International Operating Engineer - Fall 2018

jledererdc

The quarterly magazine of the International Union of Operating Engineers

i n t e r n at i o n a l

Operating Engineer

WWW.IUOE.ORG • FALL 2018

Brotherhood

Has No Borders

Operating Engineers unite and build bridges

between Ontario and Minnesota


i n t e r n at i o n a l

Operating Engineer

Fall 2018 • Volume 161, No. 4

Brian E. Hickey, Editor

Jay C. Lederer, Managing Editor

06 Remembering Giblin and Coutts

Former leaders leave a lasting legacy

08 Games Encourage Kids to ‘Dig In!’

Digital platform reaches out to future Operators

12 Labor’s Voice is Heard

Mid-term elections produce pro-worker gains

16 Brotherhood Has No Borders

U.S. and Canadian Locals make lasting connections

Departments

05 From the General President

08 Training & Education

12 Politics & Legislation

18 Canadian News

22 Local Spotlight

24 GEB Minutes

28 Union Death Benefit

[cover] IUOE Local 49 and Local 793 members stand on

the bank of the Rainy River near the existing Baudette

International Bridge.

[photo] IUOE Local 793

[right] At the Newton County Landfill in Brook, Indiana, more

than 40 IUOE Local 150 Operating Engineers are at work

pushing 1.2 million yards of dirt. Approximately a quarter of

the operators are first-year apprentices, picking up valuable

on-the-job experience and honing their skills.

[photo] IUOE Local 150

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INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

FALL 2018 3


International Operating Engineer

(ISSN 0020-8159) is published by the:

International Union of

Operating Engineers, AFL-CIO

1125 17 th Street, NW

Washington, DC 20036

Subscription Terms - $5 per year

Change of Address - Requests must

be submitted in writing to the IUOE

Membership Department (address

above). Include your new address,

registration and local union number.

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Printed in the U.S.A.

International Union of Operating Engineers

AFL-CIO

general officers

James T. Callahan, General President

Brian E. Hickey, General Secretary-Treasurer

Russell E. Burns, First Vice President

James M. Sweeney, Second Vice President

Robert T. Heenan, Third Vice President

Daniel J. McGraw, Fourth Vice President

Daren Konopaski, Fifth Vice President

Michael Gallagher, Sixth Vice President

Greg Lalevee, Seventh Vice President

Terrance E. McGowan, Eighth Vice President

Randy Griffin, Ninth Vice President

Douglas W. Stockwell, Tenth Vice President

Ronald J. Sikorski, Eleventh Vice President

James T. Kunz, Jr., Twelfth Vice President

Edward J. Curly, Thirteenth Vice President

Charlie Singletary, Fourteenth Vice President

Got Big

News

?

from Your

Local

We want to

hear about it.

trustees

Kuba J. Brown, Chairman

Brian Cochrane, Trustee

William Lynn, Trustee

Joshua VanDyke, Trustee

Barton Florence, Trustee

International Operating Engineer

appreciates the stories and

photos we receive from

local affiliates throughout

North America. Send us your

submissions or ideas for stories

you would like us to consider.

Send your submissions, plus

photos (digital images are

preferred), to Jay Lederer

at jlederer@iuoe.org, or mail

1125 Seventeenth Street, N.W.,

Washington, D.C., 20036

From the General President

AS A PRODUCTIVE and successful

2018 comes to a close, we look to keep

the momentum going into the new

year. Work hours and job placements

for our skilled H&P, Stationary and

Pipeline hands remains strong. Our

investments in recruitment and

training have scaled up to meet

demand. Our union is poised to take

advantage of every opportunity and

tackle any challenge 2019 has in store.

The Labor Movement scored some

significant victories in the final months

of this year. In August, we had a

huge victory in Missouri when voters

rejected that state’s anti-union ‘rightto-work’

law. A massive statewide

campaign, in which all of our Locals

were heavily involved, culminated in

a resounding 67% voting against the

effort to weaken and silence Missouri’s

unionized workers.

That energy carried through to the

November elections and labor unions

again played a major role across the

country. A record number of people

voted in the 2018 mid-term elections,

and IUOE members and working

families everywhere helped to elect

pro-worker candidates from both

parties.

We deployed International staff to

the battleground states of Michigan,

Minnesota, Nevada, Pennsylvania

and Wisconsin to assist our Local

unions in mobilizing voters, while

IUOE Locals in California and Illinois

ran comprehensive campaigns as

well. These efforts led the way to

victory, racking up significant wins for

working people in races for Congress,

governors’ offices, state legislatures

and ballot initiatives.

Labor’s election efforts nationwide

were monumental, with over 2.3

million doors knocked and almost

5,000 worksites visited. When the dust

settled, nearly 750 union members

were elected to various positions at

the local, state and federal level. Best

of all, we helped defeat the two biggest

anti-union governors in the nation in

Illinois and Wisconsin.

Now we must build on this success

and hold those we elected to account.

Many of our favored candidates ran

on policy, not partisan politics, as they

should. On the campaign trail, many

talked about healthcare, family wage

jobs and infrastructure investments.

These are among the bread-andbutter

issues that our union considers

a priority and why we supported

candidates, both Republican and

Democrat, who shared this vision.

On infrastructure, we have heard

a lot of promises from members of

both political parties. Now we need

to turn those promises into bold,

forward looking policy proposals that

are paid for with real money. No more

accounting gimmicks that patch things

for the short term and put off the hard

choices for a later time. That time is

now.

Congress need only look at states

like California and New Jersey where

voters recently backed raising funds

through the gas tax as long as that

money was 100% dedicated to fixing the

state’s crumbling roads and dangerous

bridges. People want safe and reliable

infrastructure and they are willing to

pay for it.

In addition, when we invest in

infrastructure we are investing in

ourselves. Studies show that every $1

billion in construction spending leads

to 5,000 direct onsite jobs. This figure

has been found to be same in the United

States as well as Canada. Ramping up

investments in infrastructure will lead

to millions of new job opportunities

in construction for current and future

Operating Engineers.

The elections revealed that our

membership can be a powerful agent

of change in our communities and

our country. Today’s politicians know

[James T. Callahan]

quite well how many people vote in the

district they represent and which issues

matter to them. We must keep up the

pressure to create more middle-class

jobs and protect our rights to collective

bargaining.

On a more somber note, we recently

mourned the passing of two great IUOE

leaders, former General President

Vincent Giblin and former General

Secretary-Treasurer Budd Coutts. Both

men spent their careers working in

the trade and working to improve the

trade for every member of this great

International Union.

During their time, both gentlemen

strengthened our membership,

raised our political clout and set

a new standard for what a vibrant

and progressive trade union can

accomplish. We stand on their

shoulders and, because of them, our

union is capable of great things.

I wish every member a peaceful

holiday season spent with friends and

family.

See you next year. Work safe.

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INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

FALL 2018 5


In Memoriam

IUOE Remembers Giblin and Coutts

THE ENTIRE IUOE family mourns

the recent passing of former General

President Vincent J. Giblin and former

General Secretary-Treasurer Budd

Coutts. Dedicated trade unionists and

strong leaders, both men made lasting

contributions to the International

union that will be felt for many years to

come.

Giblin, a 54-year member, served

as General President from March 2005

until his retirement in November 2011.

He previously had served as General

Secretary-Treasurer starting in 2002.

Vincent J. Giblin

He began working in the stationary

engineering trade in 1964 in his home

local union, Local 68 in New Jersey.

He was elected business manager of

the local in 1975 and held that position

until 2004. He was also a graduate of

the Harvard University Trade Union

Program.

Giblin was elected an International

Vice President in 1989, a position

he held until his election as General

Secretary-Treasurer. In addition, he

served as president of the Northeast

Conference of Operating Engineers

and chaired the IUOE Stationary

Committee.

Outside of the IUOE, he served

in various capacities on myriad

government and industry endeavors,

including the New Jersey Economic

Development Authority and the New

Jersey Department of Labor’s Office

of Boiler Pressure Vessel Compliance.

He also served as chairman of the

New Jersey Casino Reinvestment

Development Authority and Chairman

and Board Member of Horizon Blue

Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey.

Devoted husband of Patricia Giblin;

loving father of Vincent Giblin and his

wife Paula, Denise Costanza and her

husband Joseph, and Dennis Giblin

and his wife Stephanie; cherished

grandfather of Audrey, Brianna,

Cameron, Isabella, Annabelle, and

Brooks.

Norman Budd Coutts, hailing from

Local 955 in Alberta, marked his 60th

year of IUOE membership last year. He

served as General Secretary-Treasurer

for nearly 13 years until his retirement

in November 2002.

Coutts initiated with lUOE Local

115 in British Columbia in 1957. He

transferred into Local 955 in Edmonton

four years later, rising through the

ranks to become business manager of

the local in 1971.

He immediately developed and

implemented numerous progressive

programs, including the local’s

Training Fund in 1971 and its Pension

Fund in 1972. During his tenure, he

presided over a several-fold increase

in Local 955’s membership. Today, the

Local’s Apprenticeship and Education

Centre proudly bears his name in

recognition.

Coutts was elected an International

Vice President in 1978, making him

the youngest individual ever elected to

that position. Four years later, he was

appointed lUOE Canadian regional

director.

As General Secretary-Treasurer,

Coutts oversaw many technological

advances put in place at the

International headquarters, advances

that facilitated financial reporting and

Budd Coutts

membership listing requirements for

local unions throughout the U. S. and

Canada.

Coutts is survived by his devoted

wife and best friend of 58 years Joan;

his son Cam (Tracy); daughter Yvonne

(Maurizio); his five grandchildren

Hannah, Anitta, Kyla, Eliseo, and

Cairine.

What’s your favorite holiday color? At Labor 411, we

are partial to red, white and blue. Whether the gift is

something to eat, wear, play with or just plain enjoy, that

special present will always be measurably better if it’s

American made.

Filson clothes and bags

Kauai Coffee

Cutco knives

Chateau Ste. Michelle wine

Omaha Steaks

Harley Davidson

‘Tis The Season!

American Made Gifts

for the Holidays

It’s not always so easy to find a truly American-made

gift. The list below contains some of your favorite union-made brands that are either 100 percent

domestically produced or very close to it. These items are made by companies that treat their workers

well. By hunting down these ultra-domestic products, you will bring a smile to the gift recipient, and also

help strengthen the middle class.

Jack Daniel’s whiskey

Buffalo Trace bourbon

See’s Candies

Ghirardelli Chocolate

Stanley Tools – American Heritage collection

Turning Leaf wine

6

INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

LABOR411.ORG

FALL 2018 7


Training & Education

Local 66 Encourages Kids to ‘Dig In!’

IUOE LOCAL 66 has partnered with Simcoach Games

to develop free game apps that simulate operating heavy

equipment as tools for educating and recruiting potential

apprentice operators.

The gaming company, also based in Pittsburgh, developed

“Dig in: An Excavator Game” and “Dig In: A Dozer Game” for

the local. They introduced their first game, “Hook: A Tower

Crane Game” last year.

“We’re trying to educate kids who are in middle school

according to industry officials.

Kunz said Local 66 has 375 apprentices — the most ever

— going through its training center in New Alexandria. He

said pending Baby Boomer retirements and a need for

construction workers is driving the influx. Apprentices are in

the program for four years and receive paid classroom and

on-the-job training.

They’ll can earn as much as $60 per hour working after

they graduate, Kunz said.

International

Union of

Operating

Engineers

2019 Construction Training Course Schedule

- General Membership -

Location: International Training Center — Crosby, Texas

and maybe even a little earlier just to let people, and

especially the kids, know there are good, long lasting careers

in the construction industry,” said Jim Kunz, International

Vice President and Local 66 Business Manager. “We realized

that we had to find other ways to communicate with the

generation that doesn’t communicate in the ways that we

used to in the past.”

The games are available as free downloads in the main

app stores.

Players move dirt, dig holes and make lifts using their

thumbs to control the “joy sticks” through varying levels

of proficiency and difficulty. They also receive messages

connecting them to real life apprenticeship opportunities.

With construction booming throughout Western

Pennsylvania, union locals are advertising on television,

radio and social media in an attempt to attract candidates,

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INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

Tom Melcher, business

manager of the Pittsburgh

Regional Building and

Construction Trades

Council, said all building

trade apprenticeships are

operating at full capacity.

“To be quite honest with

you, every apprenticeship

program right now is

just overwhelmed,” he

said. “There’s so much

work out there. Every

apprenticeship school

right now is recruiting

heavily.”

The unemployment

rate in Southwestern

Pennsylvania hit its lowest rate on record in May at 3.9 percent

and union officials say more work is on the horizon. Melcher

said thousands will find jobs building the Shell petrochemical

plant underway in Beaver County and Pittsburgh is booming

with new buildings.

Jessica Trybus, chief games officer for Simcoach Games,

said the company specializes in developing apps for

workforce development and career awareness.

“The idea is really to even have a small game that’s fun

and engages someone into possibilities. That can be for an

industry, an occupation or a very specific skill set,” she said.

[article] The following was excerpted and edited for space from

TribLIVE.com Read the full text at: https://triblive.com/local/allegheny/14159750-74/construction-union-using-video-games-tointerest-kids-in-apprenticeships

Schedules may be revised periodically as new courses are added. Check www.iuoe.org for updates.

FALL 2018 9


Training & Education

Healthcare

IUOE Job Corps Augments Recruitment Efforts

Know the Facts About Pain Medications

HISTORICALLY, THE CONSTRUCTION industry has

maintained a steady balance between people leaving the

construction industry through normal attrition rates and

people entering the industry as apprentices. As the balance

begins to change, pre-apprenticeship programs are being

utilized to screen and refer program graduates to Local

Unions.

Currently, the IUOE Job Corps Training Program runs at

11 different locations within the United States that work to

provide quality Apprenticeship candidates to IUOE Locals

across the nation. They offer training for future operators,

mechanics, paving and stationary engineers. One way they

do this is through recruitment at the high school level,

identifying students with the skill set necessary to become

capable apprentices.

Whenever possible, IUOE Job Corps collaborates with

our Local Unions to assist them in recruiting efforts.

Recruitment presentations walk through the opportunities

and realities of a rewarding career as an Operating Engineer.

If a potential candidate is selected for training, they will

enroll in one of the IUOE Job Corps’ programs that offers a

solid career path that often leads to becoming an Operating

Engineer journeyman.

Training programs are competency-based and completion

can take up to 14 months, depending on previous

experience and learning ability. While enrolled, students

earn OSHA 10 certification, forklift certification, High School

Diploma or GED if needed, and acquire seat time on many

different pieces of earth moving and material handling

equipment.

Prior to completion, students must pass a Job Corps

Performance Test that was developed to mirror the Training

Standard Performance (TSP) utilized by many IUOE

Locals to test apprentices. The tests are used for evaluating

operating competency on each individual piece of heavy

equipment. IUOE Job Corps has the flexibility to offer

machine specific training to students if requested by a Local

Union.

Pre-apprentice graduates are trained on construction

workplace safety, preventative maintenance, the

expectations of an IUOE member, in addition to hands on

equipment operation.

Upon the completion

of the IUOE Job Corps

pre-apprentice program,

students are prepared to

enter the world of an IUOE

Apprenticeship Program

and have the experience

necessary to be successful

for both the Local Unions

and the employing

contractors.

For more information,

please contact:

John Saunders, IUOE Job

Corps Coordinator

jsaunders@iuoe.org

THE CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL labels opioid

abuse an epidemic. What do you need to know before you

say “yes” to pain relief? All of these opioids are powerful

painkillers and prone to abuse. Even though opioids are

prescribed medications, they are extremely addictive and

can lead to overdose or death.

Benzodiazepines (Klonopin, Valium, Xanax) a

tranquilizer used to treat anxiety and other relation

conditions.

Codeine used to relieve pain depending on dosage for a few

hours.

Demerol (Meperidine) used to treat moderate to severe

pain.

Dilaudid (Exalgo, Hydromorpone) mostly used in a

hospital setting used for short term pain relief.

Fentanyl (Actiq, Duragesic, Sublimaze) 100 times stronger

than Morphine, used for cancer patients or post-surgical

patients with severe pain. Extremely potent, can reach

deadly toxic levels if not managed within FDA approved

limits.

Hydrocodone (Lortab, Norco, Vicodin, Zohydro) used

to treat moderate to severe pain resulting from a chronic

condition, injury or surgical or dental procedures.

Methadone (Dolophine, Methadose) mostly associated

with helping those trying to quit heroin. However, can

be used part of a physician monitored pain management

program.

Morphine (Duramorph, MS Contin) used to treat severe

pain related to cancer or cancer treatment.

Oxycodone (OxyContin, Percodan) a popular opioid

prescription painkiller used for an around the clock

treatment of moderate to severe pain.

Oxymorphone (Numorphan, Numorphone, Opana) used

to treat moderate to severe pain.

Percocet (similar to OxyContin but contains a combination

of acetaminophen and oxycodone) used to treat moderate

to severe pain.

Going in for surgery or in pain? Ask your doctor about

alternative therapies. As a recent New York Times article

reported, a combination of Tylenol and Advil worked just as

well as opioids for relief of pain in the emergency room, a

randomized trial has found.

What are symptoms of abuse and addiction? Taking

medication more frequently than prescribed, using

medication for other symptoms than pain, requiring higher

doses to get the same effect, taking others prescriptions or

compulsive behaviors.

Where to get help if you think you have a problem?

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services

Administration’s National Hotline at https://www.samhsa.

gov/ or call their confidential hotline: 1-800-662-HELP

Visit Facing Addiction’s online Addiction Resources Hub,

https://resources.facingaddiction.org/

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INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

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Politics & Legislation

IUOE Gets the Vote Out in Key State and Federal Races

LABOR’S VOICE HAS returned to

Capitol Hill and to many State Houses

across the nation. Americans voted in

record numbers in the 2018 mid-term

elections where IUOE members and

working families everywhere helped to

elect pro-worker candidates from both

parties.

International Union staff deployed

to Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada,

Pennsylvania and Wisconsin to assist

local unions in mobilizing union

members for the 2018 elections. Local

unions led the way to victory in all of

those places, racking up significant

wins for working people in races for the

House, Senate and governors’ offices in

all five states.

soundly defeated in a race that election

handicappers did not see coming. The

House Republican Caucus is likely to

retain over 40 Republican supporters

of Davis-Bacon prevailing wages in the

next Congress.

The new Democratic majority

in the House has vowed to take up

an IUOE priority and move a $500

billion infrastructure bill through their

chamber over the next two years. The

Democratic chairmen and Republican

leaders of the key committees for

Operating Engineers – the Energy and

electoral effort in history. Driven

by conversations between union

members at the doorstep, over the

phone and at worksites, the AFL-CIO’s

program also deployed massive radio,

digital and direct mail campaigns.

Membership polling this cycle found

that persuadable voters trust their

unions more than any other source of

political information.

The massive effort succeeded in

putting over 740 union members into

elected office at the local, state and

national levels.

General President Callahan

congratulated Operating Engineers on

victories around the country. “It was

a big night for Operating Engineers.

We beat the two biggest anti-union

governors in the country in Illinois and

Wisconsin and saved thousands of jobs

rebuilding California’s transportation

network,” said President Callahan.

Voters in California resoundingly

turned back the effort to repeal the

recently-passed gas tax through

Proposition 6. Despite facing an uphill

battle, a sustained campaign, focused

on safety and accountability, carried

the day, continuing millions of hours of

work for members of the IUOE. It was

a huge victory for IUOE jobs and the

safety of California drivers.

Democrats took the majority in the

Unites States House of Representatives.

The only thing unclear at press time

is the exact margin of victory; there

were still ballots being counted in

many close races. The IUOE lost some

Republican allies this election, both at

the ballot box and to retirements.

Congressman Frank LoBiondo (R-

NJ) retired after a long, distinguished

career in Congress. He led the

Republican Labor Caucus and was a

senior member of the Transportation

and Infrastructure Committee. He

educated his colleagues on “the sanctity

of the collective bargaining agreement”

and was a stalwart supporter of

the IUOE. Dan Donovan (R-NY),

Congressman from Staten Island and

close ally of the IUOE, was perhaps the

biggest surprise of the night. He was

Commerce and the Transportation

and Infrastructure Committees – will

continue to be strong Davis-Bacon

supporters.

Two IUOE-endorsed energy-

Democrats lost United States Senate

races in Indiana and North Dakota.

However, we helped re-elect the

Senators from Montana and West

Virginia, and flipped the seat in

Nevada. Senate races in Arizona and

Florida had not been called as of this

writing.

Scores of IUOE members

volunteered from coast-to-coast. They

took part in the Labor Movement’s

largest

member-to-member

[above] IUOE Local 12 members John Flot,

Mike Cavasos and Jim Sargent were part

of the Nevada AFL-CIO get-out-the-vote

program in Las Vegas.

[photo] Emmelle Israel, AFL-CIO

[opposite page, top] Mark Maierle, Joe

Hinely, Josh Neuhauser spread the word

on union baked candidates in Green Bay,

Wisconsin.

[photo] IUOE

[opposite page, bottom] Visting union

households on Election Day 2018 in Las

Vegas, Nevada.

12 INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

FALL 2018 13


Member Spotlight

Local 77 Members Turn Rescuers for Fire Victims

Thousands of Tradeswomen Gather in Seattle

AN ORDINARY WORKDAY quickly

turned extraordinary for some Local 77

members when a major fire broke out

at an apartment complex for seniors

in Southeast Washington, DC. The fire

sent flames and black smoke shooting

from the roof of the Arthur Capper

Senior Public Housing complex,

forcing neighbors and bystanders,

including local Operating Engineers

and some Marines, to rescue residents

while waiting for first responders to

arrive.

The three alarm fire erupted as Local

77 Operating Engineers employed by

Clark Construction were working next

door on a CSX rail project. They quickly

noticed the fire and were among the

first to notify authorities as well as lend

a hand in the rescue efforts. Firefighters

used four ladder trucks and multiple

ground units to bring the blaze under

control.

The Operating Engineers joined

neighbors and about ten Marines

stationed at the nearby barracks to

aid in the evacuation of the residents,

many of whom needed to be carried

out. The apartment complex had 162

one- and two-bedroom units with as

many as 190 occupants.

Five days later, Local 77 members

working for Crane Service Company

[above, L to R] Local 77 members Danny

Church, Dennis Sheehan, Dutch Baldwin

and Andy Glista assited in the resscue of a

man trapped in his apartment days after

fire severely damaged the buiding.

[photo] Steve Faulkner, Local 77

were on site to help with the fire

investigation when they were called

into action to help rescue a 74-yearold

man who had been trapped in his

apartment at the fire-damaged senior

housing complex. Engineers assessing

the structural integrity of the building

heard him yelling and used a crowbar

to pry open the door of his second-floor

apartment. They found him sitting on a

couch.

The man was carried out of the

rubble after spending several days

barricaded in his room, but emerged

without serious injuries. One of the

Local 77 Operators apologetically

offered the man his peanut butter

and jelly sandwich, to which the man

replied, “It looks like steak to me!”

Clean up efforts are still ongoing and

Operating Engineers are still leading

the way.

WOMEN BUILD NATIONS, an

annual conference designed for

women in the trades, convened in

Seattle this year. Now in its eighth year,

the conference continues to grow in

popularity with over 2,200 registered

attendees, including 78 Operating

Engineers from the United States and

Canada.

Before the formal meetings kickedoff,

over 60 attendees participated

in a community service project to

help build small houses for the city’s

low income housing institute. Linda

Hamilton, IUOE Local 132 member

and International representative on

the NABTU Tradeswomen Committee,

described the day.

“There were five IUOE women who

took part in the service project. It was a

lot of fun, along with some hard work.

The houses already had the bottom

frame, so we built the sides, roof and

painted the house. We were able to

complete four houses,” Hamilton said.

Other highlights included the

annual banner parade through parts

of downtown Seattle and union

caucus meetings. The caucus meeting

allowed all the IUOE members to come

together and discuss ideas. Marge

Newgent from host IUOE Local 302

made arrangements for the operators

in attendance to go on a duck boat ride

and meet at a taco truck for dinner.

Local 302 also had special IUOE tee

shirts for the women donated by

Garner Construction, a local signatory

contractor.

“It is my hope that there will be

double the amount of women at next

year’s event. I believe the conference is

a good opportunity for the apprentices

to attend, because they are able to

meet and talk to other women in the

field, ask questions, and get advice on

how to grow in the industry,” Hamilton

remarked.

[right] The three-alarm fire ravaged a

Senior Center in Wqshington, DC. Local 77

members aided in the evacuation of 190

occupants.

[photo] www.hillrag.com

Next year’s conference is planned

for October 4-6, 2019 in Minneapolis,

Minnesota. The event has been

renamed to “Trades Women Build

Nations.”

14

INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

FALL 2018 15


Canadian News

Brotherhood Has No Borders

Ontario & Minnesota Locals unite to build bridge

the rigging and promote safety and cleanliness of the barges

and job site. He has also taken direction on some of the other

equipment, and is proving competent on the mini-excavator,

loader and spud winch.”

“Chris [Carmody] is a wonderful teacher. He gives me a

chance to do things with all of the equipment, including

the crane operation at the end of shift, so long as I follow

his direction, and do things safely,” said member and

apprentice Wilson-Hajdu. “I love Local 793 and this 339-A

apprenticeship program.”

The new bridge will be located 3.3 feet south/upstream

of the existing bridge and will tie into the existing U.S. and

Canadian Port of Entry facilities. Two aluminum arches will

be installed in the middle of the bridge at the location of the

international border.

[opposite page] L to R: Local 49 Randy Schoen, Local 793 Chris

Carmody, Local 49 Jean-Guy Trepanier, Local 49 Brandon Benson,

Local 49 Luke Zabel, Local 793 apprentice Sam Wilson-Hajdu.

[left & below] Concrete is pumped into a test pier at Rainy River

bridge.

[article & photos] Kathryn Peet and Danny Celia, Local 793

A HIGHWAY BRIDGE connecting northwestern Ontario,

Canada with northern Minnesota, U.S. is scheduled to be

replaced in the next few years.

This $20-million CAD project started in June 2018 and will

finish in late 2020. It will replace the Ontario Highway 11 /

Minnesota Trunk Highway 72 border crossing bridge from

Rainy River, Ontario to Baudette, Minnesota. This crossing

is the terminus for the world’s longest street - Yonge Street

(Highway 11), which originates in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Prime contractor Lunda Construction is performing a

multi-year construction and demolition project. Lunda will

build the new Rainy River – Baudette International Bridge

and demolish/remove the existing bridge. Veit is a subcontractor

installing the drilled shaft foundations. Lunda

is partnering with Canadian sub-contractors to build the

Canadian half of the bridge and complete the roadway work

in Ontario. Sub-contractor Facca Incorporated is doing work

on the Canadian shore.

IUOE Local 793 in Ontario has two members on site

working from barges and five members are on site from Local

49 in Minnesota.

Local 793 Ontario members are Chris Carmody, Crane

Operator for Lunda and Sam Wilson-Hajdu, Oiler/Backhoe

Operator for Lunda and a 339-A mobile crane apprentice

under Carmody.

Local 49 Minnesota members for Lunda are Randy

Schoen, Tugboat Operator, Luke Zabel, Crane Operator,

and Daniel Hanken, Tugboat Operator. Local 49 Minnesota

members Jean-Guy Trepanier and Brandon Benson are Drill

Rig Operators for Veit.

Guided by surveyors, Local 793 Ontario members Chris

Carmody and his apprentice Sam Wilson-Hajdu used

Lunda’s Manitowoc 2250, a 300-ton crane, to drive the H-Pile

beams into the river bottom. They help guide the drill rig for

placement of caissons.

“We have installed eight temporary piling as formwork for

the caisson guide. They are 55 feet long and are vibrated by

the 300-ton crane with a vibratory piling hammer,” said Local

793 member Chris Carmody. “The piling goes approximately

20-feet into the river bed.”

“Working from the barge has its challenges. Most often we

are working by radio, as my view is obstructed,” continued

brother Carmody.

“The Local 49 Minnesota operating engineers are great

guys, well trained and experts in working from barges

and around the water. Pre-planning of the job each day is

excellent, and their radio communication is exemplary. Their

approach to environmental regards is second to none.”

The river current has been a challenge. To counter this,

barges were bolted together, with long spuds digging into the

river bottom.

“We have needed to use the tug boat to help stabilize the

pile before driving it into the river bottom with the vibratory

hammer,” added Local 793 Ontario member Carmody.

The Caterpillar caisson drill rig drilled a test hole in

the river bottom, to see if the caisson would withstand the

pressure. On Monday, October 29, the caisson protection

was removed. The caisson was nine feet in diameter, weighs

40,000 lbs, and is 40 feet long. The caisson was used for

containment of the Pier materials during the drilling of the

test hole. In total, eight caissons will be drilled to support the

bridge structure.

Local 793 Ontario member and mobile crane apprentice

Sam Wilson-Hajdu is working as on this project as an oiler/

backhoe operator for Lunda. “It is a neat experience working

from a barge. Any leaks are my responsibility to clean up and

contain quickly, and we need to work safely.”

“Sam has been a great first year apprentice and is very

willing to learn,” said Brother Carmody of his apprentice.

“We talk about the pre-op inspections each morning, check

16 INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

FALL 2018

17


Canadian News

Local 115 Looks for More Community Benefits

Opportunities in BC

“The Community

Benefits model also

restores the union

presence to taxpayerfunded

construction

jobs. The record in BC

shows that unions make

a big contribution to the

stability, productivity and

safety of major projects.”

“The alternative – the

low-bid, low-wage, unionbusting

approach taken by

the previous government

for more than a decade –

was an embarrassing mess,

with huge cost overruns

and project delays.”

“The new ownership allows us to re-set

the labour model,” said Brian Cochrane.

“The federal government has an

obligation to make sure Canada’s workforce

benefits from this $10B project. If it’s going

to be a world-class project, it needs skilled,

experienced workers.”

“Prime Minister Trudeau and his team

have said encouraging things about the role

of labour in society. Now it’s time for them to

deliver.”

Cochrane communicated the union’s

views to Patty Hajdu, Canada’s Labour and

Skills Development Minister, when she

visited the Local’s training site on September

18, 2018.

Minister Hajdu took the opportunity to try

out our new Manitowoc 8500 crawler crane,

purchased with support from her Ministry as

part of a program to support union training.

AFTER YEARS OF being shut out from public construction

projects, British Columbia’s building trades unions have

signed a far-reaching agreement with the Provincial New

Democratic Party government elected in 2017.

The deal, concluded in summer 2018, promises

opportunity for greater union engagement on public

construction projects. There are also priority hiring

provisions for local residents who are looking for a career in

construction.

IUOE Local 115 is a party to the Community Benefits

Agreement through the Allied Infrastructure and Related

Construction Council (AIRCC). Non-union contractors are

still free to bid on key provincial projects, but a new public

agency will act as the employer of record, supplying labour to

all contractors. This model guarantees fair wages and working

conditions for all employees on key public projects. It also

provides guarantees on apprentice training and priority

hiring for women and Indigenous people on construction

jobs.

“It’s a historic step for BC,” said Local 115 Business

Manager Brian Cochrane. “It opens the way for a new

generation of construction workers to get the skills they need

and gain experience in a positive work environment.”

To prepare for the

expansion of the BC

construction work force, Local 115 and allied unions are

supporting the provincial government’s focus on recruiting

women. The Local hosted a Young Women in Trades

session in October to introduce high school students to

the roadbuilding, crane and mechanic trades. BC Minister

of Advanced Education and Skills Training Melanie Mark

attended, along with 29 young women.

roadbuilding, crane and mechanic trades. BC Minister

of Advanced Education and Skills Training Melanie Mark

attended, along with 29 young women.

The first test of the BC Community Benefits Agreement is

scheduled to come in 2019 with a start on the Pattullo Bridge

Replacement, a $1.4B project at the heart of Metro Vancouver.

Meanwhile, IUOE Local 115 and allied unions are looking

for opportunities to expand the Community Benefits model

to other jurisdictions.

The Government of Canada recently acquired the Trans

Mountain pipeline, where a scheduled twinning project

attempted by Kinder Morgan of Houston, Texas was going

nowhere. The twinning is designed to provide valuable export

access to the Pacific coast for Canadian oil.

[left] IUOE Local 115 Table Officers

met with BC Premier John Horgan

on September 11, 2018 to discuss

the application of Community

Benefits. L-R: Local 115 President

Wayne Mills, Assistant Business

Manager Josh Towsley, Premier

John Horgan, Business Manager

Brian Cochrane, Financial

Secretary Don Swerdan.

[above] Canada’s Labour Minister,

Patty Hajdu, with IUOE Local 115

Training Association Instructor

Wes Bauder.

[right] BC’s Minister of Advanced

Education and Skills Training,

Melanie Mark, back row second

from right, with Local 115 E-Board

member Goretti Guilbault (in blue)

and high school trades students.

[article & photos] Ian McLeod,

Local 115

18

INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

FALL 2018 19


Canadian News

Helmets to Hardhats Helps Another Soldier Find a

Placement with the Operating Engineers

MATTHEW MAGINNIS

SPOKE at the special e-board

meeting on September 22,

2018, as the IUOE Local 793

area delegate for Toronto,

Ontario, Canada. He was

initiated into Local 793

Ontario in February 2016 and

came to the union through

the Helmets to Hardhats

Canada® (H2H) program.

H2H provides opportunities

for anyone who has served

(or is currently serving) in

the Canadian Forces to get

the required apprenticeship

training to achieve journey

person status in trades within

the building and construction

industry. Local 793 Ontario

is a proud supporter of the

H2H program which also

offers seminars and career

workshops to provide an

easier transition to civilian

life.

Maginnis retired from the

military in 2015 after nine

years of service. He wanted to

be a mechanic and work on

truck and coach and tractor

trailers. The owner of the

garage was slow to want to

sign him up as an apprentice.

Maginnis found it hard to

find someone willing to

invest the time and money

to bring his skills up to the

standards required.

In the summer of 2015,

Maginnis spoke with

his wife’s friend’s father,

member Dennis LaRiviere.

He told Maginnis of the many

benefits of belonging to Local

793 Ontario. That your rights as an

employee are respected, how safety is

key in the work environment, and that

people on the union job site are treated

with professionalism and respect. The

conversation re-sparked Maginnis’

interest in getting into a trade where his

work would have value. He enrolled in

the H2H program in August 2015 and

was initiated into Local 793 Ontario in

February 2016.

“As soon as I signed up with Local

793 it was almost instantaneous that

I was in an apprenticeship program,”

Maginnis commented.

Currently working for ALL Canada

Crane, Maginnis is a 339A mobile

crane operator apprentice under

brother Mike LaPierre and previously

apprenticed under brother Rob

Rybarczyk. Maginnis likes the on-site

learning experience and exposure

to different pieces of equipment. He

is working on the Toronto Transit

Commission (TTC) expansion project

with Metrolinx across Eglinton Avenue

in Toronto, Ontario. Mike LaPierre is a

22-year Local 793 Ontario member and

a 30-year employee with ALL Canada

Crane.

Maginnis says that he likes the

structured aspects of the work and the

training and that it reminds him of the

military. “I show up early. I’m half an

hour early than I’m asked to be there,”

he said. And this dedication translates

into an affinity with the union as a

family and his chosen career. He is

truly a brother.

“When I joined 793, I thought ‘this

is my last placement,’” he says. “I felt

at home and comfortable with my

job and surroundings. When I close

that book as a union member, I’ll be

settled. Local 793 is my forever until

retirement.”

[opposite page] Local 793 member

and mobile crane apprentice Matthew

Maginnis and Local 793 member Mike

LaPierre working for ALL Canada Crane.

They are operating a TCC-1100 110-ton

Link-Belt Crane for Metrolinx on the

Eglinton Crosstown Light Rail Transit (LRT)

project in Toronto, Ontario.

[left] Matthew Maginnis speaking at IUOE

Local 793 special e-board meeting on

September 22, 2018, as the Toronto area

delegate.

[article & photos] Kathryn Peet and Danny

Celia, Local 793

20 INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

FALL 2018

21


Local Spotlight

Local 150 Raises $500,000 for Military Families

Proceeds from annual golf event supports SEAL Family Foundation

LOCAL 150’S CHARITY golf

fundraiser helped raise $500,000 for the

Navy SEAL Family Foundation at the

James M. Sweeney Classic in August.

The event hosted more than 500

golfers across four golf courses in

Lemont, Illinois and the check was

presented to retired SEAL Captain Mike

Argo, who serves on the SEAL Family

Foundation’s Board of Directors. The

event brought together a cross-section

of workers, business leaders, elected

officials and military families.

“The union construction industry

is proud to support military families,”

said IUOE Vice President and Local

150 President-Business Manager

James M. Sweeney. “Veterans are a

big part of the union construction

industry, and we are proud to welcome

returning veterans to our industry with

open arms. It is an honor to be come

together and give back to those who

have sacrificed so much for us.”

Congressional Medal of Honor

recipient and active Navy SEAL

Ed Byers, Jr. was present to thank

supporters and share the importance of

the charity’s work for military families.

The SEAL Family Foundation

focuses on creating individual and

family readiness through an array of

programs specifically targeted to assist

the Naval Special Warfare community

in maintaining a resilient, sustainable,

and healthy force.

U.S. Navy SEALs ability to stay

ready determines the success of every

mission; part of their job is to facilitate

that state of readiness at home by

ensuring every Naval Special Warfare

service member knows their family is,

and will be, taken care of.

22

INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

[above] IUOE Vice President and Local 150 President-Business Manager James M. Sweeney

(third from left) presents a check for $500,000 for the SEAL Family Foundation to SEAL Family

Foundation Executive Director Captain William Fenick, Gold Star Spouse Cindy Axelson,

and retired SEAL Captain Mike Argo at the James M. Sweeney Classic Golf Tournament on

August 13th at Gleneagles Country Club in Lemont, Illinois.

[article & photos] Ed Maher, Local 150

The foundation’s motto is “Taking

Care of THEIR Families While They

Protect OURS.”

The SEAL Family Foundation

programs include hosting family

introduction dinners upon graduation,

spouse and family retreats, children’s

educational support programs, family

readiness group grants, emergency

assistance, wounded warrior and fallen

hero family care, and bereavement

support.

You Served Your Country. Now Secure Your Future.

Become a Skilled Construction

Professional...At NO COST to You!

• Connects men & women to REWARDING CAREERS in the construction industry

• HIGH EARNING POTENTIAL through the best Apprenticeship Training Programs in the country

• Utilize your G.I. BILL EDUCATION BENEFITS to supplement your income

• EARN WHILE YOU LEARN - No experience required

• BENEFITS PACKAGE - Comprehensive healthcare and secure pension

Secure Your Future Today

www.helmetstohardhats.org

FALL 2018 23


Union Death Benefit

Benefits paid

July - September, 2018

IUOE Code of Ethics Receives Review

at the Ten Year Mark

ON THE TENTH anniversary of the adoption of the IUOE

Code of Ethics, the General Executive Board considered both

the Code and the Operating Rules and Procedures for the

Implementation and Enforcement of the Code, to determine

whether any changes were warranted. No changes were

made to the Code of Ethics. In consultation with IUOE Ethics

Officer Joseph McCann, there were a number of changes

made to the Operating Rules, effective December 1, 2018.

These changes will streamline procedures, provides that

complaints be filed in a timely fashion, and avoids duplicate

proceedings arising from election protests, internal charges,

or the filing of lawsuits relating to the cause or controversy

that is the subject of an Ethics complaint. The General

President will play a role in determining whether complaints

have sufficient merit to warrant referral to the Ethics Officer.

We are pleased that Joseph McCann, a principal in the

law firm of Murray and McCann, will continue to serve as

the Ethics Officer, a position that he has held since 2013. Mr.

McCann is a former Assistant United States Attorney for the

Eastern District of New York and was the Chief Civil RICO

Attorney for that office. He also has served with distinction

as a monitor or ethics officer for several local unions. He is

an attorney with impeccable integrity and knows the labor

movement well.

You can contact Mr. McCann at 100 Merrick Road,

Ste 514W, Rockville Center, New York 11570 or his toll

free number 1-866-380-3495. Complaints or inquiries

concerning the Code of Ethics or Operating Rules can be

made to the Ethics Officer or by writing General President

Callahan at International Union of Operating Engineers, 1125

Seventeenth Street, NW, Washington DC 20036. Complete

copies of the Code of Ethics and the Operating Rules can be

found at the IUOE website at www.iuoe.org.

As provided by Article VIII of the Code of Ethics, the Code

does not include or encompass grievances by members

that arise under collective bargaining agreements or to

complaints or allegations arising from the IUOE Constitution

or Local Union Bylaws, unless such grievances or complaints

involve an allegation of conduct prohibited by the Code.

The International looks forward to a continuation of

the Code of Ethics as part of its commitment to the highest

ethical standards.

[above] IUOE Ethics Officer Joseph McCann

JULY 2018

LOCAL 003

ALAMEDA, CA

DAN F HEENEY

ROBERT L

DRAKE

JOE VINGO

WILLIAM H

AKINS

LEE BROWN

HASTING L

SCHMIDT

KENNETH D

CLYDE

LARRY HUGHES

HERBERT

CANNON

LOCAL 004

MEDWAY, MA

WILLIAM T

HOWELL

BRIAN B

SIMONELLI

LEO L LOVELY

ROBERT P

DEPASQUALE

CHARLES A

MACKENZIE

LOCAL 009

DENVER, CO

JOE ARAGON

ELMER D ROBBS

LOCAL 012

PASADENA, CA

J. T. HARRIS

FRANK L.

GARCIA

LEROY H

VOLLMER

FRED R.

REINHARDT

JAMES D.

CAMPBELL

DONALD R. MC

KINNEY

WILLIAM A.

SEAVER

MANUEL D.

SILVA, JR.

WALTER M

MICOZ

UTAH C. BROWN

P. S. PERRY

RONAL C.

WOODEN

JOHN L. WALL

DAVID D.

BRANSON

GENE BEATTIE

PATRICK A.

MCGUIRE

LOCAL 015

LONG ISLAND

CITY, NY

JOHN R CETIN

JOHN D GALLO

VINCENT ALFISI

LOCAL 018

CLEVELAND, OH

GEORGE DOBRA

RICHARD P HEFT

JAMES W CRIPPS

ERNEST

SCHMELTZER

BERNARD L

MAERKISCH

ROBERT DRAVIS

ALBERT M

CASTELLI

ROGER

BERNATH

PAUL B

SAUNDERS

PAUL FISHER

LORENCE K

HALLOWELL

LOCAL 025

MILLSTONE

TOWNSHIP, N

FRANK MALTA

LOCAL 037

BALTIMORE, MD

ARTHUR

MORRIS

LOCAL 049

MINNEAPOLIS,

MN

ARTHUR VOCE

VICTOR A

WENZEL

CHARLES M

RATH

ARNOLD

KLEINSCHMIDT

DON

EGELKRAUT

WAYNE WENZEL

LOCAL 066

PITTSBURGH, PA

RICHARD H

CARLSON

JOHN C

THOMAS

LOCAL 098

EAST

LONGMEADOW,

MA

JOSEPH J

ALIBOZEK

LOCAL 101

KANSAS CITY,

MO

R T CAUTHON

LOCAL 103

INDIANAPOLIS,

IN

RICHARD D

STEINER

LOCAL 115

BURNABY, BC

RICHARD F

SCHAFER

ALEX TARANKO

QUINTIN D

DAVIDSON

THOMAS F

OWEN

ART R

ENGELMAN

LAWRENCE H

MCCUTCHEO

SIEGFRIED

REIDIES

BRANKO

MIHALJEVIC

LAWRENCE

RACINE

GARY R

HAWTHORNE

JOHN N

CUNNINGHAM

LOCAL 132

CHARLESTON,

WV

JEEMS E CASTO

LOCAL 137

BRIARCLIFF

MANOR, NY

EDWARD A

LUCAS

LOCAL 138

FARMINGDALE,

NY

ROBERT BLAKE

LOCAL 139

PEWAUKEE, WI

JERRY L DULL

CHARLES G

PAQUETTE

JOHN H BYRNE

LOCAL 148

SAINT LOUIS,

MO

GLENN F

EGGEMEYER

FLOYD W HILL

ALFRED J ELAM

LOCAL 150

COUNTRYSIDE,

IL

GERALD J

GREENAWALT

WILLIAM F

SWEENEY

ORVILLE G

RITTMER

RICHARD L

GILLILAND

DARREL R

SCHLOTTERBE

WALTER W

WINKEL

LOCAL 158

GLENMONT, NY

WILLIAM C

TRUMBLE

LOCAL 181

HENDERSON, KY

ARLIE R ROSS

OTIS KEOWN JR.

GEORGE W

JOLLY

LOCAL 286

AUBURN, WA

WALTER COOK

LOCAL 302

BOTHELL, WA

JOHN W

ASHCROFT

LEROY FOSNESS

DOUGLAS J

LATHROP

LEROY R

HAUSER

PETER M

MOODY

LYLE D TOSO

LOCAL 317

OAK CREEK, WI

JOY

SCHUMACHER

LOCAL 324

BLOOMFIELD

TOWNSHIP,

KENNETH C

GRINDLING

ARTHUR J

DEGRAND

RICHARD E

VANFOSSEN

ARTHUR G

MARTIN

ARTHUR L

MILLER

ELI M LUX

GARRY R LA

JOYE

BURNETT

LILLARD

ROBERT F HALL

TERRY G

SHAUGHNESSY

HARRY D

SUNDMAN

LOCAL 347

HARVEY H HERN

LOCAL 351

BORGER, TX

E T DACUS

BILLY R THOMAS

LOCAL 382

BUEL SWAIM

LOCAL 399

CHICAGO, IL

EDWARD

PRANGE

JOHN C

PETERSON

MICHAEL REILLY

MANUAL H

JURMAN

LOCAL 400

HELENA, MT

JEROME H

FRIEDSAM

RICHARD C

DANIELS

LOCAL 406

NEW ORLEANS,

LA

BOBBY R HANO

LOCAL 407

LAKE CHARLES,

LA

J C FRANKS

LOCAL 428

PHOENIX, AZ

DONALD G

HEIGLE

JULIAN K

SCHOENFELD

LOCAL 474

POOLER, GA

JOYCE A SHARPE

LOCAL 478

HAMDEN, CT

HERBERT

HARRIOTT JR

LOCAL 513

BRIDGETON, MO

LARRY PRINSTER

BOB J

SEABAUGH

RUSSELL W

MOORE

CHARLES D

HENDRIX

LOCAL 542

FORT

WASHINGTON,

PA

ROBERT J DALY

JR

FRED D FISHER

LOCAL 571

OMAHA, NE

ABE VANROEKEL

LOCAL 612

TACOMA, WA

EMIL VALENTA

LOCAL 649

PEORIA, IL

DOUGLAS G

BROOKS

CHARLES H

MAAS

LOCAL 653

MOBILE, AL

ROBERT D

MITCHELL

LOCAL 701

GLADSTONE, OR

KEITH

HARRISON

LOCAL 793

OAKVILLE, ON

LARRY D GREEN

LOCAL 825

SPRINGFIELD, NJ

JOSEPH

MCCABE

LOCAL 832

ROCHESTER, NY

24 INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

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25 INTERNATIONAL OPERATING ENGINEER

FALL 2018 25


RONALD W

WILSON

LOCAL 841

TERRE HAUTE, IN

PAUL G HARGIS

CHARLES E

MARSHALL

LOCAL 917

CHATTANOOGA,

TN

FRANK K

HERALD

LOCAL 965

SPRINGFIELD, IL

GEORGE T

WILBER

JOHN W ALLEN

AUGUST

2018

LOCAL 002

ST LOUIS, MO

HAROLD

BAECKER

LOCAL 003

ALAMEDA, CA

SIDNEY JONES

GEORGE O

CLOUGH

JAMES R LEWIS

GEORGE A DIAS

ALBAN BYER

GERALD

FOURSHA

EDDIE GOURLEY

CARL T YASUE

RONALD

LOANDO

ROBERT

TOMLINSON

LOCAL 004

MEDWAY, MA

PAUL E DUFOUR

CLIFTON H

CAMPBELL

LOCAL 009

DENVER, CO

DONALD FEURT

ELMER D ROBBS

LOCAL 012

PASADENA, CA

PAUL T DEECKEN

FRANCIS L.

CROUSE

WENDELL

GOUDIE

LOCAL 015

LONG ISLAND

CITY, NY

JAMES W

MCCONNELL

DANIEL J

MOSCATELLO

JOSEPH L

SCEPPA

LOCAL 017

LAKEVIEW, NY

DANIEL EBERT

PAUL CARTER

JOSEPH KLISZAK

LOCAL 018

CLEVELAND, OH

JACK J

BECKELHIMER

RICHARD C

SOLON

EDWARD O

HARDEN

DONALD

LINGAFELTER

WALTER FULK

HERBERT P

MAUTZ

LOCAL 049

MINNEAPOLIS,

MN

ARTHUR VOCE

DUANE

WESTLUND

GERALD NOEL

WARREN L

UTECHT

W C LONGEWAY

JIM E JABAS

LOCAL 068

WEST

CALDWELL, NJ

WILLIAM R.

LANGO

WILLIAM K. RED

LOCAL 095

PITTSBURGH, PA

GEORGE E

HENDERSON

LOCAL 101

KANSAS CITY,

MO

LAWRENCE J

STOCK

LOCAL 103

INDIANAPOLIS,

IN

JACK A

GORDON

RICHARD

YEARLING

THOMAS E KRILL

LOCAL 115

BURNABY, BC

KENNETH R

CLINE

WILFRED H

OLSON

HANS G

SCHLEGEL

LOCAL 132

CHARLESTON,

WV

WADE R

CALDWELL

LOCAL 139

PEWAUKEE, WI

RICHARD M

LOEWEN

ROBERT

STECKBAUER

ARTHUR LA

MARCHE

HARLAND L

HIRSCHFIEL

ROBERT E

YANDRE

DONALD

WERNER

RONALD H

HANSEN

LOCAL 148

SAINT LOUIS,

MO

HENRY R

WAGNER

LOCAL 150

COUNTRYSIDE,

IL

EDWARD G

HOFF

JOHN B

CONSIDINE

WILLIAM H

HARMELING

RICHARD E

BROWN

MARCUS

OWENS

RICHARD L

GILLILAND

JAMES E

MANLEY

FREDERICK G

VERGEN

JOHN FOX

LOCAL 158

GLENMONT, NY

GERALD

GAGNIER

LOCAL 181

HENDERSON, KY

JAMES O

MANNING

JAMES L

DORROH

LOCAL 234

DES MOINES, IA

WILLIAM J KUNZ

LOCAL 302

BOTHELL, WA

MORRIS M

LANGBERG

LOCAL 317

OAK CREEK, WI

NORBERT PUTZ

LOCAL 324

BLOOMFIELD

TOWNSHIP,

JAMES A ADAMS

MARVIN TAYLOR

GEORGE E

GRIFFITHS

GABRIELE

PACIOCCO

EDWARD A

WOLAK

STANLEY R

BEACH

DARCEY E

WHITE

DANIEL

MORAUSKI

ANDREW

FONTENOT

LOCAL 347

MELVIN F

GARRETT

LOCAL 406

NEW ORLEANS,

LA

MILTON B ALLEN

LOCAL 407

LAKE CHARLES,

LA

PERCY R

DEROUEN

LOCAL 478

HAMDEN, CT

CLYDE E

WHARTON

JOSEPH L

GLAZIER

LOCAL 513

BRIDGETON, MO

DENIS

HOERSTKAMP

LOCAL 542

FORT

WASHINGTON,

PA

PAUL E SNYDER

JOHN A

CIABATTONI

LOCAL 564

RICHWOOD, TX

W J ROBERTSON

LOCAL 571

OMAHA, NE

RICHARD W

WALKER

LOCAL 589

THOMAS J

KRUPP

LOCAL 647

KNOB NOSTER,

MO

LARRY E BLACK

LOCAL 701

GLADSTONE, OR

RAYMOND C

DENISON

LOCAL 825

SPRINGFIELD, NJ

HERBERT W

SHARWELL

ANDREW A

ZAHN JR

JOSEPH C

SACKELOS

MEREDITH W

HARRISON

LLOYD J

SPILLANE

RAY ESTES

HARRY

CHOWANSKY

FRANK P

ENDERLEIN

LOCAL 826

GEORGE W

BRYANT

ROLAND L BEAL

LOCAL 900

OAK RIDGE, TN

C E ONEY

LOCAL 912

COLUMBIA, TN

ELLIS H AGENT

SEPTEMBER

2018

LOCAL 002

ST LOUIS, MO

FREDERICK L

VICKERY

LOCAL 003

ALAMEDA, CA

LYNN T REESE

RUSSELL

HIGGINS

MARTIN

BASTON

JAMES R

MONTELBETTI

KLETON

SCHRAMM

KENETH K KENT

JOHN R BLES

WILLIE B KELLER

WALTER

ROBBINS

DAVID

HARMESON

GEORGE

FRESQUEZ

LOCAL 004

MEDWAY, MA

EMILIO

FEDERICO

THOMAS

DELZOPPO

MICHAEL J

SHANNON

DONALD E

NADEAU

HAROLD

PINGREE

LOUIS J

GLORIOSO

RICHARD J

DONAHUE

RICHARD

PAULDING

LOCAL 009

DENVER, CO

VIRGIL J KALEY

LOCAL 012

PASADENA, CA

HAROLD A.

BARTHOLOME

PAUL T DEECKEN

BILL F.

WILHELMUS

LUIS ADRIANO

JAMES R.

NELSON

JOE

DOMINGUEZ

JACK C.

CRANNEY

CHARLES W

SAMSON

DELBERT W.

RUSSELL

JOHN BURNS

DANNY M. BLAIR

JOHN L. WALL

CARLOS A.

ALMEIDA

GEORGE COOK

RUSSELL A. TINZ

WILLIAM H.

LAWDERMIL

JACK HODEN

PETER

KOEDOOT

FRANK J. SHAW

ROBERT L.

ROPER

ERNEST ALBERS

GORDON G.

KEEBLE

Union Death Benefit

RICHARD R.

ROSE

GREGORY

CAMP

JAMES A.

ROMINES

LOCAL 014

FLUSHING, NY

JOHN

BERTRAND

JOHN J FOLEY

LOCAL 015

LONG ISLAND

CITY, NY

ANTHONY

VITTIGLIO

WALTER J

CORBELLINI

LOCAL 017

LAKEVIEW, NY

WILLIAM E

MCCOWAN

CHARLES

SCHUYLER

RICHARD

SLATTERY JR

SHELDON L

ALLEN

LOCAL 018

CLEVELAND,

OH

CALVIN L CARR

CHARLES J

BENDA JR

WILLIAM E

BARTON

RAY

FRANKHOUSE

RICHARD

SULLINGER

RICHARD A

KNAPP

VICTOR J

BANDO

RONALD O

WOODS

RICHARD P

DUGAN

LESLIE R DULL

EDGAR L BELL

LOCAL 037

BALTIMORE,

MD

GEORGE O

BRIEN

LOCAL 049

MINNEAPOLIS,

MN

DARRALD B

SHENK

DUANE

WESTLUND

CHARLES L

JACOBSEN

CARL J

SCHNEIDER

DAVID J ZILA

LOCAL 066

PITTSBURGH,

PA

ROBERT F FIFE

ROBERT W

GRABB

ROBERT M

NOSKO

ALBERT W

PARTOZOTI

JOSEPH T

ORIENT

JOHN E LLOYD

DONALD P

SMITH

HOWARD

EVERETT JR

SAMUEL HABIB

LOCAL 091

GEORGE H

LOWES

LOCAL 101

KANSAS CITY,

MO

JOE D

MCDONOUGH

LOCAL 103

INDIANAPOLIS,

IN

M E

RICHARDSON

LOCAL 106

GLENMONT, NY

JAMES A

GOODMAN

LOCAL 115

BURNABY, BC

ELTON E

CARLSON

EDWIN K WALL

IRVIN J

SHARON

ROBERT J

FISHER

LOCAL 139

PEWAUKEE, WI

JERRY C

VISSERS

ALVIN A

KRASZEWSKI

LOCAL 147

NORFOLK, VA

EDGAR

LINKOUS JR

LOCAL 148

SAINT LOUIS,

MO

RUSSELL P

BUECHLER

JOHN J

SCHMISKIE

LOCAL 150

COUNTRYSIDE,

IL

BOYD A

FARNER SR

ROBERT E

HOUCK

GEORGE FABER

WILLIE DAVIS

JR

MERLE T SLUIS

MORRIS D

BUCKNER

ROGER L

COGDAL

JAMES W

KELLEY

MATHEW J

PRESHIREN

MARSHALL L

HOLLIS

ROBERT E

BOSHAW

VERNON M

MCMILLAN

LOCAL 158

GLENMONT, NY

JOHN E

DONAHUE

RICHARD P

DIANGELO

STEPHEN

SULLIVAN

MICHAEL E

CONTE

LOCAL 181

HENDERSON,

KY

MARVIN R

HOKE

LEONARD

PRITCHARD

LOCAL 234

DES MOINES, IA

DARRELL B

GREIMAN

LOCAL 275

VINTON, IA

WILLIAM A

HESS

LOCAL 302

BOTHELL, WA

GEORGE A BEST

BILL B

MCFADDEN

JOHN D

GREENWAY

HOWARD MC

KINNON

DELMAR D

PERCIVAL

GLEN P MOORE

TODD HONDA

DANIEL J

NEIGEL

WILLIAM A

DAVIDSON

ED BENNER

DON P

MITCHELL

Benefits paid

July - September, 2018

LOCAL 310

GREEN BAY, WI

ROLAND F

ZEINERT

LOCAL 324

BLOOMFIELD

TOWNSHIP,

THEODORE A

GROMEK

LEWIS R SHANN

CLARENCE

WILSON

CARROLL

ROGERS

JACK BLALOCK

CARL MORGAN

JR

GEORGE T

MURRAY

ROBERT J

RENAUD

LEONARD

GONIEWICHA

LARRY E JAMES

WILLIAM J

HALL

RICHARD A

DAGUE

ROBERT F

REETZ

GREGG A

NEWSOM

JAMES M

COSTELLO

WILLIAM F

FINKBEINER

LOCAL 399

CHICAGO, IL

ELMER

PSIHODA

LOCAL 400

HELENA, MT

KENNETH E

KAIGHN

BENNIE M

HOWARD

DALE J WING

LOCAL 406

NEW ORLEANS,

LA

JIMMY L GUNN

LOCAL 407

LAKE CHARLES,

LA

CHARLES W

MORTON

LOCAL 428

PHOENIX, AZ

RICHARD A

SCOTT

LOCAL 450

MONT BELVIEU,

TX

JOE P POWELL

JR

LOCAL 513

BRIDGETON,

MO

MARVIN MEYER

LEONARD A

ELY

LOCAL 515

JOHN R

LAMBDIN

LOCAL 520

GRANITE CITY,

IL

THEODORE

DRESSEL JR

LOCAL 542

FORT

WASHINGTON,

PA

HARRY E

MCGREGOR

HAROLD J

MONTROSS

WILLIAM KLINE

THEODORE R

HOFACKER

LOCAL 649

PEORIA, IL

SAMUEL B

HYDE JR

LOCAL 660

PAUL TICE

LOCAL 701

GLADSTONE,

OR

JASON E

BREAUX

MICHAEL

MCLAUGHLIN

LOCAL 793

OAKVILLE, ON

JOHN J

RINTOUL

DOMENICO

DICARLO

EDWARD B

LOVEJOY

MICHAEL J

COYLE

JEAN L

GUERTIN

LOCAL 825

SPRINGFIELD,

NJ

JOHN

LOCRASTO SR.

ROBERT CAUDY

RUDOLF M

ALTINGER

HARRY

CHOWANSKY

LAWRENCE C

HULL

LOCAL 841

TERRE HAUTE,

FRED C CRAVEN

LOCAL 953

Albuquerque,

NM

OSCAR A SIMP-

SON JR

LOCAL 955

EDMONTON, AB

JIM S FLAHERTY

F ROBERT CLIN-

TON

LOCAL 965

SPRINGFIELD, IL

CHARLES W

MURPHY JR

MARSHALL

TANGMAN JR

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