BETH TORAH TIMES WINTER EDITION -Nov-Dec 2018

cporeh

BETH TORAH TIMES

Winter Edition 2018/2019 l Kislev 5779

WWW.BTBRC.ORG


Leadership

MARIO ROJZMAN

Rabbi

EDWIN FARBER

Rabbi Emeritus

DR. MAX A. LIPSCHITZ Z”L

Founding Rabbi

GASTÓN BOGOMOLNI

Cantor

WAYNE KEIL

Chief Operating Officer

MARSHALL BALTUCH

Director of Development

GABRIELA RASCOVSKY

Religious School Director

Membership Director

JENI BUCHHOLZ

Youth & Camp Director

ANNE MANDELBAUM

Early Childhood Academy

Director

SHERRY KRUG

Administrative Assistant

TERI SMOLKEN

Controller

MARLA COHEN

BT2U Coordinator

In this issue

Messages 03

From our Rabbi, Cantor, Co-

Presidents, Director of Development,

Chief Operating Officer, Early

Childhood Academy Director &

Director of Membership

Lifecycles 13

Officers

MIKE SEGAL

RICH BERGER

Presidents

JILL KOCH

Executive Vice President

STEVEN SCHECK

Immediate Past President

HOWARD CHAFETZ

At Large VP

MICHELLE KABAK

Early Childhood Academy VP

MINDY KURKIN

Education VP

DAVID ROSEMBERG

Financial VP

ETTA EPSTEIN

Membership VP

ERIC BERGER

Operations VP

MARK MOYEL

Ritual VP

PHYLLIS SHEINMAN

Ways & Means VP

EDGARDO IMAR

Youth & Camp VP

STEVEN WILLINGER

Treasurer

ANDREA BECK

Secretary

B’nai Mitzvah 14

New Members and

Candle Lighting Times

/ Parashiot

High Holy Days 5779

Feedback

Contributions & Yahrzeit

Donations

15

17

23

News 28

From Beth Torah Sisterhood, Scheck

Family Religious School and Youth

Groups.

Donor Roster - High Holy

Days 5779

38

2 BETH TORAH TIMES


A Message from Our Rabbi

Pittsburgh

Sermon Shabbat 11.03.18

Last Shabbat morning around

11:00am a volunteer whispered in

my ear “there was an attack on a

synagogue in Pittsburgh, they are

saying at least 4 people are dead”

I received the news like a sword in

my chest!

I have never been to the state of

Pennsylvania, but I was born in

Buenos Aires and the AMIA, the

Jewish Federation, was bombed

there and the Israeli Embassy was

bombed there leaving between both

attacks more than 110 dead and

countless injured.

And I revived all those terrible

feelings of anger, impotence and

sadness.

I did not stay for Kiddush.

I left for home as I wanted to be

with my family and watch the news.

Yes, the news on Shabbat!

During this past week I was shocked

by our sense of shock and surprise!

This has happened countless times

before! In recent years, right here in

America:

- Emanuel African Methodist

Episcopal Church, South Carolina

… nine black church members

massacred by Dylann Roof.

- Al Masjid Masque, New York City

… the Imam and his assistant fatally

shot on Aug 13, 2016.

- Nov 5, 2017, 26 people killed

at First Baptist Church in

Southerland, TX.

- Sept 25, 2017, one killed and

seven injured at the Burnette

Chapel Church of Christ,

Tennessee.

It has happened again and

again! So how come now,

suddenly, we are shocked? Why

weren’t we shocked enough

when those victims were black?

Or Christians? Or as in an

Orlando bar where the victims

were Gay?

ARE WE REALLY SURPRISED????

We don’t know that hate speech

leads to hate crimes???

And yet I have been troubled

this past week. While I was

pleased with the response of

the community when we called

for a community vigil the other

night, I found myself thinking

about Charleston. Where was

our voice when Dylan Roof

opened fire in a church and

killed nine African Americans

three years ago? Sure, we shook

our heads in dismay, rabbis gave

sermons and people said, “How

terrible,” but where were the

vigils? Where were the local

protests? And last year, when a

gunman opened fire at Marjory

Stoneman Douglas High School

RABBI

MARIO ROJZMAN

in Parkland, why didn’t more of us

take to the streets and challenge

public leaders regarding gun

control? Why did it take an attack

on a synagogue to motivate us to

speak out and organize a vigil?

I am not foolish, I know why we are

shocked. It is because it almost hits

home:

We are a conservative shul, Tree of

Life is a conservative shul.

We gather Saturday mornings at

9:30, they gather at 9:45.

Continues on page 44

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A Message from Our Rabbi

“How long O Lord? The aftermath

of the shooting in Pittsburgh’s

Tree of Life”

Ad Anah Adonai – How long O

Lord – cried out the prophet – How

long? How long must we endure

these vile anti-Semitic attacks is

the question on all our minds.

It’s a painful cry that no Jewish

community has been immune from

since Pharaoh decided to enslave

his Hebrew population in spite of

all it had done from Egypt – saving

it from famine and destruction.

We all have opinions about what

happened, why it happened, what

might have triggered it. All have

some validity, none can be proven

right or wrong – every opinion has

a kernel of truth we can learn from.

The issue is too complicated and

has a long, long history. What we

need to do is look at our tradition

and see what it teaches us and put

it all in perspective. Tzay ulmad -

let’s learn. In Moses’ Maimonides

epic legal work called the Mishneh

Torah he discusses the coming of the

Messiah. He tells us that once the

Messiah comes: “All the books of

the prophets and all the writings will

no longer be valid in the days of the

Messiah except for Megillat Esther

which will remain together with the

five books of the Torah and the laws

of the Oral Torah that will never

lose their validity. Even though all

memory of troubles will be dropped

– but the days of Purim will remain.”

Why even after the coming of the

Messiah will we still read the book

of Esther and still observe Purim?

Because even when the Messiah

comes you still need to look out for

Haman!! That is how enduring anti-

Semitism is. Even in the Messianic

era we will have to keep an eye

out for Haman There is a Rabbinic

midrash which I believe explains

this rather bizarre idea. The Rabbis

say that if you are in the midst of

planting a tree and someone comes

and tells you that the Messiah has

arrived, you should finish planting

the tree and then go greet the

Messiah. What are the Rabbis

saying? I believe they are saying

two things: a) don’t alter your

lives – your work – your building

for the future – because you think

the Messiah has come. Because

it’s probably a false alarm. b) Even

if it is the Messiah you still need to

plant trees, care for the world and

build the future. Our partnership

with God and our working to repair

the world doesn’t end with the

coming of the Messiah. The story

of Esther will always be relevant

because even if you think it’s the

messiah – it probably isn’t – and

even if it is people will still be

people and Haman will still be

lurking in the shadows. In other

words, never, ever let your guard

down. My fellow Jews – Jews have

been attacked in France, in Belgium,

RABBI EMERITUS

EDWIN FARBER

in England, in Istanbul, in Argentina, in

Morocco, in Italy and of course in Israel.

Each time we are upset and horrified - Jews

being attacked and killed for the crime

of being Jewish. But for us this attack in

Pittsburgh is psychologically more traumatic

for many reasons. It’s simply more personal.

Let me illustrate why. When they first read

the list of the names of the victims – the

very first name was Daniel Stein. For many

years a fine elderly and gentle man sat over

there – (pointing to seat) many a Friday

night or Shabbat morning with his wife of

many decades. She passed away a few years

ago but he kept coming – now even more

regularly – to say kaddish. The other year

he decided to move away to be closer to

family and we miss him. His name is Daniel

Stein. For one moment I wondered if this

could have been the same man as I didn’t

remember where he moved to. It wasn’t

him – it was a different Daniel Stein. This

attack was more personal because this was

here in America in a city where many of us

personally knows people. My colleague -

Rabbi Jonathan Berkun’s father and mother

would have been

Continues on page 48

4 BETH TORAH TIMES


A Message from Our Cantor

CANTOR

GASTÓN BOGOMOLNI

A great miracle happened ALSO there

Jews of the Dominican Republic – another Chanukkah story…

By Clauss Bienen, Martín Katz y Rachel Reuter

Revised by: Rabbi Manes Kogan y Hazzan Gastón Bogomolni.

This year, it is the 80th anniversary of the Evian Conference.

In 1938 the Evian Conference was held under the auspices

of American President Roosevelt with the participation of

32 countries, in order to investigate the possibilities of help

for the emigration of Jews persecuted by Nazism. Only the

Dominican Republic under the government of General Trujillo

offers 100,000 visas for refugees.

In the year 1939 the DORSA (Dominican Republic

Settlement Association) was founded in New York under

the administration of Dr. Rosenberg, Dr. Rosen (expert in

agronomy) and Dr. Hextor (principal administrator of the

Joint). DORSA acquires from Trujillo the lands of the former

United Fruit Company in the north of the country. The lands

are dry, arid and of little agricultural value.

On May 10, 1940, the first group of refugees arrived in Sosúa.

There were 35 mainly German and Austrian people. The

DORSA paid the cost of the trip of approximately 18 days,

from Genua -Italia- to Santo Domingo.

The first settlers lived in the old houses of the

Fruit Company and began to develop a European

agriculture under the instructions of the Diplomat

Agronomist Frederick Perlstein. They grew tomatoes,

cucumbers, carrots and cabbage but couldn’t find a

market for these products. They worked and lived

under extremely rudimentary conditions. Many of the

settlers, unaccustomed to local weather conditions,

fell ill with malaria.

In 1941, a hospital, a pharmacy, a building for

administration, a small synagogue, a school with a

library, a common dining room, dormitories for men

and women were started. Houses were built only for

married couples with children, all in wood and very

austere.

In the same year more refugees arrived: Germans,

Austrians, Poles, some Dutch and French.

Continues on page 53

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5


A Message from Our Co-Presidents

Fellow Congregants:

A few months ago, through the miracle of Facebook, I caught up with an old

friend, who then sent me a photograph. It was a picture taken at my then

synagogue in Orlando, Ohev Shalom. The year was 1951. It showed about 25

Sunday School children, encompassing grades K-2. At the top of the picture

were the teachers and a big sign that said “HAPPY CHANUKAH!” Incredibly,

there I was, far younger, at the far right in the second row. For me, it was an

incredible picture, and it brought back some great memories!

I think that for most American Jews of my generation, and perhaps continuing

right up until today, our memories as children always contain thoughts of

Chanukah. I got my first bicycle on Chanukah. In fourth grade I was gifted

two great books that I still own, with a note from my mother wishing me a

Happy Chanukah. I remember my beloved mom and dad, of blessed memory,

so pleased with the smile on my face when getting my presents. I remember

my grandmother, who made awesome blintzes and latkes! I am sure that all of

you have similar memories. Forget that the Rabbis said that Chanukah was not

a major thing. For me, who grew up with relatively non-observant parents in a

largely Gentile environment, Chanukah was a very big deal – it’s what allowed

us to match up with Christmas! It was fun! You got eight presents (even

though by number 8 the gift was always very small)! G-d bless the Maccabees!

MIKE SEGAL

I write all of this because by the time you read it Chanukah will be upon us and

because I’m feeling a bit nostalgic for the good old days. When I was a kid we

literally did not lock the doors at my house – no need. My friends and I rode

our bikes around the neighborhood and beyond, and basically did what we

wanted, so long as we were home by dinner. When I was 7, I was allowed to

take the bus downtown to see a movie – by myself!

I feel sad for what our world has become. The Pittsburgh shooting was another

nail in the coffin of the world as I knew it. That world is gone – forever. However,

we must keep going and adapt. Jews survive! Here at BTBRC we are working

hard to keep you safe. I think you can be confident that we are laser focused

on protecting all of our congregants. We are also, with your help, creating a

culture of security where we all look out for each other.

Thus, as Chanukah approaches let us count our many blessings. Let us

celebrate, spin the dreidel, light the menorah, sing “Rock of Ages,” eat the

latkes, and be happy just like it’s the good old days, in the safe haven of our

beloved Beth Torah!

RICHARD BERGER

Enjoy the Holiday,

Mike Segal

Co-President

6 BETH TORAH TIMES


A Message from Our

Director of Development

In the Spirit of Chanukkah

It seemed strange for a Talmudic sage to have asked ‘mi hanukah’

“What is Hanukah?” Surely our sages were profoundly steeped in

all the minutiae of Jewish lore. Since the Talmud alludes only to the

miracle of the cruse of oil, and completely ignores the spectacular

Maccabean triumph, we must seek an ancillary meaning. The miracle

of the cruse of oil symbolizes the miracle of man’s invincible spirit in

the face of adversity.

There are occasions in life when the lamp of hope flickers low, and

its “fuel” seems to have reached its nadir. The pit of despair yawns

deeper and deeper. Failure seems inevitable, as it did with the

Maccabees before their indomitable spiritual stamina enabled them

to gain the ultimate victory. A rebirth of strength emerged from some

spiritual subliminal profundities.

It is at such a time when the miracle of the spirit becomes a reality.

This is borne out in the redemptive experience of the author of Psalm

130 who, when all seemed hopeless, cried out Mimaamakim kratiha

haShem, “Out of the depth have I called You, O Lord.”

Rabbi A. Alan Steinbach

ROCHELLE & ROBYN JOIN ME IN WISHING A HAPPY CHANUKKAH

TO OUR ENTIRE BETH TORAH FAMILY. MAY WE REJOICE IN PEACE

AND HAPPINESS ON THIS SPECIAL HOLIDAY AND AS WE ENTER THE

SECULAR YEAR OF 2019.

Over the years, I have come across many articles that have become

some of my favorites and the words below reflect one that enriches

my synagogue life and I hope yours as well. Let’s make this “New

Year’s Resolution” together.

We may compare our synagogue to a wheel, with our executive

officers and the board at the hub, the working committees as spokes,

and the general membership as the rim. If any part of the wheel does

not function properly, serious trouble results. On the other hand, if

every part performs its task efficiently, we have one of the greatest

inventions of mankind. Should any member consider himself more

important than any other member, the alignment and symmetry of

our organization is disrupted. If in a wheel one spoke is larger than

MARSHALL BALTUCH

the other spokes, the wheel has little value; or

if the hub should expand beyond its limits, we

then have an empty hoop, and no wheel can

travel with a rim sans spokes.

There are times when an organization (the

wheel) will travel over rough roads and extra

strain may demand lubrication. Nothing is

more effective for this purpose than friendly

cooperation. It reduces friction and supplies

that “ingredient” which makes the difference

between a well-oiled machine and a clanking

mass which produces nothing but noise and

discord.

With this comparison in mind, let us all

resolve to cooperate, and let us perform our

part, whether it be at the hub, at the spokes,

or at the rim. No part is so important that we

can dispense with all other parts. No member

is so insignificant that he will not be missed.

Chag Chanukkah Sameach and a Happy

Secular New Year.

Marshall Baltuch

Director of Development

Winter Edition 2018/2019 l Kislev 5779

7


A Message from Our

Suzy Fischer Early Childhood

Academy Director

Our Early Childhood Academy is having another amazing year. All of our

classrooms and filled and we have added additional rooms to meet the

demand for our program. Our Suzy Fischer Early Childhood Academy has

expanded to 19 classrooms, and growing.

Our newly formed Parent Community, KOOLAM, has made a wonderful

start this year with many fundraising and friend-raising events. Our

weekly challah sales and Scholastic Book Fair has already raised funds.

Our goal this year is to upgrade and enhance our playgrounds. Thank you

to Sharon Lewen and Melanie Gorin, co-presidents of KOOLAM, for their

commitment and leadership of this amazing ECA Parent Community!

The Jewish holidays were enjoyed and celebrated by all our children with

special events, Sukkah parties, food experiences, music and dance to

enhance the beauty of the holidays and Create Jewish Memories for our

children and families.

December brings our favorite holiday, Chanukkah. We bring out the

menorahs, candles, latkes and the joy of the holiday is felt throughout the

school.

Our Chanukkah De-Lights show on Decmber 7th , is a wonderful way to

conclude the first months of school and get everyone in the holiday mood

as our pk2, pk3 and Jr.K children entertain their families with Chanukkah

songs and dances!! Our Toddlers and Twos also get into the Chanukkah

spirit and invite all their families for a special Chanukkah party on December

5th!!

ANNE MANDELBAUM

The ECA Staff send

their wishes for a

Joyful Chanukkah to

all our Beth Torah

Families.

8 BETH TORAH TIMES


A Message from Our

Membership Director

Dear Families,

By the time you receive this issue many things have happened

at BT since the last Beth Torah Times. We had experienced

meaningful High Holy Day time. We shared many shabbatot

and social and communal events, from family programs

(FunFest) to Latin Concerts (Entrelazadas).

We continue to enhance the Beth Torah experience by

growing the number of opportunities we can take advantage

of as a community. The Social Action volunteers expanded

their actions by re-instituting the Mitzvah Day with lots of

offerings to contribute to the well being of other (Jewish and

non-Jewish) communities. A new initiative of a Culture Club

offers added learning opportunities to nurture ourselves in

different fields; architecture, Jewish History, theater, music

appreciation and more. The all-year- round programs (Café con

Torah, Partners in Torah, Rikudim, Yiddish Club) started again

this year.

Yes, life goes on. We are about to enter a new secular year

(2019) and we must admit that we live in a dynamic world of

constant impact and change. We, as American Jews are being

impacted by sick minds of intolerance and hatred. Once

again more than ever, we should remain united and connected

amongst ourselves and to our communities. Take adavantage

of the many opportunities we offer to remain strong against

every storm.

GABY RASCOVSKY

As always, please feel free to contact

me at grascovsky@btbrc.org or

305. 932.2829 x 7821 at any time.

Sincerely,

Gaby Rascovsky

Membership and Religious School

Director

10 BETH TORAH TIMES


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11


Lifecycles

Lifecycles

“Life is lived with people.” Rabbi Ed Farber

MAZAL TOV TO:

Liron and Jackob Dweck in honor of the birth of their

daughter, Noa

Miriam and Bruce Masia, on the marriage of their daughter,

Alexandra (Ali) Lakofsky to Yehonatan Kor, son of Chedva and

Avraham Kor of Rehavia Israel

Sandra Cantor and Horacio Schutt, on the marriage of their

daughter, Daiana Kucawca to Eli Tukachinsky

Diane and Stephen Wander, on the marriage of their son,

Josh to Alison Masterman

Jan and Alex Hockman, on the recent marriage of their son,

Jeremy to Cori Stone

Renee and Jorge Lerman, on the recent marriage of their son,

Benjamin to Tatiana Mesa

Ilene and Moises Cohen, in honor of the birth of their

daughter, Elizabeth and to the proud Grandparents, Lea and

Salomon Cohen and Uncle Abe

Jessica and Kevin Plotkin, on the birth of their daughter,

Alison Daren and to the proud grandparents, Etta Birenbaum

Epstein and Adrienne and Marc Plotkin and to Aunt Melissa

and Uncle Oleg Zubarev

Judy and Rich Berger, on the marriage of their son Jeremy to

Chris Howard, son of Susan and Sheldon Howard

Renata and Jeffrey Wolfe-Schlesinger, on the naming of their

son, Daniel

CONDOLENCES TO:

Wendy and Steven Kravitz, Ellen and Larry Elbrand and Marlene

and Michael Olin and Families, in memory of beloved mother

and grandmother, Shirley Kravitz

Cheryl and Nelson Ferreira, Jeni, Matt, Kayla, Addison and

Dylan Buchholz and Londyn, in memory of beloved mother,

grandmother and great grandmother, Gerri Toth

Bernie, Kristy and Adam Singer, in memory of beloved mother

and grandmother, Rosalind ”Roz” Singer

Bergman Family, in memory of beloved mother, grandmother

and great grandmother, Joan Bergman

Sandra Moskovitz, Rob and Evelyn Moskovitz, Dan and Susan

Moskovitz, Bradley, Justin, Josie and Logan, on the passing of

beloved husband, father and grandfather, David Moskovitz

Judi and Bob Billig, on the passing of beloved brother, David

Dobin

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13


Mazal Tov to our

B’nai Mitzvah

November 3 RYAN ROTHENBERG

Son of Shari & Jeff

November 10 NOAH KURKIN

Son of Mindy & Mark

November 15 DYLAN WIGODA

Son of Ruthy & Paul

November 16 TALIA ROSENTHAL

Daughter of Jeanne & Kerry

December 9 NOA BEN DAVID

Daughter of Oranit & Eron

December 9 BRADEN PARRIS

Son of Aileen & Steven

January 5 MICHAEL PLEWINSKI

Son of Fabiola & Brian

January 12 CINDY HELLER

Daughter of Carolina

January 17 ANDREW SIMPFENDORFER

Son of Susan Fox & Conrad

Simpfendorfer

January 19 PARKER SANDERS

Son of Kerri & Jeffrey

January 21 MATTHEW GOLOD

Son of Vanessa & Sebastian

14 BETH TORAH TIMES


Candle lighting Times

for Shabbat and Parashiot

November 24 VAYISHLACH 5:11PM

December 1 VAYESHEV 5:11PM

December 8 MIKETZ 5:11PM

December 15 VAYIGASH 5:13PM

December 22 VAYECHI 5:16PM

December 29 SHEMOT 5:20PM

January 5 Vaera 5:25PM

January 12 Bo 5:30PM

January 19 Beshalach 5:35PM

January 26 Yitro 5:41PM

Welcome our New Members

ADRIANNE & ADAM BLOMBERG

FERNANDA & MICHAEL NEWMAN

VERA MUZYKANSKI & DANIEL CHTEINBERG

ELENA & ABRAHAM SILBER

LORENA & ABRAHAM ABRAMSON

PATRICIA PEREZ & BRETT PALAT

JUAN MONTOYA

SANDRA MEHLER

KARINA DUER & ISAAC KATZ

DIANA GRAJALES

KFIR AMSALEM & JULIANA SALTCHICK

OREN MAROM & KARINA RYAN

DAIVA SUMSLATE

SHEILA VISHNEVSKY

ENA & SOLOMON ENGEL

AMY SHUTTER

LUZ GEDULD


High Holy Days Feedback

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18 BETH TORAH TIMES


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19


ASK DR. KERUV

Q: We have our family Chanukah party each year. This year

we invited our daughter’s brother in law’s family to our party.

His wife is not Jewish and the children are being brought

up with no particular religion at this time. Our tradition is

to give each child their own menorah to light the Chanukah

candles and recite the prayers. Is it appropriate to give all

the children menorahs even if they aren’t being brought up

Jewish?

Dianne Dreidel from Davie

A: Dianne it is perfectly alright to give all the children

menorahs. The story of Chanukah teaches us about religious

freedom. Invite others to share in the joy of lighting the

menorah. If you expose the children from an interfaith marriage

to the wonderful custom of Chanukah perhaps the memories will

be happy and long lasting, and hopefully will help influence the

non Jewish spouse and children to partake in Jewish traditions in

the future. You need to make the interfaith couple and children

feel welcome in your home when celebrating Chanukah and

other Jewish holidays. Chanukah is a happy holiday with lots of

ethnic foods, games, and songs; what better way to show the joys

of Judaism to a young family.

Dr.Keruv

This column will be printed in the Beth Torah Times each

edition.If you have a question, please email

drkeruv@hotmail.com or

Mail to

Dr. Keruv

Beth Torah Benny Rok Campus

20350 NE 26th Avenue, N. Miami Beach, Fl. 33180

20 BETH TORAH TIMES


REGISTER AT https://btbrc.shulcloud.com/form/mitzvahday.html

Winter Edition 2018/2019 l Kislev 5779

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22 BETH TORAH TIMES


“...As my father planted for me before I was born,

so do I plant for those who willcome after me.”

- Talmud Ta’amit

Contributions &

Yahrzeit Donations

Beth Torah gratefully acknowledges

these gifts of Tzedakah, from

March 2018 to August 2018

The Officers and Board of Directors, Professional and Office staff join in expressing our

Mazal Tov or Condolences to the following families:

GENERAL FUND

Received from…

Diane and Stephen Wander, in memory of George Rodman,

beloved father of the Rodman Family

Goldstein-Okay Family in memory of beloved son, Alan

Bernardo Selcer, in memory of beloved Moises Zaragoza and

Samuel Zaragoza

Raquel and Michael Scheck, in memory of beloved mother,

Berta Berezdivin

Phylis Meier, in memory of beloved father, Leo Simensky and

beloved sister, Sandra Frank

Phylis Meier, in memory of beloved Rebecca Simensky

Ramsey and Henry Pevsner, in memory of beloved Ralph Baker

and Pearl Barrett

Herbert Goldberg, in memory of beloved son, Steven Goldberg

Bob Shelley, in memory of beloved mother, Evelyn Shelley

Burton Young, in memory of beloved mother, Clara Young

Marta Jacofsky, in memory of beloved Carlota Dunayevich de

Jacofsky

Julio Barenboim, in memory of beloved Sara Barenboim

Ramsey and Henry Pevsner, in memory of beloved Ruth

Pevsner

Annette Willis, in memory of beloved grandmother, Hannah

Harriet Pearson, in memory of beloved Albert Johnson, Rose

Johnson, Julian Pearson, David Pearson and Joan Harris

Helen and Edward Decker, in memory of beloved Bernard Catz

Anne and Harold Mandelbaum, in memory of beloved Joan

Bergman

Harry Zimmerman, in memory of beloved sister, Sylvia

Zimmerman

Bette Joy Field, in honor of Jeremy and Chris Berger’s wedding,

son of Judy and Rich Berger

Dora Katz, in honor of Elaine Fisher’s birthday

Rhoda Stein-Lipschitz, in honor of Sherri and Jeff Niefeld’s 40th

Wedding Anniversary

Winter Edition 2018/2019 l Kislev 5779

23


IN MEMORY OF SHIRLEY KRAVITZ, BELOVED

MOTHER AND GRANDMOTHER OF

WENDY AND STEVEN KRAVITZ, ELLEN AND LARRY

ELBRAND AND MARLENE

AND MICHAEL OLIN AND FAMILIES

IN MEMORY OF DAVID DOBIN, BELOVED BROTHER

OF JUDI AND BOB BILLIG AND FAMILY

Received from…

Gisela and Rabbi Mario Rojzman and Family

Laurie and Rabbi Ed Farber and Family

Marcela and Cantor Gaston Bogomolni and Family

Wayne Keil

Rochelle and Marshall Baltuch and Family

Ronna and Mike Segal and Family

Judy and Rich Berger and Family

Raquel and Michael Scheck and Family

The Beth Torah office staff Teri, Sherry, Marla, Lea, Veronica

and Catalina

Marcia and Joel Hochberg

Etta Epstein

IN MEMORY OF GERRI TOTH, BELOVED MOTHER

OF CHERYL AND NELSON FERREIRA AND

GRANDMOTHER OF JENI AND MATT BUCHHOLZ

AND GREAT GRANDMOTHER OF KAYLA, ADDISON,

DYLAN BUCHHOLZ AND LONDYN

Received from…

Gisela and Rabbi Mario Rojzman and Family

Laurie and Rabbi Ed Farber and Family

Marcela and Cantor Gaston Bogomolni and Family

Wayne Keil

Rochelle and Marshall Baltuch and Family

Ronna and Mike Segal and Family

Judy and Rich Berger and Family

Raquel and Michael Scheck and Family

The Beth Torah office staff Teri, Sherry, Marla, Lea, Veronica

and Catalina

Arlene Keil

Rhoda Stein-Lipschitz

Etta Epstein

Melissa and Oleg Zubarev

Jessica and Kevin Plotkin

IN MEMORY OF ROSALIND “ROZ” SINGER, BELOVED

MOTHER AND GRANDMOTHER OF BERNIE, KRISTY

AND ADAM SINGER AND FAMILY

Received from…

Gisela and Rabbi Mario Rojzman and Family

Laurie and Rabbi Ed Farber and Family

Marcela and Cantor Gaston Bogomolni and Family

Wayne Keil

Rochelle and Marshall Baltuch and Family

Ronna and Mike Segal and Family

Judy and Rich Berger and Family

Raquel and Michael Scheck and Family

The Beth Torah office staff Teri, Sherry, Marla, Lea, Veronica and

Catalina

Tina and Myron Cohen

Lea and Salomon Cohen and Family

Janet Hager

Mindy Drath

Scott Weisblum

Lenore Elias

Shelly Lipson

Arlene Keil

Judy and Joel Feinman

IN MEMORY OF DAVID MOSKOVITZ, BELOVED

HUSBAND, FATHER AND GRANDFATHER OF

SANDRA MOSKOVITZ, ROB AND EVELYN

MOSKOVITZ AND DAN AND SUSAN MOSKOVITZ,

BRADLEY, JUSTIN, SARA, JOSIE, LOGAN AND FAMILY

Received from…

Gisela and Rabbi Mario Rojzman and Family

Laurie and Rabbi Ed Farber and Family

Marcela and Cantor Gaston Bogomolni and Family

Wayne Keil

Rochelle and Marshall Baltuch and Family

Ronna and Mike Segal and Family

Judy and Rich Berger and Family

Raquel and Michael Scheck and Family

The Beth Torah office staff Teri, Sherry, Marla, Lea, Veronica and

Catalina

Ronni and Bob Whitebook

Judi and Ray Wilensky

24 BETH TORAH TIMES


KETTLER & LEVY FAMILIES YOUTH CONNECTION

Received from…

Karen and Michael Matluck, in memory of beloved mother,

Elaine Matluck

Carole Fink, in memory of beloved husband, Jeffrey Fink,

mother’s Elizabeth and Gertrude and aunt, Goldy

Gareth Fink, in memory of beloved father, Jeffrey Fink and

sister, Heidi

Syd Nacron, in memory of beloved father, Emmanuel Rudy and

beloved parents, Rosa and Rubin Najkon

Justine and Stanley Warmbrandt, in memory of beloved son,

Barry Warmbrandt

Justine and Stanley Warmbrandt, in memory of beloved

brother, Marvin Warmbrandt

Ilene, Jay, Brian, Courtney and Austin Rechtman and Rachel and

Patrick Banks, in memory of beloved father and grandfather,

Edwin Rechtman

Lenore Elias, in memory of beloved husband, father and

grandfather, Alvin Elias

Syd Nacron, in memory of beloved daughter, Rosemary Nacron

Alyne and Abbey Kaplan, in memory of beloved Norman Wrubel

Deborah Berkowitz, in honor of Fern Sher’s 89th birthday

EVELYN and MONROE MITCHEL and FAMILY

CONTINUING EDUCATION

Received from…

Berta Feldman, in honor of Elaine Fisher’s birthday

Evelyn and Monroe Mitchel, in memory of beloved mother,

Mary Goldberg and beloved uncle, Benjamin Benjamin

SCHECK FAMILY RELIGIOUS SCHOOL

Received from…

Susan and Sid Koslovsky, in memory of Alex and Millie Koslovsky

and Gertrude Greenberg

Steven Zucker, in memory of all deceased members of my

family, and in honor of all of these wonderful souls

Berta Feldman, in memory of beloved husband, Abraham

Feldman

Jane and Alan Axelrod, in memory of beloved Joan Leff

Rabbi Ed and Laurie Farber, in memory of our parents

SUZY FISCHER EARLY CHILDHOOD ACADEMY

Received from…

Audre Niedenthal, in memory of my dearest beloved dad, Bert

Bass

KIDDUSH FUND

Received from…

Raquel and Manuel Rydz, in memory of beloved fathers,

Moises Cohen and Felix Rydz

Judy and Joel Feinman, in memory of beloved mother,

Norma Reich

Jean and Bruce Smoler, in memory of beloved Goldie

Smoler

Deborah Friedman, in memory of Ruth Newman

SHIRLEY SCHREIBER FAMILY CAMP SIMCHA

SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Received from…

Perry Phillips, in memory of beloved Louis Phillips and

Miguel Berezdivin

DR. STUART KLODA CAMP RAMAH AND YOUTH

SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Received from…

Madeline and Joel Benes, in honor of Danny Whitebook’s

birthday

WARREN HENRY AUTO GROUP AND THE ZINN

FAMILY LEV SHALEM MACHZOR FUND

Received from…

Arlene Keil and Family, in memory of beloved sister and

aunt, Renee Glassman

Bette Joy Field, in honor of my children

SIDDUR LEV SHALEM FOR SHABBAT AND

FESTIVALS

Received from…

Ron Smith, in honor of Rabbi Rojzman and Rabbi Farber

and wishing you a healthy and Happy New Year

Ronni and Bob Whitebook, in memory of Shirley Kravitz,

beloved mother and grandmother of Wendy and Steven

Kravitz and Family

Ronni and Bob Whitebook, in memory of David Moskowitz,

beloved husband, father and grandfather of Sandra

Moskowitz and Rob and Evelyn Moskowitz and Dan and

Susan Moskowitz and Families

Jill and Brian Koch, in memory of Andy Rodman’s father

Friends of Rosalind (Roz) Singer, in memory of beloved Roz

Singer

Winter Edition 2018/2019 l Kislev 5779

25


MIRIAM AND SEYMOUR FELDSTEIN LIKRAT

SHABBAT FUND

Received from…

Arlene Keil, in memory of beloved sister, Isabel Lerner

KERI BROOKE HEIKEN COLLEGE OUTREACH FUND

Received from…

Syd Nacron, in memory of beloved daughter, Rosemary Nacron

PATTI MINTZ CAMP RAMAH SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Received from…

Shelly Lipson, in memory of beloved mother, Doris Dorfman

and beloved brother-in law Robert Lipson

SUZANNE LIPSON ISRAEL PROGRAMS FOR

COLLEGE STUDENTS

Received from…

Evelyn Wagenberg, in memory of beloved Hilda and Marcos

Yanovich

BT2U

Received from…

Tina and Myron Cohen, in memory of beloved sister, Selma

Silverman

RABBI ROJZMAN’S DISCRETIONARY FUND

Received from…

Renee and Jorge Lerman, in honor of the marriage of their son

Ben to Tatiana

Sharon Miriam Blumberg, in memory of beloved Joel A Gellar

Goldie Wigutow, in memory of her beloved husband, Sol

Wigutow

RABBI FARBER’S DISCRETIONARY FUND

Received from…

Christy and Bernie Singer in loving memory of Bernie’s Mom, Roz

Singer

Ilene and Jay Rechtman in honor of the birth of their grandson,

Austin Ian Rechtman

Ilene and Jay Rechtman in prayer for a speedy recovery for

Morechai ben Laima

Marc and Jackie Fine in honor of the baby naming of their new

granddaughter

Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon Muchnick in honor of the High Holy Days

services

Robin Wucher and Larry Willis in memory of Robin’s Uncle,

Lloyd Wucher, on the occasion of the unveiling ceremony.

Sylvan Marlen and Gorecki Korda in honor of Beth Torah

Mindy and Marc Dickler in memory of Robert and Sandra

Feldman

You may also send your tax-deductible donations to these other funds:

- SECURITY

- MARSHALL BALTUCH USY SCHOLARSHIP FUND

- SHELLEY FAMILY EARLY CHILDHOOD LEARNING CENTER

- SPANISH MAJZORIM FOR IAMIM NORAIM

- EVA AND HELMUT WELLISCH ETZ HAYIM - CHUMASH FUND

- RABBI MAX A LIPSCHITZ YOUTH SCHOLARSHIP FUND

- PHYLLIS & STEVE SHEINMAN YOUTH SCHOLARSHIP FUND

- RUTH WAGNER SHAPIRO YOUTH SCHOLARSHIP FUND

- CAMPUS RENOVATION PROJECT

- JENNY LERMAN RELIGIOUS SCHOOL FUND

- MORRIS STEIN MEMORIAL FUND

- DR. SHULAMIT KATZMAN SCHOLARSHIP FUND FOR JEWISH EDUCATION

26 BETH TORAH TIMES


News from Sisterhood

Chanukkah means dedication, which

represents the Maccabees defeating

the Syrians and rededicating the Temple

with the miracle of finding holy oil that

miraculously lasted for 8 days, despite

having only enough for one day.

Our Sisterhood is a dedicated group of

women and we honored our members at

our Paid up Membership Brunch, along with

honoring Rachel Lerfelt with our special

Eyshet Chayel award. This award is given

annually to a member of our Sisterhood

who goes above and beyond at helping out

at various events and programs.

Our program included a special skit about

Jewish pirates. Thank you to Judie Berger

and Terry Jonas for writing the script and

to our hard-working committee. A special

thanks goes to our Beth Torah Temple

Presidents, Rich Berger and Mike Segal for taking

on the roles of two of the pirates.

Our Chanukkah party, will be graciously hosted

by our own Gisela and Rabbi Rojzman. Instead

of a gift exchange, we have chosen to donate

to Sharsheret by bringing special toys for the

families of the women who are suffering from

breast and ovarian cancer.

On January 20 at 10 am, Sisterhood will be

celebrating with a Tu B’Shevat Seder. This will be

in lieu of our annual Women’s Seder at Passover.

Special Todah Rabah to our Sisters who have

honored us with donations.

Chanukkah Sameach!

Judy Berger and Etta Birenbaum Epstein

Sisterhood Co-Presidents

28 BETH TORAH TIMES


News from the Scheck Family Religious School

Dear Families,

Shalom,

We hope this issue finds you well.

Incredibly, school has been in session

for about two months. In such a

short time we have achieved many

accomplishments. First of all, we

proudly share that our classrooms

have grown, not because we

expanded the walls, but because the

number of students has increased

in every grade level. We opened the

year by baking round Challah for

Rosh Hashanah, and right away in

mid October we shared the Shabbat

table with families in grades K-3. The

turnout reached the 150 people who

celebrated Shabbat in shul. We also

initiated our collective Mitzvah project

with KFB and our students in those

grade levels attended the Kosher Food

Bank Facility to help stack the monthly

items. During the month of November,

students in grades 5-6 visited the

Holocaust Memorial Museum to

commemorate Kristallnacht and,

of course, discussed the tragedy in

Pittsburgh. As December approaches,

we start re - evoking the miracles of

Chanukkah and thinking of a relaxing

break. It is our true hope to continue

to illuminate and nurture our children

with Jewish values and educate them

as Jewish Civilians of the world.

The end of the secular year is approaching soon and once again the

year goes round and round as many things happen around us, some

good simchas to share and yet other sorrows to despair. We want

to greet our families with a prosperous and peaceful 2019 as we

thank our teachers for their devotion to the sacred task of Jewish

Education.

Last, but not least, we want to congratulate the Kurkin Family on

Noah’s Bar Mitzvah while we thank Mindy for the tireless hours and

effort she invests in our school as the V.P of Education.

Mazel tov, Noah and to the entire family.

Sincerely,

The Scheck Family Religious School Team

Winter Edition 2018/2019 l Kislev 5779

29


News from the YOUTH GROUP

USY & KADIMA

30 BETH TORAH TIMES


.

EXPERIENCE ISRAEL

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TEL AVIV - MASADA - EIN GEDI - JERUSALEM -

GALILEE - TZFAT - GOLAN - AKKO - TEL AVIV

Discover the Old and the Modern Israel

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f

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Copyright © 2018 Momentum Tours & Travel, Inc. All rights reserved.

MAY 19 - MAY 29, 2019

Ed Farber

Rabbi / Educator

ONLY 5 SPACES AVAILABLE

with

Marshall Baltuch

Trip Administrator

GRANTS TO SUBSIDIZE EACH ATTENDEE BY THE

HAROLD E. SIMON CHARITABLE FOUNDATION, INC

For More Information Contact Marshall Baltuch - mbaltuch@btbrc.org

Winter Edition 2018/2019 l Kislev 5779

31


32 BETH TORAH TIMES


Winter Edition 2018/2019 l Kislev 5779

33


34 BETH TORAH TIMES


Winter Edition 2018/2019 l Kislev 5779

35


36 BETH TORAH TIMES


Winter Edition 2018/2019 l Kislev 5779

37


Donor Roster

High Holy Days 2018 - 5779

“Each according to the Blessing which the Lord God has bestowed upon them”

We thank the following people and their families for committing

to our High Holy Days campaign.

LIFETIME MEMBERSHIP

Lois & Sanford z”l Hildebrandt

Marcia & Joel Hochberg

Cheryl & Ruben Kloda

Shelly & Arthur z”l Lipson

Raquel & Michael Scheck

Linda Shelley

Robert Shelley

Ronni & Bob Whitebook

RABBIS’ CABINET MEMBERSHIP

Anonymous

Carola & Michel Cohen

Marcia & Jeff Frantz

Jeannie & Barry Lewin

Syd Nacron

Ana Karina & Jonathan Politano

Laurie & Stephen Riemer

Phyllis & Steve Sheinman

Terri & Jeffrey Sonn

Elizabeth Laduzinski & Jose Waingarten

BT2U PROGRAM

The Scheck Family

ENDOWMENTS

ETZ CHAYIM CHUMASH FUND

Eva & Helmut Wellisch

LEV SHALEM MAHZOR FUND

Warren Henry Auto Group &

Zinn Family

LIKRAT SHABBAT SIDDUR FUND

Miriam & Seymour Feldstein

BETH TORAH FOUNDATION

Dr. Shulamit Katzman z”l

Educational Scholarship Fund

NEW PERMANENT SEATS

Tammy & Eric Isicoff

Renee & Jorge Lerman

Valentina & Ariel Saban

Anica & David Shpilberg

With much gratitude, we thank

Marcia Frantz, for compiling our

Annual Book of Remembrance.

PILLAR OF BETH TORAH

$25,000 - $35,999

NER TAMID

$18,000-$24,999

Monica & Daniel Bajuk

Lana & Michael Fischer

Grosskopf Family

RABBI MAX’S B’NAI MITZVAH

CLUB – $13,000 - $17,999

Amy & Howard Chafetz

Linda & Gil Drozdow

Kathy & Daniel Haime

Marcia & Joel Hochberg

Alison & Rick Mars

Rosa Rok

38 BETH TORAH TIMES


Raquel & Michael Scheck

Carol & Michael Steiner

Warren Zinn

TEN COMMANDMENTS

$10,000 - $12,999

Ellen & David Block

Esrubilsky Family

Cheryl & Ruben Kloda

Amy Dean & Alan Kluger

Temy & Mario Kreutzberger

Ronni & Robert Whitebook

MENORAH

$7,200-$9,999

Adriana & Edgar Halac

Gisela & Rabbi Mario Rojzman

Alan Rosenthal

Michele & Steven Scheck

SHOFAR

$5,000 - $7,199

Jane & Alan Axelrod

Elise & Gil Bonwitt

Tammy & Eric Isicoff

Adrienne & Jeff Scheck

Hili & Marty Scheck

Ronna & Mike Segal

Michelle & Daniel Serber

Robert Shelley

Anica & David Shpilberg

Hedy & Daniel Whitebook

RABBIS’ CIRCLE

$3,600-$4,999

Morris Deakter

Miriam & Seymour Feldstein

Elinor Ganz

Avra & Joel Glicksman

Lois Hildebrandt

Debora & Rafael Konitzki

Joann & Roni Laskin

Jeanne & Barry Lewin

Shelly Lipson

Robert Quittner

Phyllis & Steve Sheinman

Alicia Tasma & Hugo Silbergleit

BENEFACTOR

$2,500-$3,599

Mark & Mildred Cohn

Carolyn & Joshua Frank

Amy & Marc Gittelman

Barbara & Robert Goldfarb

Fernando Halac

Sharon & Glenn Kaplan

Beverly & Joe Koplowitz

Jodi & Carlos Lerman

Renee & Jorge Lerman

Jessica & Jorge Linkewer

Ariela & Gary Mars

Elizabeth & Marcos Morjain

Evelyn & Robert Moskovitz

Syd Nacron

Adrienne & David Promoff

Sergio Rok

Raquel & Manuel Rydz

April & Robert Snyder

Robin & Larry Willis

CHAI

$1,800 - $2,499

Anonymous (2)

Laurie & Rabbi Ed Farber

Nancy & Elan Feldman

Marcia & Jeffrey Frantz

Susan & Richard Golden

Adriana Faerman & Glenn Gopman

Jan & Alexander Hockman

Barbara & Samuel Kaplan

Jodi & Daniel Katz

Robin & Brian Kettler

Rebecca & Frank Kriger

Ana Raquel & Abraham Linkewer

Michelle Robinson & Wayne

Lippman

Anne & Harold Mandelbaum

Masha Mayer

Judith & Barry Nelson

Sandra & Andres Oppenheimer

Aida Politano

Rochelle Roberts

Isabel & Omar Romay

Leila Selebrinsky & Marcelo Saiegh

Barbara & Herbert Saks

Lisa Gaeta & Harry Sendzischew

Sisterhood

Paula & Felipe Sommer

Ilene & Jay Sosenko

Susan & Marvin Tuchklaper

Ruth & Howard Vernick

Justine & Stanley Warmbrandt

Eva & Helmut Wellisch

Marilyn & David Zinn

SHAMASH

$1,000-$1,799

Anonymous

Judy & Rich Berger

Gustavo Bogomolni

Marla & Michael Cotzen

Silvie & Peter Dreyfuss

Deborah & Harvey Friedman

Sandra & Eric Friedman

Terri Schrifman & Stanley Friedman

Elsa Glucksberg

Vita Gopman

Carina & Pablo Hoberman

Stephanie & Mark Kleiner

Wendy & Steven Kravitz

Bettina Rubinton Linkewer

Sen. Gwen Margolis

Karen & Michael Matluck

Phylis Meier

Evelyn & Monroe Mitchel

Julie & Andrew Rodman

Melanie & David Rosemberg

Jorge Rosenblut

Libby & Richard Schechter

Laurie & Greg Schenker

Arlene Schnell

Iris & Fernando Schlaen

Linda Shelley

Jean & Bruce Smoler

Joanne Solomon

Ellen & Howard Sprechman

Nurit Edelman & Martin Talmasky

Debra & Edward Zebersky

Winter Edition 2018/2019 l Kislev 5779

39


CHAVER

$500-$999

Lynn & Mark Altschuler

Anonymous

Claudine Assous

Rochelle & Marshall Baltuch

Helene Berger

Judith & Bob Billig

Michael Blasberg

Norma & David Blecker

Myriam & Charles Block

Donna & Ron Bloomberg

Sharon Blumberg

Virginia & Marcelo Buki

Ruth Burstyn

Graciela & Daniel Cababie

Bernard Cohen

Elaine Cohen

Ilene & Moises Cohen

Rebecca & Jay Cohen

Ana & Enrique Covos

Susan & Marc Einbinder

Olga & Narciso Falkon

Bette Joy Field

Linda & Eugene Finkin

Diana & Ernesto Frost

Sheryl & David Fruitman

Viviana & Alexander Furth

Herbert Goldberg

Carol Greener

Ian Hagen

Sheila & Brian Hunis

Rosa & Jorge Jaskelson

Arlene Keil

Wayne Keil

Jill & Brian Koch

Mindy & Mark Kurkin

Raquel & Natalio Leiserson

Rhoda Stein-Lipschitz

Adrienne Weinstein Lowy

Viviane Manhard

Helen & Samuel Marcoschamer

Karen & Jonathan Morton

Aida & Jose Nicenboim

Audre Niedenthal

Veronika & Ellis Norsoph

Valeria & Dario Nul

Marcia & Charles Orvieto

Claire & Chaim Plewinski

Maxene & Eugene Posman

Gabriela & Fito Rascovsky

Henri Rojzman

Marci & Oren Rosenthal

Edith & Arnold Schecter

Caryn & Larry Schwartz

Clarita & Bernardo Dov Selcer

Jessica & Kevin Shacter

Penni & Robert Sheir

Helene & Stanley Sinclair

Sue & Stanley Skopit

Ruanne Spivack

Sindi & Steven Strumwasser

Denise & Ofer Tamir

Lilia & Leon Wechsler

Lizette & Josh Weingard

Rita & Craig Weinstein

Perli & Jerry Zuchowickiu

DONOR

$360 - $499

Linda & Marcos Ackerman

Anonymous (2)

Lily & Shlomo Attas

Prosper Azerraf

Deborah Berkowitz

Yvette & Enrique Ciklik

Lea, Salomon & Abe Cohen

Ellen Elias

Berta Feldman

Enrique Gajstut

Ann & Norman Hurwitz

Terry & Mark Jonas

Kristina Laaniste & Esteban Koffsman

Fayanne Kuttler

Silvana Cotler & Oliverio Lew

Pauline & Derek Lubie

Esther & Marcos Mantel

Alicia & Norberto Margulis

Juliana & Efrain Martinez

Sandra & David Moskovitz

Sherri & Jeff Niefeld

Sonia & Jack Rydz

Tania & Daniel Scharifker

BUILDER

$180-$359

Marjorie Aloni

Nancy & Jonny Alpern

Anonymous

Joann & Gary Arnowitz

Karen Nisnik & Edy Att

Debora & Jorge Baran

Elizabeth & Ricardo Bebchik

Andrea Beck

Sandra & Silvio Berlfein

Lily & Jacky Blank

Marcela & Cantor Bogomolni

Veronica Etinger & Ignacio

Borenszteyn

Annette & Rabbi Geoffrey Botnick

Candace & Richard Brook

Susan & Eduardo Comella

Lois Danis

Sandra Edelboim

Lenore Elias

Etta Birenbaum Epstein

Rosa Fernandez & Sergio Farache

Judy & Joel Feinman

Elena & Daniel Feldsberg

Sharon Felix

Victorine & Victor Fleischman

Ruth Froom

Isidoro Ghelman

Joseph Goldman

Marisa & Daniel Halle

Mona Heisler

Jacqueline Hodes

Sandra & Edgardo Imar

Marta Jacofsky

Thali Gottesman & Maurice Kadosh

Eileen & Charles Koch

Elaine Krutchik

Elena & Abraham Kubiliun

Denise & Daniel Landman

Sonya Lederer

Jenny & Jeff Levinson

Avital & William Lichter

Sara & William Ludmir

Marina & Gustavo Lumer

40 BETH TORAH TIMES


Anne & Robert Marcovich

Debbie & Ed Margolis

Miriam & Bruce Masia

Martha & Itzhak Miller

Nicole & Jeffrey Musaffi

Raquel & Jose Naftali

Judith & Fabian Neiman

Nancy & Marcelo Nudel

Mindy Tucker Olofsen & Jan Olofsen

Yael & Damian Ostrowicz

Nicole & Alon Ozer

Harriet Pearson & Perry Phillips

Sheryl & Robert Podgorowiez

Adrienne & Alden Pravder

Mara & Robert Redstone

Jolie & Harold Rivner

Sergio Roitberg

Judy Rosenblum

Orli & Jason Rudolph

Margo Brilliant & Robert Schwartz

Fanny Segal

Iris & Isaac Semaya

Lauren Slater

Debbie & Todd Snyder

Terri & Jeffrey Sonn

Carla & James Spector

Pam & Burt Srebrenik

Denise Stamm

Linda & Steven Steiner

Carmen & Yoel Vivas

Diane & Stephen Wander

Florence & Bob Werner

Leslie & Steven Willinger

SPONSOR

$100-$179

Julio Barenboim

Esther & Isaac Bensussan

Aileen & Eric Berger

Judith Berger

Julie & Jason Berkowitz

Alexandra & Andres Berman

Luis Dikes

Suzan & Mark Farber

Robert Feingold

Carole Fink

Simona & Joseph Goldfarb

Rae Cutler & Donald Goodis

Seymour Hammer

Dina Hashman

Marylin Holzberg

Lois Koppel

Pola & Abraham Mansdorf

Anita Meuret

Jutta Myers

Sonia & Andres Naftali

Ramsey & N Henry Pevsner

Maria Rojas

Edna & Barry Rosenthal

Stephanie & Marc Schmulian

Eileen Nissman Stern &

Jeffrey Stern

Dana & Jonathan Stern

Evelyn & Jose Weisinger

Carol & Robert Wolf

Rebeca Yaker

CONTRIBUTOR

$18 - $99

Anonymous

Catalina Abello

Sara Viviana & Gustavo Asman

Brenda Auerbach

Marilee & Eugene Bass

Barbara Bergmann

Sheryl Berkowitz

Sara & Guillermo Bermann

Vivienne Borkan

Linda & Jerome Buchsbaum

Celia Diamond

Niurka & Yosef Echevarria-Cabret

Asenath Elfenbein

Rita & Jack Esquenazi

Ronnie Estey

Shelley & Isaac Farin

Raquel & Abraham Feldman

Sheila Morrell & Howard Fine

Jonathan Fischer

Julieta Ludman & Pablo Fried

Michael Gilinsky

Danielle & Spencer Goldenberg

Pauline & Gerald Halpern

Dorothy Herold

Liliana & Marcos Iberkleid

Raquel & Leonard Jacobskind

Dora Katz

Leslie & Russel Lazega

Rachel & Harvey Lerfelt

Jeffrey Levin

Michelle & Yair Levy

Sharon & Jason Lewen

Maritza Lieberman

William Marcus

Tamar Mayer

Thabatta & Igal Mizrahi

David Parris

Inez Mota & Leonardo Popiol

Ilene & Jay Rechtman

Ronald Rindler

Feiga Rosell

Dina & Avi Rosenblat

Sheri Rosenthal

Elizabeth Edmunds & Gregory

Rothschild

Ivana & Yankel Schwartz

Oranit Shaked

Brenda Silbergleit Nae

Melissa G. & Ben Steinfeld

Beatriz & Daniel Tkach

Pearl Tucker

Roxana Feldman & Oscar Waldman

Steffi Wallace Keffer

Ana & Jorge Weinstein

Sonia & George Weisselberger

Goldie Wigutow

Toby Wolson

Steven Zucker

Winter Edition 2018/2019 l Kislev 5779

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42 BETH TORAH TIMES


Winter Edition 2018/2019 l Kislev 5779

43


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3

RABBI ROJZMAN MESSAGE

There are lots of Nazis in Pennsylvania, There are

lots of Nazis right here in Florida.

They were getting ready apparently to have a Bris, a

Bris that never took place. We had a baby naming.

So I decided that I wanted to talk to that baby who

did not have a Bris, because babies sometimes

understand more than adults.

I will call him “baby” because I don’t know his

name (he wasn’t able to receive one that day)

but brilliantly Zev Steinberg tried to think of a

name. For those of you who may have seen this, I

apologize in advance.

Little boy, what’s your name – do you have one?

Sweet baby, just eight days, what should we call

you?

Is your name Shalom? We long for peace in this

troubled world. I hope you are Shalom.

Is your name Nachum? Oh, how we need to be

comforted in our grief. I hope you are Nachum.

Is your name Raphael? Our broken hearts and

bleeding souls need healing. I hope you are

Raphael.

Is your name Moshe? Our unbearable anguish and

rage demands justice. I hope you are Moshe.

Is your name Ariel? We need the ferocious strength

of lions to protect our people. I hope you are Ariel.

Is your name Barak? We need courageous warriors

to vanquish our enemies. I hope you are Barak.

Is your name Simcha? We need an end to sadness

by bringing joy into our world. I hope you are

Simcha.

Is your name Yaron? We need an end to mourning

by bringing song into our lives. I hope you are

Yaron.

Is your name Matan? We need the gift of children

who will bring a better tomorrow. I hope you are

Matan.

You know baby, you should have been carried high

into the congregation on Shabbat morning - past

from loving hands to loving hands - on a cushioned

pillow to receive your Jewish name. Instead your

elders fell and were carried out on stretchers in

plastic bags. Their names on tags.

So little boy, what’s your name? Take them all if you

will. Take a thousand names. Be Peace and Comfort and

Healing. Be Justice and Strength and Courage. Be Joy

and Song and a Gift to the world. Be every good name

and every good thing.

Baby, you are joining an amazing civilization. One that

teaches humanity that God is one and only one. That

every person is created in his image and cannot even

infer that he is better than the other. A civilization

that maintains that we need to take care of widows,

orphans and strangers.

And yet “bechol dor vador”, in every generation there

were and there will be people ready to kill us.

A week from today we will commemorate the 80th

anniversary of Kristallnacht, the night of the “Broken

Glass” where Nazis torched synagogues. Kristallnacht

was the beginning of the end for the Jews of Germany

After Kristallnacht, Germans did not come to help

the Jews clean up. Quite the contrary, the Jews were

forced to pay for all the damage as the Germans

claimed they had brought it on themselves!

You know baby, when you heard all the screaming,

you also heard the screaming of 2 police officers and

2 S.W.A.T team officers as they worked to stop the

murderer.They risked their lives as well.

Never after a pogrom did non-Jews help the Jews to

recover, but this is America.

Listen Baby: A group called Muslims Unite for

Pittsburgh Synagogue held a fundraiser. Listen to the

words of Wasi Mohamed, from the Islamic Center of

Pittsburgh. He told the crowd at the fundraiser that

their work is not finished with the fundraiser alone. He

said: “We just want to know what you need.”

That’s America at its best!

Like Rabbi Wolberg wrote, “Pittsburgh also reminded

us of Jews at their best.” Most of those Jews who

were killed were elderly. They were that synagogue’s

minyonaires … they came every day to ensure that

there was a minyan to say kaddish. We have people

like that at Beth Torah! Every synagogue has people

like that … people who honestly believe and live by

the words: “Kol Yisroel areivim zeh la zeh – all Jews are

responsible one for another.” There are plenty of Jews

who live by those words.

44 BETH TORAH TIMES


Yes, little baby, sometimes we are blamed that we take

care of only our own. But it is not true! We don’t only

take care of our own!

Look what happened the day of your supposed Bris.

After the attack, Robert Bowers, the killer who cried,

“I want to kill all the Jews …” was kept alive at the

Allegheny General Hospital, where at least three

of the doctors and nurses who cared for him were

Jewish. The President of the hospital, Dr. Jeffrey

Cohen, who happens to be a member of the Tree of

Life Congregation, told the media: “We are here to take

care of sick people. We’re not here to judge you, we’re

not here to ask if you have insurance or do not have

insurance … we’re here to take care of people who

need our help.”

We read in the parasha of the week:

“And Abraham died in a good old age, an old man,

and full of years, and was gathered to his people. And

Isaac and Ishmael, his sons, buried him in the cave of

Machpelah.”

Did you hear that???

Isaac and Ishmael together.

Even after all their past, after all their differences, after

all their complexities, after all their discrepancies, they

together buried Abraham.

The support, the love, the compassion, the kindness

that we received from the community made us

feel that we were not burying our eleven dead by

ourselves. We were not alone. Ishmael was with us.

Many others were with us.

People from different faiths were with us and they are

with us hugging us, embracing us.

And if Ishmael and Isaac with all their differences were

able to bury their dead together, why can’t Republicans

and Democrats bury 11 American Jews together??

These days, rabbis are afraid to speak out or make

moral pronouncements for fear of sounding too

political. No matter what we say, we are criticized for

sounding too much like a liberal or a conservative,

a Republican or a Democrat. Many of us have been

silent in the face of the horrors taking place in our

country. Have we forgotten the words of Elie Wiesel?

“We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the

oppressor, never the victim, silence encourages the

tormentor, never the tormented.”

In the past two years there has been a 67% percent

increase in anti-Semitic incidents in America and a

ninety percent increase in New York.

This needs to stop.

So, I am mourning today the precious lives lost

in Pittsburgh. But I am also mourning for the loss

of civility, the rise of prejudice, the diminution of

honesty, and the inability of our leaders to talk to

one another. I am mourning because this is not the

America we deserve

Baby, tell them that you don’t want to hear more

politicians telling you “our thoughts and prayers are

with the families of the victims” Tell them that you

represent the future and for this country to be a

light to other nations and to have a future, we need

the leaders to be leaders and not walking egos.

We are a remarkable people, and we live in a

remarkable country. So, we as a people, must stay

strong, we as a country must remain optimistic.

We dare not give into despair. We are a people

dedicated to a Torah whose “ways are ways of

pleasantness and all its paths are peace.” Do you

know where you find those words?

In the words of the Book of Proverbs that provided

the Tree of Life Synagogue its very name: “Eitz

Chayim He – it is a tree of life to those who grasp

it and those who uphold it are happy. Its ways are

ways of pleasantness and all its paths are peace.”

I received yesterday morning a phone call from

a dear friend, a member of our congregation, Dr

Sosenko. He became a grandpa. You know what

the new baby’s name is?? Ilan Chaim (a tree of life,

after the attacked synagogue’s name)

Baby take another name be CHAIM, BE LIFE!

Life is a synonym of Judaism

We believe in life, we are life.

And we will be alive

Am Israel Chai

THE PEOPLE OF ISRAEL ARE HURT BUT ALIVE

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45


46 BETH TORAH TIMES


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47


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4

RABBI FARBER MESSAGE

in that synagogue that morning if they weren’t jetlagged

from a trip they had just made. Good friends of ours

from Kendall have a son who was literally walking by that

synagogue on his way to a synagogue down the street

when the police pulled up with sirens blasting and the

gunman was running back into the synagogue. He took

cover to avoid any stray bullets. This attack was personal.

And it affected us more because in our minds – we were

thinking – if it could happen there – it could happen here.

How do I know that? Because immediately our leadership

– like leaderships in synagogues across the country –called

meetings to discuss in some cases – bringing security

as many synagogues to my dismay have zero security

arrangements – or in our case to strengthen an already

strong security situation. I went to the Memorial service

and vigil at the Holocaust Memorial and there were police

and swat teams deployed to protect the few thousand

who gathered there. So - this one was different because it

happened here. On Chanukkah we will spin a dreidel which

has the letters that spell out – a miracle happened there.

It happened in Israel – there – not here. But in Israel their

Dreidels are different – they say – a miracle happened

here. Because they walk the streets where the battles took

place – they live in the country where the persecutions

began and the heroism of the Maccabees brought

liberation. That’s what is happening here. When Jews

are attacked in other countries – we feel it – we mourn –

we’re concerned. But it happened there. This attack didn’t

happen – Sham – there – it happened – poh – and when

it happens ‘poh’ – here - the connection is stronger – the

reaction is stronger the fear is greater.

Now back to our learning about the planting of

the tree even when the messiah has arrived and telling

the story of Esther, Haman and Mordechai even after the

Messiah is here. America is not only the greatest country

that has ever existed in the history of the world – not only

does the free world exist today because of America and the

greatest generation – not only does any hope for the future

of humanity depend completely on the power and the

success of America – but America has been the greatest

country outside of Israel for Jews to live and thrive. If

we are shrinking because to many of our children and

grandchildren have lost their connection to Judaism and

the Jewish people – and because we have low fertility rates

– that is not the fault of America – that is our fault and our

fault alone – but that my friends is a different sermon for

a different time. And we Jews know that America has been

the greatest place for Jews and most minorities. And we are

very, very proud of it. But we have forgotten the lessons the

Rabbis taught us about planting the tree even if we think

the messiah has come and reading about Haman and Esther

even if we are sure the Messiah has come. The lesson of

the book of Esther is – never – ever – let your guard down.

Watch out for Haman. He is there is every generation – in

every generation and in every place. He is looking for the

opportunity to raise his ugly head and kill Jews because

he has an ancient hate that is – a neurosis or a pathology

– or it’s genetic or its cultural or religious or comes with

mother’s milk. I don’t know – but I do know its eternal

and nothing – nothing – will very make it go away. Strong

opposition to it – condemning it – isolating it – making it

persona non grata will limit it – push it into the shadows –

force it back into hiding. But it won’t eliminate it and it will

without failure arise again. Some American Jews have made

the mistake of thinking that America is the messianic age

for American Jews. We have arrived and we are free, safe

and secure. Yes, we are freer and safer and more secure

than we’ve ever been in the Diaspora. We said the prayer

for Israel a few moments ago – it says – Bless the state of

Israel – the beginning of our redemption. THE BEGINNING

– not the final redemption. Because Israel understands

that Haman is still there and although Jews are more

secure now in Israel than they have been since the days of

the Maccabees the Messiah hasn’t come. So Israel does

everything in her power to secure the state and its citizens.

Too many Americans have forgotten the lesson of Haman

and planting the tree. The tree is real life – stay connected

to reality even if you think the Messiah has come. Reality

in America and throughout the world means – secure your

Jewish institutions as best as you can. Laurie and I were in a

synagogue in Vermont for a wonderful simcha a few weeks

ago. We noticed that on Shabbat morning we walked in

unnoticed -in the sense that there was zero security – no

one at the front door to even notice our arrival. When we

got to the sanctuary doors we were warmly welcomed. I

asked the Rabbi who knows I am from Miami why there

was absolutely no security at the door. She said – Ed – this

is Vermont – not Miami. And I thought to myself – after all

I was a guest and there are sometimes where my natural

tendency to say what I think is curbed – so I thought to

myself – I guess she thinks that anti-Semitism and mental

illness and hatred somehow stops at the Florida Georgia

border. Well it doesn’t. And the Messiah has not come –

and there are Hamans out there. But here’s the other side

48 BETH TORAH TIMES


of the truth. America is the dawn of redemption in the

sense that it is the very best place there has ever been for

Jews. Within 15 minutes of the attack in Pittsburgh police

cars were sent out throughout Dade County to secure

synagogues and any Jewish site that might have been

open. This happened throughout the country. In Alabama

Jeremy Schwartz reported to us about the police securing

Hillel on Campus – the local synagogue - the JCC and Jewish

fraternities on campus. There are four police officers in the

hospital now in Pittsburgh who ran into that synagogue –

putting their lives at risk – to save Jews. They would not like

me saying it that way. Because they ran into that synagogue

to save innocent lives – and they would have run into a

church or a mosque or a mall. They would be upset that I

said Jews because for them there are the innocent people

and the criminals and that’s that. But we have a history

and in our history the governments of the world were the

instigators of the attacks on the synagogues – they were the

corroborators with and protectors of the ones who bombed

the JCC’s and the Israeli Consulates. The government – the

law enforcement - in our history were more often than

not the ones who instilled the anti-Semitism. That has

never been and is not the case in America and that my

fellow Jews – is the difference – and it is all the difference.

And in America – the Christians and the Muslims and the

secular Americans were universally horrified at this attack

and rallied to our sides and that will help push back on the

Hamans in this world. But heed the lesson of the Book of

Esther and remember what the Rabbis said about the tree

planting and the Messiah. Do not forget reality -do not let

your guard down. A Mayor of a major city opposed using

armed guards in our religious institutions because that isn’t

America. He lives in a messianic vision that hasn’t come

yet – in Hollywood they call it LaLa Land but at least they

know its LaLa Land and I loved the movie but it wasn’t the

real world. He is right – we shouldn’t have to put security in

our Churches, Synagogues and Mosques. And we shouldn’t

have to lock our homes at night – or have guards at our

condos – or tracking devices on our cars or even now on

our children. But until the Messiah comes and even after

he comes – we will have to do it. Hopefully we’ll have to do

it less and the number of times that Haman raises his ugly

head will be less and less – fewer and fewer. And yes - that

means we need leaders on both sides of the aisle that can

disagree agreeably and tone down the heated rhetoric that

can in no way help us. Harry Truman did three great things.

He ended the war and saved at least 100,000 American

soldiers lives and the city of Tokyo from total destruction.

He recognized the State of Israel and in that way assured

her existence. And he said – The Buck Stops Here – the

responsibility stops in the oval office. To put a halt to this

deterioration of our political discourse – to get it out of

the gutter the leaders of the GOP and the leaders of the

Democrats should have a meeting and then come out in

one voice denouncing hate speech – commit to more civil

but vigorous public debate of the key issues and in unity

denounce any kind of violence or hate speech. If they can’t

get together on this then they are not leaders. But it has to

start with the White House because the buck stops there.

The White House bears the greatest responsibility because

it has the bully pulpit and it has the microphone.

I found a message on my answering machine

on the Monday after the attack. It was from a security

company I never heard of. They said – Rabbi – we don’t

know how to reach your synagogue – we know you have

a security company and they are good – but we know

that they are spread thin because of this terrifying and

heinous attack. We want to know if we could send some

security people just to help you out. We aren’t seeking

your business or any payment – we just want to be part

of the solution and let you know that all Americans stand

in solidarity with you. That is the difference and that is

why we will be ok – better than ok - here - as long as we

remember that even in the land of the free and the home

of the brave the anti-Semitic virus has not and cannot be

erased – it can only be contained and Haman is there in the

shadows. Our job is to keep pushing him to the margins

– into the shadows and be prepared on the rare occasion

when he snaps and is ready to end his own life to act on

his overwhelming hatred of the Jew. I want to end by doing

what we do in any Shivah house – we specifically say the

name of the deceased and pray that we can make his/her

memory into a blessing and then we say a prayer that ends

in peace. These peoples are martyrs of the Jewish people –

people who die for one reason – they are Jews. But they are

martyrs with names:

• Joyce Feinberg: Yiddis bat Ava Menachem -75, an

intellectual and academic, who was knowns as a mentor

and surrogate mother to her students.

• Dr Richard Gottfried, Yosef ben Chaim, 65, A Dentist

by trade, he volunteered his services to those who were

uninsured at the Catholic Charities Free Dental Clinic.

• Rose Mallinger, Raizel bat Avraham - 97, was the

oldest victim, yet her age never stopped her from attending

weekly services at Tree of Life. Spry and quick-witted, she

was often seen walking in the neighborhood and stopping

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49


to chat with friends at the grocery store.

• Dr. Jerry Rabinowitz, Yehudah ben Yechezkel -66, a

primary care physician, who with his signature bowtie earned

a reputation for faithfully tending to the needs of his patients,

friends and family. Even in his final moments, he ran outside,

dodging a barrage of bullets, to help the wounded.

• Brothers David and Cecil Rosenthal, David ben Eliezer

and Chaim ben Eliezar - 54 and 59, considered by congregants

as welcome ambassadors. They always sat in the back of the

Temple and greeted people as they came in to worship. The

duo had developmental disabilities and often spent their days

at the nearby JCC.

• Bernice Simon, Beila Rochel bat Moshe, 84, and

Sylvan Simon, Zalman Shachna ben Menachem Mendel, 88

exchanged their marriage mows at the Tree of Life synagogue

and remained a devoted presence there ever since. Sylvan

loved chatting with his friends and sharing jokes. Together,

they were an inseparable couple known for walking hand in

hand around town.

• Melvin Wax, Moshe Gadol ben Yosef, 88, was at

synagogue every Friday and Saturday, without fail. The first to

arrive and the last to leave, he took on so many tasks – from

chanting Torah to changing light bulbs.

• Daniel Stein, Daniel Avrom ben Baruch, 71, was a

simple man who loved his faith and family above all else. A

loving husband, father and most recently grandfather, a role

he embraced and cherished.

• Irving Younger, Yitzchak Chaim ben Menachem, 69, was

a familiar face at Temple, often doing the jobs no one wanted.

When people came into Tree of Life for services, Irv, made

sure everyone felt comfortable and welcomed. He didn’t

know a stranger – everyone was his friend.

Each of these individuals represented the good in humanity,

embraced life and were guardians of their faith. They are a

reminder to all of us that life is so precious and nothing is

promised. May their memory be for a blessing.

We end with hope. It is a poem written by Zev Steinberg

and dedicated to the young boy whose arrive was being

celebrated at the synagogue and whose Hebrew name was

going to be announced that morning. The event did not

obviously take place so Zev Steinberg wonders what the

baby’s name will be. He entitles the piece – What’s your

name:

Little boy, what’s your name – do you have one? Sweet baby,

just eight days, what should we call you? I have heard the

sacred circumcision postponed for jaundiced yellow, but

never before for bloodshed red. Is your name Shalom? We

long for peace in this troubled world. I hope you are Shalom.

Is your name Nachum? Oh, how we need to be comforted in

our grief. I hope you are Nachum. Is your name Raphael?

Our broken hearts and bleeding souls need healing. I

hope you are Raphael. You should have been carried

high into the congregation on Shabbat morning - passed

from loving hands to loving hands - on a cushioned pillow

to receive your Jewish name. Instead your elders fell

and were carried out on stretchers in plastic bags. Their

names on tags. Is your name Moshe? Our unbearable

anguish and rage demands justice. I hope you are Moshe.

Is your name Ariel? We need the ferocious strength of

lions to protect our people. I hope you are Ariel. Is your

name Barak? We need courageous warriors to vanquish

our enemies. I hope you are Barak. The blood on Shabbat

morning was supposed to be covenantal not sacrilegious,

sacramental not sacrificial, sacred not unholy. The tears

were supposed to be of boundless joy not bottomless

sorrow. The cries were supposed to be “mazel tov” not

the mourner’s kaddish. Is your name Simcha? We need

an end to sadness by bringing joy into our world. I hope

you are Simcha. Is your name Yaron? We need an end to

mourning by bringing song into our lives . I hope you are

Yaron. Is your name Matan? We need the gift of children

who will bring a better tomorrow. I hope you are Matan.

So little boy, what’s your name? Take them all if you

will. Take a thousand names. Be peace and Comfort and

Healing. Be Justice and Strength and Courage. Be Joy and

Song and a Gift to the world. Be every good name and

every good thing. And, Sweet baby, take one more name

if you will – because I hope you will be blessed with a

long, blissful, beautiful and meaningful life… I hope you

are Chaim.

Olam Chesed Yeebaneh – God will build a world of

kindness –Enlighten the whole world with His Glory

Do not stand apart from the community – Love your

neighbor as yourself. My God, the soul you have placed

in me is pure; to repair the world in the Kingdom of the

Divine Mother. May we be God’s partners in bringing

more kindness into the world and pushing darkness and

evil back into the hole from which it has crawled out of.

May this be God’s will. Amen and Shabbat Shalom.

50 BETH TORAH TIMES


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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5

CANTOR BOGOMOLNI MESSAGE

After the negative results in the field of agriculture,

the settlers began to establish farms for the raising of

dairy cattle. The farms at the beginning were handled

collectively with negative results.

In 1943, two experts arrived in Sosúa: Mr. David Stern and

Mr. Douglas Blackwood. The first organized a restructuring

of the farms, each of approximately 50 hectares with

their respective water resources. To ensure drinking water

for Sosúa and the farms, the aqueduct in the mountains

(Chocco) was extended. Mr. Blackwood instructed them

in the management and raising of dairy cattle. He quickly

gained the confidence of the settlers, since they realized

that tangible and commercially interesting results could

be obtained.

Each immigrant or settler had according to the statutes of

the DORSA the right to obtain a farm with 15 animals, the

prices were established by the administration. Each month

they had to pay 10 dollars as amortization of the capital

plus a small interest of 3% per year. Each settler was also

entitled to a job in the two small industries: the dairy

factory (C.I.L.C.A. - Compañía Industrial Lechera, C. por A.)

and the livestock meat products factory. These two small

factories functioned initially as cooperatives.

In 1945 approximately 700 people lived in Sosúa, mostly

immigrant single men. Many manage to leave the United

States: some, unable to adapt to the environment and the

management of a farm, others (especially professionals)

looking for a higher education and a better standard of

living.

In 1947 another group of immigrants arrived from

Shanghai, China. What a trip! From Europe to China and

from China to Sosúa. They were approximately 35 people.

The Benjamin, Strauss, Rothenberg, Floersheim and Hecht

families were among them.

The year 1950 is considered the last year of Jewish

immigration to Sosúa. The last two families that were

accepted as settlers were the Reuter and the Neuman

families, both from Israel.

Although Sosúa was planned as a refuge for Jewish

immigration of at least 2,000 people only 800 arrived.

As we said, after 1945, many went to the United States or

Mexico and also a few returned to Germany. The problems

of the first years - however - were overcome and Sosúa

progressed and expanded in every way.

Sosúa in those days, maintained a theater, a movie theater,

a synagogue, a hospital with excellent service and a school.

The latter very soon gained a very good reputation thanks

to its director, the unforgettable Dr. Robischek, outstanding

doctor of Vienna, known for his works of investigation in

the bacteriological field in addition to a solid connoisseur

of the Jewish sources.

Pioneers cannot forget the “Oasis” or the Cafehouse, or

Kneipe, or Taberna, a meeting point for friends. There

they played cards, adjusted the last prices of CILCA, drank

Dominican coffee or simply met people to chat over a little

bit of tea.

There was also the celebration of the Jewish holidays:

Hanukkah, Purim and Passover. In the cultural sense,

the settlers remained faithful to their European culture,

mainly German and Austrian. It is interesting to note

that despite the fact that almost all the immigrants from

Sosúa were expelled from their home countries, under

discriminatory and extremely humiliating conditions, they

always maintained the cultural ties that bound them with

the traditions and customs of their countries of origin. In

Sosúa you could hear phrases like: “cooked or not-cooked

at 12.30 we are going to eat” or, “in my country, Germany,

things were like that”, etc. In the religious aspect, it could

be said that the colonists were liberal traditionalists, with a

strong tendency to assimilate to the environment. Children

from the communities of Santo Domingo and Sosúa under

the circumstances of the first years, many immigrant men

married Dominican women and formed, in the cultural and

religious sense, mixed marriages. The interesting thing is

that these marriages, exposed from the point of view of

the Jewish tradition, to a strong assimilation to the gentile

environment, were able to preserve in their children and

even in their grandchildren traits of the Jewish tradition

and culture. In the first 30 years, some families managed

to make some capital and sent their children to the United

States to receive a better education. The majority of these

children never returned to settle in the country again.

Tourism in Sosúa ... Tourism (especially German) and

foreign investment -especially in real estate- has changed

the face of this town founded by Jewish settlers 80 years

ago. Sosúa is today one of the picturesque villages in the

northern part of the country, whose life is closely linked to

modern tourism (all inclusive).

52 BETH TORAH TIMES


The Jewish Community of Sosúa today ... Today there is

little left in Sosúa of what it used to be. The remaining

Jews, about fifteen families, maintain a small and beautiful

synagogue. Next to it, there is a well-designed museum

describing the origin of the arrival to the country, with

photos of the SHOÁ survivors and their primitive life. They

have their separate cemetery very well taken care of, in the

Way of Llibre with about one hundred tombs of immigrants

that rest forever in that land, descriptive tombs of a

sacrificed and fruitful life. From June 1996 to May 1997,

Rabbi Manes Kogan (Hillcrest Jewish Community Center,

Jamaica, NY), the rabbi then of the Jewish Community of

Santo Domingo and the first ordained Conservative Rabbi

in the history of the DR, took charge of Jewish education

and activity in the Community of Sosúa. At the beginning of

May of 1997 a religious ceremony was realized where three

beautiful girls (Shiara Strauss, Yifat Milz and Erika Benjamin)

became Benot-Mitzvá.

In January 1997, our hazzan Gastón Bogomolni, then a

19-year-old Argentinean boy, recommended by Rabbi

Manes Kogan, took the full time reins of this Community

and began to carry out continuous Jewish activity for the

first time in the history of the Community. Among these

activities were: religious services, Jewish education for

children (from 6 to 16 years old), talks with adults about

the tradition and history of the Jewish People, teaching of

Rikudei-Am (Israeli dances), teaching of Shirei Am (Jewish

Folk songs), preparation for Bar and Bat-Mitzvah, etc.

Gastón organized the community, from forming a directive

until finding the solution to the administrative system. The

difficult task of calling volunteers to collaborate with the

task that involved everyone equally was also organized.

Gastón also took charge of the Museum, took seminars

to become its director and organized it. He also tried to

reorganize the material in the oral archive, interviews

with immigrants who were still alive. As a result of this

work he helped to recover the kidnapped files belonging

to the DORSA. Between the low social status and the low

cultural life (without cinemas, without theaters, etc.),

Gastón decided to organize a series of cultural activities

through the Jewish Community, and thus provide in

some way, culture to the small town of Sosúa and its

surroundings. Among these activities were: “Concert of

Jewish and Argentine music in Purim”, “A great miracle

happened there”, (puppet work for Jánuka), “The Fiddler

on the Roof”, (performed by the children of the community

and presented at a Resort-Hotel), among others. After an

arduous and hard work, unique and enriching, and once the

Jewish life and a smile returned to the Jewish community

of Sosúa, Gastón moved to the Jewish Community in Santo

Domingo to continue the task and legacy that Rabbi Kogan

who moved to the US. The leaders of Sosúa and Gastón kept

in touch while he was now in the capital of the country.

More than a few times Gastón made the effort to try to

get some new leader or in his absence a madrich (Youth

Counselor) to continue the important task that had been

carried out in the Caribbean Jewish Colony. Unfortunately,

many of the parents had already moved to the capital so

that their children would receive a higher education and of

a better level.

Years went by, Gastón Bogomolni had already moved

aside from the Dominican reality by moving to Barcelona

in 1999. A new leader loomed over Santo Domingo but

there was no connection with the Sosúa Jews. Those who

were once teenagers had already become older and life

moved them to the same universities outside Sosúa or the

country, the most advanced of age began to be more tired

and the community went back to ground zero. However,

in 2006-2007, the old board of the directors chaired by

the strongest hearts of the community, Ivonne Milz, Joe

Benjamin and Edith Myers, decided to invest money to

obtain a more arranged museum. So it was that after the

effort of professionals left the museum has never seen

before. Hazzan Gastón had being back several times in the

last 20 years to visit the community of Sosua, has lectured,

concertized, taken university students, etc. In spite of what

many researchers tried to predict that: “The assimilation

and the circumstances in which the Colony was created

would, by themselves, gradually disappear Jewish life in

the community”, Hazzan Bogomolni continues in touch

with all the leaders of the community and is now acting as

a consultant to once again get a new spiritual leader for

the Jews who remained there, including the new ones who

immigrated in the last 20 years. Bogomolni has also created

a whatsapp group with all the 20+ students, whom many

live here in South Florida and a reunion will be set soon too.

A great miracle happened then, and with Hashem’s willing,

a greatest miracle will happen today too!

Click here to check out Pictures of the Jewish Colony of

Sosua

(If you would like to help to give light and life back to

the Jewish Community of Sosua, please contact me

cantorbogomolni@btbrc.org)

Happy Chanukkah!

Cantor Gastón Bogomolni

Winter Edition 2018/2019 l Kislev 5779

53


AMERICAN FRIENDS OF MAGEN DAVID ADOM

Saving lives.

It’s in their blood.

And it’s in yours, too.

Please join us for an inspirational evening at the

THE ART OF

Saving Lives in Israel

The Art of Saving Lives

Host Committee

Judy and Kevin Abrams

Lizzie and Murray Brown

Roberta and Harvey Chaplin

Moni and Jeff Cohen

Susie and Jon Diamond

Ann and Ari Deshe

Hollis and Councilman Jeffrey Freimark

Paula and Joel Friedland

Ashley Finestone and Rob Tabatchnick

Melissa and David Greenberg

Andrea and Keith Hartley

Tzippy Holand

Elsie and Gene Howard

Mandy and William Kakon

Janie and Ron Kupferman

Sheila Duffy and Richard Lehrman

Debra Leibowitz

Judi Berson-Levinson and

Steven Z. Levinson

Shari and David Lombardi

Judy and Monroe Milstein

Robyn Morse

Erica and Mark Mutchnik

Ronit and David Neuman

Brenda and Andrew Nullman

Marcelle and Andrew Rosen

Perla and Councilman Seth Salver

Lyle Stern

Terri and Jeff Sonn

Heidi and Aaron Tandy

Orli and Jonathan Teboul

Elise and Ron Udelson

HONORING

Janie and Ron Kupferman

Judy and Monroe Milstein

2018 Visionary Award Recipients

SPECIAL GUEST

Noam Gershony

2012 Paralympics Tennis Gold

Medalist, former IDF Apache

helicopter pilot rescued by

Magen David Adom.

November 28, 2018 6:30 P.M.

The Sagamore Hotel

Kosher Cocktail Buffet

Complimentary Valet

R.S.V.P. by visiting afmda.org/Sagamore-Event

Individual Ticket: $275 per person

Young Leader (Under 40) Ticket: $180 per person

For more information, please contact us at

Miami@afmda.org or 561.835.0510.

We proudly acknowledge the generous support of

our Corporate Partners

afmda.org

54 BETH TORAH TIMES


Winter Edition 2018/2019 l Kislev 5779

55


ADDRESS

Beth Torah Benny Rok Campus

20350 NE 26th Ave,

North Miami Beach, FL 33180.

CONTACT

Email: info@btbrc.com

Main Office Phone: 305-932-2829

WWW.BTBRC.ORG i facebook.com/BETH.TORAH

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