CAMA's Centennial Season—December 11, 2018—Free Community Concert—Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra—Avi Avital, mandolin—The Granada Theatre, 8:00 PM

justin.camasb

FREE COMMUNITY CONCERT: CELEBRATING CAMA AT 100!
at The Granada Theatre

In celebration of a century of great music in Santa Barbara and with continuing appreciation for the generations of concertgoers and patrons who have made this legacy possible, CAMA’s Board of Directors sponsors this Free Community Concert by the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra with star mandolinist Avi Avital. Thank you to “The CAMA Family” of engaged music lovers who have made Santa Barbara a classical music capital for 100 concert seasons! Enjoy!

AVI AVITAL, mandolin

LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
“America’s finest chamber orchestra…”
– Public Radio International

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2018, 8:00 PM

Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra
Avi Avital, mandolin

Founded in 1968 as an artistic outlet for the recording industry’s most gifted musicians, the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra has spent the ensuing five decades methodically burnishing its reputation as one of the world’s top ensembles. A musical force in his own right, “Explosively charismatic” (The New York Times) virtuoso mandolin soloist Avi Avital has emerged as one of the foremost ambassadors for his instrument. This concert will see them team up for an all-Vivaldi program, including two of the Venetian Baroque master’s concertos for two violins; of course, no Vivaldi program would be complete without The Four Seasons, his beloved collection of violin concertos, to be performed with Avital on mandolin.

ALL-VIVALDI PROGRAM:
Concerto for Two Violins in G minor, RV 517
Concerto for Two Violins in A minor, RV 523
The Four Seasons (complete), F.I:22-25

PRE-CONCERT LECTURE BY DAVID MALVINNI, PH.D.

While there is no ticket fee, tickets are required, and are available on a first-come, first-served basis. CAMA season subscribers have priority and first option for reserving seats. The public will have the opportunity to reserve no-cost tickets starting Friday, September 28, 2018. •

AS A GIFT TO THE COMMUNITY,

CAMA'S BOARD OF DIRECTORS

PRESENTS

LOS ANGELES

CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

Avi Avital & The Four Seasons

Tuesday, December 11, 2018, 8:00 PM

The Granada Theatre (Santa Barbara Center for the Performing Arts)


INTERNATIONAL SERIES

AT THE GRANADA THEATRE

SEASON SPONSORSHIP: SAGE PUBLISHING

LOS ANGELES

Esa-Pekka Salonen

PHILHARMONIC

OCTOBER 28, 2018

Primary Sponsor

The Elaine F. Stepanek

Concert Fund

Principal Sponsor

The Samuel B and Margaret

C. Mosher Foundation

Sponsors

Bitsy & Denny Bacon and

The Becton Family Foundation

Val & Bob Montgomery

The Towbes Fund for the

Performing Arts, a field interest

fund of the Santa Barbara

Foundation

Co-Sponsor

Robert & Christine Emmons

LOS ANGELES

CHAMBER

ORCHESTRA

with Avi Avital

DECEMBER 11, 2018

A gift to the community

from the CAMA Board

of Directors

ITZHAK

Mikhail Pletnev

PERLMAN

JANUARY 15, 2019

Primary Sponsor

Sara Miller McCune

Principal Sponsor

Herbert & Elaine Kendall

Sponsor

Judith L. Hopkinson

Co-Sponsor

Jocelyne & William Meeker

Stephen J.M. & Anne Morris

PHILHARMONIA

BAROQUE

ORCHESTRA

FEBRUARY 5, 2019

Sponsors

Hollis Norris Fund

Michele & Andre Saltoun

Co-Sponsor

Edward DeLoreto

RUSSIAN

NATIONAL

ORCHESTRA

FEBRUARY 27, 2019

Sponsor

Bitsy & Denny Bacon

Co-Sponsor

Peggy & Kurt Anderson

Louise & Michael Caccese

PHILHARMONIA

ORCHESTRA

MARCH 20, 2019

Sponsors

Anonymous

Alison & Jan Bowlus

Ellen & Peter Johnson

Co-Sponsors

Elizabeth & Andrew Butcher

Chris Lancashire

& Catherine Gee

Jocelyne & William Meeker

ROYAL SCOTTISH

NATIONAL

ORCHESTRA

APRIL 5, 2019

Sponsor

Meg & Dan Burnham

Co-Sponsor

George & Judy Writer


MASTERSERIES

AT THE LOBERO THEATRE

SEASON SPONSORSHIP: ESPERIA FOUNDATION

RICHARD

GOODE

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Primary Sponsor

The Stephen & Carla

Hahn Foundation

Co-Sponsors

Bitsy & Denny Bacon

Alison & Jan Bowlus

TAFELMUSIK

BAROQUE

ORCHESTRA

MARCH 9, 2019

Concert Partners

Bridget Colleary

Lynn P. Kirst

GARRICK

OHLSSON

MARCH 30, 2019

Co-Sponsor

Anonymous

Stephen J.M. &

Anne Morris

AUGUSTIN

HADELICH

APRIL 17, 2019

Co-Sponsor

Jocelyn & William Meeker

Stephen J.M. & Anne Morris

MISCHA MAISKY

MAY 6, 2019

Co-Sponsor

Ellen & Craig Parton

Concert Partner

Raye Haskell Melville

Concert Sponsors as of November 15, 2018

CAMA AT THE GRANADA THEATRE - LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

5


Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

ROBERT K. MONTGOMERY President

DEBORAH BERTLING First Vice-President

CRAIG A. PARTON Second Vice-President

WILLIAM MEEKER Treasurer

JOAN R. CROSSLAND Secretary

Rosalind Amorteguy-Fendon

Bitsy Becton Bacon

Edward Birch

Jan Bowlus

Daniel P. Burnham

Stephen Cloud

NancyBell Coe

Bridget B. Colleary

Jill Felber

Joanne C. Holderman

Judith L. Hopkinson

James H. Hurley, Jr.

Peter O. Johnson

Elizabeth Karlsberg

Raye Haskell Melville

Hank Mitchel

Stephen J.M. (Mike) Morris

Patti Ottoboni

Andre M. Saltoun

Judith F. Smith

Judith H. Writer

Catherine Leffler,

President, CAMA Women’s Board

As of November 29, 2018

Emeritus Directors

Russell S. Bock*

Dr. Robert M. Failing*

Mrs. Maurice E. Faulkner*

Léni Fé Bland*

Arthur R. Gaudi

Stephen Hahn*

Dr. Melville H. Haskell, Jr.*

Mrs. Richard Hellmann*

Dr. Dolores M. Hsu

Herbert J. Kendall

Robert M. Light*

Mrs. Frank R. Miller, Jr.*

Sara Miller McCune

Mary Lloyd Mills

Mrs. Ernest J. Panosian*

Kenneth W. Riley*

Mrs. John G. Severson*

Nancy L. Wood

* Deceased

Administration

Mark E. Trueblood

Executive Director

Elizabeth Alvarez

Director of Development

Michael Below

Office Manager/

Subscriber Services

Justin Rizzo-Weaver

Director of Operations

2060 Alameda Padre Serra, Suite 201 Santa Barbara, CA 93103 Tel (805) 966-4324 Fax (805) 962-2014 info@camasb.org

6 CENTENNIAL SEASON CELEBRATION


INTERNATIONAL SERIES at the GRANADA THEATRE

SEASON SPONSORSHIP: SAGE PUBLISHING

LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

AVI AVITAL LEADER & MANDOLIN

Margaret Batjer violin, Tereza Stanislav violin, Josefina Vergara violin, Sarah Thornblade violin

Tuesday, December 11, 2018, 8:00 PM

The Granada Theatre (Santa Barbara Center for the Performing Arts)

ANTONIO VILVALDI

Concerto in G minor for Two Violins, RV517

Allegro

Andante

Allegro

Program subject to change.

Concerto in A minor for Two Violins, RV523

Allegro

Larghetto e spiritoso

Allegro

INTERMISSION

The Four Seasons

Concerto in E major, Op.8, No.1, La primavera (Spring)

Allegro

Largo

Danza pastorale

Concerto in G minor, Op.8, No.2, L’estate (Summer)

Allegro non molto

Adagio e piano - Presto e forte

Presto

Concerto in F major, Op.8, No.3, L’autunno (Autumn)

Allegro

Adagio molto

Allegro

Concerto in F minor, Op.8, No.4, L’inverno (Winter)

Allegro con molto

Largo

Allegro

Mr. Avital, Ms. Batjer, Ms. Stanislav, Ms. Vergara, Ms. Thornblade

CAMA thanks our generous sponsors who have made this evening’s performance possible:

A gift to the community from the CAMA Board of Directors

We request that you switch off cellular phones, watch alarms and pager signals during the performance. The photographing

or sound recording of this concert or possession of any device for such photographing or sound recording is prohibited.

CAMA AT THE GRANADA THEATRE - LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

7


ABOUT

LOS ANGELES

CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

2018/2019 Season

Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra

(LACO), ranked among the

world’s top musical ensembles,

marks the 2018-19 season with more artistic

energy and creative impulse coursing

through its musical veins than at any time in

its history. Enhancing the intimacy and precision

that is the Orchestra’s hallmark, LACO

has named Jaime Martín as Music Director

Designate. Praised as "a visionary conductor,

discerning and meticulous" (Platea Magazine),

Martín takes the podium as Music Director

in the 2019-20 season. The Orchestra,

beloved by audiences and praised by critics,

is known as a champion of contemporary

composers, with eight ASCAP Awards for Adventurous

Programming, as well as a preeminent

interpreter of historical masterworks.

Headquartered in the heart of the country's

cultural capital, LACO has been proclaimed

“America’s finest chamber orchestra” (Public

Radio International), “LA’s most unintimidating

chamber music experience” (Los Angeles

magazine), “resplendent” (Los Angeles

Times) and “one of the world's great chamber

orchestras"(KUSC Classical FM).

In 2018-19, LACO spotlights its rich

legacy and highlights the ensemble's depth

and range with favorite works, including

the Mozart Requiem, Beethoven’s Fifth and

Sixth Symphonies and Mendelssohn’s “Italian”

Symphony. Explored, too, is the intimate

side of the last century, with works by Korngold,

Ligeti, Seeger and Arvo Pärt. As part

of MusicLAb, the Orchestra’s signature commitment

to new music and pushing the envelope,

the season also features world premieres

by esteemed film composer James

Newton Howard, Los Angeles-based composer

Sarah Gibson and highly regarded

Latin American composer Juan Pablo Contreras,

and a West Coast premiere by Bryce

Dessner, best known as a member of the

Grammy Award-nominated band The National.

American composer Andrew Norman

continues as LACO’s Creative Advisor and

Composer-in-Residence.

Performing throughout greater Los Angeles,

the Orchestra presents eight Orchestral

Series concerts at Glendale’s Alex Theatre

and UCLA’s Royce Hall; four Baroque Conversations

at downtown LA's Zipper Hall and

three at Santa Monica’s St. Monica Church or

the First Presbyterian Church of Santa Monica;

three In Focus chamber music concerts in

partnership with The Huntington and at Santa

Monica's New Roads School; and three SES-

SION experiences that explore classical music's

cutting-edge sounds and challenge traditional

concert-going expectations.

Long committed to the power of collaboration,

LACO has partnered with the

8 CENTENNIAL SEASON CELEBRATION


Inner City Youth Orchestra of Los Angeles

and USC Thornton School of Music to create

The Los Angeles Orchestra Fellowship,

which, in September, welcomed its inaugural

cohort of four top-tier post-graduate string

musicians from underrepresented communities.

The comprehensive training program

addresses the lack of diversity within American

orchestras with a rigorous curriculum

that includes artistic mentoring, rehearsal,

performance and auditioning opportunities

over the course of two years. Further advancing

the Orchestra’s mission to nurture

future musicians and composers as well as

inspire in young people a love of classical

music, LACO presents an array of education

and community programs, such as Meet

the Music, Community Partners, Campus to

Concert Hall and the LACO/USC Thornton

Strings Mentorship Program.

Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra was

founded in 1968 as an artistic outlet for the

recording industry’s most gifted musicians.

Founder and cellist James Arkatov envisioned

an ensemble that would allow these

conservatory-trained players to balance

studio work and teaching with pure artistic

collaboration at the highest level. LACO

presented its first performances with the

financial backing of philanthropist Richard

Colburn and managerial expertise from attorney

Joseph Troy, who also became the

Orchestra’s first president. Sir Neville Marriner,

Gerard Schwarz, Iona Brown, Christof

Perick and Jeffrey Kahane, LACO's illustrious

Music Directors, each built upon a tradition

of joyous music-making performed by exceptional

artists as adept in the Baroque as

in the music of today. Jaime Martín continues

this tradition beginning in 2019-20. The

Orchestra has made 31 recordings, toured

Europe, South America and Japan, and performed

across North America. LACO's offices

are located in downtown Los Angeles. n

CAMA AT THE GRANADA THEATRE - LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

9


AVI AVITAL

T

violin

he first mandolin soloist to be nominated for a classical Grammy, Avi

Avital is one of the foremost ambassadors for his instrument. Avital’s

inspired music-making has electrified audiences in performances

around the world. He has recently appeared with the Chicago Symphony, Los

Angeles Philharmonic, and St. Louis Symphony, and in 2018/19 makes his debut

with the San Diego, Seattle, and Detroit symphonies, as well as his debut on the

10 CENTENNIAL SEASON CELEBRATION


at the Marlboro Music Festival, La Jolla

Sum¬merfest, Sarasota Music Festival and

the Salzburg Festival, and is the curator

of LACO’s chamber music series, In Focus.

She is on the violin faculty at USC, Thornton

School of Music and the Colburn School.

Margaret Batjer

main stage of Carnegie Hall with Orpheus

Chamber Orchestra. Born in southern

Israel, Avital began learning the mandolin

at the age of eight. He later graduated

from the the Conservatorio Cesare Pollini

in Padua, Italy, where he studied with Ugo

Orlandi.

MARGARET BATJER

violinMargaret Batjer,

Tereza Stanislav

who has served as

concertmaster of

Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra since

1998, made her first solo appearance at

the age of 15 with the Chicago Symphony

Orchestra. She has performed with a

succession of major orchestras, including

the Phila¬delphia Orchestra and the

St. Louis, Seattle and Dallas symphony

orchestras. Batjer has also performed with

such European ensembles as the Chamber

Orchestra of Europe, the Prague Chamber

Orchestra and the Berlin Symphony

Orchestra. As an esteemed chamber

musician, she has appeared regularly

TEREZA STANISLAV

violinHailed for the “expressive

beauty and wonderful

intensity” (Robert Mann)

of her playing, Los Angeles Chamber

Orchestra’s assistant concertmaster

Tereza Stanislav is an active and versatile

performer. A highly sought after chamber

musician, she has appeared in venues

such as the Library of Congress, Wigmore

Hall and Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital

Hall, and waith artists such as Jean-Yves

Thibaudet, the Miró Quartet and Jon

CAMA AT THE GRANADA THEATRE - LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

11


Kimura Parker. An advocate for new music,

Stanislav has worked with many composers

and performed several world premieres

including Gunther Schuller’s Horn Quintet

and Louis Andriessen’s The City of Dis.

Stanislav was awarded the highest grant

from the Canada Council for the Arts in

the category for Professional Musicians

(Individuals) in Classical Music.

and Carmel chamber music competitions

and has collaborated with Gilbert Kalish,

Jeffrey Kahane, Andres Cardenes,

Randall Hodgkinson and Warren Jones.

Sarah Thornblade

Josefina Vergara

JOSEFINA VERGARA

violinJosefina Vergara joined LACO

SARAH THORNBLADE

violinSarah Thornblade joined LACO in

1999 and is now the Orchestra’s

associate principal second

violin. She is a member of the Eclipse Quartet

and is a recent recipient of an Aaron Copland

Fund recording grant. She has recorded

music by composers such as Morton

Feldman, Frederic Rzewski, James Tenney

and Zeena Parkins for the Tzadik, New

World and Bridge labels. Thornblade has

performed with the Denali and Arianna string

quartets, Camerata Pacifica, Jacaranda

Music and the Auros Group for New Music.

A Pomona College faculty member, she is a

grand prize winner at the Fishoff, Coleman

in 1999 as principal second

violin. Ms. Vergara’s chamber

and recital appearances have included the

La Jolla Chamber Music Society, Santa Fe

Chamber Music Festival, Ojai Music Festival,

Aspen, Camerata Pacifica, and the St. Bart’s

Music Festival. Josefina Vergara was a

founding member of the Pacifica Quartet.

She has taught at the Music Academy of

the West and the Brevard Music Festival.

Ms. Vergara earned her Bachelor of Music

degree at Indiana University, studying with

Miriam Fried. Ms. Vergara has appeared

as Principal Second with the National Arts

Centre Orchestra, and performed with the Los

Angeles Philharmonic, Pittsburgh Symphony,

and New Century Chamber Orchestra. n

12 CENTENNIAL SEASON CELEBRATION


the four seasons

by Donald Munro

For Patricia Mabee, who adores Vivaldi’s The

Four Seasons but isn’t quite so infatuated

with commuting through all of them, “winter”

in LA is thankfully a gentle term. It doesn’t

involve a thick parka rated to 10 below zero.

No slushy streets. Freezing her fingers because

of forgotten gloves? Not a chance. For

that, the longtime Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra

principal keyboard has to get out of

town.

“I love traveling to cold places like Scandinavia,

Canada and New York in the winter,”

she says, “but no more than a few weeks at a

time, please!”

Then it’s back to Los Angeles, which has,

at the most -- two seasons? One? The matter

is up for debate.

Cover art from the Orchestra’s 1980 recording of The Four Seasons under the

baton of former music director Gerard Schwarz. Photos by Ken Veeder.

Antonio Vivaldi wrote his famed The Four Seasons

when he was living in Mantua, Italy, a place that

definitely has all four. After experiencing hot, humid

summers and freezing winters, it’s no wonder

he was always so glad to see spring and autumn

(especially without air conditioning or central

heating). Vivaldi probably would have loved the

weather in LA Everyone else does, right?

“I love traveling to cold

places like Scandinavia,

Canada and New York in

the winter but no more

than a few weeks at a

time, please!”

— Patricia Mabee

— principal keyboardist

CAMA AT THE GRANADA THEATRE - LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

13


Patricia, who’s played The Four Seasons for

LACO seven times during her 42-year tenure

with the Orchestra, is “mainly a SoCal girl,”

but she did live in a small Colorado town for

three years, so she knows her traditional seasons.

She remembers sledding, ice skating

and making “snowpeople.” In the spring she

watched for bird nests.

“I felt a thrill when the eggs hatched, seeing

the birds learn to fly,” she says. “It was

bittersweet when they finally flew away. The

changes of seasons in rural Colorado created

an indelible impression of how the cycles of

life are always present.”

Many artists throughout history have felt

the same way. In the four violin concerti that

make up Vivaldi’s piece, the composer offers

narrative elements inspired by seasonal

changes around him: rushing streams, buzzing

insects, singing birds, drunken dancers,

thundering storms, a dog barking while his

goatherd master sleeps. Painters, composers,

choreographers, poets, filmmakers and

other artists have long been intrigued with

the theme of the four seasons, and not just

in the literal sense of green shoots breaking

through the soil or leaves turning a golden

brown.

From a biological and cultural standpoint,

the idea of the seasons is a powerful influence,

even for people who don’t live in climates that

offer the “traditional” lineup of fall colors and

white Christmases. In a more contemplative

sense, the seasons at their most fundamental

can symbolize the circular nature of life: from

birth to death. That’s often what draws artists

to the theme, from Nicolas Poussin to David

Hockney and Jasper Johns.

Johns’ set of four intaglio prints, The Seasons

(Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter), was part

of a recent retrospective of the artist’s work,

Something Resembling Truth, at The Broad

museum in downtown Los Angeles.

Mantua is a city in Lombardy, Italy, and capital of the province of the same name.

The engraving shows a bird’s-eye view of a city in the middle of a lake. It also the city

where Vivaldi composed the Four Seasons.

The four panels, painted in 1985-86, are

filled with seasonal symbols and art history

allusions. You can find the obvious (a snowman

in Winter) to the more subtle (in Summer,

look closely at the American flag, which

is a famous subject

for Johns, because

it only has 48 stars).

Sprinkled through the

works are seahorses,

recurring allusions to

Picasso, streaks of

rain, and, in each one, a

branch with blossoms,

leaves, or no growth at

all, depending on the

season. Johns puts his

own figure into each

of the four paintings,

an

touch.

autobiographical

14 CENTENNIAL SEASON CELEBRATION


For Ed Schad, who curated The Broad

exhibition, Johns painted not with whimsy

but “spirit and grace,” he says. “It’s emotional,

rather than something that’s analytic.” When

the series was first displayed in New York, the

paintings were hung in “traditional” order:

spring, summer, fall and winter, or what you

could call the traditional birth-to-death progression.

But the Broad, in consultation with

the artist, hung them differently: summer, fall,

winter, spring.

This might seem a

subtle change, but it

was significant: “The

idea was that it would

feel more like a circle

than a linear expression

of the seasons,” Schad

says. “Seeing spring at

the end sees the whole

thing as a circle, more

than the literal march

from birth to death.”

Picking up on that

circle theme, another

recurring element in

each painting is a partial

circle with a human

arm pointing in various

positions, like the hand

of a clock. The confident,

outstretched

limb brings to mind

Leonardo Da Vinci’s

iconic Vitruvian Man.

Schad suggests it could

signify “the sort of arbitrary

ways by which

we measure our lives.

There are devices and

instruments that we use to organize ourselves:

rulers, clocks, agreed upon conventions. And

then there are things that are unique to us and

are hard to measure: personal memory, gesture,

expression.”

The seasons, then, stay the same. But each

individual journey through them is as one-of-akind

as the snowflakes you find in “Winter.”

When you talk to the experts, you’ll find

that our relationship to those seasons is both

biological and cultural.

The Vitruvian Man (Italian: Le proporzioni del corpo umano secondo Vitruvio, which

is translated to “The proportions of the human body according to Vitruvius”), or

simply L’Uomo Vitruviano, is a drawing by the Italian polymath Leonardo da Vinci

around 1490.

CAMA AT THE GRANADA THEATRE - LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

15


In some ways, we’re like birds that instinctively

know it’s time to fly south (or at

least to the nearest Macy’s gift-wrapping

department). Over the course of millennia,

humans have adapted both genetically and

environmentally to the regions to which our

gatherer-hunter ancestors migrated, says Dr.

Andrew Jones, a sociology professor at California

State University, Fresno.

One recent study indicates that human

DNA reacts to the seasons, changing

the body’s chemistry depending on the time

of year. (As many as one-fifth of all genes in

blood cells undergo seasonal changes, even

in terms of warding off inflammation. Take

that, cold and flu season.)

We also behave in certain ways depending

on the season, taking cues from our

surroundings.

“We wear different clothing to recognize

what season we are living in depending on

the region in which we live,” Jones says. “One

can get away with wearing shorts year round

in LA, but I would not recommend that during

winter time in Buffalo, New York! While humans

living on the East Coast may wear long

coats in winter, you would be hard pressed

to see anyone wearing such garments on the

West Coast. Think of how some mammals

shed fur to stay cool in the summertime – we

shed layers of clothing.”

Different calendars around the South Asian countries of India, Bangladesh, Nepal

and Sri Lanka, recognize six seasons or ritu: Vasanta (spring), Grishma (summer),

Varsha (rains/monsoon), Sharad (autumn), Hemanta (winter), Shishira (cool season).

Our acknowledgment of seasons in the

northern hemisphere is subject, then, to cultural

construction. Along with the obvious holidays

and seasonal transitions (Halloween just

seems more fun when there’s a chill in the air),

we also receive cues as to what season it is by

the availability of goods.

Fashion tends to

run one to two seasons

ahead, for example. “If the

clothing racks in stores

have summer fashions on

display, it must be winter,

and if coats are on display,

it must be summer,”

Jones says. This is marketing

strategy, yes, but

it’s based on human nature:

people like to plan

ahead, and they also get

antsy. In February, who

wants to think about buying

yet another sweater?

Then there’s the question

of why there are four seasons.

It’s not necessarily

a given.

16 CENTENNIAL SEASON CELEBRATION


For instance, the Hindu calendar recognizes

six seasons. In India there is summer,

monsoon, autumn, late autumn, winter and

spring, Jones says. The Bengali and Tamil

calendars also recognize six seasons. Scandinavian

countries denote seasons by temperature

– winter begins when the temperature

does not rise above zero degrees Centigrade;

summer when the temperature rises above

10 degrees Centigrade. The Sami of northern

Scandinavia have seasons that correspond to

the life cycle of reindeer, and thus, acknowledge

eight different seasons. The eight seasons

of this cycle are directly related to the

annual behavioral patterns of the reindeer.

There isn’t any Arctic wildlife wandering

the freeways of Southern California, of course,

but Angelenos have other ways of demarcating

the seasons. At The Broad, Schad pondered

the subject during the run of the Jasper

Johns show.

“I definitely thought about it almost every

day that I saw them,” he says of the works

that make up The Four Seasons. “One of the

interesting things for me is that with Johns’

thoughts on these points of measurement –

whether it’s a clock or a ruler – the fact that

we don’t have readily identifiable seasons in

Los Angeles makes me think of all the micro

things that mark a year. It may be 50 degrees

in LA in the winter, but that’s an opportunity

for a person to wear a sweater or a coat, even

though it isn’t necessary.”

That’s because so many people in Southern

California are transplants, bringing their

own traditions along, he speculates. From

seasonal menu items to the way people dress,

the area is a melting pot of seasonal customs.

“A lot of the ways that people mark the seasons

are kind of grandfathered in for Los Angeles,”

he says.

Patricia, the LACO principal keyboard,

can’t think offhand of any quirky seasonal traditions

of her own. Temperate weather is just

fine by her.

“I wear my big fluffy slippers all year

round,” she says.

She continues to adore The Four Seasons,

even though she has to reach back to

her childhood to make a real seasonal connection.

Her favorite part as a keyboardist

comes in the second movement of Autumn,

aka “The drunkards have fallen asleep.”

“If we get the OK from the leader, it’s an

opportunity to improvise a bit of an interpretation

of the drunkard’s dreams under the

surface of the somnambulant strings,” she

says. “There really is no melodic material, so

we take our cues from the harmonies. They

begin placidly, meandering.

But before long they become quite dissonant

and disturbing until they again return to total

calm.”

That full cycle — placid to dissonant

to total calm — fits in rather nicely with the

theme of Johns and other artists who have

been drawn to the rhythm of the seasons. It’s

an idea that has traction wherever you live,

regardless of whether you ever need snow

tires. Schad lives in Culver City near a movie

studio, and one night he came home from

work to find his entire block covered in fake

snow. That’s Los Angeles for you.

“If it doesn’t have seasons,” he says, “it’s

happy to invent them.”

Writer Donald Munro has had a career in journalism

for the past three decades. A California native,

he went from being the student editor of Cal Poly’s

Mustang Daily to an arts journalism grad student at

Columbia University to a local arts critic in Fresno.

He can be reached for comment at donaldfresnoarts@gmail.com.

CAMA AT THE GRANADA THEATRE - LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

17


program notes

ANTONIO

VIVALDI

Concerto in G minor for Two Violins,

RV517 (c.1725)

Orchestration: 2 solo violins; strings; continuo

Estimated Duration: 11 minutes

Concerto in A minor

for Two Violins, RV522 (1711)

Orchestration: 2 solo violins; strings; continuo

Estimated Duration: 12 minutes

Le quattro stagioni (The Four

Seasons), Op.8, Nos.1-4 (1715)

Orchestration: solo mandolin; strings; continuo

Estimated Duration: 37 minutes

Antonio Vivaldi wrote more

than 500 concertos in his lifetime.

Some featured a solo

instrument with an orchestra (the violin was

most often the solo instrument), while some

concertos, like the first two this evening were

“doubles,” with two solo instruments. Some

featured groups of soloists with an orchestra,

a genre known as the concerto grosso.

In 1711, Vivaldi published an incredibly influential

collection of concertos called L’estro

armonico, of which the A-minor Concerto for

Two Violins was part. It was more than a decade

later that Vivaldi began writing his most

famous works, a set of four concertos called

Le quattro stagioni, better known as The Four

Seasons. Vivaldi’s works were a great source

of inspiration for later composers like J.S.

Bach, who copied out many of Vivaldi’s works

for study or arrangement. For example, Bach

adapted the A-minor Concerto for Two Violins

as an organ work.

Through his extensive work in the genre,

Vivaldi standardized some of the characteristics

we associate with the concerto. For instance,

he regularly composed his concertos with

quick outer movements and a slower central

movement, a structure that was the norm for

the whole of the Baroque period. He used

ritornello form in the fast movements of his

concertos, a form that allowed for give and

take between soloist and orchestra. Vivaldi’s

RV517 and RV522 are fine examples of double

concertos. The two works have a few things

in common: they are both in minor keys and

both follow the traditional three-movement

structure. In each, the two solo violins spend

much of the time in the quick movements

18 CENTENNIAL SEASON CELEBRATION


trading musical material or playing in harmony

with one another. These are two of

Vivaldi’s most recognizable concertos—their

melodies are beautifully crafted and evoke a

sense of both drive and drama. The central

movements of each provide contrast, with

slower tempos and more pensive moods.

Vivaldi’s Four Seasons, known

in Italian as Le quattro stagioni, were published

in 1725 as part of a set of twelve

concertos. It was Vivaldi’s eighth opus,

and he called it Il cimento dell’armonica e

dell’inventione, or The Contest of Harmony

and Invention. The Concertos were inspired

not just by the seasons themselves, but by

a set of four sonnets written about spring,

summer, autumn and winter. The authorship

of these sonnets is questionable, but most

historians believe that it was Vivaldi himself.

This makes sense because each sonnet is

broken down into three sections, each section

corresponding to a movement in the

Concerto. The Four Seasons can therefore

be classified as “programmatic,” music that

intends to evoke something extra-musical.

Originally written for solo violin, tonight’s

performance features Avi Avital’s virtuosic

arrangement for solo mandolin.

All of the Concertos demonstrate virtuosic

musical displays by all players, but

especially by the soloist. “La primavera,” or

Spring, begins with the crispness and clarity

of a cloudless spring day, and features singing

birds and murmuring streams. A sudden

quick thunderstorm invades, but birdsong

soon regains control. The second movement

illustrates a peaceful day, the quiet

disturbed only by a barking dog. The final

movement is a lively dance for countryfolk

who seem to be celebrating the return of life

after a long winter.

The first movement of Summer,

“L’estate,” begins slowly, almost as if it’s too

hot to move. The birds sing lazily, and the

air is mostly still, until a breeze whips up,

a warning of a gathering storm. The most

striking moment of this Concerto is the hailstorm

that rains down in the third movement,

a perfect contrast to the tranquility of

the opening.

Autumn, “L’autunno,” seems to return to

the clarity we heard in Spring. The musical

themes in both first movements are similar.

Once again, the countryfolk are celebrating,

but this time they are rejoicing in their successful

harvest. Wine is part of this merriment,

and the slowing of the tempo and the

quieting of the dynamics seems to reflect

the peaceful sleep that overtakes some of

the party-goers. The last part of the Concerto

illustrates a hunt with horn calls. A chase

ensues, harkening back to the fourteenth

century tradition of the Italian genre called

the “Caccia,” songs that glorified the hunt

through vocal canons (literally one voice

chasing another).

Finally, there is winter, “L’inverno.”

The opening sounds like a shivering person

rhythmically stamping his feet to stay

warm. The soloist provides the icy winds,

and the ensemble responds with chattering

teeth. The middle movement describes the

peaceful pleasure of warming up inside by a

crackling fire. In the final movement, those

outdoors walk carefully on the icy paths,

while those inside feel winter’s chill relentlessly

finding its way into the house. But

still, Vivaldi reminds us, winter—like all the

other seasons—has its specific charms and

moments of contentment. n

By Christine Gengaro, PhD

CAMA AT THE GRANADA THEATRE - LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

19


CAMA WISHES YOU JOY THIS SEASON

AND THROUGH THE YEAR.


FREE COMMUNITY

CONCERT

CELEBRATING CAMA AT 100

Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

ALL-VIVALDI PROGRAM INCLUDING THE FOUR SEASONS

THE GRANADA THEATRE

The CAMA Board of Directors

are the sponsors of this concert offered free to the community as a gesture of thanks

to the "CAMA Family" of engaged music lovers who have supported bringing the

world’s finest classical music to Santa Barbara for 100 concert seasons.

The Board thanks and celebrates the generations of concertgoers and patrons

who have made this legacy possible, as well as those who are investing

in the next 100 years.

Thank you!

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

ROBERT K. MONTGOMERY President

DEBORAH BERTLING First Vice-President

CRAIG A. PARTON Second Vice-President

WILLIAM MEEKER Treasurer

JOAN R. CROSSLAND Secretary

Rosalind Amorteguy-Fendon

Bitsy Becton Bacon

Edward Birch

Jan Bowlus

Daniel P. Burnham

Stephen Cloud

NancyBell Coe

Bridget B. Colleary

Jill Felber

Joanne C. Holderman

Judith L. Hopkinson

James H. Hurley, Jr.

Peter O. Johnson

Elizabeth Karlsberg

Raye Haskell Melville

Hank Mitchel

Stephen J.M. (Mike) Morris

Patti Ottoboni

Andre M. Saltoun

Judith F. Smith

Judith H. Writer

Catherine Leffler,

President, CAMA Women’s Board

CAMA AT THE GRANADA THEATRE - LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

COMMUNITY ARTS MUSIC ASSOCIATION • camasb.org

21


Centennial Events

OCTOBER 20, 2018

CENTENNIAL GALA

HONORING SARA MILLER McCUNE

Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore

Ray and Mary Freeman

Stephanie Slosser, Sara Miller McCune,

Chuck Slosser

Alexandra and Robert Nourse,

Bob and Val Montgomery

Robert and Christine Emmons Sue and

Ed Birch

Deborah and Peter Bertling

Val and Bob Montgomery Sara Miller

McCune

Jackie Inskeep and Isabel Bayrakdarian

Back row: Val Montgomery, Chancellor

Yang and Dilling Yang

front row: Bob Montgomery, Sara Miller

McCune, and Judith Hopkinson

Sara Miller McCune, Harry and

Judy Weisbart

Photos by Monie Photography

22 CENTENNIAL SEASON CELEBRATION


Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

Join me as a member of CAMA's International

Circle. Our next event is a post-concert

reception with Itzhak Perlman, famed and

beloved violinist and Co-Chair with Sara Miller

McCune of CAMA's Centennial Artist Council.

I look forward to welcoming you to this wonderful

event and other events throughout CAMA's

historic Centennial Celebration.

Chris Emmons

For more information about CAMA's International

Circle, call Elizabeth Alvarez at (805) 966-4324.

Centennial Events

OCTOBER 7, 2018

INTERNATIONAL CIRCLE || MUSIC ON THE RIVIERA

Photos by Nell Campbell

CAMA’s International Circle and special guests were invited to inaugurate

CAMA’s two-year Centennial Celebration at the spectacular and historic Riviera Park.

Guests were treated to an afternoon of sweets, savories and Champagne along

with a performance by the Music Department, UC Santa Barbara Flute Ensemble.

With special thanks to International Circle Chair Christine Emmons and to Elizabeth Karlsberg,

Sponsor and Chair of the event. For more information about CAMA’s International Circle,

contact Elizabeth Alvarez at (805) 966-4324.

CAMA AT THE GRANADA THEATRE - LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

23


Centennial Events

RED CARPET

RECEPTION

OCTOBER 28, 20118

CAMA honored all subscribers and ticket holders of the

opening concert of the 100th Season with the Los Angeles Philharmonic

with a Red Carpet Reception.

With appreciation to Sara Miller McCune and Bitsy Becton Bacon

for sponsoring the Red Carpet Reception, and to Deborah Bertling, Centennial

Celebration Chair for planning this warm welcome to the CAMA community.

Historic photos lined the lobby and a short video played in the McCune Founders Room

as guests enjoyed light tapas, wine and champagne.

24 CENTENNIAL SEASON CELEBRATION


nting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

Photos by Monie Photography

CAMA AT THE GRANADA THEATRE - LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

25


Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

Anne-Sophie Mutter

Esa-Pekka Salonen

Santa Barbara Band

Community Arts String Orchestra

CAMA’S CENTENNIAL

100 th and 101 st SEASONS

Honoring CAMA’s 100-year tradition of bringing the finest classical

music in the world to our special community, we invite you to

participate in CAMA’s historic Centennial Celebration.

We are celebrating CAMA's Centennial by gratefully acknowledging donors who

contribute during CAMA’s 100th and 101st Seasons. Contributions of $250 and

above during this time will be recognized in the Centennial acknowlegements in

our concert programs.

Please contact either Elizabeth Alvarez or Nancy Lynn

at (805) 966-4324 to learn more.

Renée Fleming

Michael Tilson Thomas

André Previn

London Philharmonic


Lisa-Marie MAzzucco photo

“It’s always been a

great pleasure for

me to perform on the

CAMA series, and

I’m looking forward to

many more visits.

I send you my heartiest

congratulations

on your centennial

season. Bravo!”

—ITZHAK PERLMAN, CO-CHAIR,

CAMA CENTENNIAL

HONORARY ARTISTS COUNCIL

centennial honorary artists council

Itzhak Perlman

honorary co-chair

Sara Miller McCune

honorary co-chair

Vladimir Ashkenazy

Isabel Bayrakdarian

Joshua Bell

Alfred Brendel

Renée Fleming

Daniele Gatti

Richard Goode

Hilary Hahn

Stephen Hough

Olga Kern

Lang Lang

Jerome Lowenthal

Zubin Mehta

Anne-Sophie Mutter

Sir András Schiff

Peter Serkin

Leonard Slatkin

Christian Tetzlaff

Jean-Yves Thibaudet

Chris Thile

Michael Tilson Thomas

Dawn Upshaw

André Watts

Pinchas Zukerman

CAMA AT THE GRANADA THEATRE - LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

27


Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION DONORS

MAESTRO

$1,000,000 and above

CONCERTMASTER

$500,000–$999,999

CRESCENDO

$250,000–$499,999

Bitsy & Denny Bacon and The Becton Family Foundation

CADENZA

$100,000–$249,999

Judith L. Hopkinson

Samuel B. and Margaret C. Mosher Foundation

Ed & Sue Birch

Robert & Christine Emmons

SAGE Publishing

The Elaine F. Stepanek Foundation

George & Judy Writer

RONDO

$50,000–$99,999

Deborah & Peter Bertling

NancyBell Coe & William Burke

Sara Miller McCune

Jocelyne & William Meeker

Val & Bob Montgomery

Anne & Stephen J.M. Morris

Cumulative contributions of $50,000 and above during CAMA’s Centennial Seasons

will include Centennial Circle membership.

28 CENTENNIAL SEASON CELEBRATION

As of November 15, 2018


CONCERTO

$25,000–$49,999

Suzanne & Russell Bock

Meg & Burnham

SONATA

$10,000–$49,999

Anonymous

Marta Babson

Alison & Jan Bowlus

City of Santa Barbara

Bridget B. Colleary

Ann Jackson Family

Foundation

Ellen & Peter Johnson

Herbert & Elaine Kendall

Hollis Norris Fund

Mary Lloyd & Kendall Mills

Montecito Bank & Trust

Ellen & John Pillsbury

Michele & Andre Saltoun

The Towbes Fund for the

Performing Arts

Hubert Vos

VIVACE

$5,000–$9,999

Elizabeth & Andrew

Butcher

Edward S. De Loreto

Louise & Michael

Caccese

Chris Lancashire &

Catherine Gee

Jill Doré Kent

Montecito Bank & Trust

Craig & Ellen Parton

Winona Fund

ADAGIO

$1,000–$2,499

Karen Bushnell

Shelley & Mark Bookspan

Diane Boss

Suzanne & Peyton Bucy

Annette & Richard Caleel

CAMA Women's Board

Susan & Claude Case

Patricia Clark

Gregory Dahlen III & Christi Walden

Department of Music University of

California Santa Barbara"

Wendy & Rudy Eiser

Katina Etsell

Nancyann & Robert Failing

Jill Felber

Kum Su Kim

Bob & Margo Feinberg

Catherine H. Gainey

David Hamilton

Renee & Richard Hawley

ALLEGRO

$2,500–$4,999

Helene & Jerry Beaver

Robert Boghosian & Mary

E. Gates Warren

Roger & Sarah Chrisman

Foundation

Fredericka & Dennis Emory

Ronald & Rosalind A.

Fendon

Mary & Raymond

Freeman

Elizabeth Karlsberg &

Jeff Young

Joanne C. Holderman

Shirley Ann & James H. Hurley Jr.

Karin Jacobson & Hans Koellner

Diane Johnson

Jackie Inskeep

Gerd & Peter Jordano

Sally Kinney

Lois Kroc

Dora Anne Little

Maison K

Gloria & Keith Martin

Maureen Masson

Ruth & John Matuszeski

Dona & George McCauley

Frank McGinity

Karin Nelson & Eugene Hibbs/

Maren Henle

Russell Mueller

Northern Trust

Gail Osherenko & Oran Young

Anne & Daniel Ovadia

Diana & Roger Phillips

Ann M. Picker

Connie & Richard Kennelly

Lynn P. Kirst

Raye Haskell Melville

Sally & George Messerlian

Performing Arts

Scholarship Foundation

Dorothy Roberts

Steven Trueblood

Carrie Towbes and

John Lewis

Donald Rink

Anitra & Jack Sheen

Halina W. Silverman

Barbara & Wayne Smith

Judith F. Smith

Marion Stewart

Santa Barbara Foundation

Linda Stafford Burrows

Beverly & Michael Steinfeld

Milan E. Timm

Barbara & Sam Toumayan

Anne Smith Towbes

Pam & Terry Valeski

Barbara & Gary Waer

Sheila Wald

Nick & Patty Weber

Dr. Robert Weinman

Westmont College

Victoria & Norman Williamson

Patricia Yzurdiaga

Cheryl & Peter Ziegler

CAMA’s Centennial

spans two concert

seasons, 2018/2019

and 2019/2020.

Please call Nancy Lynn

or Elizabeth Alvarez at

the CAMA office to

learn more about the

Centennial Circle.

Centennial Celebration

campaign began May 1, 2018

and spans two seasons:

2018/2019 and 2019/2020

ANDANTE

$250–$999

Sylvia Abualy

Antoinette & Shawn Addison

Jyl & Allan Atmore

Howard A. Babus

Becky & William Banning

Phyllis Brady & Andy Masters

Edith M. Clark

Lavelda & Lynn Clock

Michael & Ruth Ann Collins

Joan & Steven Crossland

Michael K. Dunn

Ann & David Dwelley

Meg & Jim Easton

Julia Emerson

Thomas & Doris Everhart

Eunice & J.Thomas Fly

Ghita Ginberg

Nancy & Frederic Golden

Robert L. Grant

Glenn Jordan & Michael Stubbs

Debbie & Frank Kendrick

Kathryn Lawhun & Mark Shinbrot

Christie & Morgan Lloyd

Barbara & Ernest Marx

Patriicia & William McKinnon

James P. and Shirley F. McFarland

Fund of the Minneapolis Foundation

Christine & James V. McNamara

Donald & Karine McCall

Andrew Mester

Peter L. Morris

Mrs. Raymond King Myerson

Maureen O'Rourke

Hensley & James Peterson

David & Dottie Pickering

Minie & Hjalmar Pompe van

Meerdervoort

Carol & Edward Portnoy

Patricia & Robert Reid

Tiffany & Justin Rizzo-Weaver

Ada B. Sandburg

Lynn & Mark Schiffmacher

Naomi Schmidt

Carol Vernon & Robert Turbin

Lorraine & Stephen Weatherford

Grace & Edward Yoon

CAMA AT THE GRANADA THEATRE - LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

29


MUSIC EDUCATION

MUSIC EDUCATION PROGRAM

$25,000 and above

The Walter J. & Holly O. Thomson Foundation

$10,000–$24,999

Ms. Irene Stone/ Stone Family Foundation

Mary Lloyd & Kendall Mills

$1,000–$9,999

CAMA Women's Board

William H. Kearns Foundation

Sara Miller McCune

Mr. & Mrs. Frank R. Miller, Jr. /

The Henry E. & Lola Monroe Foundation

Performing Arts Scholarship Foundation

Westmont College

$100–$999

Becky & William Banning

Lynn P. Kirst

James P. and Shirley F. McFarland Fund

of the Minneapolis Foundation

CAMA Education Endowment

Fund Income

$10,000 AND ABOVE

William & Nancy Myers

$1,000–$4,999

Linda Stafford Burrows –

This opportunity to experience great musicians excelling

is given in honor and loving memory of Frederika Voogd

Burrows to continue her lifelong passion for enlightening

young people through music and math.

Kathryn H. Phillips, in memory of Don R. Phillips

Walter J. Thomson/The Thomson Trust

$50–$999

Lynn P. Kirst

Keith J. Mautino

Performing Arts Scholarship Foundation

Marjorie S. Petersen

Volunteer docents are trained by CAMA’s Education Committee Chair, Joan Crossland, to deliver this program to

area schools monthly. Music enthusiasts are invited to learn more about the program and volunteer opportunities.

Call the CAMA office at (805) 966-4324 for more information about the docent program.

MEMORIAL GIFTS

Dr. Robert Failing

Mrs. Betty Meyer

Dr. Walter Picker

Ann M. Picker

Jim Ryerson

Christine Ryerson

Sharon Felber Taylor

Bridget Colleary

Cornelia Chapman

Ellicott Million

Dr. Eric Boehm

Eric Boehm

Michael Towbes

Bridget B. Colleary

Gerd & Peter Jordano

Else (Leinie) Schilling Bard

Joanne C. Holderman

Frederica Vogle Burrows

Linda Stafford Burrows

Professor Frederick F. Lange

MaryAnn Lange

Harold M. Williams

Nancy Englander

Sybil Mueller

Lynn P. Kirst

Dr. Robert Sinsheimer

& Karen Sinsheimer

Robert Boghosian &

Mary E. Gates Warren

Lynn R. Matteson

Lynn P. Kirst

Robert S. Grant

Robert L. Grant

Nan Burns, Dr. Greg Dahlen,

Robert S. Grant

William S. Hanrahan

Susie Vos

Bridget B. Colleary

30 CENTENNIAL SEASON CELEBRATION


Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

The CAMA Women’s Board Presents

A PRE-CONCERT LECTURE SERIES

2018/2019—CENTENNIAL SEASON

December 11, 2018

Tuesday, 7:00 PM

Community Celebration Concert

LOS ANGELES

CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

AVI AVITAL, MANDOLIN

The Granada Theatre

PRE-CONCERT LECTURE

David Malvinni, PhD, musicologist,

classical

guitarist, author, and creator of CAMA’s

outreach program

January 15, 2019

Tuesday, 6:00 PM

ITZHAK

PERLMAN, VIOLIN

The Granada Theatre

PRE-CONCERT LECTURE

Kostis Protopapas, Artistic & General

Director

of Opera Santa Barbara

February 5, 2019

Tuesday, 7:00 PM

PHILHARMONIA BAROQUE

ORCHESTRA

NICHOLAS McGEGAN, Director

The Granada Theatre

PRE-CONCERT LECTURE

Andy Radford, Music Director,

Santa Barbara Youth Symphony and

Lecturer, Woodwind Brass & Percussion

Program, UCSB Department

of Music

February 27, 2019

Wednesday, 7:00 PM

RUSSIAN NATIONAL

ORCHESTRA

MIKHAIL PLETNEV, Director

The Granada Theatre

PRE-CONCERT LECTURE

Derek Katz, Professor of Music History

at UCSB

March 20, 2019

Wednesday, 7:00 PM

PHILHARMONIA

ORCHESTRA

ESA-PEKKA SALONEN, Conductor

The Granada Theatre

PRE-CONCERT LECTURE

Simon Williams, Professor Emeritus,

UCSB Department of Theater and Dance;

Opera

and Theater Critic

April 5, 2019

Friday, 7:00 PM

ROYAL SCOTTISH NATIONAL

ORCHESTRA

THOMAS SØNDERGÅRD,

CONDUCTOR

The Granada Theatre

PRE-CONCERT LECTURE

Adrian Spence, Artistic Director of

Camerata Pacifica

COMMUNITY ARTS MUSIC ASSOCIATION OF SANTA BARBARA, INC

31 CENTENNIAL CAMA AT THE SEASON GRANADA CELEBRATION

THEATRE - LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

31


In

Memoriam

Dr. Robert

Mayo Failing

(1928–2018)

CAMA fondly remembers our long-time Board

member and past President, Dr. Robert Failing, who

passed away last month.

Dr. Failing found time apart from his busy career

as a prominent member of Santa Barbara Cottage

Hospital’s pathology department to serve on the

CAMA Board for 29 years from 1969 to 1997.

He served as CAMA's Vice President for nine years

and for two years as President during the 1978/79

and 1979/80 seasons.

Everyone who knew him will remember him for his

keen intelligence, storytelling wit and astonishing

mountaineering accomplishments.

Over the span of 18 years beginning at age 49

he was the ninth person on record to have reached

the summits of all 50 states in the USA, and reached

the top of six continents, in the process scaling the

highest points of over 45 countries.

Dr. Failing's

Horn Concerto

During his active summer

trips to Europe during

the Cold War years, longtime

CAMA Board member

Dr. Robert M. Failing mixed

classical concert attending

with “peak bagging,”

including ascents of three

of Switzerland’s mightiest.

Failing wrote that his “Swiss

three-movement triplehorn

concerto premiered

in Zermatt. Breithorn, the

first movement, was light

and harmonic. The second

movement, Mettelhorn, was

strong but a little metallic

and dissonant. The concerto

reached the top, climbing to

a booming, melodic third and

final Matterhorn movement.”

He will be greatly missed by everyone in the

CAMA family.

CAMA AT THE GRANADA THEATRE - LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

32


COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS

IN CAMA'S CENTENNIAL

CELEBRATION YEARS

g the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

2018/2019

November 8

MASTER CLASS

RICHARD GOODE, PIANO

— partnership with Department of

Music, UC Santa Barbara

December 11

FREE

COMMUNITY

CONCERT

LOS ANGELES CHAMBER

ORCHESTRA

AVI AVITAL, MANDOLIN

January 19

PUBLIC BOOK

TALK

BY HATTIE BERESFORD

at the Faulkner Gallery,

Santa Barbara Central Library

— partnership with Santa Barbara

Public Library

February 28

RUSSIAN

TEA ROOM

— partnership with

Opera Santa Barbara

Kelly Newberry

1st prize winner in 2018

April 10

CONCERT

CHOIR OF NEW COLLEGE

OXFORD

— co-sponsored by Westmont

College, Trinity Episcopal Church,

CAMA, and the American Guild

of Organists

April 28

COMPETITION

FINALS

PERFORMING ARTS

SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION

— partnership, CAMA and PASF

May 19

CAMA’S

100 th BIRTHDAY

BASH

with performances by Department

of Music (UC Santa Barbara),

Westmont Music Department,

Music Academy of the West, Santa

Barbara Symphony, and Opera

Santa Barbara; plus partnerships

with area restaurants and wineries

(Throughout the Season)

PRE-CONCERT

LECTURES

featuring speakers associated

with CAMA, Opera Santa Barbara,

SB Youth Symphony, UCSB

Department of Music, and UCSB

Department of Theater and Dance

2019/

2020

November 7, 2020

EDUCATION AND

OUTREACH EVENT FOR

CHILDREN

— partnership with the Santa Barbara Youth Symphony

COMMUNITY ARTS MUSIC ASSOCIATION OF SANTA BARBARA, INC

(805) 966-4324 • www.camasb.org

CAMA AT THE GRANADA THEATRE - LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

33


MUSIC EDUCATION PROGRAM

LIFETIME GIVING

diamond circle

$500,000 and above

Bitsy & Denny Bacon and

The Becton Family

Foundation

Suzanne & Russell Bock

Linda Brown*

Andrew H. Burnett

Foundation

Esperia Foundation

The Stephen &

Carla Hahn Foundation

Judith L. Hopkinson

Herbert & Elaine Kendall

SAGE Publishing

Michael Towbes /

The Towbes Fund for the

Performing Arts

sapphire circle

$250,000–$499,999

Anonymous

The CAMA Women's Board

Léni Fé Bland

Sara Miller McCune

The Samuel B. & Margaret C.

Mosher Foundation

The Stepanek Foundation

The Wood-Claeyssens

Foundation

ruby circle

$100,000–$249,999

The Adams Foundation

Ann Jackson Family

Foundation

Deborah & Peter Bertling

Dan & Meg Burnham

Virginia Castagnola-Hunter

NancyBell Coe &

William Burke

Robert & Christine Emmons

Mary & Raymond Freeman

Dr. Dolores M. Hsu

Hollis Norris Fund

Shirley Ann &

James H. Hurley Jr.

Shirley & Seymour Lehrer

Raye Haskell Melville

Mr. & Mrs. Frank R. Miller, Jr./

The Henry E. &

Lola Monroe Foundation

John & Kathleen Moseley/

The Nichols Foundation

Val & Bob Montgomery

Nancy & William G. Myers

Montecito Bank & Trust

Michele & Andre Saltoun

The Santa Barbara Foundation

Jan & John G Severson

Judith F. Smith

Jeanne C. Thayer

Mrs. Walter Thomson

Union Bank

Dr. & Mrs. H. Wallace Vandever

The Wallis Foundation

Winona Fund

Nancy & Byron Kent Wood

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Yzurdiaga

emerald circle

$50,000–$99,999

Anonymous

Ms. Joan C. Benson

Mr. & Mrs. Peter Beuret

Dr. & Mrs. Edward E. Birch

Louise & Michael Caccese

Dr. & Mrs. Jane Catlett

Roger & Sarah Chrisman

Mr. & Mrs. Robert M. Colleary

Mrs. Maurice E. Faulkner

Arthur R. Gaudi

Mr. & Mrs. Robert B. Gilson

The George H. Griffiths &

Olive J. Griffiths Charitable

Foundation

Mr. Richard Hellman

Joanne C. Holderman

Michael & Natalia Howe

Hutton Parker Foundation

Ellen & Peter Johnson

Judith Little

John & Lucy Lundegard

Jocelyne & William Meeker

Mrs. Max E. Meyer

Craig & Ellen Parton

Performing Arts Scholarship

Foundation

Marjorie S. Petersen/ La

Arcada Investment Corp.

Diana & Roger Phillips

Mr. Ted Plute &

Mr. Larry Falxa

Lady Ridley-Tree

Barbara & Sam Toumayan

George & Judy Writer

Stephen J.M. & Anne Morris

topaz circle

$25,000–$49,999

Anonymous

Edward Bakewell

Helene & Jerry Beaver

Robert Boghosian &

Mary E. Gates Warren

Alison & Jan Bowlus

Linda Stafford Burrows

Elizabeth & Andrew Butcher

Ms. Huguette Clark

Mrs. Leonard Dalsemer

Edward S. Deloreto

Mr. & Mrs. Larry Durham

Lynn P. Kirst &

Lynn R. Matteson

Dr. & Mrs. Robert Failing

Priscilla & Jason Gaines

The George Frederick

Jewett Foundation

Patricia Kaplan

Elizabeth Karlsberg

& Jeff Young

William H. Kearns Foundation

Jill Dore Kent

Otto Korntheuer/ The Harold

L. Wyman Foundation in

memory of Otto Korntheuer

Chris Lancashire

& Catherine Gee

Mrs. Jon B. Lovelace

Leatrice Luria

Mrs. Frank Magid

Ruth McEwen

Frank McGinity

Sheila Bourke McGinity

James & Mary Morouse

Northern Trust

Patricia Hitchcock O’Connell

Efrem Ostrow Living Trust

Mr. Ernest J. Panosian

Kathryn H. Phillips

Mrs. Kenneth Riley

Anitra & Jack Sheen

Marion Stewart

Ina Tournallyay

Mrs. Edward Valentine

The Outhwaite Foundation

The Elizabeth Firth Wade

Endowment Fund

Mrs. Roderick Webster

Westmont College

amethyst circle

$10,000–$24,999

Anonymous

Anonymous

Rebecca & Peter Adams

Mrs. David Allison

Dr. & Mrs. Mortimer Andron

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Arthur

Mr. & Mrs. J.W. Bailey

Marta Babson

Mrs. Archie Bard

Leslie & Phillip Bernstein

Frank Blue & Lida Light Blue

Mrs. Erno Bonebakker

CAMA Fellows

Mrs. Margo Chapman

Chubb-Sovereign Life

Insurance Co.

Carnzu A Clark

Chaucer's Books/ Mahri Kerley

Lavelda & Lynn Clock

Dr. Gregory Dahlen & Nan Burns

Karen Davidson M.D.

Julia Dawson

Mr. & Mrs. William Esrey

Fredericka & Dennis Emory

Ronald & Rosalind A. Fendon

Dave Fritzen/DWF Magazines

Catherine H. Gainey

Kay & Richard Glenn

The Godric Foundation

Corinna & Larry Gordon

Mr. & Mrs. Freeman

Gosden, Jr.

Mr. & Mrs. Bruce Hanna

Robert Hanrahan

Lorraine C. Hansen

Mr. & Mrs. Stanley Hatch

Renee & Richard Hawley

Dr. & Mrs. Alan Heeger

Karin Nelson & Eugene

Hibbs/Maren Henle

Mr. Preston Hotchkis

Glenn Jordan & Michael

Stubbs

Elizabeth & Gary Johnston

KDB Radio

Linda & Michael Keston

Mrs. Robert J. Kuhn

Katherine Lloyd/ Actief-cm, Inc

Lois Kroc

Dora Anne Little

Ruth & John Matuszeski

Keith Mautino

Dona & George McCauley

Jayne Menkemeller

Russell Mueller

Myra & Spencer Nadler

Joanne & Alden Orpet

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Patridge

Patricia & Carl Perry

John Perry

Mrs. Ray K. Person

Ellen & John Pillsbury

Anne & Wesley Poulson

Susannah Rake

Mr. & Mrs. Frank Reed

Jack Revoyr

Betty & Don Richardson

The Grace Jones Richardson

Trust

Dorothy Roberts

The Roberts Bros. Foundation

John Saladino

Jack & Anitra Sheen

Sally & Jan Smit

Betty Stephens &

Lindsay Fisher

Selby & Diane Sullivan

Joseph M. Thomas

Irene & Robert Stone/Stone

Family Foundation

Milan E. Timm

Mark E. Trueblood

Steven D. Trueblood

Kenneth W. &

Shirley C. Tucker

Mr. & Mrs. Hubert D. Vos

Barbara & Gary Waer

Mr. & Mrs. David Russell Wolf

Dick & Ann Zylstra

*promised

34 CENTENNIAL SEASON CELEBRATION


BUSINESS SUPPORTERS

BUSINESS SUPPORTERS

We thank the many businesses that support

CAMA's programs and events!

Laurel Abbott, Berkshire Hathaway

Luxury Properties

American Riviera Bank

James P. Ballantine

Belmond El Encanto

Bertling Law Group

Blue Star Parking

Bon Fortune Style & Events

Wes Bredall

Heather Bryden

Ca' Dario

Camerata Pacifica

Casa Dorinda

C'est Cheese

Chaucer's Books

Chooket Patisserie

Cottage Health System

Custom Printing

Eye Glass Factory

First Republic Bank

Flag Factory of Santa Barbara

Frequency Wine

Gainey Vineyard

Grace Design Associates

Colin Hayward/The Hayward Group

Steven Handelman Studios

Hogue & Company

Holdren's Catering

Indigo Interiors

Islay A/V

Jardesca

Maravilla/Senior Resource Group

Microsoft® Corporation

Mission Security

Montecito Bank & Trust

Northern Trust

Oak Cottage of Santa Barbara

Oceania Cruises

Olio e Limone/Olio Crudo Bar/

Olio Pizzeria

Opera Santa Barbara

Pacific Coast Business Times

Peregrine Galleries

Performing Arts Scholarship

Foundation

Regent Seven Seas Cruises

Renaud's Patisserie & Bistro

Rose Story Farm

Sabine Myers Design

SAGE Publishing

Santa Barbara Choral Society

Santa Barbara Foundation

Santa Barbara Travel Bureau

Stewart Fine Art

The Tent Merchant

The Upham Hotel

UCSB Arts & Lectures

Westmont Orchestra

CAMA AT THE GRANADA THEATRE - LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

35

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