, breaking up clumps

of sausage.

• Roast, stirring every 10 minutes, until

sausage is browned and cooked through

and sprouts are tender and crisped on the

outside, about 40 minutes.

• Transfer to a bowl and top with toasted

pecans* and herbs.

Whole Latte Love

Roasted Brussels Sprouts

with Sausage

Quizzmas Carol answers:

1. “O Holy Night”

2. “Silent Night”

3. “The Little Drummer Boy”

4. “What Child is This?”

5. “Jingle Bells”

6. “Joy to the World”

7. “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing”

8. “Santa Claus Is Coming to Town”

9. “Do You Hear What I Hear?”

10. “We Three Kings”

WHOLE LATTE LOVE

[Courtesy of Schnucks Cooking School]

Start to finish: 70 minutes

Serves: 12

3 10.75-ounce pound cakes, thawed and cut into

1-inch cubes

7 large Schnucks eggs, beaten

1 cup Schnucks pumpkin puree

3/4 cup heavy cream

1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice

1 cup powdered sugar

3 tablespoons prepared espresso or dark-roast

coffee, cooled

• Preheat oven to 350ºF. In a 9-by-13-inch baking

dish, bake cake cubes for 10-15 minutes, until dry.

• In a large bowl, mix eggs, pumpkin puree,

cream and pumpkin pie spice until combined.

Add cake cubes and gently toss until evenly

coated. Let rest 10 minutes.

• Wipe baking dish clean and spray with nonstick

cooking spray. Evenly spread mixture into

pan. Bake 25-30 minutes until egg is set and top

is slightly crisp.

• Mix powdered sugar with espresso and stir

until combined. Drizzle glaze over top and serve

immediately.

Maple-Sriracha Carrot Medley

* How to toast pecans

• Preheat oven to 350ºF

• Lightly spritz baking sheet

with cooking spray.

• Place a single layer of

pecans on the baking sheet

and toast them about 5 minutes,

or just until they become

aromatic. Keep a careful

watch on them, as they can

scorch easily.


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WWW.UNIQUEHEATINGCOOLING.COM

November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I SCHOOLS I 13

[Left to right] Hanna Woods Elementary Principal Kristy Roberts and Assistant

Principal Debbie Reid agreed to be duct taped to a wall as a reward for their

students, who collected 1,200 cans of food for Parkway’s food pantry.

bulletin

board

By BONNIE KRUEGER

Sticking it to the principals

The principals at Hanna Woods Elementary

found themselves in a “sticky” situation

last month. Principal Kristy Roberts

and Assistant Principal Debbie Reid were

duct taped to a wall.

The stunt was a reward for their students,

who collected 1,200 cans of food for Parkway’s

food pantry, more than doubling

their 500-can goal over a two-week period.

Two second-grade classes collected the

most cans and won the honor of duct taping

their principals to a wall on Friday, Oct. 26.

Roberts said, “I am really proud of our

students and families for going above and

beyond for our district food pantry and helping

those in need. It shows what a caring

community we have at Hanna Woods!”

Roberts noted that this was the first time

she was duct taped to a wall and said it was

actually fun. It took about 12 rolls of duct

tape for the two principals to stay on the wall.

Outstanding youth leader

Whitfield School senior Finn Murphy

recently was recognized as a St. Louis

County Outstanding Youth Leader. The

Outstanding Student Leadership program

provides training

and recognition to youth

in St. Louis County, assisting

them with development

of the skills needed

to be effective leaders and

citizens. One senior from

each county high school is

nominated annually by his

or her principal for participation

in a leadership

conference and recognition

ceremony.

Murphy

Girls take flight

More than 100 young women from 15

bi-state area high schools learned about

future careers in aviation as they participated

in the first-ever Girls in Aviation Day

at St. Louis Downtown Airport in Cahokia,

Illinois. Local schools that participated in

Girls in Aviation Day included Parkway

North High, Parkway South High, Westminster

Christian Academy and Villa

Duchesne.

The high school students flew planes in

high-tech simulators and climbed into the

cockpits of various aircraft for an overview

of the instrumentation. Saint Louis

University’s Parks College of Engineering,

Aviation and Technology – in partnership

with Women in Aviation International

[WAI] – hosted the first of what they hope

will become an annual event.

In addition to the hands-on activities, the

event featured a career expo, where the

students had the opportunity to talk with

representatives from more than a dozen

companies and organizations in the aviation

industry about various job opportunities

and the paths to take to secure those

types of positions.

To learn more about Girls in Aviation,

contact Rachel Rimmerman via email at

parksevents@slu.edu.

Giving back through reading

Assistance League of St. Louis volunteer

Mindy Hellmich, a resident of Manchester

and retired Parkway reading specialist,

was one of the 20 book fair volunteers at

Airport Elementary.

Each of the 225 students

of the Ferguson-Florissant

District chose two new

books and received a

bookmark. Other activities

included a puppet show,

classroom readings and

sign language instruction.

Barnes & Noble contributed

thousands of new

books and some financial

support for this program.

During the 2017-18 service

years, the Assistance

League’s Books From Friends Program

held book fairs in elementary and middle

schools throughout St. Louis city and

Manchester resident Mindy Hellmich poses

with a new friend from Airport Elementary.

county and provided 12,000 books to

aspiring readers.

Speaking out against

underage gambling

The Missouri Gaming Association, the

statewide professional association of the

Missouri casino industry, is inviting high

school seniors to enter the 23rd annual

Project 21 scholarship competition. This

year, one $2,500 first-prize scholarship and

three $1,500 second-prize scholarships

will be awarded.

Students must write and publish an original

essay or article in the school newspaper,

or create a poster or video. Entries must be

published or displayed at the student’s high

school for at least one full week between

Dec.1 and Feb. 15, 2019. The deadline for

submitting Project 21 scholarship entries

to the Missouri Gaming Association is

March 1, 2019. The scholarship application

and guidelines are available for

download at missouricasinos.org or bit.ly/

MGA-2019-Project21.

Calling all young adult thespians

Local young actors are invited to compete

in the National Society of Arts and

Letters [NSAL] 2019 Chapter Drama

Competition. NSAL, a nonprofit organization

that recognizes and supports

talented, young, emerging artists, invites

individuals between the ages of 18 and 27

who live or go to college within the NSAL

Saint Louis Chapter region of Missouri,

southern Iowa, Kansas and southern Illinois

to apply.

Contestants will perform for a panel of

top-ranked professional judges at the NSAL

Chapter Drama Competition on March 16

at Webster University in St. Louis. NSAL

encourages contestants to start planning

early as they must present two audition

monologues from memory, including a

comedic and serious piece.

For more information or to view the

2019 NSAL Saint Louis Chapter Drama

Competition application form, rules and

performance requirements, visit nsalstl.

org/competitions. The application deadline

is March 1.


14 I SPORTS I

November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

@WESTNEWSMAG

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

Ranked in all ten

pediatric specialties!

215470_SLC_NewsWest_10x2.indd 1

8/7/18 2:34 PM

sports

briefs

High school girls tennis

Sophomore Erin Reynolds made history

for The Fulton School at St. Albans girls

tennis program.

Reynolds won the recent Class 1 District

7 singles tennis championship. She defeated

St. Dominic’s Abbi Worster 6-2, 6-3.

The championship marked the first time

in The Fulton School’s history that a student

has won a district singles title.

Reynolds noted she did not anticipate

winning the district.

“I was expecting and hoping to get

second place so I could move on to sectionals

but it seemed unlikely after I started

off losing the first set of my first match,”

Reynolds said.

She has a history of competing against

Worster.

“I have played Abbi Worster in nonschool

tournaments and we have always

gone back and forth,” Reynolds said.

“Sometimes I win and sometimes she wins.

However, my partner and I lost to her in

doubles during team districts.”

But in the singles match with Worster, it

was different. Reynolds prevailed.

“I started off winning and my momentum

just kept going,” Reynolds said. “I took it

The Fulton School at St. Albans Eagles celebrate their

second-place District 7 tennis tournament finish.

one point at a time and focused on placing

the ball in difficult positions for her on the

court.”

When Reynolds won the match point, her

emotions ran the gamut.

“I was shocked and elated when I won,”

Reynolds said. “I couldn’t believe it. I

immediately hugged my coach, parents

and teammates. I couldn’t stop smiling for

hours.”

The bonus came when she discovered

she was the first-ever athlete from The

Fulton School to win a district title.

“Finding out I made history just made

me even more excited,” Reynolds said. “I

never thought this would happen and even

though I come from a small school, it was

a huge accomplishment for me.”

Reynolds’ postseason run came to an end

in the Sectional 4 tournament. She lost to

Helias Catholic High’s [in Jefferson City]

Catherine Conley 6-0, 6-0. The loss eliminated

her from further play.

“Catherine Conley is the only person that

beat me in the regular season, so I was not

looking forward to that match,” Reynolds

said. “I played my best game and, unfortunately,

the score doesn’t reflect our longand

hard-fought points. Catherine simply

made fewer errors than I did and that

caused me to lose.”

Reynolds finished with a 10-1 record in

singles play.

“I am pretty happy with my season,”

Reynolds said. “I was hoping to make it to

state but I have two more years and that is

my goal for the future.”

Her team did well in the district, too. The

Fulton School at St. Albans Eagles finished

second in the District 7 tournament.

The Eagles defeated St. Charles 5-2 in

the semifinals. In the championship match,

The Fulton School fell 5-0 to St. Dominic.

High school hockey

The CBC Cadets won the Top Hat Classic

Fall Tournament held by the Webster

Groves hockey program. The preseason

tournament featured 12 teams.

The Cadets won the Bow Tie Division

of the Orange Conference. CBC defeated

Francis Howell 8-1, De Smet Jesuit 1-0

and Kirkwood 5-0. CBC got past Oakville

5-4 in a shootout that took eight rounds.

In the semifinals, CBC faced Kirkwood

and scored a 5-1 victory.

CBC captured the championship with a

2-0 victory over Vianney.

High school girls volleyball

Another district tournament, another

championship for the Lafayette Lancers

girls volleyball team.

Lafayette defeated rival Marquette 19-25,

25-13, 25-15 to claim the Class 4 District

3 championship played at Parkway South.

That makes 12 consecutive district titles for

the Lancers. The past 11 have come under

coach Zach Young.

“It’s really incredible when you consider

the great teams and coaches we’ve faced

the past 12 years,” Young said. “We’ve had

some amazing players and parents over that

Lafayette Lancers girls volleyball, District 3 champions

stretch of time. When you get a team of

great players and parents along with some

of the best assistant coaches around, you’ll

have a chance each year to do great things.”

Young acknowledged there was some

pressure on his team considering their tremendous

success in recent years.

“Anytime you’re the favorite in a tournament,

there’s some pressure,” Young said.

“However, we just focused on taking it one

point at a time.”

Lafayette defeated Parkway Central

25-10, 25-12 in the semifinal. It was a good

showing by the Lancers.

“We were very consistent during the

semifinal against a very well-coached

Parkway Central team,” Young said.

During the regular season, Lafayette

defeated the Mustangs. Then, they met

again for the district title.

“Marquette has a great team and we

knew it would be a tough match,” Young

said. “They were really good the first set

and didn’t make hardly any errors. The

second two sets, I thought our serving and

defense really picked up. Our seniors Natalie

Lenoard, Ava Mitchell, Staciana Stock

and Lauren Willis did a phenomenal job

leading our team during districts – just as

they have done all season.”

Stock led Lafayette with 22 kills in the

two district matches while Allison Beaton

and Brooke Borgmeyer each had 11 kills.

Shannon McLain had 46 assists. Lenoard

had 19 digs.

• • •

The Incarnate Word Academy volleyball

team now owns a Missouri state record.


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WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I SPORTS I 15

The Red Knights defeated Orchard Farm

25-13, 25-8 to snare the Class 3 District 6

championship played at St. Charles High.

It was the 35th district championship

for the Red Knights, the most in state history.

Incarnate Word had shared the mark

with Santa Fe High [in Alma, Missouri]

at 34. The Chiefs did not win their district

this year, so Incarnate World took the state

record.

The Red Knights defeated Visitation

Academy 25-17, 25-22 in the sectional

round. However, Incarnate Word’s season

came to an end when St. Francis Borgia

earned a 25-13, 27-29, 25-18 victory over

the Red Knights in the quarterfinal match

that was played at Visitation.

Incarnate Word ended its season with a

26-10 record.

High school girls cross country

The Parkway West girls cross country

team won its district race. The Longhorns

finished first with 69 points, just ahead of

Eureka’s 72 points. The team advanced to

sectionals, where they took home the title.

Longhorns coach Charlie Cutelli said his

team was not overconfident heading into

the Class 4 Sectional 1 meet at Big Driver

in Washington, Missouri.

Parkway West took first with 49 points.

It was the eighth sectional title for the

Longhorns.

“We have won the sectional the last three

years, which is quite the accomplishment,”

Cutelli said.

Senior Chloe Hershenow came in third

in 19 minutes, 43.53 seconds to lead Parkway

West. Senior Claire Smout came in

11th in 20:06.89 and sophomore Leah Selm

was 12th in 20:08.78. Kate Yates was 17th

in 20:15.95 and junior Emma Caplinger

was 36th in 20:46.64.

“They were excited,” Cutelli said about

this team after the sectional win. “Districts

and sectionals are so high-strung as you

have to finish top four as a team to move on.

Although we felt confident going into both

meets, you never know what can happen.”

High school boys cross country

The Lafayette Lancers’ boys cross country

team finished first in the Class 4 Sectional

1 meet at Big Driver in Washington,

Missouri.

The Lancers won with 47 points. The

team finished third in the District 2 meet.

The sectional victory surprised his team,

Lafayette coach Sean O’Connor said.

“We did not expect to win since both

Kirkwood and SLUH had beat us several

times throughout the year,” O’Connor said.

“They were happy of the result [at districts]

because of the quality of teams at the meet,

but they also knew they could do better.”

The Lancers were led by Aiden Murphy.

The junior finished fourth in 16 minutes,

40.16 seconds. In fifth place was senior

Harrison Brown in 16:44.97. In sixth

place was senior Michael Nicholson in

16:50.09. Junior Alex McMillen was 16th

in 17:02.48. Senior Michael Atteberry was

28th in 17:12.73.

High school boys soccer

The Whitfield Warriors and coach

Michael Quante overcame not having

a home field on which to practice and

play this season. Whitfield made it to the

post-season. The resilient team lost to St.

Charles West in overtime in the

sectionals on Oct. 30.

The PGA Championship,

held at Bellerive Country Club

in August, took over Whitfield

School’s facilities as the school

is located across Ladue Road

from the country club.

The boys soccer program lost

its home field because media

trucks for the golf tournament

were parked on the Whitfield

soccer field. The turf was ripped

up earlier this summer to make

way for network TV operations.

Whitfield boys soccer

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16 I COVER STORY I

November 14, 2018

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The Art of Sobriety

Nonprofit helps teens, young adults

creatively battle addiction

By JESSICA MESZAROS

Trading drugs and alcohol for paintbrushes

and musical instruments – that’s

what one local organization is encouraging

in its fight to stem the tide of teenage substance

abuse and self-harm.

Kathie Thomas, a Chesterfield resident

and innovation business consultant, is

the founder and president of Hope Creates.

The nonprofit arts program was created

to help local teens and young adults

obtain sobriety and recovery by providing

them with creative opportunities, including

painting, improvisational theater, tie-dye,

pottery, fiber artistry, music and more.

“If you’re going to take drugs, cutting or

alcohol away from a kid, and that’s the only

thing that made them feel like they had any

control over their life or their world or their

pain, then you have to give them something

back,” Thomas said.

Through Hope Creates, teens and young

adults create original works of art, receive

one-on-one coaching and then participate

in gallery shows and concerts across the

community. Recently, the nonprofit held

its third annual “Don’t Quit Before The

Miracle: An Expressive Arts Exhibition”

on Oct. 21 at .ZACK, the Kranzberg Arts

Foundation’s multi-use arts facility.

Each participant must be one year sober

to showcase their work – though they can

participate in creation events at any time

during their sobriety. Pieces at the exhibition

are priced for individual sale with the funds

going toward future Hope Creates events.

“It’s a program that gives kids experience

as both artists and entrepreneurs,” Thomas

said. “It pretty much pays for itself, but the

goal isn’t so much the revenue generation

as it is the programming, the experiences

and the realizations of self-worth, value

and a sense of pride.”

The positive feedback doesn’t just come

from exhibition attendees.

Musician and artist Adam D. returned to

the St. Louis area from Colorado when he

was about three months sober. He originally

participated in the creation of physical art

but now he plays music and has performed

concerts at multiple Hope Creates events.

Most recently, he played original music at

a 2018 National Council for Alcohol and

Drug Abuse [NCADA] event in which

Hopes Creates participated.

“With getting sober, the biggest thing is

that if you’re not having more fun being

sober than you were when you were using,

you’re usually not going to stay sober, and

that’s what Hope Creates has really done

for me,” Adam said. “It’s given me a place

to express my music, and have a place and

outlet for that. It’s been really cool because,

for my entire life, I’ve wanted to do something

with my music. Now, I’m getting

more and more opportunities with Hope

Creates, and at the same time, helping to

support the sober community.”

According to Thomas, 36 artists participated

in the 2019 exhibition. She said their

stories are “tremendous.”

Pieces from the “Don’t Quit Before The

Miracle: An Expressive Arts Exhibition” in

2017 at .ZACK [Hope Creates photo]

“Grandmothers were there saying, ‘I’m

so proud of my grandson, and all these

kids,’” Thomas shared. “One young man

said he never thought he’d be good at photography,

because he was into sports, and

then once he got into drugs, all he cared

about was drugs. Now, he’s a photographer

and a painter and really thriving.”

To provide structured time in which

the artists create their art pieces, practice

music and prepare for upcoming exhibitions,

Hope Creates hosts community creation

events. The program had 17 creation

events and six gallery exhibitions last year

and also provided recovery community art

projects, art creation workshop opportunities,

dedicated studio time, internships and

mentoring programs for expressive arts

and entrepreneurialism.

Lexy A., who has been sober since October

2015, has been involved with Hope Creates

for about a year. She heard about the program

in one of her art classes at her school,

where she

is majoring

in environmental

science

and minoring in

ceramic pottery.

“Ever since then,

I’ve been going to

the community creation

events,” Lexy said. “I’ve

even been able to hold a leadership

role in teaching one of the

community creation events and

served as a summer intern for the

organization.

“I was able to start learning the business

side of a nonprofit entity and really just

help out with setting up these exhibits and

kind of being a facilitator of, basically, a

nonprofit that runs on donations, setting up

a database in order to reach out to people,

things like that,” she said of her internship.

An artist with

Hope Creates makes

a piece at a community

creation event in Overland.

[Hope Creates photo]

Creating hope

“It’s personal,” Thomas said of her desire

to found Hope Creates. “One of my kids is

a recovering addict.”

During those helpless days of her daughter’s

addiction, Thomas turned toward art as

a coping mechanism for herself; later, she

saw the benefits of it for others.

“I’m a graphic designer and innovation

consultant, so art is part of who I

am,” Thomas said. “I turned to it. I started

making large, black and white landscapes

or abstract collages just to vent and to feel

like I had control over something. It was

therapeutic, it was meditative, and at the

end, there was something beautiful that

was some kind of expression of what I was

feeling – but it wasn’t toxic anymore.

“Creation, literally, is the opposite of

self-destruction ... creation can be clean

and sober and enjoyable.”

Most of the artists in the Hope Creates

program agree with Thomas. The

program has a 93-percent success rate

compared to a national success rate of

15 percent for similar programs. Thomas

credits both the process of creating

something meaningful and the support of

the community.

“You can’t stay sober alone,” Lexy said.

“Isolation is what takes us back out there

into wanting to drink and use, because we

don’t feel like we’re a part of something.

With Hopes Creates, we do feel like we’re

part of something. And in having that

cohesive network, there’s always somebody

I can turn to, and I feel comfortable

talking about my problems to these

people.”

According to the NCADA, a recordbreaking

760 people died as the result of

opioid abuse in the St. Louis region in

2017.

“People don’t know that in 2016 we lost

more people than we lost in the 10-year

Vietnam War,” Thomas said of opioid

deaths. “People don’t know that in 2017

we lost 24 times the number of people we

lost on 9/11, for which we went to war. This

year, we’re going to lose 76,600 people or

more; we could fill the [Enterprise Center]

four times with the bodies.

“We lose two [people] in St. Louis every

single day, and we lose 200 in the United

States every single day ... The community

needs to know.”

Lexy said the goal of Hope Creates

events is to create a mind-shift about the

stigma of addiction.

“The stigma about people suffering from

addiction is that they’re on the fringe of

society and that they don’t have anything

else to offer. Unless someone has somebody

who is close to them who is dealing

with such a thing, most people view it as,

‘they have nothing to offer,’” Lexy said. “I

think because we have these galleries and

we are showing these beautiful pieces of

art and we’re able to tell people our stories,

that definitely induces a mind shift

and changes the way the community views

people like us.”

“The opposite of addiction isn’t sobriety,”

Thomas said. “Sobriety is a necessity …

The opposite of addiction is community. If

you feel that you are connected to people

who will give you unconditional love and

accountability, and really get you and care

about you, don’t enable you and really support

you, that is what makes sobriety stick

in most cases.”

For more information or to donate to

Hope Creates, visit hopecreates.org.


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November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I HEALTH I 17

New research shows that testing

young dogs’ cognitive abilities may

help to more quickly identify the

best potential service animals.

health

capsules

By LISA RUSSELL

Sniffing out the best

assistance dogs

The demand for service dogs is increasing

rapidly in the U.S. Due to the many

challenges involved with identifying and

training these specialized dogs, however,

that demand greatly exceeds the current

supply.

Only about 50 percent of dogs that start

a training program to become assistance

animals will successfully complete it. As

a result, the wait time to receive a trained

assistance dog can be up to two years.

While a dog’s physical characteristics

and temperament have traditionally been

the top priorities when evaluating potential

assistance dogs, University of Arizona

researchers recently looked at whether

cognitive ability also is a good predictor

of a dog’s success as a service animal

– before the long and expensive training

process begins.

“People have really focused on temperament

and how reactive a dog is to certain

things in the environment,” said Evan

MacLean, assistant professor in the UA

School of Anthropology. “What we were

interested in was the fact that these dogs

also face cognitive challenges. They have

to learn all these things in the course of

their training, and they have to be able to

flexibly solve problems when things go

wrong.”

The study focused on both assistance

dogs in training for people with disabilities,

and explosive detection dogs being trained

to work for the U.S. Navy. MacLean and

his colleagues looked at the performance

of both types of dogs on 25 different cognitive

measures by using a battery of gamebased

tests, like hiding and finding objects

and other forms of canine play. Dogs in the

study were considered “successful” based

on whether or not they ultimately graduated

from the training.

Through cognitive testing, MacLean and

his colleagues were able to predict the top

25 percent of graduates with 86 percent

accuracy. They also found that different

sets of skills predict whether a dog will be

a good detection dog or a good assistance

dog. In assistance dogs, social skills such

as the ability to pay close attention to and

maintain eye contact with humans were

especially important. In detection dogs,

good short-term memory and sensitivity to

human body language were the best predictors

of success.

The study’s findings suggest that cognition

is an important factor, alongside temperament

and physical traits, in predicting

working dog success. If organizations that

train dogs could better predict which dogs

are most worth the investment, it would not

only help ensure that people in need get the

right dogs faster, but tens of thousands of

dollars in unnecessary training costs could

be saved, MacLean said.

On the calendar

St. Luke’s Hospital offers cholesterol

and glucose wellness screenings on

Friday, Nov. 16 from 7-10:30 a.m. at St.

Luke’s Resource Center, 101 St. Luke’s

Center Drive in Chesterfield. Screenings

include cholesterol and glucose numbers

along with a one-on-one consultation

with a registered nurse/health coach,

which includes blood pressure and body

composition measurement. A 10- to

12-hour fast and advance appointments

are required. The fee for these screenings

is $20, with an optional A1C finger stick

test [for those at risk for Type 2 diabetes]

available for an additional $12. Appointments

are limited and fill quickly. To register,

visit stlukes-stl.com.

• • •

BJC St. Louis Children’s Hospital sponsors

a Staying Home Alone course on

Wednesday, Nov. 28 from 6:30-8 p.m. at

the Wildwood Municipal Building, 16860

Main St. in Wildwood, in the City Council

chambers. This class is designed for parents

and children together, and will help

determine a child’s readiness physically,

mentally, socially and emotionally to

stay home alone. The class fee is $25 per

family [provide the names of all family

members attending]. To register, call

(314) 454-5437.

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18 I EVENTS I

November 14, 2018

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RSVP by December 10th • 636-587-3737

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forgive yourself and others, and build your life around what you love.

15 Hilltop Village Center Dr. • Eureka MO 63025 • 636-587-3737

local

events

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

The 40th Annual St. Louis Jewish Book

Festival is now through Nov. 16 at The

Jewish Community Center, 2 Millstone

Campus Drive in Creve Coeur. An annual

celebration of authors, books and ideas,

with additional bookend events year-round.

The range of author topics includes business,

cooking, economics, family, fiction,

history, music, religion, sports and more.

For more information, visit jccstl.com.

• • •

Marquette Theater Company presents

“Into the Woods” at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov.

15 through Saturday, Nov. 17, with a final

matinee at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 18 at

Marquette High’s Theatre, 2351 Clarkson

Road in Chesterfield. “Into the Woods” features

beloved storybook characters such as

Cinderella, Rapunzel, Jack and the beanstalk,

Red Riding Hood and others. For tickets,

visit ticketsource.us/event/272361.

• • •

St. Luke’s Spirit of Women Event – All

Decked Out is from 5:30-8 p.m. on Thursday,

Nov. 15 at DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel,

16625 Swingley Ridge Road in Chesterfield.

Ladies can spend an evening with family

and friends before the holidays. Appetizers,

beverages, shopping, holiday minimakeovers

and tips to stay healthy through

the holidays and beyond. Cost is $25 and

includes health screenings, mini-massages,

swag bag, appetizers, desserts, drink tickets

and more. Visit DoubleTreeChesterfield.

com for directions. To register, visit stlukesstl.com.

For questions, call (314) 542-4848.

• • •

Fair Trade Market is from 9 a.m.-3

p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 17; Sunday, Nov.

18; and Friday, Nov. 23 through Sunday,

Nov. 25 at Manchester United Methodist

Church, 129 Woods Mill Road in Manchester.

The Fair Trade Market offers

holiday gifts, international crafts, exquisite

foods and food samples, educational

presentations and giveaways.

• • •

An Artist Critique Group is from

10-11:30 a.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 20 at Chesterfield

City Hall, 690 Chesterfield Parkway

West. Each artist can bring one artwork,

photograph, painting, sculpture, sketch or

proposal to the event. Participants take turns

presenting the artwork and receiving feedback

from the group. The event is part of a

series. For future dates or more information,

email smani@chesterfield.mo.us.

BENEFITS

The Saint Louis Crisis Nursery’s Young

Professional Board hosts “Nursery Night

at Napoli” from 5:30-7:30 p.m. on Thursday,

Nov. 15 at Bar Napoli, 7754 Forsyth

Blvd in Clayton. All proceeds benefit the

Saint Louis Crisis Nursery. Admission is

$50 [or $40 in advance] and includes select

open bar, appetizers, raffle tickets, music

and networking opportunities. To be entered

in a special raffle, bring an unwrapped toy

for the Saint Louis Crisis Nursery.

• • •

Trivia Night is from 6-10 p.m. on Friday,

Nov. 16 at Ballwin Golf Club, 333 Holloway

Road in Ballwin. Teams of eight will

compete in 10 rounds of trivia. The evening

includes complimentary beer and soda.

Bring your own snacks. For more information

or to register, visit ballwin.mo.us.

• • •

COMING FALL 2019 TO EUREKA

Early Childhood Center

Ready, Set,

Learn!

Rockwood preschool helps children

get ready to learn by providing a solid

educational foundation for the future.

The Rockwood Preschool Program provides:

Coming Soon to Eureka

• Certified Teachers • Research-based curriculum

Early Childhood Center

• Resources that meet • Low student to teacher ratio

the at individualized Eureka -Fall needs 2019 • Preparing children for success

of children

in Rockwood kindergarten!

Ready, Half Set, Day and Learn! Full Day Programs

For more information,

call 636-891-6200 or 636-891-6260

or visit www.rsdmo.org/earlychildhood

Rockwood preschool helps children get ready to learn by

providing a solid educational foundation for the future.

Half day and Full Day Programs


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Assistance League of St. Louis’ annual

gala, “A Night of Hope and Dreams,” is at

6 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 17 at The Atrium

at Edward Jones, 12555 Manchester Road in

St. Louis. The event features dinner, an auction

and commentary from auctioneer/emcee

Rene Knot, KSDK-TV’s morning anchor.

• • •

Holy Infant’s Cash Bingo begins at

7 p.m. [doors open at 5:30] on Saturday,

Nov. 17 at 627 Dennison Drive in Ballwin.

Admission is $20 and includes 15 games

of Bingo [9 cards each] plus drinks [beer,

wine, soda and water]. Sandwiches, snacks

and desserts available for purchase. For

more information, contact Ray Brune at

(314) 952-5965

• • •

Chesterfield Family YMCA hosts a Step

Up to the Plate Trivia Night at 7 p.m. [doors

open at 6 p.m.] on Saturday, Nov. 17 at Barat

Academy, 17815 Wild Horse Creek Road in

Chesterfield. Table and dress will be sportsthemed

but trivia rounds will not. Free onsite

child care with advance registration. Free

soda and water in limited quantity. $25 per

person; maximum 10 players per table. Sign

up at gwrymca.org or call (636) 532-3100.

• • •

A Circle of Concern Benefit Concert

featuring Lafayette High and the Genesis

Jazz Project is at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 20

at Lafayette High’s theatre, 17050 Clayton

Road in Wildwood. Non-perishable food

item or cash donation for admission.

HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS

The Brewery Lights festivities are

from 5-10 p.m. every Thursday through

Sunday from Nov. 15 through Dec. 30 at

the Anheuser-Busch St. Louis Brewery,

1200 Lynch St. in St. Louis [drive-through

tours welcome Monday through Wednesday

until midnight]. A free, family-friendly

event for all ages. Kids can enjoy festive

games, rides on the Brewery Express train,

and nightly screenings of a classic holiday

movie on an outdoor big screen. For more

information visit, budweisertours.com.

• • •

The 11th Annual Holiday Shopping

Extravaganza is from 1-6 p.m. on Friday,

Nov. 16; 9 a.m.-6 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 17;

and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 18 at

the St. Charles Convention Center, 1 Convention

Center Plaza in St Charles. Over

200 booths with unique gift items, gourmet

goodies and holiday home décor are

featured. Free admission and parking. For

details, visit treasurechestshows.com.

• • •

Wild Lights at the St. Louis Zoo is from

5:30-8:30 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 23 through

Sunday, Nov. 25; Wednesday, Nov. 28

through Sunday, Dec 2; Wednesday, Dec.

5 through Sunday, Dec. 9; Monday, Dec.

November 14, 2018

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I EVENTS I 19

10 [Sensory Night for individuals on the

autism spectrum and others who may benefit];

Wednesday, Dec. 12 through Sunday,

Dec. 23; and Wednesday, Dec. 26 through

Sunday, Dec. 30. Tickets can be purchased

at stlzoo.org/wildlights, or at the door.

• • •

St. Louis Philharmonic Holiday Pops

concert is at 8 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 7 at

Logan University’s Purser Auditorium,

1851 Schoettler Road in Chesterfield.

Attendees are encouraged to bring a new

toy to donate or a cash contribution to sup-

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FAMILY & KIDS

Winter Jewels is from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. on

Tuesdays through Sundays now through

Dec. 31 at the Sophia M. Sachs Butterfly

House in Faust Park, 15193 Olive Blvd

in Chesterfield. Visit a fierce dragon and

noble knights, discover tropical jeweltoned

butterflies and fairies in the Conservatory

and make new friends in the Gnome

Forest. For details, visit butterflyhouse.org.

• • •

The Wildwood YMCA’s Kids Night Out

is from 6:30-10 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 17 at

2641 Hwy. 109 in Wildwood. Children ages

5-12. Swimming, games, sports, dinner,

crafts and more. Concessions available

for purchase. Kids must wear gym shoes

and bring a swimsuit and towel. Register

in advance at gwrymca.org/wildwood, in

person, or by calling (636) 458-6636. Cost

is $20 per child for non-members; $15 per

child for members. $5 sibling discount [not

available through online registration].

• • •

The 2018 Chesterfield Turkey Trot is at

8 a.m. on Thursday, Nov. 22 at Chesterfield

Amphitheater, 631 Veterans Place Drive in

Chesterfield. Start Thanksgiving Day the

right way. Sign up for the 5K or Kids Fun

Run. For more information or to register,

visit chesterfield.mo.us.

Hardwood In Stock!! Carpet In Stock!!

$

2 99 5” Hickory $

2 99 35 oz.

or Birch

“Trackless”

8 Colors Available

$

3 99 5” Hickory $

3 99 45 oz.

Multi-Width

“SmartStrand Blend”

12 Colors Available

$

5 99 5” Solid Oak $

5 99 60 oz.

“Silk”

15 Colors Available

$

6 99 3 1/4” Solid Maple

4 1/4” Solid Oak

Completely Installed with our best pad!

Lifetime warranty on installation!


20I EVENTS I

November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

@WESTNEWSMAG

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

EVENTS, from page 35

port the United States Marine Corps’ Toys

for Tots campaign. Admission is $20. Tickets

are available at stlphilharmonic.org.

• • •

Living Word Church presents “The

Glory of Christmas” concerts at 4 p.m.

and 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 9 at 17315

Manchester Road in Wildwood. Childcare

is provided for kids age 2 and younger.

Admission is free and all are welcome. For

more information, visit livingwordumc.org.

• • •

The Bach Society Chorus & Orchestra’s

annual Christmas Candlelight

Concert is at 7:30 p.m on Tuesday, Dec.

11 at Powell Hall, 718 N. Grand Blvd.

in St. Louis. The Bach Society will be

joined onstage by the St. Louis Children’s

Choirs with a special guest appearance

by legendary jazz singer Denise Thimes.

Ticket prices range from $30-75 and can

be purchased by visiting powellhall.com

or by calling (314) 534-1700.

• • •

“The Nutcracker” is performed at 2 p.m.

on Sunday, Dec. 14 at Logan University,

1851 Schoettler Road in Chesterfield. The

joy and whimsy of this one-hour Nutcracker

ballet is a narrated performance the entire

family can enjoy. Tickets are available at

loganuniversity.brownpapertickets.com.

Sklar Brothers headline comedy night benefit, Nov. 24

SPECIAL INTEREST

“The Scots in St. Louis: Speaker

Series on the History of Scots in Missouri”

is open from 6:30-8:30 p.m. on

Thursday, Nov. 15 at the United Hebrew

Congregation, 13788 Conway Road in

St. Louis. The series continues through

March 2019 and future sessions will

be announced on the website [stlstandrews.com].

Tickets are $8 and can be

purchased at the door or online. Free

admission for students with student ID.

Refreshments provided.

In the wake of their friend’s death in

2014, a group of college students said,

“enough.” They determined it was time

to start a conversation about suicide and

mental illness. It was time to wake up.

For the past four years, Project Wake

Up has been raising funds to produce a

documentary aimed at creating awareness

of the growing suicide epidemic.

Through golf tournaments, trivia events

and other fundraisers, Project Wake Up

has raised more than $300,000.

Now, on Saturday, Nov. 24, the nonprofit

hosts its inaugural comedy night

– and you can be there.

Headlined by Parkway North graduates

the Sklar Brothers, the event will

take place at 7 p.m. [doors open at 6

p.m.] at the Skip Viragh Center for the

Arts in the Siefert Auditorium on the

campus of Chaminade College Prep, 425

S. Lindbergh Blvd. in Frontenac.

Known for their ESPN cult classic

series Cheap Seats and their subsequent

podcast View from the Cheap Seats, the

Sklar Brothers won’t be the only local

celebrities on stage that evening. Chris

Denman and Travis Terrell of We Are

Live! Radio and St. Louis Live! will

emcee the event that also will showcase

comedians Tim Convy, Nathan Orton,

Angela Smith and Steve Pace.

• • •

Introduction to Photography is from

6-9 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 19 in Room C

of the Manchester Park Building, 359 Old

Meramec Station Road in Manchester.

Participants ages 18-plus can learn the

basics of photography indoors and outdoors

including how to shoot landscapes,

portraits and family events. Equipment

and lighting are provided. Bring your

own camera. Cost is $15. Registration

closes on Friday, Nov. 16. To register,

visit manchestermo.gov.

The Sklar Brothers

Pianist Tom Townsend, founder of

Pianos for People, will open the show,

and his son Nate, the documentary’s

director, will show a clip of the film.

The event will include food trucks and

a full bar with purchase of a special cup.

Tickets range from $20 to $50 and are

available online at projectwakeup.org

under the “Events” tab.

• • •

Progress 64 West, a nonprofit alliance

of area citizens and business leaders,

hosts its 31st Annual Excellence in Community

Development Awards Banquet

at 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 21 at

the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel, 16625

Swingley Ridge Road in Chesterfield.

John Nations, president and CEO of Bi-

State Development Agency, is the keynote

speaker. Tickets, at $85 per person,

and sponsorships are available online at

progress64west.org.

A Taste of “The Hill”

Thanksgiving Buffet

11:00am-5:00pm

Adults $24.99

Kids $8.99 (10 & Under)

(Kids under 4 eat free)

Reservations Required

Live Music

Thursday - Saturday • 6:30-9:30pm

Full Service Holiday Catering

• Holiday Parties

• Corporate Events

• Rehearsal Dinners

• Private Parties

Online Delivery & Carryout

NOVEMBER SPECIAL

MONDAY & TUESDAY

Buy 1 Large

2-topping pizza

(Thin Only)

and get one FREE

100 Holloway Road • Ballwin 63011

636.220.8989•www.candiccis.net

THANKSGIVING CELEBRATION

3 DAYS OF HALF OFF GIFT CARDS

MONDAY, NOV 19TH - WEDNESDAY, NOV 21ST

BUY YOUR UNLIMITED HOLIDAY GIFT CARDS

HALF OFF

WITH FOOD & DRINK PURCHASE OF $60 OR MORE

LIVE MUSIC

WEDNESDAY, THANKSGIVING EVE • 7PM - 11PM

17253 New College Ave., Wildwood

636.273.4300 • www.wildwoodpub.com


FACEBOOK.COM/WESTNEWSMAGAZINE

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

By SUZANNE CORBETT

Dalie’s Smokehouse General Manager

Craig Basler calls this time of year “the

big push” – a ham and turkey push credited

to Dalie’s quality and service.

“We’re making it easy for people,”

Basler said. “We’re offering whole

smoked turkeys and our bacon-wrapped

hams. They’re great for formal dinners,

buffets or holiday parties.”

Dalie’s turkeys are moist, gently smoked

and packaged in oven bags, which makes

reheating a quick and easy task. Hams

are house-cured, smoked and fitted with a

caramelized sugar, seasoned bacon blanket.

Both are smoked with green cherry

wood. A subtle smoking wood, seldom

used at other operations, that doesn’t

overpower a meat’s natural flavor as other

woods, such as hickory, would.

Each holiday season, ham and turkey

become the signature meats of Dalie’s

catering menu, but don’t overlook the

restaurant’s exceptional selection of traditional

barbecued meats, sides and desserts.

Dalie’s menu combination makes entertaining

a snap for hosts, especially when

they take advantage of Dalie’s catering

services, which include pick-up, drop-off

and full-service options.

“We can cater any size event from 15

people or more. We also provide free

delivery within a 15-mile radius,” said

Basler. “We get a lot of compliments on

our service because we take the extra steps

to do it right. When we deliver, we’ll set up

the chafers, open the pans and make sure

everything is ready to go before we leave.

“We can put the entire meal together

from meats, sides and desserts. We now

have all our seasonal menu sides featured,

like Sweet Potato and Peach Casserole

topped with marshmallows and a crumb

topping. It’s just like mama made. And,

we have green bean casserole. You got to

have it because it wouldn’t be the holidays

without it.”

Dalie’s catering selections reflect the

diversity of the smokehouse menu where

smoked meats rule. Barbecue ribs, succulent

pulled pork, tender beef brisket and

gently smoked chicken and turkey are on

the menu year-round. Regular customers

know to arrive early to get their favorites

before they sell out and land on the

dreaded “Sold out for today” chalkboard.

“We sell out of something every day,”

said Basler. “But we always have plenty

of options. And we’re trying new things

all the time. We love to experiment. Some

of those experiments become the daily

specials like our Turkey White Bean Chili,

which is the Tuesday special.”

Look for Dalie’s latest creation,

Smoked Pork Loin, another Tuesday special

that is served plated or as a sandwich,

topped with a French onion herb wine

sauce. Friday is Chicken and Dumplings

made with smoked chicken and housemade

rolled dumplings. Wednesday is

Cajun day – the day Gumbo makes its

menu appearance. Lovers of burnt ends

should plan to come early on Wednesdays,

Fridays and Sundays before they sell out.

Off-menu specials are handwritten

on butcher paper and taped on the walls

behind the counter.

There, you might find the Brisket Philly,

a delightfully sloppy sandwich ladled

with smoky brown gravy, peppers, onions

November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

Dalie’s Smokehouse: Where holiday catering keeps customers happy

Dalie’s Smokehouse

2951 Dougherty Ferry Road • Valley Park • (636) 529-1898 • daliessmokehouse.com

Hours: 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday; 11 a.m.-4 p.m. on Sundays; Closed Mondays

Closing times are approximate.

I 21

Dalie’s for lunch – delicious!

and melted white American cheese – or

a surprising Vegan Sandwich that pairs

smoked Portobello mushrooms and Asian

Jack Fruit, which Basler says “taste like

chicken,” atop a vegan-approved hoagie.

The best way to discover Dalie’s’

savory and sweet delights is to stop in for

lunch or dinner before placing your holiday

catering order. But don’t wait. Basler

recommends placing holiday orders now.

“We want to make the holidays happy

for all our customers,” he said.

Jumbo Lump Crab Cakes

in Season!

Carryout

Children’s Menu

Happy Hour Daily

165 Lamp & Lantern Village

Town & Country

636-207-0501

*All fish subject to availability.

Party Room Available

at Big Bend Location

www.lazyyellow.com

Gift Certificates Available

631 Big Bend Rd.

Manchester

636-207-1689

an 8” or 10” Decorated Cake

St. Louis - Chesterfield

159 Lamp and Lantern Village

Chesterfield, MO 63017

(636) 220-6087

NothingBundtCakes.com

Expires 11/30/18. Limit one (1) coupon per

guest. Coupon must be presented at time

of purchase. Valid only at the bakery(ies)

listed. No cash value. Coupon may not be

reproduced, transferred or sold. Internet

distribution strictly prohibited. Must be

claimed in bakery during normal business

hours. Not valid for online orders. Not valid

with any other offer.

LIMITED

DELIVERY

AREA

14 INCH PIZZA

3 TOPPINGS

$

9 95

14 INCH PIZZA

1 TOPPING & 12 WINGS

$

24 95

DOES NOT APPLY WITH ANY OTHER OFFER

ORDER ONLINE CALL FOR DELIVERY

15638 Manchester Rd Ellisville, MO 63011

www.bwpizza.com • 636-527-6969

We’re Smokin’ for the Holiday!

18-JN-0142-1004-3

Trim: 4.916” by 2.72”

Bleed: N/A

Bring in Your Turkey and

We’ll Smoke It For You!

• Turkeys must be received by

Sunday, November 18th •

Catering Available

Family Functions

Corporate Events

School Banquets

Weddings & More

Bakery #: 142

Chesterfield

print

15467 Clayton Rd. • Kehrs Mill & Clayton Rd.

636-394-3332 • www.CharlottesribBbq.com


22 I

November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

@WESTNEWSMAG

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

WEST HOME PAGES

H NEST

JUNK REMOVAL

Furniture • Appliances • Electronics • Big TV’s • Fences • Decks

Trampolines • Swing Sets • Above Ground Pools • Sheds • Railroad Ties

Exercise Equipment • Garage/Basement Clean Out • Pool Tables

Hot Tubs • Remodeling Debris • Paint • Estate Clean Out • Books

ASK US ABOUT FREE BOOK PICKUP

(with service)

Call TODAY and we’ll HAUL it AWAY

314-312-1077

www.honestjunk.com

www

Locally Owned & Operated

$

25 OFF

Any Pick-Up

Expires 12/29/18

cannot be combined with other offers

COMPLETE KITCHEN & BATH REMODELING

PLUS OTHER INTERIOR PROJECTS

References Available

Serving West County &

Reasonable Pricing

surrounding areas since 1985

Quality Work

Edwards Remodeling • Call 314-397-5100 • Licensed & Insured

Driveways, Patios, Pool Decks, Garage Floors,

Retaining Walls, Stamped and Colored Concrete

Insured For Your Protection

West County

ELECTRICAL

DESIGNS

Kitchen Lighting Upgrades

• Recessed Lighting • Pendant Lighting

• Under Cabinet Lighting • All Residential Electrical

• Exterior/Security Lighting •Flat Screen/Surround Sound

• Panel Upgrades/Basement Wiring

314.836.6400

“Let Us Shine the Perfect Light on Your Investment.”

®

636-394-0315

www.tileandbathservice.com

Senior Discounts Available

Visit Our Showroom

Showers Rebuilt-Bathrooms Remodeled

“Water Damaged Showers a Specialty”

Tub to Stall Shower Conversions

Grab Bars/High Toilets/Personal Showers

Floors/Vanities/Barrier Free Showers

Tile & Bath Service, Inc.

36 Years Experience • At this Location 27 Years

14770 Clayton Road • 63011

H anDYMan

VOP

handyman

call On a

PrOfessiOnal!

Home Repairs • Plumbing • Electrical

Carpentry • Painting • Windows & Doors

Appliances • Roof Repairs • Decks & More!

636.541.0375 • 636.394.2319

Finish & Trim Carpentry Co.

Custom Woodworking • Bars • Bookshelves

Mantels • Doors • Stairs • Media

Kitchens • Sunrooms • Additions

Roy Kinder

Master Carpenter #1557

Custom Contractor/Builder

(636) 391-5880

Insured • Licensed • Guaranteed

Since 1979 • www.finishtrim.com

When you

want it

done right...

Check our

ads first.

636.591.0010

25+ YEARS

EXPERIENCE

County House Washing

& Painting

WEST

A+

RATED

Power Washing • Painting • Staining

INTERIORS • EXTERIORS • CONCRETE

CEDAR HOMES • DECKS & FENCES

Tim Trog 636.394.0013

WWW.COUNTYHOUSEWASHING.COM

TOP GUNN

DECK & FENCE

TOP GUNN FAMILY CONSTRUCTION

Now Scheduling

Fall Projects!

Custom Decks • Concrete

Int/Ext Paint • Powerwashing

Staining • Sealing • Fences • Siding

Windows • Gutters • Sun Rooms • Pole Barns

Kitchens & Baths • Carpentry • Drywall

“WE DO IT ALL”

18 Years Experience

Senior, Military, &

First Responder Discounts

Free Estimates

636.466.3956

gunnfamilyconstruction@gmail.com

THE FAN MAN

INSTAllATIoN ProFESSIoNAlS

Ceiling Fans • Wholehouse Fans

Gable Vent Fans • Recessed Lighting

Specializing in installation for two story homes

with no wiring on first floor.

When Handyman Quality Just Won't Do.

(314) 510-6400

Brad Thomas

Stairs

•Baluster Replacement

•Staircase Remodeling

Brad Thomas

314-954-2050

Wildwood

brad@bradthomasstairs.com

www.bradthomasstairs.com

Add the elegance of iron in 2 days or less!

636-938-ROOF (7663)

Like us on Facebook

Locally Owned & Operated by Rick Hinkson

When you want it done right

the first time...

We’re the place to check out first.

636.591.0010

DESIGN & REMODELING

Kitchen/Baths/Room Addition

Basement Finishing Specialist

Sun Rooms • Decks

Outdoor Spaces • Siding

Soffit • Roofs • Hail Damage

Licensed • Bonded

636-946-6870

Insured • References

Free Estimates

www.keimarcontracting.com


FACEBOOK.COM/WESTNEWSMAGAZINE

WESTNEWSMAGAZINE.COM

November 14, 2018

WEST NEWSMAGAZINE

I 23

• WEST CLASSIFIEDS • CLASSIFIEDS@NEWSMAGAZINENETWORK.COM • 636.591.0010 •

e

s:

CLEANING SERVICES

~ LORI'S CLEANING SERVICE~

Choose a cleaner who takes

PRIDE in serving you and is

grateful for the opportunity.

Call Lori at 636-221-2357

CLEAN AS A WHISTLE

Weekly • Bi-Weekly • Monthly

Move-In & Move-Out

AFFORDABLE

$10 Four OFF Seasons

New Clients

PRICING

Family Owned & Operated

Your Lisa Satisfaction Wilson Guaranteed

Insured/Bonded

314-426-3838

Your Message

LOUD & CLEAR

4409 Suite K Meramac Bottom Rd.

DECKS

West classifieds work!

St. EVERYTHING Louis DECKS:

MO 63129

636.591.0010

Construct, Repair,

314-892-1003

Upgrade, Clean / Stain

MarkHicksLLC.com

Since 1982, no money up front

warranty, insured, free estimates

Discounts • BBB A+ • Angie’s List

636-337-7733

ELECTRICAL

D-K ELECTRIC

Residential - Commercial

New Service - Repair

Remodeling Four - Troubleshooting Seasons

Free Estimates - No job too small

Licensed - Bonded- Insured

Electrician answers your calls at:

636-458-1559

ERIC'S ELECTRIC

Licensed, Bonded and Insured:

Service upgrades, fans, can lights,

switches, outlets, basements,

code violations fixed, we do it

all. Emergency calls & back-up

generators. No job too small.

Competitively priced. Free Estimates.

Just call 636-262-5840

FLOORING

Your Message

LOUD & CLEAR

West classifieds work!

636.591.0010

HELP WANTED

- PAYMENT

at

METHODS

www.GNHSERVICES.com

-

now!

MC ❑ VISA ❑ AMEX ❑ DISCOVER ❑

(UNCHANGED)

- CATEGORY HEADING -

CARPET REPAIRS

Restretching, reseaming

& patching. No job too

small. Free estimates.

(314) 892-1003

GARAGE DOORS

DSI/Door Solutions, Inc.

Garage Doors, Electric Openers.

Fast Repairs. All makes & models.

Same day service. Free Estimates.

Custom Wood and Steel Doors.

BBB Member • Angie's List

Call 314-550-4071

www.dsi-stl.com

HAULING

HAULING

J & J HAULING

WE HAUL IT ALL

Service 7 days. Debris, furniture,

appliances, household trash,

yard debris, railroad ties, fencing,

decks. Garage & Basement Clean-up

Neat, courteous, affordable rates.

Call: 636-379-8062 or

email: jandjhaul@aol.com

05/18

COMPASSIONATE CAREGIVERS

NEEDED!! VISITING ANGELS hiring

for Chest/WW/Ballwin $12

/hr; ($13 CNAs) FT & PT positions;

Flexible Schedules; Days &

Overnts; Pick Up Extra Hrs; 1 yr

Exp reqd; Pers Care, Housekeep,

Meal Prep, Transp, etc; Apply at

www.WestplexHomeCare.com

Wendy’s is now hiring

Crew Members and

Shift Supervisors!

For our St. Louis Market

— Including —

• Ballwin,

• St. Charles

• Chesterfield

• St. Peters

Apply online at

www.BFCareers.com

SKIPS HAULING & DEMOLITION!

Junk hauling and removal. Cleanouts,

IN WEST appliances, UNTIL furniture, FURTHER debris, NOTICEfor Rockwood School

• CUSTODIAL POSITIONS •

RUN District

construction rubble, yard waste,

excavating & demolition! 10, 15

& 20 cubic yd. rolloff dumpsters.

Licensed & insured. Affordable,

dependable & available! VISA/MC

accepted. 22 yrs. service. Toll Free

1-888-STL-JUNK (888-785-5865)

or 314-644-1948

GNH Services, Inc. is NOW

HIRING a Maintenance Assistant!

We believe in FUN, GROWTH &

SUCCESS! Come join us and apply

IS A

REAL ESTATE

CAREER RIGHT

FOR YOU?

SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE

Berkshire Hathaway

HomeServices

Select Properties

Call Lyn Buchmiller

Managing Broker

636.236.9693

40 hours/week

To apply please go to:

www.rsdmo.org

or call 636-733-3270

EEOC

TEACHERS NEEDED!! - F/T, P/T

& SUBS Med size Preschool – but

GROWING!! Great Environ; Must

Love Kids! $ based on exp; Lots

of opportunities WILDWOOD

EARLY LEARNING CENTER; 1 mi

E of 109 on Manchester Rd; Send

res to apply@wildwoodELC.com;

or call Mollie at 636-273-5000.

HOME IMPROVEMENT

EVERYTHING DECKS:

Deck Restoration

Clean / Stain

MarkHicksLLC.com

30 years exp., no money up front

warranty, insured, free estimates

BBB A+ rating • Angie’s List

636-337-7733

Total Bathroom Remodeling COST each:

Cabinetry•Plumbing•Electrical

21 Years Experience

WANTED TO BUY

• SPORTS MEMORABILIA •

basements, kitchens, baths & decks.

WESTBaseball Cards, MID Sports RIVERS Cards,

24 years experience.

Cardinals' Souvenirs and

314-393-1102 or 636-237-3246

Sports Memorabilia

2016 Pre-1975 Only. 2016

Private Collector.

LANDSCAPING

314-302-1785

JAN 13

JAN 13

JAN 27

JAN 27

ONE TIME CLEAN UP

clean it all up or out!

PAINTING

Beds - Bushes - Trees - Dirt - Rock FEB - Mulch 10

FEB 10

REPAIR, REDO, OR ALL FEB NEW! 17

Walls - Stairs - Walks - Patios - Pits

ADVANTAGE

LANDSCAPE FEB 24

FEB 24

+ REHAB + PAINTING CO.

• FREE ESTIMATES Interior & Exterior

• MAR 09

MAR 09

636-775-5992

Painting

MAR 16

Drywall Repair • Taping

MAR 23 Powerwashing MAR • Wallpaper 23 Stripping

Top Quality Work • FREE Estimates

APR O6 636.262.5124

APR 06

RETAINING WALLS • PAVER PATIOS APR 13

INSURED

MENTION AD & RECEIVE 10% OFF

MOWING & ALL LANDSCAPING NEEDS APR 20

APR 20

STAINING DECKS BY BRUSH

Free EstimateMAY 04

GARY MAY 04 SMITH

PAINTING & REPAIR

314-280-2779 MAY 18

MAY 18

MAY 25 Interior Painting • Wallpaper

Dry Wall • Crown Molding & Trim

LEAF CLEAN UP

- 25 years Experience -

M I E N EAUG R 17

LANDSCAPING AUG 24

Retaining Walls • Patios • Pruning

Chainsaw Work • Seasonal Clean SEP 07 up

Honeysuckle Removal SEP 14

Friendly service with attention SEP to detail 21

Call Tom 636.938.9874

www.mienerlandscaping.com OCT 05

OCT 12

MORALES LANDSCAPE OCT LLC 19

• Clean-Up • Mowing • Mulching

• Planting • Aeration • Sod NOV Install 02

• Leaf/Tree Removal • Paver NOV Patios 16

• Trimming/Edging • Stone NOV & Brick 23

• Retaining Walls • Drainage Work

- FREE ESTIMATES DEC - 07

636-293-2863 DEC 14

moraleslandscape@hotmail.com DEC 21

New ❍

LINE AD:

DISPLAY AD:

WEST ❑ x

LANDSCAPING

JACK'S LANDSCAPING

Total lawn maintenance for your

home or business. Mowing,

mulch, planting, Existing sod, ❍retaining

x

walls, brush removal. More services

available upon request. Please

call for a FREE and ❑X

PROMPT estimate.

314-330-9040


LEAF CLEAN UP

CURBSIDE

PICK UP

AVAILABLE!

$ _______________ 30.00

X # of issues:

636-293-2863

________________

MRN ❑

TFN

All Around Construction LLC

= TOTAL: MEMORABILIA $ _______________

WANTED

All interior & exterior remodeling

& repairs. Historic restoration,

molding duplication. Finished - PUB DATES -

Tree and Bush Trimming/Removal, JUN 08

Mulching, Landscaping Make-overs JUN 15

and Clean ups, Powerwashing. JUN 22

Now accepting lawn cutting

customers for 2019 season. JUL 06

FAST & FREE ESTIMATES JUL 20

TWO MEN & A MOWER JUL 27

636-432-3451

AUG 10

Chris' Lawn &

Tree Service LLC

Locally owned & operated

FALL LEAF REMOVAL

& CLEAN-UP

SHRUB & TREE TRIMMING,

& BED CLEANUP

RESIDENTIAL•COMMERCIAL

636-265-7007

314-482-3707

JUN 08

Fully Insured • Owner/Operator

Call Gary 314-805-7005

JUN 22

JUL 06 Interior and

JUL exterior 20 painting

Deck staining

- Insured & AUG Free 10 estimates -

10% discounts for seniors and veterans

Dickspainting.com

AUG 24

314-707-3094

SEP SEP 21

PAINTING

KEVIN'S PAINT SERVICE

Professional & Expert interior/

exterior painting, drywall & ceiling

repair, and powerwashing.

30 years painting experience.

Low rates and Free Estimates.

Call Kevin at 636-322-9784.

PLUMBING

LICENSED PLUMBER

Available for all plumbing needs.

No job too small. Free estimates.

25 years experience.

Senior citizen discount. 24 hours.

Call 314-808-4611

GVM PLUMBING

Can't beat my prices!

Greg Miller

636-288-7002

gvmplumbingstl@gmail.com

• ANYTHING IN PLUMBING •

Good Prices! Basement

bathrooms, small repairs & code

violations repaired. Fast Service.

Certified, licensed plumber - not

a handyman. Call or text anytime:

314-409-5051

SCENTSY CONSULTANT

Scentsy aromatherapy, essential

oils and much more are available

from your local Independent

Consultant today. Products

for the whole family. Great

holiday packages available.

Check out all of our products at

https://snshineegrl.scentsy.usy

TREE SERVICES

PHIL'S TREE SERVICE

FREE Estimates - FULLY Insured

Topping, Trimming, Removal

Landscaping, and Pruning.

25 Years Experience.

ASK ME ABOUT FIREWOOD!

Call today 636-466-2888

GET 'ER DONE TREE SERVICE

Tree trimming, removal, deadwooding,

pruning and stump

grinding. Certified arborist.

Fully Insured • Free Estimates

A+ BBB • A+ Angie's List

Serving the Area Since 2004

314-971-6993

TREE SERVICES

DORSEY TREE SERVICE

Trees trimmed or removed,

stumps removed. Bucket truck

service. Fully insured.

In business for 30 years.

Call 314-355-5115

WATERPROOFING

TOP NOTCH Waterproofing &

Foundation Repair LLC

Cracks, sub-pump systems, structural

& concrete repairs. Exterior

drainage correction. Serving Missouri

for 15 years. Finally, a contractor

who is honest & leaves the

job site clean. Lifetime Warranties.

Free Estimate 636-281-6982

WEDDING SERVICES

Marriage

Ceremonies

~

Renewal of Vows

~

Baptisms

Full Service Ministry

314.703.7456

West classifieds work!

636.591.0010

WEST CLASSIFIEDS • 636.591.0010 •

OCT 05

Life

OCT 19

NOV 02

NOV 23

Celebrations

DEC 07

DEC 21

11.05.15

Celebrate the life of your loved ones

with our community, family and friends!

- Serving West St. Louis County since 1996 -

- Delivered to more than 67,000 mailboxes -

For more information on obituaries contact:

636-591-0010 | obits@newsmagazinenetwork.com

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