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Illuminated Spaces

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ILLUMINATED

SPACES

1 NOVEMBER - 23 DECEMBER 2018

1 | ILLUMINATED SPACES | 1 NOVEMBER TO 23 DECEMBER 2018


For each artist, they have a personal connection with some

or all of the themes explored in this exhibition and their

background continues to inform their art.

Canberra is well known as a world centre for glass. This

reputation stems from the strength of the Glass Workshop

at the ANU School of Art and Design and the Canberra

Glassworks, as well as the calibre of artists who study, live

and work in the Canberra region. A diverse community

of practitioners has developed. Yet, when we think of the

Canberra glass scene, traditional forms of glass art, such

as stained glass, might not immediately come to mind. Nor,

perhaps, do site-specific, large-scale works, as these are

generally displayed in buildings – not in gallery environments.

Illuminated Spaces is a survey show featuring artists whose

work is informed by the tradition of architectural glass art,

including stained glass. When I began researching glass

practices in Canberra, I was amazed to discover just how

many of the region’s glass artists either had a background in

stained glass or a deep fascination with it. I soon discovered

that many glass artists also had a strong interest in the built

environment and in making art for architectural settings.

When you think about it, this makes a lot of sense, especially

given the strong relationship between glass and light,

something that is integral to the success of stained-glass

windows and architecture alike. Nine of these artists are

brought together in this exhibition.

Illuminated Spaces has developed from a desire to highlight

the influence of architectural glass art and engagement

with the built environment more broadly on the Canberra

glass scene. For example, audiences may not be aware that

Kirstie Rea and Richard Whiteley separately came to glass

through stained glass, or the fact that Ruth Oliphant studied

architecture before embracing glass.

Ideas explored in this exhibition include the importance

of colour, light and symbolism, as well as the relationship

between art and the built environment. In some instances,

the exhibition highlights a different dimension to an artist’s

practice. It facilitates a more nuanced understanding of

contemporary glass art in the Canberra region.

Featuring artists Lisa Cahill, Scott Chaseling, Judi Elliott,

Jeremy Lepisto, Ruth Oliphant, Lucy Palmer, Clare Peters,

Kirstie Rea and Richard Whiteley.

Dr Grace Blakeley-Carroll, Curator

2 | ILLUMINATED SPACES | 1 NOVEMBER TO 23 DECEMBER 2018


Lisa CAHILL

Undercurrents, 2018

kiln formed glass, aluminium, stainless steel

Lisa Cahill loved art as a child. She discovered glass more than

twenty years ago and has not looked back. Cahill has completed a

number of large commissions for buildings in Australia, the USA

and France. She often combines her interest in architecture with

childhood reminiscences, such as memories of coastal areas in

Victoria and Denmark, as seen in Undercurrents.

3 | ILLUMINATED SPACES | 1 NOVEMBER TO 23 DECEMBER 2018


Lisa CAHILL

Inhale #3, 2018

kiln formed, aluminium, stainless steel

I have travelled a lot as a child and an adult and the buildings and

architecture have always been a big part of how I experience these

different countries. Growing up on coastal Victoria and in Canberra

I always dreamed of living in a big city and the architecture was a

big part of that. So, naturally, now I am drawn to making work that

enhances architecture or creates a sense of place.

4 | ILLUMINATED SPACES | 1 NOVEMBER TO 23 DECEMBER 2018


Scott CHASELING

Self Portrait: Past and Present, 2017

wood, glass, plastic, mirror, neon

and silicone

Scott Chaseling studied sculpture at the South Australian College of the

Arts and was an associate at Adelaide’s Jam Factory Craft and Design.

Extensive travel has informed his approach to art. Glass has been his

primary medium for over thirty years. He has strong links to Canberra,

through involvement with the Canberra Glassworks.

His current practice sees him explore... the possibilities of creating sculpture

that represents a liminal space between a sense of place and one of being lost.

In this work he uses materials unconventionally to exploit... the viewer’s

preconceived notions of object classification. This is seen in his use of silicone

in a manner that resembles leadlight.

5 | ILLUMINATED SPACES | 1 NOVEMBER TO 23 DECEMBER 2018


Judi ELLIOTT

Two Walls Grouped, 2016

kiln formed glass

Judi Elliott believes that she was born

an artist. With a background in ceramics,

in the early 1980s Elliott enrolled

in Klaus Moje’s first glass course at the

Canberra School of Art, and has been

working in the medium ever since. She

has completed large commissions for

architectural settings and currently

works from her Canberra studio.

Through glass, Elliott has explored her

interest in the built environment for

more than three decades. My theme

and inspiration was always ‘the home’ and

architecture for many reasons, mainly my

love of both. She is stimulated by... the

body language of houses! Each house you

enter carries in the walls the lives of the

people who have lived there.

6 | ILLUMINATED SPACES | 1 NOVEMBER TO 23 DECEMBER 2018


Judi ELLIOTT

Architecture in the Environment, 2017

kilnformed glass

7 | ILLUMINATED SPACES | 1 NOVEMBER TO 23 DECEMBER 2018


Jeremy LEPISTO

Structure 1 (from the Aspect Series), 2018

kiln formed glass and fabricated glass

Represented by Beaver Galleries

8 | ILLUMINATED SPACES | 1 NOVEMBER TO 23 DECEMBER 2018


Jeremy LEPISTO

Structure 2 (from the Aspect Series),

2018

kiln formed glass and fabricated glass

Represented by Beaver Galleries

Jeremy Lepisto ‘found’ glass as a

university student in America. Lepisto

has worked extensively with other

artists and has operated his studio for

more than a decade, through which

he has completed a number of large

site-specific commissions. He is a PhD

Candidate in the Sculpture Workshop

at the ANU School of Art and Design.

Inspired by his everyday urban

surroundings, Lepisto celebrates

the beauty and history that exists

all around us and can be found

in... items such as power lines, water

towers, bridges, construction cranes

and cityscapes or, in this instance, in

houses. His work employs... the visual

vocabulary of these places to create

sculptures that explore the complex in the

common in an attempt to comment on

the places and experiences we all share.

9 | ILLUMINATED SPACES | 1 NOVEMBER TO 23 DECEMBER 2018


Ruth OLIPHANT

Rise, 2013

fused glass and steel

Represented by Beaver Galleries

Ruth Oliphant came to glass through architecture. Having completed most

of an architecture degree, she decided to embark on an apprenticeship

in traditional stained glass. She then studied glass in her hometown of

Canberra.

Oliphant’s interest in both historical glass and contemporary techniques

has seen her experiment with ways to make leadlight-like works without

using lead. She draws together her passion for stained-glass windows and

architecture in her practice, as she writes: Both windows and architecture are

very present in my work. I use the built environment as a palette to explore ideas of

place, belonging and as an allegory for self. The ‘window’ is a constant theme in

my work and I use it as a symbol for looking within oneself or out into the world.

10 | ILLUMINATED SPACES | 1 NOVEMBER TO 23 DECEMBER 2018


Ruth OLIPHANT

Untitled, 2004

leadlight

Represented by Beaver Galleries

11 | ILLUMINATED SPACES | 1 NOVEMBER TO 23 DECEMBER 2018


Lucy PALMER and Kirstie REA

Untitled, 2018

glass and concrete

Kirstie Rea’s first foray into glass was through stained glass. She took

classes in stained glass in the 1970s and went on to complete a degree

in glass at the Canberra School of Art in the 1980s. A teacher and a

mentor, Rea has operated her studio for more than thirty years.

Her interest in the relationship between glass and architecture continues

to inform her practice, as she observes: It is hard to separate glass, light and

the built environment. They simply go together. Whilst saying that what I am

drawn to as inspiration for my creating is the outdoors, places remote from our

cities and the urban. Architecture and ‘the built’, then becomes the contrast to

the outdoors and signals ‘the return’ from a day out and about.

12 | ILLUMINATED SPACES | 1 NOVEMBER TO 23 DECEMBER 2018


Lucy Palmer’s artistic career started by accident, when she took an elective in visual art while studying to be a teacher

in Adelaide. She is drawn to the optical qualities of glass, something she explores in her new home of Canberra.

Her interest in light also extends to its relationship with architecture, and the role that glass plays in architectural

settings. As she explains: Light informs architecture. It forces us to engage with our environment. Using glass to manipulate

the light can transform a space, changing how we view our surroundings and thereby changing the way we respond to those

surroundings. I see glass as being a central component in architectural design given its incredible versatility and ability to effect

and modify a space.

13 | ILLUMINATED SPACES | 1 NOVEMBER TO 23 DECEMBER 2018


Clare PETERS

Place of Promise, Place of Shelter, Place of Rest, 2018

kiln formed pate de verre, powder coated steel, leaded

and soldered construction

Clare Peters has long been fascinated by architectural

glass art, working in stained glass since her early

twenties. After a twenty-year nursing career she

followed her passion full time, studying at the ANU

School of Art. Peters now practises from her working

and teaching studio on the NSW Central Coast.

14 | ILLUMINATED SPACES | 1 NOVEMBER TO 23 DECEMBER 2018


Clare PETERS

Hope, Held I, II, III, IV and V, 2018

kiln formed pate de verre, powder

coated steel, leaded and soldered

construction

Her current work draws together her

interests in ecclesiastical stained glass

and contemporary studio practices,

as she explains: My work sits on a

background of the historical stained

glass windows and their ability to bring a

message of hope through glass and light.

Through looking at the metaphorical

meanings of ‘light’ in relation to God and

the scriptures, I used steel and glass as

a backdrop for the illuminating text they

carried – strength and fragility combining

as a metaphor for God and humanity.

15 | ILLUMINATED SPACES | 1 NOVEMBER TO 23 DECEMBER 2018


Richard WHITELEY

Three New Australians, 1983

glass, copper foil and enamelled glass

16 | ILLUMINATED SPACES | 1 NOVEMBER TO 23 DECEMBER 2018


Richard WHITELEY

Absent Space 2, 2016

glass, cast and carved

As an altar boy Richard Whiteley

became fascinated by glass after

observing light move through stainedglass

windows in his church. While a

teenager in Melbourne he undertook

an apprenticeship in stained glass,

before completing a degree in glass

in Canberra. The Head of the Glass

Workshop at the ANU School of Art

and Design, Whiteley continues to

explore his interest in light through his

practice.

Light through stained glass was a primary

motivation and still is. My current work uses

a different process to where I started (with

leaded and stained glass). However, the

principal of light being transmitted though

glass is still a key part of my practice. I have

often looked to architects as they sculpt

exterior and voided spaces as a primary

agent for their work.

17 | ILLUMINATED SPACES | 1 NOVEMBER TO 23 DECEMBER 2018


Exhibition partners

Canberra Glassworks is supported by the ACT Government through artsACT and the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body.

Cover image:

Lucy Palmer & Kirstie Rea, Untitled (detail), 2018, glass and concrete

Photographs: Adam McGrath

canberraglassworks.com

11 Wentworth Ave, Kingston ACT 2604

T 02 6260 7005

E contactus@canberraglassworks.com

opening hours

Wed to Sun 10am to 4pm

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