December Envision Equity

jcpsdep

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ENVISION EQUITY DECEMBER 2018

NABSE 2018

JCPS Staff Present District’s Racial Equity Policy at the

2018 NABSE Conference in Baltimore Maryland

By Dr. Geneva Stark—Specialist, Diversity, Equity,

and Poverty Programs Department

Photo, Abdul Sharif

T

he following role groups should attend the National Alliance of

Black School Educators (NABSE) Conference: NABSE members,

supporters, superintendents, principals, school board members,

education human resource professionals, deans, professors,

education department heads, administrative/educational support

staff, teachers, parents, curriculum specialists, students, clergy,

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employers, job seekers and any individual or organization

concerned about the education of our nation’s children.

My colleagues from the JCPS Diversity, Equity, and Poverty

Programs department and I had the opportunity to attend the

NABSE conference this November. A few highlights are as follows:

One

NABSE’s Historical Black

Collegiate Tour at Bowie

State University and

Howard University. Both of

the universities provided

excellent presentations on

their education

departments. I was able to

speak with chairs from

both universities about recruiting efforts for Jefferson County

Public Schools. Dr. Marc Lamont Hill was the featured speaker at

Howard University Speaker Series. The title of his presentation

was Decriminalizing the Imagination: Schooling Toward A World

Without Prisons.

Two

Superintendent Robert W. Runcie of Broward County Schools

spoke about the school shooting at Parkland High School. He

spoke about the highs and lows of the job and the abuse of social

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media. He indicated that he had recognized the teacher of the

year with keys to a new Toyota Camry and 10 minutes later he

had to witness the bloodshed at Douglas High School in

Parkland, Florida.

Mei-Ling Ho-Shing student at Douglas High School gave her

heart felt account of the events of the school shooting. She

also spoke about the increase of police presence in schools and

the implications it may have for students of color if officers are

not trained properly.

Three

America to Me Documentary Series. This unscripted

documentary series presents an exclusive look into an

academic year at suburban Chicago's Oak Park. Students,

teachers and administrators from one of the country's highest

performing and diverse public schools are profiled in the face

of decades-old racial and educational inequities. The series

delves into the experiences of the racially diverse student

population, sparking conversations about what has and has

not succeeded in the quest to achieve racial equity and

overcome bias in education. Teachers, staff and community

members were on a panel discussing the racial inequities

students are facing every day.

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Four

Dr. John Marshall, the JCPS Chief Equity Officer, and I had the

distinct honor of presenting Jefferson County Public School’s

Racial Equity Policy The title of the session was: Racial Equity

Policy: The Need for Districts to Address the Racial Neglect

Once and For All. Unapologetically, Right Now

The Jefferson County Board of Education has taken bold steps

to embrace and

approve a race and

equity policy to ensure

that race is a guiding

factor in all decision

making. The work

associated with

implementing,

monitoring, and

From left, Dr. John Marshall, and Dr. Geneva Stark pose for a photo with

two session attendees.

evaluating the policy

is elephantine and

requires a level of commitment that is unapologetic. This

session promises to inform districts of the work and need for the

Racial Equity Policy, share the Racial Equity Policy and the

Equity Scorecard, and share the unique functionality of the

department. The session will provide data that led to the

creation of a Racial Equity Policy, components of the policy,

implementation guidelines, accountability measures, strategies

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for gathering support from the community, and strategies for

addressing the challenges from those who resist using race to

highlight inequities. Materials and resources that support the

policy development and implementation will be shared with

the participants.

Above, an audience member asks a question about the JCPS Racial Equity Policy.

Dr. Marshall and I presented the Racial Equity Policy to one of

the largest breakout sessions at the conference. The audience

was energized and stimulated by the topic and the bold steps

Jefferson County Public Schools have taken to ensure equity

for African-American students. Many participants indicated

that they were facing some of the same challenges as JCPS:

low expectations of students, opportunity gap, digital divide,

high concentration of African-American students in Special

Education and alternative schools, and high suspensions.

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Many schools indicated that they had an equity officer in their

district, but have not seen the level of commitment that JCPS

has demonstrated. Participants asked a lot of questions and

how Dr. Marshall and I can help them to advance the needed

work in their district.

Above, Chancey Elementary School Principal

Ronda Cosby speaks to the audience about

her school’s Racial Equity Policy. Right,

Delquan Dorsey answers questions about the

District’s Racial Equity Policy.

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ENVISION EQUITY DECEMBER 2018

Gifted Identification through

a Culturally Responsive Lens

“By Labron Horton—JCPS Advance/Gifted Program Coordinator

All groups are equally endowed in intelligence, academic ability,

and creativity; thus, no group should have the monopoly on being

identified and served as gifted.” (Gifted and Advanced Black Students

in School, 2011)

Why is there such a great divide in Jefferson County Public Schools in

the identification of minority and low income students in comparison

to their peers? This is a very profound question with an answer that

hinges on a multiplicity of factors. “Treating all students equally in

the identification of gifted students all too often results in the extreme

under-identification of an entire segment of the student

population.” (Slocumb, Payne, 2000, p4). A multifaceted approach to

identification based on valid and reliable measures permits access for

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all populations and diminishes the disproportionality gap between

subgroups.

As a district, we must take an honest look at our screening and

identification process through a cultural lens. The current district

gifted and talented policy addresses how we identify students for

gifted programming

but there remains a

need for

improvement when

implementing this

policy. The Advance

Program/Gifted

Office is in the

process of

providing training

to make sure that

teachers and staff

are aware of equitable identification methods and are trained on

how to identify students in all areas of giftedness (general

intellectual, specific academic ability, leadership, creativity, and

visual & performing arts) from all backgrounds.

According to the National Association for Gifted Children’s Gifted

Programming Standards, all students in grades K-12 should have

equal access to a comprehensive assessment system that allows

them to demonstrate diverse characteristics and behaviors

associated with giftedness. When identifying primary talent pool or

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gifted students, schools must ensure that they are using multiple

measures to identify gifted and talented students in their schools.

This will help eliminate the risk of excluding students who are

under-represented

or students who

are gifted in areas

outside of

intellectual ability.

It is essential to

take into

consideration

factors that could

mask a student’s

true abilities,

guaranteeing we

are identifying the student’s gifted abilities and not just their

“access” to opportunity.

When schools are screening students for gifted identification, a

valuable question to consider is “Does this tool or assessment

provide an equitable opportunity for all students to be identified?” All

identification tools are not created equal. Current research

supports that there are some culturally sensitive methods such as

non-verbal assessments, and universal screeners that lend

themselves to identifying students from traditionally underrepresented

populations. As educators we need to acquire the

knowledge to be able to recognize the culture-specific

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characteristics and abilities

of our students.

Moving forward, schools

must implement a balanced

approach to identifying

students from all

backgrounds. As we strive

to bring JCPS students to

proficiency, let us not forget

to move our gifted and

talented students beyond

proficiency towards

excellence.

Resources:

HOPE Scale (Marcia Gentry)- http://

purduegeri.wix.com/projecthope#!

hope-scale

Peters, S., Plucker, J. (2016)

Excellence Gaps in Education:

Expanding Opportunities for

Talented Students. Cambridge,

MA:Harvard Education Press

Payne, R., Slocumb, P. (2000)

Removing the Mask: Giftedness in

Poverty. Highlands, TX: aha! Press,

Inc.

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COMMUNITY MEMBERS

ENCOURAGED TO ‘TAKE

WHAT YOU CAN TOTE’

By Abdul Sharif

Generalist—Diversity, Equity, and Poverty Department

Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS) and the 15th District Parent

Teacher Association (PTA) are encouraging Louisville families to

“Take What You Can Tote” on Saturday, December 8.

The annual clothing giveaway event will

be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the

Clothing Assistance Program (CAP)

building, 319 S. 15th Street. Each year,

community members are invited to the

CAP building to select gently used

clothing for their children, other members of their family, and

themselves. While any Louisville family in need is welcome, the

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initiative

specifically targets

Louisville’s Zones

of Hope

neighborhoods.

Families attending

Take What You Can

Tote may fill as

many as four bags,

which will be provided by organizers. Community members will be

served on a first-come, first-served basis to select from gently

used adult and

children’s clothing.

While this clothing

giveaway does not

include school

uniforms, CAP does

provide new

uniforms and

gently used

clothing to district

families, by appointment, throughout the year. Families needing

assistance should contact their child’s Family Resource and Youth

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Services Center

(FRYSC)

coordinator to

make an

appointment.

Each year, CAP

serves thousands

of families

throughout the

Louisville

community. This

event is made

possible through the generous donations of local PTA clothing

drives, community members, churches, and civic and social

organizations.

If you have clothing you would like to donate, you can call the

CAP at 485-7062 or 485-7450. You can also bring the items

down to the CAP office, located at 319 S. 15th Street (inside the

Central High School Football Stadium). Hours and days vary, so

call first to ensure that the office is open.

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Diversity, Equity, and Poverty Department

The Model

Recognizing Culturally Responsive and Innovative Classroom Teachers

Name: Analese Cravens & Molly Hollister

School: Engelhard Elementary School

As Reading Recovery teachers,

we have a wealth of best

practice knowledge regarding

early literacy. We realized that by not

sharing our knowledge we were

doing a disservice to the kids we

served directly, the first grade kids

we didn’t get to work with, and their

teachers.

About a year ago, our school was

trying to figure out a way to help first

graders combat the summer reading

loss and help support first grade

teachers so they could not only catch

the students up but also teach their

core content. We knew we needed to

think “out of the box”.

The combination of the two led us to

create the First Grade Reading Lab.

Click here for video story.

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Analese Cravens, left, and Molly Hollister, right. Photo by Abdul Sharif


ENVISION EQUITY DECEMBER 2018

Check out our monthly update video featuring JCPS Chief of

Communications Renee Murphy, and JCPS Chief Equity Officer Dr.

John Marshall, to find out what DEP has coming up next month!

Click Here to Play

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JCPS Satellite Office

@ Shawnee Will

Provide Service for

Downtown Residents

By Abdul Sharif

Generalist—Diversity, Equity, and Poverty

Department

ENVISION EQUITY DECEMBER 2018

O

n January 22, 2019, the

Diversity, Equity, and

Poverty Programs Department

will host a grand opening for the

new JCPS Satellite Office in the

Academy @ Shawnee, located at

4018 West Market Street (West

Wing). The Satellite Office @

Shawnee will be the second

such office to open in West

Louisville, joining the first

satellite office located in the

California Community Center at

1600 St. Catherine Street. The

JCPS Satellite Office in the

California Community Center

opened on January 4, 2018, and

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Photo, google images


has provided services for families, including support from Exceptional

Child Education (ECE), Student Assignment, Student Relations, Title I,

and more. The California Office has also hosted Parent Camps, the

“Literacy &” after-school and summer programs, and other district

events.

The Satellite Office @ Shawnee will extend these support services to

residents in the Shawnee and Portland neighborhoods. Donald

Dillard, the JCPS Supervisor of Satellite Offices, will host a Community

Conversation on December 3 for our community stakeholders to

provide feedback as to what services they would like to see at the

Satellite Office @ Shawnee. The Community Conversation will take

Photo, Abdul Sharif

place from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Academy @ Shawnee. Please call

485-8746 to R.S.V.P.


COUNSELORS ROCK!! FAFSA CHALLENGE

HELPS STUDENTS IN FOSTER CARE TAKE

STEPS TOWARD ATTENDING COLLEGE

By Lindsey Bale—JCPS Foster Care Liaison

S

ince October 1, JCPS counselors (with the assistance of

Louisville Education and Employment Partnership [LEEP] staff,

CARTS, home school coordinators, and other supportive staff)

along with Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority

(KHEAA) outreach counselors helped many students complete their

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). This is just one of

many steps required for students to enroll in post-secondary

education.

National studies show that somewhere between 70 and 84 percent

of youth in foster care want to attend college, but only 31 to 45

percent ever enroll in college. By completing the FAFSA, students in

foster care took the first step toward accomplishing this goal.

In October, the Foster Care Division of Diversity, Equity, and Poverty

Programs held a FAFSA Challenge, asked counselors to get as many

eligible foster youth as possible to complete the FAFSA by October

31. With the help of several people, three counselors were able to

get 100 percent of their foster youth to complete the FAFSA. These

counselors are Tina Hall from Iroquois High School, Jason Willis

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from the Academy @ Shawnee, and Mary Ann Tackett from

Waggener High School (photos below). In addition, Holli Duke at

Uspiritus Brooklawn Campus had the highest number of students in

foster care complete the FAFSA!

This is just one piece of the puzzle in helping our students in foster

care achieve their goals. Thank you to each and every person who

competed in the challenge and thank you for your continued

support of all of our students. Together, we can help our students in

foster care complete their puzzle and create the future they

imagine!

Tina Hall—Iroquois High School

Holli Duke— Uspiritus Brooklawn

Jason Willis —The Academy @ Shawnee

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The Model

Recognizing Culturally Responsive and Innovative Classroom Teachers

Name: Wanda Jaggers

School: JB Atkinson

W

anda Jaggers is currently a

first-grade teacher at

J.B.Atkinson Academy. Wanda has

taught for four and a half

years. She received her bachelors

degree in Elementary Education at

Murray State University and is

currently perusing her MA in

Literacy from the University of

Louisville (UofL). She grew up in

the neighborhood where she

teaches. Wanda is currently

working with Dr. Amy Seely-Flint of

UofL as a part of the National

Council for teachers of English

Professional Dyads of

Culturally Relevant Teaching.

Click here for video story.

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MUHAMMAD ALI

CENTER TO SHOWCASE

ESPN FILMS

By Elliott Mitrani—Program Coordinator, Muhammad Ali Center

ENVISION EQUITY DECEMBER 2018

T

he Muhammad Ali Center has partnered up with ESPN to

showcase a selection of ESPN

30 for 30 Films here at the

Muhammad Ali Center. The films all

highlight the story of redemption

and sports. We have shown films like

Believeland, The 16 th Man, Brothers in

Exile, and Into The Wind. We have two

final films left of our first season. We

will be showing the journey of

former basketball player Chris Herren

in Unguarded as tries to be a successful NBA player while

battling drug addiction. This film will take place on November

27 th . Our final film is Run Ricky Run on December 11 th as we look

more in depth in the life and career of former NFL Superstar

Ricky Williams. All of our films our at 6PM and is open to the

public with free refreshments.

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In addition, the Muhammad Ali Center continues to host a new

special exhibit—America to Zanzibar: Muslim Cultures Near and

Far. In this exciting, family-friendly exhibit, children and families

will learn about the many diverse expressions of Muslim cultures

through age-appropriate, interactive experiences with art,

architecture, design, music, and more. In addition, this new

exhibit inspires cultural empathy, which helps children and

families become more attuned to seeing the similarities and

differences of others in a positive way.

The Muhammad Ali Center is offering curriculum-based field-trip

experiences in conjunction with America to Zanzibar for grades

pre-k to 12 th grade. These guided curriculum experiences include

various topics in Muslim culture, from architecture to world

religion. Through a generous gift from Texas Roadhouse, we have

had four 4 th and 5 th grade classes being sponsored: Byck,

Okolona, Watterson, and Wellington Elementary School. Finally,

the Muhammad Ali Center has partnered with the Kentucky

Museum of Arts and Crafts for a joint field-trip experience that

includes a special art-making activity open to all grade levels.

With only a month and a half left, come and check out this

amazing exhibit before it moves to the next museum!

For More Information:

https://www.alicenter.org/programs/film-programming/

https://www.alicenter.org/visit/group-visits/school-trips/

(502)992-5340

education@alicenter.org.

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Resource

Teacher

Spotlight

Melanie Page

ENVISION EQUITY DECEMBER 2018

M

elanie Page is currently

an Equity and

Inclusion resource teacher for

several Elementary Schools in

Jefferson County Public

Schools. As a native of the

Southside of Chicago, Melanie

learned early on that an

equitable education system

was vital to the development

of a community. It was her

activism and community

involvement as a student at

Howard University that ignited

her passion for providing

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youth with the tools they needed to reach their full potential.

This led to her earning a Bachelor's degree in English/African

American Studies and a Master’s degree in Curriculum and

Instruction. She began her career as a fifth-grade teacher in

Atlanta, Georgia. Over the last twelve years as an Elementary

educator, Melanie has sought to build on students’ strengths

and identities to develop their agency and academic success.

She believes supporting students through culturally relevant

innovative instruction will have profound effects on the

achievement gap. In her pursuit of this passion she has shared

her expertise as an Instructional Coach, Google Trainer,

Deeper Learning Presenter, and Equity Advocate

with teachers across the nation. With her recent completion of

Bellarmine University’s Educational Leadership Program, she

hopes to remove barriers for students by guiding JCPS

schools through this racial equity work.

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ENVISION EQUITY DECEMBER 2018

Mixed: A Colorful Story

by Arree Chung

Henry Holt and Co. (BYR) (July 3, 2018)

Preschool to 3rd grade

Books for Young Readers

Blended

by Sharon Draper

3rd to 7th grade

Atheneum/Caitlyn Dlouhy Books (October 30, 2018)

First there were three colors, red, yellow and blue.

But wait, one color thinks it’s the best! No,

another color think it’s the best! And so begins an

inspirational and whimsical story about color,

tolerance and embracing our differences.

This Makes Me Happy

by Courtney Carbone

Prek – 1st grade

Rodale Kids (April 24, 2018)


Eleven-year-old Isabella’s parents are divorced

and each week she has to move to a different

house. Her parent’s fights are even worse after

their divorce and they always seem to be about

her. Izzy feels stuck in the middle of her family

and her identity. Her dad is black, her mom is

white, and she feels caught in between two

worlds. Isabella is forced to tackle tough

questions slike what does it mean to be half white

or half black? To belong to half mom and half

dad? And how can she become whole?

Great conversation starters for talking to middle

grades about race and divorce.

Great beginning reader series tackling emotions and how to

deal with them if they overwhelm. Provides children with

the words to name their emotions and voice their feelings.

Images obtained from Google Images..

Book list provided by Heather Lee, Louisville Free Public Library.

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ENVISION EQUITY DECEMBER 2018

Kentucky Shakespeare to Perform

Taming of the Shrew at LFPL

Locations

The Louisville Free Public Library and

Kentucky Shakespeare are once again

partnering to bring free, family-friendly

performances of Kentucky

Shakespeare’s two-actor Taming of the

Shrew to the Library. Two of

Shakespeare’s strongest characters

square off in a battle of wits in this

comical live performance on tour at 17

LFPL locations in November and

December. The audience will engage

with professional actors in a creative

show that focuses on the importance of

self-respect, self-esteem, healthy

relationships, conflict resolution, and an

anti-bullying message.

The tour is made possible through a

grant from Metro Louisville. Ages six

and up are welcome. The full schedule of

performances is listed below and is also

available at LFPL.org/KyShakespeare.

#LFPLShakespeare

December 1, Jeffersontown Library, 2

p.m.

December 3, Newburg Library, 6:30

p.m.

December 6, Shawnee Library, 6:30

p.m.

December 8, Fern Creek Library, 2 p.m.

December 11, Middletown Library,

6:30 p.m.

December 12, Portland Library, 6 p.m.

December 15, Main Library, 2 p.m.

Have Fun and Get Fit with LUL

The Louisville Urban League is

offering weekly fitness opportunities.

Come join our staff for quick workout

or mindfulness activity. FREE to the

public. Please RSVP here if you can.

Click here for our list of Multicultural

Books for Elementary Students

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J E F F E R S O N C O U N T Y P U B L I C S C H O O L S

S A T E L L I T E O F F I C E

@ S H A W N E E

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Coaching Students with DACA

College Access

DACA and undocumented students can go to

KY colleges and universities.

Per CPE policy KRS 13:0245 Section 8:

• An undocumented student who graduates

from a Kentucky high school can enroll at

Kentucky colleges/universities as in-state

residents for tuition purposes.

Need help navigating the application process?

Contact Assistant Director, Diversity

Recruitment- Aimee Huffstetler

502.852.1295, aimee.huffstetler@louisville.edu

Scholarships

These scholarships and resources are

open to DACA, and in some other cases,

undocumented students:

» Migrant Network Collection

» Hispanic Scholarship Fund

» SHPE Foundation

» Latino Student Resource Guide (LLEO)

Resources

» United We Dream (UWD)

» Dream Educational Empowerment Program

(DEEP)

» Scholarships A-Z

» My (Un)Documented Life

Programs & Organizations

The Latino Leadership and College Experience

Camp is a local, community based program

that provides college coaching and leadership

development to Latinx and immigrant youth

including undocumented and DACA students.

For more information visit www.thellcec.org

Kentucky Dream Coalition is an immigrant

youth led organization focused on supporting

the undocumented and DACA-mented youth

and students in the state through organizing,

workshops and mentoring.

For more information visit www.facebook.com/

kentuckydream/

FAFSA

Unfortunately, undocumented and DACA-mented students cannot

receive state or federal financial aid.

DACA students can complete the FAFSA for scholarship purposes.

Step 1: Like all applicants, your first step should be to create an FSA

ID for yourself and your family. If parents do not have a SSN do NOT

create an FSA ID with an ITIN (individual tax identification number).

Undocumented parents and students cannot create an FSA ID or use

an ITIN on FAFSA forms at https://fsaid.ed.gov/npas/index.htm

Step 2: There are 6 sections on the FAFSA: Student Demographics

(which includes student eligibility), School Selection, Dependency

Status, Parent Demographics, Financial Information and Sign & Submit.

The two sections that are most confusing for DACA recipients are

the Student Demographic section (particularly, the student eligibility

questions) and Parent Information (if parents are undocumented).

Step 3: Students can enter their income information manually or

through the IRS retrieval tool if they filed taxes.

Step 4: If the parents of a DACA recipient are undocumented, they

must also not misrepresent themselves. When reporting parental

information, do not use an ITIN in place of a Social Security Number.

Parental information should be entered as follows:

» A parent can complete FAFSA using “000-00-0000” for PARENT

I SSN AND “999-99-9999” for PARENT II (Note: if parent holds

ITIN to file taxes, do not use in place of SSN)

» Parents’ income info must entered manually. Do not try to use the

IRS Data Retrieval tool.

» Because parents don’t have a SSN, they cannot create an FSA ID.

Therefore, parents must print, sign, and mail in signature page.

There is a bar code on the signature page that will match your

parent’s signature to your specific application once the signature

page is mailed into the FAFSA office listed on the signature page.

There is no need to print the entire application. Just send in the

signature page.

Step 5: On the signature/submission pages, students can sign with

their FSA ID. The parent must sign and mail in the signature page. For

the 2019-2020 school year, send the parent signature page to:

Federal Student Aid Programs

P.O. Box 7652

London, KY 40472-7652

Step 6: You will be able to check the status of your FAFSA online

via www.fafsa.ed.gov with the same FSA ID and PIN number you

created when you filed the FAFSA. Once the parent signature page is

processed, you will be able to access your Student Aid Report (SAR)

to view your EFC (expected family contribution), which is the number

that demonstrates your need This information is important for needbased

scholarships.

Adapted from BCTC Latinx Outreach “Coaching Students with DACA”

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RACIAL EQUITY POLICY

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JEFFERSON COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS

2018

Giveaway!

Saturday, December 8, 2018

10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

TM

Clothing Assistance Program (CAP)

319 S. 15th Street

Louisville, KY 40203

The 15th District Parent Teacher Association (PTA), in

conjunction with Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS), invites

community residents—especially those residing in the Louisville Metro Government

Zones of Hope Neighborhoods: California, Newburg, Parkland, Russell, and

Shawnee—to the Take What You Can Tote! Clothing Giveaway.

This event will provide each household representative with empty bags. Tables and

racks of gently used clothing and accessories for men and women will be available

on a first-come, first-served basis.

This event will also include books and other special items that will be distributed on

a first-come, first-served basis. Once all items are depleted,

no more will be available.

No uniform or children’s clothing will be included in this giveaway.

If inclement weather cancels this event, it will be moved to Saturday, December 15.

For more information, call CAP at 485-7062.

every child. one voice. ®

Diversity, Equity, and Poverty Division

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J E F F E R S O N C O U N T Y P U B L I C S C H O O L S

D I V E R S I T Y , E Q U I T Y , A N D P O V E R T Y P R O G R A M S D E P A R T M E N T

G I R L S TO

GALLOWS

Dr. Cherie Dawson-Edwards, a criminal justice and social

change professor, in partnership with the Jefferson

County Public Schools Diversity, Equity, and Poverty

Programs Department, will present a series of pd events,

and a community conversation that focus on the

marginalization, resilience, and brilliance of girls of color.

The scaffolding pd will focus on the school system and

how inequities and the lack of restoration for girls (of

color) perpetuate a lower sense of belonging and

contribute to negative academic outcomes.

PD Dates:

November 28, 2018 (PD # 18-1999067) | January 23, 2019 (PD # 18-1999072)

March 27, 2019 (PD # 18-1999073) | April 17, 2019 (PD # 18-1999074)

May 15, 2019 (PD # 18-1999106)

Time: 4:45–6:45 p.m.

Location: C.B. Young Jr. Service Center, 3001 Crittenden Drive, Louisville, KY 40209

Community Conversation:

Date: April 18, 2019 | Time: 6–8 p.m. | Location: C.B. Young Jr. Service Center, 3001

Crittenden Drive, Louisville, KY 40209

For more information, please contact Telva Hogan @ telva.hogan@jefferson.kyschools.us or 233-1808.

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ENVISION EQUITY DECEMBER 2018

Title Session Code Date & Time Location Contact

Gender Diversity

and LGBTQ

Inclusion

SBDM: Teamwork

for Achievement

SBDM:

Introduction to

School-Based

Decision Making

18-1996887 December 3

4:00 to 5:30 p.m.

18-1996891 December 3

4:30 to 7:30 p.m.

18-1995906 (PD)

18-1996840 (EILA)

December 3-4

4:30 to 7:30 p.m.

Poverty Simulation 18-1996508 December 6

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Newburg Branch

Library

Greathouse-Shryock

Traditional

Elementary

Greathouse-Shryock

Traditional

Elementary

Marion C. Moore

School

Dr. Monica Lakhwani

(502) 485-7269

Dr. Shawna Stenton

(502) 485-3056

Dr. Shawna Stenton

(502) 485-3056

Dr. Monica Lakhwani

(502) 485-7269

A Mile in My Shoes:

Homeless Education

Student

Empowerment and

Inclusive Pedagogy

18-1993456 January 7

9:00 to 11:00 a.m.

18-1997702 January 14

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Equity N.O.W. 18-1997218 January 15

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Being the Change:

Rejecting Anti-Bias

Pedagogy

Culturally

Responsive

Classroom

Management

Racial Equity

Analysis Protocol

Reaching and

Teaching Black

Boys Through

Literacy

Windows and

Mirrors: Who Do

Your Students See?

SBDM: School

Councils and

Budgets

SBDM:

Introduction to

School-Based

Decision Making

18-1998602 January 16

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

18-1998627 January 16

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

18-1998609 January 16

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

18-1998615 January 16

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

18-1998633 January 16

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

18-1996890 January 23

4:30 to 7:30 p.m.

18-1995907 (PD)

18-1996843 (EILA)

January 23-24

4:30 to 7:30 p.m.

VanHoose Education

Center

Farmer Elementary

Atherton High

Sanders Elementary

Sanders Elementary

Sanders Elementary

Sanders Elementary

Sanders Elementary

Auburndale

Elementary

Auburndale

Elementary

Giselle Danger-

Mercaderes

(502) 485-6153

DEP

(502) 485-3506

Vanessa Posey

(502) 485-3631

DEP

(502) 485-3506

DEP

(502) 485-3506

DEP

(502) 485-3506

DEP

(502) 485-3506

DEP

(502) 485-3506

Dr. Shawna Stenton

(502) 485-3056

Dr. Shawna Stenton

(502) 485-3056

To view a complete list of DEP professional development sessions, visit https://www.jefferson.kyschools.us/node/1350

35


ENVISION EQUITY DECEMBER 2018

Announcing...

"The Model"

Starting in the September edition of

Envision Equity, we will highlight sample

lesson plans and videos of Jefferson

County Public Schools (JCPS) classroom

teachers who are culturally responsive and

innovative. This new section of Envision

Equity will be called “The Model.”

If you are a JCPS teacher or know of a

JCPS teacher who should be highlighted as

a model of culturally responsive and

innovative classroom practices, please

submit his or her contact information to

abdul.sharif2@jefferson.kyschools.us by

the 15th of each month.

Editor—Catherine Collesano

Editor, Photo Contributor—Abdul Sharif

Credits

Special thanks to all of our community partners and educators who helped make this special edition of

Envision Equity possible.

Envision Equity is a publication of the JCPS Department of Diversity, Equity, and Poverty Programs. All

submissions should be sent to Catherine Collesano at catherine.collesano@jefferson.kyschools.us or Abdul

Sharif at abdul.sharif2@jefferson.kyschools.us. If you are interested in becoming a subscriber or a

contributor to Envision Equity, please contact one of the editors at the above email address.

www.jefferson.kyschools.us

Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer Offering Equal Educational Opportunities

36

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