BeatRoute Magazine BC Edition December 2018

beatroute

BeatRoute Magazine is a monthly arts and entertainment paper with a predominant focus on music – local, independent or otherwise. The paper started in June 2004 and continues to provide a healthy dose of perversity while exercising rock ‘n’ roll ethics.

Currently BeatRoute’s AB edition is distributed in Calgary, Edmonton (by S*A*R*G*E), Banff and Canmore. The BC edition is distributed in Vancouver, Victoria and Nanaimo. BeatRoute (AB) Mission PO 23045 Calgary, AB T2S 3A8 E. editor@beatroute.ca BeatRoute (BC) #202 – 2405 E Hastings Vancouver, BC V5K 1Y8 P. 778-888-1120

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December‘18

PUBLISHER

BeatRoute Magazine

LAYOUT

& PRODUCTION MANAGER

Naomi Zhang

FRONT COVER PHOTO

Shimon

www.shimonphoto.com

FRONT COVER DESIGN

Randy Gibson

MOVING MOUNTAINS EDITOR

Jessie Foster

jessie@beatroute.ca

Managing Editor

Jordan Yeager

jordan@beatroute.ca

Editor-In-Chief

Glenn Alderson

glenn@beatroute.ca

City

Yasmine Shemesh

yasmine@beatroute.ca

04

05

06

HI, HOW ARE YOU?

- With Anita Sikma

PULSE - CITY BRIEFS!

CITY

- Marking The Infinite

- Street/Route

- Places Please

- Make It Fair

12 Beers Of Christmas

Fried Chicken Crawl

25

26

28

HOLIDAY GIFT

GUIDE

BPM

- The Funk Hunters

- CONTACT Festival

- Clubland

MOVING

MOUNTAINS

- December Hill Report

- Backcountry Avalanche

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Maryam Azizli • Sarah Bauer • Trevor

Campbell • Lyndon Chiang • Kira Clavell •

Adam Deane • Craig Douglas • Chris Dzaka

• Esmée Colbourne • Karina Espinosa •

Heath Fenton • Conor Finlay • Jeevin Johal

• Prachi Kamble • Brendan Lee • Christine

Leonard • Joey Lopez • Noémie Attia •

Andrea Nazarian • Keir Nicoll • Jennie

Orton • Dora Prieto • Alan Ranta • Daniel

Robichaud • Tory Rosso • Judah Schulte •

Leah Siegel • Stepan Soroka • Austin Taylor

• Cole Young

CONTRIBUTING

PHOTOGRAPHERS &

ILLUSTRATORS

Syd Danger • Christopher Edmonstone •

Pooneh Ghana • Tom Hawkins • Shimon

Karmel • Zee Khan • James Mackenzie

• Jen Maler • Carole Mathys • Timothy

Nguyen • Stephen Oxenbury • Jaik

Puppyteeth • Johann Wall

ADVERTISING INQUIRIES

Glenn Alderson

glenn@beatroute.ca

778-888-1120

Local Music

Maddy Cristall

maddy@beatroute.ca

The Skinny

Johnny Papan

johnny@beatroute.ca

Comedy

Graeme Wiggins

graeme@beatroute.ca

GRASSIFIEDS

Jamila Pomeroy

jamila@beatroute.ca

Live Reviews

Darrole Palmer

darrole@beatroute.ca

Film

Hogan Short

hogan@beatroute.ca

15

16

17

20

23

GRASSIFIEDS

- Tokyo Smoke

- Feel The Strain

- Strain Of The Month

MUSIC

- Thievery Corporation

- Polo & Pan

COVER

- Hey Ocean!

BEST OF 2018

THE SKINNY

- Ignite

- Redd Kross

29

31

37

38

FILM

- Best Films of 2018

- Weed The People

- This Month In Film

REVIEWS

- Tyler The Creator

- Anderson .Paak

- Bauhaus

- Daniel Romano

- Rhye

- MORE!

LIVE REVIEWS

- Drake

- Jorja Smith

- Andre Nikatina

HOROSCOPES

DISTRIBUTION

Gold Distribution (Vancouver)

Mark Goodwin Farfields (Victoria)

Web

Jashua Grafstein

jash@beatroute.ca

Social Media

Mat Wilkins

mat@beatroute.ca

BEATROUTE MAGAZINE

202-2405 Hastings St. E

Vancouver BC Canada

V5K 1Y8

editor@beatroute.ca • beatroute.ca

©BEATROUTE Magazine 2018. All rights reserved.

Reproduction of the contents is strictly prohibited.

CALPURNIA - Page 23

December 2018 3


WITH ANITA SIKMA

Written by Austin Taylor

For more than ten years Vancouver

based jewellery designer Anita

Sikma has been crafting an intricate

brand of hand made jewellery. Her

aesthetic pulls design sensibilities

from automotive machinery, doom

metal and Art Deco architecture, all

while uncompromisingly maintaining

the distinct look which has gained

her a cult like following of collectors

across Canada and abroad. We caught

up with Sikma in her Hasting-Sunrise

studio to learn more about her

inspirations, aspirations, favourite

tunes and her most memorable

holiday gift.

When did you first realize

you wanted to pursue

a career as a jewellery

designer?

When I applied for the jewellery

design and metal techniques diploma

program at VCC in 2002, I really had

no idea what I was getting myself into.

I just knew that the two-dimensional

art I was creating as a student or as

a hobby wasn’t fulfilling. I needed

to make something that satisfied

me personally, create objects that

would be worn, adorned, cherished,

gifted and passed on through

generations. Whenever I think of the

word ‘Jewellery’ a slew of memories

bubble around my head—mostly all

moments that were shared between

me and my family. I love that. The

first pieces I made in school I brought

home and gifted to my family and

friends over the winter break in 2002.

I think that once I began being able

to create pieces and gift them with a

confidence I knew that I would never

stop.

Can you tell us about the

creative inspirations for

your work?

Both sides of my family inspire me,

I learnt how to make and take from

who I am and design from my heart.

But growing up in a very machine

influenced environment has definitely

marked my design aesthetic.

How do you want people to

feel when they wear your

jewellery?

Every one of my customers deserves

a piece that is made just for them, I

want you to feel and see that. I want

my customer to understand that

everything that is Anita Sikma Design,

is made and designed by hand. All

my pieces are handled individually,

making each piece one of a kind.

What is your jewellery

philosophy? How do you

like to wear your favourite

pieces?

I like to wear my favourite pieces just

like I would wear my favourite shirt

— for a week straight! Haha! I tend

to go back and forth, like right now

I’m layering the Snake and Dagger

pendant with my Weed Leaf pendant.

Next week I’m gonna start wearing

my Snake and Cross pendant and the

Mini Padlock pendant together. Also,

I always have on at least three bangles

and a good fistful of silver. The only

time I take my jewellery off is to sleep

or shower, but I don’t shower that

often.

What is your favourite music

to jam to in the studio?

Kinda all depends on my vibe. I don’t

have wifi so I have two super ancient

iPod and a tower of old CD’s. I keep in

a regular rotation of my favs like Sonic

Youth, Sabbath and throw in lots of

Photo by Darrole Palmer

Janet, Dee-Lite, KD, Lucinda and AC/

DC. I love finding CDs at value village

too, so there’s always a variety of

tunes.

Other than Jewellery, do

you have any other creative

outlets?

I like to cook, I sew sometimes but

mostly I love to socialize. I find that

surrounding myself with super

positive friends and family benefits

my psyche and lends a hand to my

creative mind.

What is one of the best

holiday gifts you have ever

received?

Honestly, the very first thing that

comes to mind is my 3 level Barbie

house I got last year. Just kidding, it

was when I was like 6, unwrapping

that was the best thing ever. Other

than that, my partner gave me a

plastic spatula one year that was

pretty sweet.

Can you tell us about your

upcoming in studio market?

Ya! I’m hosting my second annual

market in my Hastings design space

on Saturday, December 15th. There

will be Josée Gordon-Davis for

Reassembly Botanicals, Katie Beaton

for Beaton Linen, Tony Dubroy luxury

wooden house-ware, Erin McCoy of

Cowichan Valley Soaps and myself.

It’ll be from 11-6 and lit with amazing

gifts for you and your pals.

What’s next? What’s your

vision for the future of

your brand?

Mostly just stay humble. All I really

want is to continue to create, be

innovative, to be constantly learning

and solving problems, figuring stuff

out, getting stuff done. I’d also love to

maybe sit down with Rick Allen (Def

Leppard drummer) and talk about

his triumphant comeback in 86 at the

Monsters of Rock festival, that would

be sick.

Anita Sikma crafts unique handmade jewelry, making each creation a one-of-a-kind.

Anita Sikma is hosting her second

annual market at her design space

on Dec. 15 located at 2132 E Hastings.

She can also be found online at www.

anitasikma.com

4

December 2018


CITY BRIEFS!

200 Cigarettes Krampus Mad Vibes Mench Winter Breakout

200 CIGARETTES

December 31 at the Biltmore Cabaret

2019 marks the 20th anniversary of

this ‘90s cult classic about a group

of twenty somethings trying to cope

with relationships, loneliness, and their

individual neuroses in 1980s New York.

The Biltmore Cabaret is channeling

the movie, which stars Christina Ricci,

Courtney Love, Janeane Garofalo,

Dave Chapelle, and Paul Rudd, by

transforming itself into an interactive

space, with an eclectic music selection

and even a polaroid photographer.

COMMUNITY DONATION

DRIVE

December 1-16 at Eastside Studios

Bring things like children’s books,

diapers, art supplies, period products,

bedding, and warm clothing to any of

the Eastside Flea’s markets throughout

the month of December. The items will

be donated to those in need at the Ray-

Cam Cooperative Centre and the Wish

Drop-In Centre Society.

KRAMPUSMARKT

December 6-8 at Strange Fellows

Brewing

Celebrate the holiday season’s favourite

bad guy with this three day long,

old world-inspired market. A huge

and carefully curated assortment of

talented local artists will set up shop,

and also lead some workshops on the

Saturday. Watch out for makers like

Antler Ceramics and Frances Hahn.

KEITHMAS IX

December 15 at the Rickshaw

Theatre

It’s the most wonderful time of the

year: Keith Richards’ birthday — oh

yeah, and the holidays! Vancouver’s

wildest Christmas tradition is back

for another round of Jack. This year,

bands like La Chinga, Rich Hope, Little

Destroyer, and War Baby perform at

the Rickshaw Theatre. And, as always,

proceeds go to the Greater Vancouver

Food Bank, for which the event has

raised over $50,000 and counting.

MAD VIBES

December 21 at Fortune Sound Club

Canadian comedians Mufaro R. Mbudzi

and Tarisai Mbudzi will be filming their

debut comedy special, Mad Vibes, at

Fortune Sound Club this month. The

Zimbabwe-born brothers, known for

their sharp commentary on topics like

cultural appropriation and high tuition

fees, will film back to back half-hour

sets at what promises to be both an

exciting and hilarious night.

MENSCH. JEWISH

DELICATESSEN POP-UP

December 11 at Faculty Brewing

Consider it a belated Hanukkah

present. The Jewish deli that had

a short-but-so-sweet home in East

Vancouver a couple years ago is back

for one night only. Head over to Faculty

Brewing on December 11 for that slow

brined, smoked, hand cut, New York

hot pastrami on rye your taste buds

miss. Their beet-cured lox and labneh

cheese bagel will be available too.

PARTY4HEALTH

December 31 at the Seabus and

Waterfront Station

Looking for some good, clean fun

this New Year’s? Party4Health — an

initiative with a purpose to show

people how to live a healthy and happy

life without substances — is hosting

their second annual NYE party on the

route from the Seabus at Lonsdale

Quay across to Waterfront Station

downtown. Enjoy the ride on your way

to your destination or just go back and

forth until midnight. Participants are

asked to refrain from drug or alcohol

consumption.

SILENT NIGHT

December 13 at 336 E 1st Avenue

Queer ASL, a program that offers safe

spaces for queer and transgender

individuals to learn sign language, is

holding its first annual art show and

voice-off salon! Silent Night will include

everything from holiday-themed works

to pieces celebrating deaf culture. The

art will also be available for purchase

and the organizers have asked for

attendees to turn off their voices when

they enter the space for the evening.

VSO’S HOME ALONE

December 14, 15 at the Orpheum

Theatre

Celebrate the end of the Vancouver

Symphony Orchestra’s milestone, 100th

season, by listening to a live rendition of

composer John Williams’ score of this

holiday favourite. You’ll almost be able

to see Kevin McCallister outsmarting

those dim-witted wet bandits!

WEIRDOS HOLIDAY MARKET

December 8-9 at the Hall

If you’re looking for wonderfully weird

and strange gifts to give this season,

you won’t want to miss this. Find

everything from anatomical curiosities

and taxidermy to jewelry and art. There

will also be tarot card reading, live

music performances, food vendors, and

a bar on site.

December 2018 5


CITY

MARKING THE INFINITE

ABORIGINAL WOMEN REDEFINING CONTEMPORARY ART IN AUSTRALIA

DORA JOELLA PRIETO

“This is my gift to you, to the world, from my heart.” –

Gulumbu Yunupingu

Marking the Infinite features 68 works from nine

Aboriginal Australian women artists, making their

mark on the international arts scene with impressive

technique, concept, and a warm sincerity. Aboriginal

women have been redefining the contemporary art

scene in Australia since the 1980s.

The group exhibition at the Museum of

Anthropology – which is also the museum’s first

showcase of all-female artists – features the works

of Nonggirrnga Marawili, Wintjiya Napaltjarri,

Yukultji Napangati, Angelina Pwerle, Lena Yarinkura,

Gulumbu Yunupingu, Nyapanyapa Yunupingu,

Carlene West, and Regina Pilawuk Wilson.

The mixed media paintings reflect landscapes with

meticulous detail, earthy colour palettes, and abstract

patterns. Subjects include the various stages of the

Australian Bush Plum, a contemplation of the stars,

a reimagining of wooden funerary poles, and fishing

nets. Each piece reflects Indigenous ways of knowing

and culture, while empowering the artist matriarchs

in their remote villages of Australia. The exhibition is

also accompanied by profound quotes and portraits

of all the artists.

“Marking the Infinite is both very contemporary

and very traditional,” says curator Henry Skerritt.

Indeed, simply defining the works as either is a stale

European construct that limits the contemporary art

scene and results in colonial impact on Indigenous

art expression. “These artists paint to keep their

culture strong, and their innovative techniques and

concepts are a way to keep their culture alive.” Both

the curators and collectors wanted to position the

pieces as significant contemporary art, in part to

show how Indigenous art can indeed be viewed as

dynamic in the international art scene.

For around a century, Aboriginal Australian art

has been supported through small, communityowned

arts organizations in remote Indigenous

communities all over Australia. Skerritt says that

the social importance of these centres is extremely

relevant considering the oppressive colonial past and

present of Australia. He continued that “many social

problems came to these communities as a result of

the removal of agency through colonial practices, but

art is a reclamation of agency.”

The art culture that has been nurtured through

these community-run centres has reflected

innovation, tradition, and anything in between

– whatever the community wants it to be. This is

how Aboriginal art became part of the Australian

contemporary art scene, with art that is as firmly

rooted in tradition as it is in contemporary

exploration.

Marking the Infinite is a major travelling exhibition

that has reached critical acclaim in contemporary

art galleries in its North American tour, including

the Phillips Collection, Nevada Museum of Art,

Newcomb Art Museum, and other prestigious

galleries. The curators and artists created the tour

to exhibit in areas that also had strong Indigenous

presence.

The Museum of Anthropology in Vancouver was

chosen as an important stop for the North American

tour. The MOA increasingly attempts to put its

impressive collection to anti-colonial, Indigenous

use. Furthermore, there are many similarities in the

history of colonization and present-day challenges

for First Nations people and Australian Aboriginal

people. The exhibit provides a space for imagining

art scenes that push new eras of knowledge, where

the return is twofold: for Indigenous cultures to

thrive, and to add to the exploration of the human

experience in the contemporary art scene.

Marking the Infinite runs until March 31, 2019 at the

Museum of Anthropology.

Photo by Stephen Oxenbury

THROUGH

JAN 20, 2019

Featuring more than forty breathtaking designs by

China’s foremost couturière.

Organized by the Vancouver Art Gallery, an initiative of the Institute of

Asian Art, in collaboration with SCAD FASH Museum of Fashion + Film

Visionary Partners for the Institute of Asian Art

Liu Bao, Wang Ying and Liu Manzhao

Supporting Sponsor:

Additional Sponsor:

Guo Pei, One Thousand and Two Nights, 2010, silk cloak embroidered with metal thread and silk- and 24-karat-gold-spun thread and adorned

with silk bows and fox fur, Photo: Courtesy of SCAD

Carlene West is one of nine Aboriginal women whose artwork is featured in Marking The Infinite.

6

Ad_BeatRoute_GuoPei_5x115in.indd 1

2018-11-27 2:04 PM

December 2018


UPCOMING SHOWS

HEY OCEAN!

CARMANAH & SCHWEY

DECEMBER 8

AMINE

WITH BUDDY AND KAYO GENESIS

DECEMBER 19

CALPURNIA

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

DECEMBER 21 / 22

NAO

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

JANUARY 12

SOLD OUT!

AARON PRICHETT

WITH KIRA ISABELLA AND DAVID JAMES

JANUARY 15

PETER MURPHY

RUBY CELEBRATION FEATURING DAVID J

JANUARY 19

JEREMY HOTZ

DANGEROUSLY HANDSOME TOUR

JANUARY 25

DAN MANGAN

THANK YOU FOR BEING A FRIEND JUNGLE

WITH GUESTS

THE ULTIMATE GOLDEN GIRLS EXPERIENCE WITH HOUSES

FEBRUARY 12 FEBRUARY 13

MARCH 9

SOLD OUT!

TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT VOGUETHEATRE.COM


Mircea Cantor No title, (2004) light box | 22 7/16 x 31 1/2 x 3 1/8 in (57 x 80 x 8 cm)

Rennie Museum | 51 East Pender St | Vancouver


STREET/ROUTE

By Chris Dzaka | Photos by Timothy Nguyen

BeatRoute hits the pavement in

Vancouver and asks…


What are your plans for

the holiday season?

Austin Butcher, Stussy

“Probably drink rum and eggnog

with my family. My family is super

big but we’re spread out. On

Christmas it’s not that big numberwise,

but it’s always fun.

Allen Hogan, Owner – Clean the Sole

“Work probably until the week of or just before so I

have money to get everything I need for the people I

want to get it for. For me it’s a happy time of year.

John Kim, Manager - BB Korean

Cuisine Bistro

“It’s family gathering time, right? There are a lot of people

here and downtown. Many of them students and

they’re away from their family. They can enjoy at my

place and have some drinks.

Sadie Potosky, The Dug Out

“Christmas for me is very much for the kids. As far as

plans go, just hanging out and trying to spread a bit of

light and love around here.

Tamara Grunberg , Stussy

“Love Christmas! I Just changed the (Stussy Store) playlist and

I’ve been listening to Christmas music the last four hours. I’m

excited for it. I’m probably going to see my family, but I’m

Jewish so I don’t totally get into it. I’m a fake, haha.

Farrell Augustin,

Ez Dog Grooming

“I love Christmas. I love the spiritual

part of it, the snow, the cold, the

jingles and the caroling. Definitely

gonna be eating a lot of food and

spending time with family.

Peter Stewart, The Dug Out

“We have a lot of clients who have mental issues, drug

issues, alcohol issues or family issues. They don’t have

anywhere to go for Christmas so we are happy to open

the doors so everyone has a place to hang out and relax.

Holly Carter, Student

(John Casablancas)

“I’m disappointed because I’m

away for Christmas this year so

I’m not gonna be with my family.

It’ll be my first Christmas away

from home. I’m kind of bummed,

but I can always FaceTime with

my family.

Riley Epp, Birds and Beets

“I feel like there is no meditative Christmas spirit

cultivated here because of the lack of snow. I’ll

probably, like, bake a brie and eat the baked brie

at my house. No family, just chill out with my dog

and my girlfriend.

December 2018 9


Indian Ink Theatre Company (New Zealand)

$24

TICKETS FROM

Jan 15–

Feb 03, 2019

THEATRE

PLACES, PLEASE

YOUR MONTHLY THEATRE GUIDE

LEAH SIEGEL

Oh, December. It’s one last month of large helpings

of food, Michael Bublé Christmas songs, eggnog

lattés, and seasonal Hallmark romantic movies

before January 1, when we arbitrarily decide that

fun isn’t good for us, but the gym is. Here’s a

helpful hint: if you’re still struggling to find a great

Christmas gift for a friend, get them a theatre ticket.

Not only is it a thoughtful present, it’s also a great

way to find out if your friend likes theatre – or if you

should find a new friend.

Blind Date

Goldcorp Stage at the BMO Theatre Centre,

November 22-December 30

Do you ever sit at bars and watch Tinder matches

meet for the first time? Yes, it’s a little bit creepy –

but it’s so entertaining. There’s something about the

awkwardness of others that is absolutely fascinating.

Along comes Blind Date, a 90-minute piece of

spontaneous theatre that rewards those of us with

voyeuristic tendencies. In it we watch Mimi arrive

for a blind date, only to find herself stood up. Not

to let a good opportunity go to waste (she is, after

all, dressed up, and there’s a bottle of wine already

ordered), she plucks a new date from the audience

with whom to spend the evening. Prepare for the

awkward, but anticipate swooning by the end. While

talking to CTV, playwright Rebecca Northan said

that “On a perfect night of Blind Date, the whole

audience falls in love.”

Little Dickens

Historic Theatre, December 4-22

If you’ve ever gotten tired of the saccharine

wholesomeness that Christmas stories usually

offer, look no further than Little Dickens at the

Cultch. Master puppeteer Ronnie Burkett returns

this December with his semi-improvised take on

A Christmas Carol, where you can expect raunchy

jokes, a puppet strip tease, and an audience singalong.

In case it wasn’t clear, leave the kids at home

for this one.

Bombay Black

Firehall Arts Centre, December 5-15

In India, Apsara works as an exotic dancer while

her mother Padma finds the customers. The

two fled a rather awful-sounding situation with

Apsara’s father, leaving Padma embittered and set

on revenge. Things get interesting when a blind

customer named Kamal visits Apsara. What’s the

appeal, the mother and daughter wonder, for a blind

man to “watch” her dance? It turns out that Kamal

has an agenda – and harbours bitter secrets of his

own. Rohit Chokhani’s new take on Anosh Irani’s

play distinguishes itself by framing the story from

Kamal’s perspective, and it has already won critical

acclaim.

It’s a Wonderful Life

Gateway Theatre, December 6-31

It’s a Wonderful Life is the best Christmas movie

out there. End of discussion. First off, Jimmy Stewart

is bae. Second, despite the film being a classic, the

issues that George Bailey faces (economic insecurity,

depression, general existential angst) feel very

current. It’s like writer-director Frank Capra just

gets us, you know? The folks over at Gateway have

decided to turn this story into a musical, which is an

interesting choice – one that risks turning an already

sentimental story sappy. That said, there’s no better

time of the year for sap. Bring on the emotions!

Hilarious, touching and

altogether most rewarding.

—THEATREVIEW

#ricericebaby

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THECULTCH.COM

Bombay Black is a critically acclaimed production guaranteed to challenge your senses.

10

December 2018


From the brains behind Make It, one of Canada’s largest

November 6, 2018

$19.95 CDN / $16.95 USD

Trade paperback

5.25 × 8

ISBN 978-0-9952665-3-7

Also available in ebook

Published by Page Two Books

www.pagetwostrategies.com

Dates, prices and manufacturing

details are subject to

change or cancellation with-

out notice.

Photo credit: Tom Hawkins

THIS IS AN ADVANCE READING COPY. DO NOT QUOTE

FROM THIS MATERIAL WITHOUT PERMISSION OR

WITHOUT COMPARING WITH THE FINISHED BOOK.

and most successful craft shows, comes this book to help

creative entrepreneurs turn their great ideas into reality.

Make It Happen is the how-to book to help entrepreneurs

sharpen their creative vision, figure out—and overcome—

what’s holding them back from turning their great ideas into

reality, and get started making it happen.

Jenna Herbut is the brains behind Make It, one of Canada’s

largest and most successful craft shows, and Make It Happen is

packed with her hard-won insight and inspiration. The book

contains lessons learned over Jenna’s entrepreneurial journey;

case studies and tips from creative, courageous entrepreneurs

who realized their dreams by overcoming fear and resistance;

and invaluable “Make It Real” exercises to get you practicing

and applying new techniques, skills and ideas.

In Make It Happen you’ll discover how to:

On sale date

FROM THE FOUNDER OF

THE MAKE IT SHOW

• Tap into your unique passion and let it shine

• Think and act to make it happen

• Figure out what to do when it’s just not happening

By the end of Make It Happen you’ll be well on your way to

becoming one of a beautiful breed of risk takers who are

willing to put it all on the line to make their vision a reality.

JENNA HERBUT is the creator of the Booty Beltz, which

sold into 120 boutiques all over Canada, the United States, and

Japan and was featured in Flare, Elle Canada, LouLou, and on

CityLine, CTV, and Global news. After touring as a vendor in

craft shows and festivals across the country, Herbut founded

and promoted her own fair, Make It, which quickly expanded to

a bi-annual, three-city event. Make It has become a well-known

community for both new and established makers, and boasts

100,000+ shoppers yearly. Since the inception of the Make It

show, Herbut has expanded her business to include Conscious

Lab, which is a community space for creative entrepreneurs

located in Vancouver, Canada.

THE CREATIVE ENTREPRENEUR’S

GUIDE TO TRANSFORMING

YOUR DREAMS INTO REALITY

jennaherbut.com

makeitshow.ca


CITY

MAKE IT HAPPEN

A GUIDEBOOK FOR THE CREATIVE ENTREPRENEUR

JORDAN YEAGER

Photo by Tom Hawkins

Jenna Herbut translates her years of experience as a business owner into an easily digestible book.

Craft fairs are not just for your grandma

anymore (but hey, she’s still invited). When

Jenna Herbut and her brother Chandler started

their modern take on the classic makers market,

Make It!, in 2008, it was their goal to make craft

fairs appealing to people from all walks of life –

grandparents, 20-somethings, and grandchildren

alike.

As a student in 2004, Herbut started her

first business: Booty Beltz. Eventually, Booty

Beltz — belts made of scarves with easy-towear

fasteners — were sold in 120 stores across

Canada, the United States and Japan. Herbut

also peddled them at craft fairs around the

country. It was at these markets that she noticed

a trend.

“The fairs were quite traditional, the

customers were a bit older, and I was in my

20s,” says Herbut. “So I thought if the vibe

was different – if the marketing was fresh and

appealed to people my own age – you would

get a whole different demographic coming in.”

Herbut decided to go for it and put on a

small market in Edmonton. Ten years later, the

creator-driven exhibition has grown from 25

booths to more than 215 vendors selling their

wares at the bi-annual shows that take place

in Vancouver, Edmonton and Calgary. Herbut

has been at the helm of it all, eventually letting

Booty Beltz “die a slow death” as she focused

instead on the Make It! project, which was “a

bigger adventure.”

“With business, sometimes people fail

because they’re playing too small,” she says. “It’s

no different than a breakup. You fall in love, you

open your heart, you give yourself to something,

and sometimes it doesn’t work out. But you

grieve it, you mourn it, and then you move on.”

For any up-and-coming creators or

entrepreneurs who have the energy but aren’t

sure exactly where to channel it, Herbut has

written a book called, appropriately, “Make It

Happen.” The book is essentially a guide for

people who were in her position all those years

ago: people navigating the business world for

the first time who “have no idea what the hell”

they’re doing. She’s noticed a trend in young

creators who may hold back from pursuing their

goals for fear, both of failure and of success.

Herbut will be selling copies of her book at

each upcoming Make It! Market. Catch her in

Edmonton November 22-25, Calgary December

6-9, and Vancouver December 12-16.

THEATRE • DANCE • MULTIMEDIA

MUSIC • FILM

SALT. PHOTO: RICHARD DAVENPORT

12

December 2018


CITY

DECK THE HALLS WITH STOUT AND PORTER

• Written by Jennie Orton • Illustration by James Mackenzie

Winter is coming, friends. And many of us combat the darker days by shifting to beer that matches our cold dark hearts. We trade in

crushable beach lagers for beer that requires a knife and fork. We put down the saison in favour of the intoxicating tendrils of stout foam

as it crawls up the glass like a smoke bomb revealing your new dark master. To keep it interesting and save you from a season of Guinness,

BeatRoute has compiled a list of our favourite choices for beer that sticks to your ribs through the cold months.

Broken Resolution Cherry Baltic

Porter - Parallel 49 Brewing

An aptly named holiday season Limited Release,

this is a surprisingly tasty addition to your vices.

This porter is cool-fermented and complex of

flavour. A present malt refrains from taking over

the palate thanks to the tart cherry flavour and the

standard porter characteristics of chocolate and

deep purple fruit. A satisfying sipper to say “f@#$

it” with.

33 Acres of Darkness – 33 Acres

A perennial favourite of local beer connoisseurs,

this sessionable at 5% Schwarzbier combines Cara

Vienna, Black Prinz, and Caramel Munich 40 malts

roasted in harmony to produce a caramelized

but light “supernatural lager” as described by the

brewery. It’s the dark beer that doesn’t make you

feel full, combining chocolate and coffee notes

with a refreshing mouth feel.

Postmark Stout – Postmark Brewing

A more standard issue stout, this drinkable 4.8%

beer has the roasted barley backbone stout lovers

crave while not destroying your cozy guts with

high gravity. If you are looking for an exceptionally

made traditional stout, this one’s your man.

Bourbon Barrel Aged Russian Imperial

Stout – Moody Ales

Aged for six months in bourbon barrels, this one…

this one has teeth. At 11%, this Imperial is brewed

more to the English tradition with large hops to

balance the malt and make this a dangerously

drinkable behemoth.

Attack of the Cherry Stout – The

Parkside Brewery

This murky black goddess finishes with sweet sour

cherries to give it an exciting palate experience

while still being a high gravity dark beer. This is one

fruity brew you can enjoy and not worry about

toxic masculinity coming from a neighbouring

table to ruin your fun.

Mapalé Milk Stout – Andina Brewing

Company

It wouldn’t be a list without a milk stout, and

this one is an infinitely interesting brew from one

of the city’s most charming breweries. As with

all milk stouts, it features lactose so those with

allergies should steer clear lest you crop-dust the

taproom with your intestinal woe. But for the rest

of you, this is a smooth and sweet milkshake of a

beer. You’ll love it.

Oaked Stout – Faculty Brewing Co.

This surprising brew from our new favourite local

brewery is a wonderfully clean stout with crisp

oaked age to its finish. A non-aggressive 5% with a

refreshing quench to it, and they let you bring your

dog into the taproom so…gold medal as far as we

are concerned.

Chai Milk Stout – R&B Brewing

This beer is like dessert after Christmas dinner.

Sweet and milky and filling, this isn’t a beer you

would drink more than one of, but it is a great way

to cap off an evening. There is a lot going on in this

beer but it’s the Silguri Chai Spices that make it a

rare treat.

Mona – Four Winds Brewing Company

This saucy minx is a Belgian Ale aged in Port Barrels

on Cherries then blended with an assortment of

barrels which amounts to a truly crazy personality.

This beer is bold and lush and lusty, a good show

off bottle to bring to your holiday party.

Luminosity – Temporal Artisan Ales

Though not in keeping with the seasonal dark beer

theme, this is a must drink right now in the city.

Available at Luppolo as a shared space-brewing

project, Temporal brews very interesting beer; but

this one is their masterpiece. A truly fascinating

and delicious beer, this sour has bretty atmosphere

with tequila barrel character and an overall flavour

profile that will make you salivate. Seriously: go try

this beer.

Floridian Holiday IPA – Electric

Bicycle Brewing

For those of you that prefer to escape the winter

and head somewhere balmy for the holidays,

this one is for you. And much like Florida, it is a

complex experience. Tropical fruit is all over the

initial palate but then it hits you with an absolutely

numbing pepper punch. It, like Florida, is not for

everyone. But if you’ve got the stomach for it, it’s a

pretty swell vacation from the every day.

Winter Cider – Dominion Cider Co.

For those with celiac disease or those who like

their brew a little sweeter who still want to cash in

on the winter brew hoopla, we recommend this

apple pie in a bottle. Heirloom apples and a wallop

of mulled spice flavour, the flavour is balanced

by the dryness to create a cider that would be at

home in a to-go mug for a night of ice skating. But

wear a helmet: it’s 6.5%.

December 2018 13


FRIED CHICKEN CRAWL

WHERE TO FIND THE CITY’S JUICIEST BIRDS

JORDAN YEAGER

FOOD & DRINK

From time-tested staples like Church’s to artisan spots like DownLow, Vancouver is all about that funky chicken.

Vancouver is known for many things:

being rainy, being boring, and being

expensive are amongst its most

commonly reputed traits. While

Montreal and Toronto garner their

reputations on burgeoning art and

food scenes, Vancouver tends to fall

by the wayside, the last kid picked in

gym class for every game other than

hiking, skiing and wakeboarding. But

quietly, Vancouver’s food scene has

been bulking up, hitting the gym after

school. And lately, she’s been looking

thicc. It’s winter, and we need comfort

food to make it through unscathed.

Fried chicken is a go-to comfort food

classic, and when it comes with sides

like macaroni, potato salad, and fries, it

doesn’t get juicier. Here’s a roundup of

the best fried chicken Van City has to

offer. You’re welcome.

Juke Fried Chicken

182 Keefer St.

When you think of fried chicken in

Vancouver, you think of Juke. It’s the

stalwart of the city’s scene – in 2016,

co-owners Justin Tisdall and Cord Jarvie

14

along with sous chef Bryan Satterford

noticed a gap in the market and made

it their mission to fill it. There were

places to get fried chicken, sure. But

they wanted to turn frying chicken into

a craft. Since opening their flagship

location in Chinatown, they’ve also

recently expanded to include a second

space on Davie Street, affectionately

dubbed Little Juke.

Juke’s chicken stands out for several

reasons – their chicken and many

of their sides are gluten-free – but

what really sets it apart is the level of

knowledge and passion the team brings

to the table. Tisdall and Satterford

came to the venture from Chambar

and Hawksworth respectively, and

their cumulative years of experience

in the fine dining world has translated

beautifully to the world of comfort

food. At Juke, expert craftsmanship

is evident – each piece consistently

boasts the signature crunchy skin and

juicy meat you expect – nay, demand –

from a quality breast or thigh.

“We wanted a place where you could

just have really good food and have a

good time, but not have to pay a ton

of money,” says Tisdall. “Comfort food,

especially in a city that rains a lot.”

The Juke menu is extensive, with

obvious standouts being the spicy fried

chicken and the sandwich (available at

both locations), the nuoc cham ribs,

and the mac and cheese poppers (both

available at Little Juke). Whether you’re

gluten-free or not, Juke is a must-try.

DownLow Chicken Shack

905 Commercial Dr.

DownLow is another example of

restaurateurs with backgrounds in fine

dining deciding to dedicate themselves

to refining comfort food. Owners

Doug Stephen and Lindsey Mann

were the brains behind Merchants

Workshop, which until recently was

located a few blocks up Commercial

Drive from where DL stands now. In

June, they decided to focus entirely

on the Nashville hot chicken they’d

been serving as their Sunday special

at Merchants, and DownLow Chicken

Shack was born.

With spice levels including classic,

mild, medium, hot, extra hot, and

“side of milk,” it’s safe to say Stephen

and Mann’s years of commitment to

perfecting their recipe have paid off.

Bite into a “keep it light” breast, a “take

it easy” thigh or an “on a bun” sando

(fried chicken breast on a potato bun

with sweet and sour slaw, pickles, and

special sauce – careful, she’s messy)

and you’ll see why they often sell out of

product entirely.

Sides are essential here. Go for the

fries (there’s a secret menu version

topped with chicken, slaw, and pickles),

the corn bread, or the macaroni salad.

They also offer weekly specials, like

(beef) burgers on Mondays, tenders on

Tuesdays, rib sandwiches on Thursdays,

and chicken and waffles on weekends,

plus a whole secret menu you’ll have to

learn for yourself.

Phnom Penh

244 E Georgia St.

While Phnom Penh stands out on this

list as being the only place that doesn’t

specialize entirely in fried chicken, their

deep-fried chicken wings simply cannot

be excluded. If you’re embarking on

a fried chicken crawl across the city,

you would be remiss to skip out on

the dish, which has gone on to make a

questionable name for itself as “crack

wings.” Some pieces boast more meat

than others, but honestly, the heavily

peppered, lemony, crispy batter would

be enough to hold up on its own.

Douse them in the accompanying

lemon and black pepper dipping sauce

and pile on some chillies and sautéed

garlic bits, and you’ll entirely forget the

lineup you just stood in for upwards of

an hour.

The Frying Pan

505 Burrard St.

Not far from the intersection of Burrard

and Pender Street is a smattering of

food trucks, and amongst them, from

11:00 to 2:45 Monday through Friday,

is The Frying Pan. Their best seller is

the spicy chicken burger, which comes

topped with pickles, slaw, and a mayobased

sauce on a soft, squished-looking

bun that holds up to its task well. The

chicken itself is perfectly cooked and

towards the milder side in terms of

spice – their standard is medium, but

there is an option to go spicier, which

you probably should. It’s well-seasoned

and well-packaged, so it doesn’t get

messy until the very end.

The Frying Pan also has the added

task of making their sandwiches (which

range from “no heat” to “feel the burn”

and “fire starter”) easily portable, so if

you’re in between meetings and need a

quick bite, this is your best bet.

Church’s Chicken

2304 E Hastings St.

Walk into Church’s Chicken and

you might not have the highest

expectations for your forthcoming

culinary experience. Open 24 hours

a day at all of its Vancouver locations

(save for two in Richmond), Church’s

is the quintessential fast food fried

chicken joint. It doesn’t try to dress

itself up as anything other than what it

is through décor, either. And you know

what? It’s respectable that they let

the food speak for itself. With options

for regular or spicy thighs, wings and

tenders, plus sides like macaroni, fries,

onion rings and potato salad, it’s easy

to fill up here without breaking the

bank.

It’s not Vancouver’s best fried chicken,

but it’s affordable and tasty; when it’s

3:30 a.m. and the drunk munchies set in,

there’s literally no better (and no other)

option. Make sure you try the gravy.

December 2018


TOKYO SMOKE

AUSTIN TAYLOR

Grassifieds

With cannabis legalization comfortably settling

in and new or previously undercover herb

enthusiasts coming out of the woodwork, it’s

refreshing to see Tokyo Smoke rise above the

haze as much more than your average cannabis

retailer. Their objective is to change the public

perception and stigma of cannabis use. This is

accomplished through educational programs,

community engagement, design focused

products and high end retail experience far more

akin to an uptown boutique than your standard

strip mall head shop.

In 2015, father-son duo Alan & Lorne Gertner

established their first location in Toronto.

Designed from a customer first perspective, the

shop aimed at making their stores as informative

and educational as possible. This vision includes

education bays throughout each store where

visitors can casually browse informational

materials and feel comfortable asking their

knowledgeable staff any cannabis inquiry they

may have. Their stores are a space for people to

feel comfortable asking questions, taking their

time to learn what is right for them. Which

strain well help me fall asleep? What is CBD?

Can I actually take that much pot on a domestic

flight? All common questions accompanying

the recent influx in cannabis users. Tokyo

Smoke believes in changing the world through

cannabis normalization, this includes community

programs such as offsite cannabis education

sessions offered to groups and businesses.

Now open in Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto and

most recently Manitoba, their stores feature a

well curated assortment. Products range from

designer rolling papers, artisanal bongs, tech

grinders and luxury paraphernalia to graphic

T-shirts and Nalgene bottles printed with “bong

water”—all are displayed within a contemporary

and inviting retail space. Each brand and item

has been carefully selected to compliment their

hi-brow design sensibilities and pro cannabis

mantra. Featuring local brands such as A-Ok

Studios and international hemp heavyweights

Mister Green.

With so much authenticity and quality

brought into their retail space and branding,

it’s was only a matter of time until they start

producing their own cannabis. Tokyo Smoke is

set to launch a line of cannabis products in the

near future. They plan to start with dried flower

and expanding along with updated legislation to

edibles and vape pens.

Tokyo Smoke Vancouver recently opened its

doors at 150 W Hastings St. A distinct addition to

the DTES thriving cannabis community. Whether

you are eager to learn about cannabinoids or

looking for the perfect holiday gift for the design

conscious cannabis aficionado in your life, check

out Tokyo Smoke online or now in store.

Tokyo Smoke is located at 150 W Hastings St.

FEEL THE STRAIN

JAMILA POMEROY

Understanding Cannabis Strain Types

STRAIN-OF-THE-MONTH

Snow White

With the festive aroma of pine, Snow White may just be the

perfect strain for the holiday season. The indica dominant strain

will give you pain-relieving relaxation for that post holiday

shopping. This strain may give you a mild case of the munchies,

so make sure you have a tin of emergency cookies handy.

Written by Jamila Pomeroy

The categorical breakdown of cannabis plants remains the

touchstone for both growing specs and predicted effects,

ultimately helping us figure out what strain is best for our

individual needs. It’s easy to get lost or confused when picking

a strain that’s right for you. Getting to know the difference

between Indica and Sativa strains is a great place to start.

The term Indica refers to species that grow lower to the

ground, with broad leaves, shorter flowering cycles and a growth

preference leaning towards cooler climates. Indica strains often

have more calming and sedative effects, perfect for relaxing.

Indica strains increase dopamine, a neurotransmitter that helps

regulate the brain’s reward and pleasure centres. This, along with

the the often higher levels of CBD, make Indica strains great for

pain management.

The term Sativa refers to taller species with narrow leaves,

longer flowering cycles, and a growth preference leaning towards

warmer climates. Sativa strains generally provide more energetic,

invigorating, and uplifting cerebral effects; pairing well with

active tasks, social gatherings, and creative projects. Sativa

strains increase serotonin, a neurotransmitter involved in the

regulation of learning and creativity. This, along with the the

often higher levels of THC, make Sativa strains better fitted for

tasks involving focus, often paired with anti-anxiety and antidepressive

qualities.

Strains referred to as hybrids will have originated from both

indica and sativa parent plants, making them a hybrid of the two

categories. Hybrid strain effects will vary depending on whether

they are indica or sativa dominant.

December 2018 15


MUSIC

THIEVERY CORPORATION

PEELING BACK THE LAYERS OF ETERNAL COOLNESS

ANDREA NAZARIAN

POLO & PAN

EXOTIC REVERIES AND SUNNY NOSTALGIA

NOÉMIE ATTIA

The electro-lyrical duo Polo & Pan has introduced a new

tropical air to French touch, made up of exotic children guitars

and luscious rhymes and rhythms. Their first LP, Caravelle (as in

the exploring sailing ship), was released last year, introducing

the mega hit Canopée that you can hear in every good indie

coffee shop.

Beyond making a very nice soundtrack for your coffee sipping

moments, Polo & Pan’s music is the fruit of eclectic influences,

beginning by their home, the great hexagon. “Bands like Air,

Daft Punk, rocked us since we were young. We don’t have any

pretention to claim we are the new French touch generation,

but we are French and we love France and we honour it the best

we can. French is our mother tongue: we both agree that it is

sometimes hard to master but it can be very beautiful.”

The lyrics of Caravelle, resonate as poetically to francophone

ears as to English-speaking ones. “We use voice a lot like a

musical instrument, like in Cœur d’Artichaut, with the vocoder.

So it’s not important if people don’t understand what we say.”

One instantly feels the joyful aura of these tunes, homages to

their “blessed childhood” and to exotic musical gems. “We have

traveled a lot and there are themes that are dear to our hearts,

like travel, love of course, light, sun… rather positive stuff. We

always grow up with the idea that you have to suffer to be

beautiful, that pain generates ‘talented’ creation, but it’s not

true at all.”

And talent there is, as Polo & Pan draw their sounds from

classical music as well as from 70s French variété, all magically

combined in sweet electro beats. The delicious Zoom Zoom,

with its Brazilian singing and bossa nova guitar line also

16

Photo by Jen Maler

Eric Hilton and Rob Garza have been consistently independent over the course of their career.

Thievery Corporation hasn’t stopped grooving in 23

years. In 1995, Rob Garza and Eric Hilton bonded over

their mutual love of bossa nova, jazz and dub and

began producing sample-based electronic music in

Washington, D.C. Since then, the duo has blossomed

into an internationally acclaimed collective of musicians

and vocalists, selling out shows around the world and

headlining major music festivals.

Over two decades, Thievery Corporation has perfected

its signature “outernational” sound – a psychedelic,

contemporary riff on world music that never stops

sounding fresh. Blending downtempo, acid jazz and

trip-hop with vocals and rhythms from Jamaica, Brazil,

the Middle East, Africa and India, the group’s impressive

discography is full of decadent, sensuous tracks that drip

like honey.

The band seamlessly weaves understated but powerful

messages throughout their music as well. Progressive

political lyrics denouncing police brutality, racism and

oppressive trade policies are speckled throughout albums

like Radio Retaliation and The Richest Man in Babylon,

among others.

“When you listen to the music, it’s sort of like an onion

where you peel back different layers and hear different

messages. There are statements in there but they’re more

subtle,” explains Garza over the phone from Chicago,

where the band is playing a two-night stint at the House

of Blues. “We’re not trying to tell people what to think,

we’re just trying to make people think.”

Arguably the most impressive part of Thievery

illustrates their fascination for musical cultures of every corner

of this world. “We have this little challenge: each time we travel

to a country we try to bring back a musical instrument from

that country. We take it and we create keyboards and then we

play—we create a lot of our instruments.”

Half of the duo, Pan, co-created a “musical time machine”

called radiooooo.com, where you can rediscover forgotten

tunes from anywhere in the world, dreaming of and learning

about a faraway culture. “Inspiration also comes from the idea

of a culture you make up. So sometimes it is very subjective, but

it’s the idea of fantasy too, the idea of giving your interpretation

of a place where you haven’t necessarily been.” We could even

forgive the low-key exoticism in the name of their oniric naïveté.

Our neoliberal hell could definitely use some positivity

sparkles, which these Frenchies are willing to offer—who

would’ve thought, coming from the very country that invented

the concept of ennui and excels in despising their neighbours?

Polo & Pan are fond of diverse crowds and are refreshingly

friendly. “We love wandering in the crowd before our shows,

to see, to feel ‘who we’re dealing with.’ And it inspires us a lot

because in the end our show is to see people. They come to see

us but we come to see them, and they are very important in our

way of making a show, an event, a concert.”

Proudly French while honouring all cultures, poetic but

always happy, excellent musicians and eternal kids (Pan stands

for Peter of course), Polo & Pan incarnate an electronic, dreamy,

endless summer.

Polo & Pan perform on December 12 at the Imperial.

Corporation is the fact that they’ve remained independent

for the entirety of their career, never signing to a major

label and releasing exclusively under their own Eighteenth

Street Lounge Music (ESL Music) label. Thievery’s

consistent independence is a fierce testament to the

band’s collaborative, intercontinental and passion-driven

ethos.

The group is currently touring Treasures from the

Temple, a follow-up LP to their acclaimed 2017 album, The

Temple of I and I. Both releases were recorded at Jamaica’s

Geejam studios on the scenic northeastern tip of the

island. The Jamaican influence is strong on both albums,

beautifully showcasing Thievery’s unique take on the

island sound.

“We love the culture and people of Jamaica and a huge

inspiration for us is the music,” says Garza. “Jamaican

music has been a cornerstone of what we do. It has that

dubby bass that lets us create a lot of our sonic trickery

in terms of using delays and reverbs. The music creates a

lot of space for different layers and sounds to be laid on

top of it. It has similarities to Brazilian bossa nova in the

sense that it creates space, and it gives us the opportunity

to create unique textures over those deep basslines and

grooves.”

With ten studio albums under their belt and no signs

of slowing down, the outernational impact of Thievery

Corporation looks like it will only grow stronger.

Thievery Corporation perform at the Commodore Ballroom

on December 27

Polo & Pan keep summer going with their palpable positivity.

December 2018


Photo by Shimon

“We were playing all these

shows, trying to be this super

positive indie pop

band, but we were falling apart

on the inside,to be honest.

We were crumbling.”

- Ashleigh Ball (Hey Ocean!)

When Hey Ocean! released their sophomore

record It’s Easier to Be Somebody Else in 2008, they

were thrusted into the limelight as Vancouver’s

indie-pop darlings. Their happy-go-lucky, Summerbeach

vibes gave listeners a hip new artist to

groove to when they wanted to wiggle their woes

away on the carpeted bedroom dancefloor. Hey

Ocean! had a positive and upbeat aura about

them, and that’s what people adored.

Frontwoman Ashleigh Ball certainly fits this

mould. Her down-to-earth, free spirited nature

pumped our conversation with an open energy,

turning what was meant to be a 45 minute

formal interview into a two hour chill-sesh that

hopscotched from stories regarding the band, to

a wild L.S.D. influenced strip-down at her sister’s

wedding, to bizarre and outworldly topics such as

boofing, bronies, and Burning Man. Even outside

of Hey Ocean! her day-job as a voice actor for

animated franchises like Tom and Jerry, Bratz, Care

Bears, and My Little Pony is enough to crack a

smirk upon your face.

But not everything is rainbows and sunshine

all the time for anyone, no matter who you are.

The proverbial black cloud is a natural necessity

in human evolution, it’s the mud that nourishes

the blossoming flower that is our soul. We all face

valleys and pitfalls, even bands like Hey Ocean!

After a grinding several years escalating from a

local Vancouver act to a full-fledged touring and

recording artist, 2015 found the band corroding as

internal struggles began to arise.

“We broke up in a sense,” Ball explains. “We had

that dramatic sort of breakup, like a couple in a

restaurant. It was this weird fallout, but we still had

all these open ended things, like gig obligations,

so we kinda had to keep that going. There’s this

kind of face that you have to put on as a band.

No matter what, you have to go out and perform

every night pretending like everything is fine, but

deep down there’s a pain. We were playing all

these shows, trying to be this super positive indiepop

band, but we were falling apart on the inside,

to be honest. We were crumbling.”

The members of Hey Ocean! found themselves

becoming a facade, plastering porcelain smiles to

mask the thick fog of dismay. It felt as if the band

that had once brought them so much connection,

love and fulfilment, was slowly washing away.

Each member became a caricature of the public’s

expectation, their true selves getting lost in the

dust kicked up by the tires of their tour van.

“We were putting a lot of pressure on ourselves

to take on every single show that came our way,”

Ball explains. “We did Warped Tour and it’s like…

‘what the fuck were we doing on Warped Tour?’

We weren’t paying attention to what our bodies

wanted or what our minds needed. We were

getting pressured by our label at the time to record

and write new music. When you’re so exhausted

and at each other’s throats all the time, then put in

a position where you’re forced to write music, it’s

not coming out of a place of love or joy. It didn’t

feel right. It wasn’t coming from the right place.“

Time spent apart saw each member release

their own solo records. Guitarist/vocalist David

Beckingham released Just When the Light in 2016

and bassist/vocalist David Vertesi dropped Sad

Dad Cruise Ship that same year. Ball, the band’s

lead vocalist, released her solo EP, Gold In You, in

2017. Hey Ocean! spent three years apart. Now

the band has returned with a darker edge and an

evolved sound with their newest album, The Hurt

of Happiness.

The album’s title track is one of the most

interesting of the release. It’s an atmospheric

offering that, though musically angelic, lyrically

feels like a drawing of emotional desperation.

“I think it was a fitting title for us in a lot ways.”

Ball says. “That was one of those songs that we

just sat at my place and worked out. It definitely

has dark undertones. I think it’s about just being

HEY OCEAN!

Indie-Pop Darlings Walk the Edge of Hurt and Happiness

WRITTEN BY JOHNNY PAPAN

a bit broken and trying to fix things. For some

people… it hurts to try and find happiness. It’s not

an easy thing for a lot of people.” Ball continues:

“There have been bouts of depression within the

band, it hasn’t all been easy, especially when you’re

throwing yourself into this very uncertain musical

path. You’re super vulnerable, you’re putting

yourself out there time after time, but it’s all you

really know how to do, or all you really want to do.

I think [the song] definitely stems from the hurt

we were feeling and masking it with this happy-golucky

vibe that people knew and loved us by. Being

this quintessential indie-pop band that people

want us to be. It all extended from this baggage

that we were carrying and needed to clean out.”

After three years apart, three solo albums, and

three individual efforts to cut their own paths

along this topsy-turvy landscape we call the music

industry, what exactly inspired this reunion? Ball

explains:

“I think we all just felt drawn back together,”

she says. “We love each other, we have so much

history. The Daves are like brothers to me. You

become a family when you’ve been in a band

together for 10 years. I dunno, we just kinda talked

about it. We had some of these unfinished songs

and we thought ‘Hey, what would it be like if we

got together for a weekend and tried writing?’ So

the guys came over to my apartment and we just

sort of spent a weekend hanging out and smoking

weed and singing together for the first time in

three years. It was an organic experience, it felt

really good.”

Though a deviation from their old style, it’s clear

that Hey Ocean! still wants to make you dance. If

sound was the sky, the bright sun of Hey Ocean!

has set, and their audio waves have turned into a

celestial roof of blackened-blue complemented

by sprinkles of stars and a disco-ball moon.

There were no pressures from labels, no touring

obligations, no need to wear a mask. It’s music

they wanted to make, a direct representation of

who they are as they stand in this moment in time.

The album may be different, but it’s honest. And

that’s what’s most beautiful about The Hurt of

Happiness.

Ball concludes: “You have to kinda recreate

yourself when you’re trying to make art and trying

to be a band. You can’t just write the same thing all

the time or always try to be this entity that people

think you are. You have to shake things up a bit

and challenge people. I think I’m ready to do more

of that. I’m more comfortable in my skin, we’re less

worried about being a certain thing people expect

us to be.”

Hey Ocean! play the Vogue Theatre (Vancouver) on

December 8.

December 2018 17


MUSIC

THE PRETTYS

A FEAST OF SNACKS FOR THE SENSES

COLE YOUNG

Photo by Shimon

The Prettys make smart and sensible garage rock that has taken on a flavour of its own on their latest release, Tapas.

The five hour interview/feast of tapas started with

an interpretive dance to Enya, ended with a drunken

listening party and in between The Prettys touched

on everything from flesh eating disease, YTV, death,

recent dreams of cyborg friends, their writing process

and their obsession with the moon.

The Prettys’ third LP, Tapas, is an extraordinarily

well-crafted garage rock album where the three

songwriters — Code Andrusko, Josh Gettien and Pierce

Kingan — blend their styles perfectly. However, when

asked about the name of the new album, they all split

apart with their own explanations.

“I went to rehab a year ago and we were talking

about breaking up the band. Matty [Reed] had just

left and we were all devastated, and the only thing

that kept me sane was that these guys told me when

I got out we’d all go for tapas,” Kingan says. Andrusko

is quick to mention that it also goes well with the

theme of their previous album, Soirée. “It’s like a

bunch of tasty snacks like if you go out drinking, you

have snacks here and there so you can keep drinking,”

he says. Meanwhile, Gatien yells something about

drinking all night. Drummer Luke Basso adds that he

thought it was because there’s three songwriters so it’s

like a potluck of all of their songs.

Kingan explains that “Leishmaniasis,” one of the

many standout songs on the album, is a disease caused

by parasites and that symptoms usually include skin

ulcers. “Ya it spreads through your mucus,” he says

between silly Siri searches and bites of melted brie on

baguette.

“What I like about that song is that it’s a flesh

eating disease and you’re comparing it to being in

love,” Andrusko says right before he starts singing the

line, “It feels just like what you’re doing to me, my

baby.”

Another top song, “Nite Creeper,” sounds like what

you’d listen to while driving slowly in the rain through

downtown in some foreign city right after a fight with

a loved one. The sounds embody the feeling of being

alone while surrounded by people. The repeated

lyric, “It’s getting pretty hard on me,” sung as the song

breaks down, drains the energy necessary for optimism

out of you while at the same time persisting that you

don’t stop, giving the listener a strangely dark sense of

motivation.

The Prettys’ albums all have that magic touch that

Felix Fung (Little Red Sounds) puts on everything he

works on. The Prettys all express similar recollections

of grinding for hours in the studio with Fung while he

unapologetically pushes each member to play their

absolute best. They describe times where it can be a

heated argument over which direction a song will take

in the studio, but once it’s laid down and you’re in the

other room sharing a smoke, you’re best buddies again.

“During the first album I broke down one day and

was like, ‘You’re ruining my fucking song!’ and then

a week later he was calling me saying ‘I need you to

come do back up vocals for this other band because I

really like your voice,’” says Gatien between swigs of his

double bottle of Carlo Rossi. Kingan then introduces

the idea that Fung should sells shirts that say “I

survived recording at LRS.”

Despite the jokes, there’s a clear reason these boys

keep going back to the studio and their albums keep

coming out sounding great. If you’re going to write

songs as good as they do, you want someone as

talented as Felix Fung to be recording and producing

them.

The Prettys have three talented songwriters who all

bring their own style to the table by writing the initial

songs by themselves, then bringing them to the band

for “The Prettys to put their treatment on them,” as

Andrusko says. “I usually write songs about 15 years

in advance,” jokes Gatien. In reality though, the riff for

“Felicia,” the one track off Tapas that ex-saxophonist

Matty Reed makes an appearance on, is actually 13

years old. The Prettys may not drink the oldest, most

expensive wines but they do patiently let their songs

develop and mature until they’re perfectly delicious

and intoxicating.

The Prettys celebrate the release of Tapas at Red Gate on

December 22.

18

December 2018


RICH HOPE

ROCK ‘N’ ROLL TROUBADOUR GOES ALL IN

CONOR FINLAY

DID YOU DIE

RIDING THE ROYAL UNICORN

MADDY CRISTALL

MUSIC

SMALL TOWN ARTILLERY

KEEPING THE MAGIC CLOSE TO HOME

MADDY CRISTALL

Photo by Christopher Edmonstone

Rich Hope is all yours if you want him.

Plenty of heart and soul to go around, Small Town Artillery put it all on the line.

Vancouver’s own Small Town Artillery recently

released their third album, Don’t Talk Away

the Magic, and it’s arguably their best yet. The

album was recorded at Bluelight Studios, it is

an poignant body of work made of “pure heart

and soil” as lead singer Tom eloquently puts it.

The band is compiled of band leader Tom Van

Deursen, a man with a powerful presence and

a soft soul. He ends most of his performances

topless, dripping with sweat with his eyes closed

thanking the audience who are all completely

melted from what they just witnessed. His

dear friend and brother Derek is the band’s

talented drummer often seen who essentially

For more than 20 years, Vancouver based Rich

Hope has been a faithful ambassador to a genre

that sounds best when kept raw. A celebrated

fixture in the live scene, I’m All Yours is his

Hope’s first release since 2009’s Is Gonna Whip

It On Ya, and the time between records allowed

the songs ample time to gestate.

“We took our time with the recording, I

wanted it to sound visceral,” Hope says of the

evolution. He is joined by longtime members,

bassist Erik Nielsen and drummer Adrian Mack,

and new addition, Matt Kelly on keyboards. The

band shared a collaborative spirit in the studio

during late night sessions with producer Felix

Fung, as several new song ideas were fleshed out

on the fly and quickly captured.

“It was a more collaborative piece than I’ve

ever done,” Hope says. “The other guys in the

band definitely contributed to the songs and

we wanted to write things when we were most

excited about them, because that’s when they’re

the most fun to play.”

That enthusiasm is evident throughout the

album, with dynamic twists and turns that

play out like an encyclopedic lesson plan in

what made guitar driven music from past eras

so exciting. Opener, “It Come Alive,” starts

the album with blazing guitar and vocals that

Photo by Kayla Mcinnis

drips with passion and talent. Their bassist is

the highly skilled Carson Webber who also

plays in Year of the Wolf and The Long War, the

three bands often tour together which is highly

convenient and likely tiring for Webber. They

always tour with their high octane horn section

which consists of the gifted Nathan Barrett

and Mike Kayser. Lastly, Ashley Robyn provides

harmonious back up vocals with her distinctive

and roaring voice.

Small Town Artillery have received some

notable accolades since they formed in 2014

including being named top 100 bands in CBC’s

Searchlight (2018). They are now signed with

perfectly sets the stage for the kind of mood

to follow. For the rest of the album, Hope and

co. know their terrain well, playfully tearing up

the floorboards of many iconic styles, delving

into the sonic worlds of RnB, country, garage

and all shades in between. The bluesy and dark

“La Iguana” features a dusty guitar tone with

bursts of horns, weaving a hypnotic groove

for Hope to croon over. “Golden Clouds” pays

a catchy homage to the original track by the

Flamin’ Groovies with a healthy dose of twang.

“Creepstone” marries a driving bass and drum

beat with reverb soaked bursts of guitar and

sultry vocals. A notable highlight and personal

favourite for Hope is “Heartbreaker.”

“I sat on it and one day I thought I might give

up on it, but I’m really happy with how it turned

out,” he says. Featuring pedal steel guitar by

Scott Smith and a long sustained outro jam that

pulls all the right stops, “Heartbreaker” is a pitchperfect

ending to an album that stays in a solid

gear from beginning to end, and a consistent

showcase of Hope’s versatility and mastery

of the genre. I’m All Yours is a not so gentle

reminder that rock ‘n’ roll is alive and well.

Rich Hope performs on Dec. 15 at the Rickshaw

Theatre.

JumpAttack! Records and just came back from

an extensive tour through small town B.C

including Kaslo, where the Van Deursens are

originally from. Their final show of the tour was

at the jam packed Imperial, it was brimming

with a blown away audience.

Tom describes Don’t Talk Away the Magic

as the ‘most emotional album I have ever

made.’ This is apparent in the autobiographical

lyrics that are rich with depth and honesty.

Tom further explains ‘I was going through

heartbreak at the time and put my entire soul

into this record.’ The fervent lyrical content

of the record is beautifully paired with its rich

sonic landscape. The musicality of the band is

refined, they have all played music the majority

of their lives which is apparent in their music.

Their performances are sweaty and boisterous

examples of how much fun music is and should

be. Tom explains ‘ I want our shows to have

layers, or less layers (in terms of clothing). Small

Town Artillery certainly does have layers, they

are a dense lasagne of skilled musicality and

emotional generosity. Don’t Talk Away the

Magic is available now; it is one of those turn off

your phone, shut the blinds and close your eyes

kind of records.

Small Town Artillery perform on December 14 at

The Rio Theatre.

Royal Unicorn is the highly anticipated fourth album

from Victoria’s Did You Die. The album is a compelling

body of work that showcases the band’s relentless talent.

The vocals of both frontman Richie Alexander and longtime

singer/songwriter Katherine Kovna are reminiscent

of shoegaze heavyweights such as My Bloody Valentine,

Slowdive and Ride. The vast scope of the music coupled

with the pop-sensibilities of Dinosaur Jr make for an

album that is familiar but fresh at the same time time.

Did You Die are more at home with the Philly bands

of today (Nothing, Spirit of the Beehive) than their

Canadian west coast contemporaries, and that can be

boiled down to one thing: dynamics. It is to this end

that the influence of Vancouver producer Felix Fung’s

production can not go unnoticed. He is completely in

his wheelhouse here. Alexander’s songwriting is brought

to life with Fung’s production from every vocal layer

to the perpetual guitar ambience to every bass drone

that devolves into rhythmic chaos. Royal Unicorn took

two years and came with a vast array of unforeseen

circumstances.

“The process was epic,” Alexander says. “We tracked

everything with Jordan Koop at his studio in Gabriola,

BC. Some of us lost our jobs and I broke my arm during

the sessions. We enlisted Felix Fung who came to our

house to re-track guitars and drums, and then re-mix

the whole album at his studio in New West.”

As Bruce Cockburn says, “Nothing worth having

comes without some kind of fight.” This record bleeds

with complexity and emotional endurance. The pace

of the album brings about a sense of urgency to the

listener, but ultimately makes you understand the

uneasiness, like when you realise something is wrong but

you’ve been oblivious the whole time.

Alexander explained he named the album this

because “Royal Unicorn was the name of the old

Fortune Sound Club in Vancouver. One of my favourite

places to see or play shows back in the day.”

The album artwork was created by Victoria artist

Lyle Shutlz. You can almost hear the album cover, it’s a

dark and dreamy painting which pairs perfectly with the

nature of the band. Did You Die just returned from an

album release tour out east. Alexander describes their

touring experience positively.

“What makes it work is that everyone is very adult

and respectful of each other’s space. We also love the

same music, making it really easy in the van for what to

put on.”

Royal Unicorn is a lived in album that was well worth

the struggle of making it.

Did You Die perform Dec. 7 at Static Jupiter (Vancouver).

Royal Unicorn is now available through all streaming

platforms.

December 2018 19


Best of 2018

Album • Song • Live Show • Movie • Moment

Darrole Palmer

Live Editor

BEST ALBUM

Mac Miller - Swimming

If you were like me, you were

convinced Mac was still Best Day

Ever Mac Miller, but Swimming

displays Mac’s maturity and

willingness to explore a variety of

genres in an extremely emotional

and introspective album. Swimming

will forever be criminally underrated

and should have been the beginning

of something special in his career,

not the ending. (Runners up: The

Weeknd - My Darkest Melancholy,

Travis Scott - Astroworld)

BEST SONG

Sheck Wes - “Mo Bamba

Travis Scott’s protégé, Sheck Wes’s

debut single has been one of the

most catchy, fun songs of the year.

What other songs have made floors

collapse this year?

BEST LIVE SHOW

Jorja Smith - April 28 @ the

Biltmore

Playing a venue that was way too

small for this rising star made the

English singer’s Vancouver show feel

very intimate and special. Won’t

ever see her in a venue that small

again but will remember it forever.

BEST MOVIE

Sorry to Bother You

In a time where every fucking movie

is a remake, Sorry to Bother You

is an original yet hilarious satirical

view on capitalism, while taking on

a wide range of issues from race,

gender and entertainment.

BEST MOMENT

Being in School. After years of

dealing with the stress and abuse

of the restaurant industry, I quit

and went to school for graphic

design. Becoming more than just

a photographer and starting my

creative career has got me excited

for 2019 and beyond.

Maddy Cristall

Local Music Editor

BEST ALBUM

Noname - Room 25

Noname’s follow up to her

groundbreaking debut album,

Telefone, is a fully realized body of

work. Noname seamlessly combines

vulnerable spoken word, sultry bars

and complex musicality. (Runners

Up: Kali Uchis- “Isolation”, J Mascis-

Elastic Days)

BEST SONG

Kali Uchis (ft. Tyler the Creator

and Bootsy Collins) - “After the

Storm”

This single from Uchis’

imcomparable debut, Isolation, is

instantaneously addictive and an

excellent introduction of the young

singer into the world. It features

hip-hop marvel Tyler the Creator,

who adds a raspy edge, and funk

legend Bootsy Collins, who elevates

the track into a timeless opus.

BEST LIVE SHOW

Broken Social Scene - August 3 @

Pickathon

Broken Social Scene performed

a spectacular set at the beautiful

Woods Stage to a visibly emotional

audience. Strangers were hugging,

no phones were out, it was as if

time stood still and I will never

forget that concert.

BEST MOVIE

A Stupid and Futile Gesture

The David Wain portrayal of

National Lampoon’s co-founder

Doug Kenny (played by Will Forte)

is as funny as it is heartbreaking.

The creative biopic is an untold

story, told very well.

BEST MOMENT

Travelling to Mexico City for my

30th birthday. I fell in love with the

eclectic and bustling city draped

in art.

Mat Wilkins

Social Media Editor

BEST ALBUM

Yves Tumor: Safe in the Hands of

Love:

This record has a little bit for

everyone. There are some pop

bangers lurking within like

“Lifetime,” but other songs like

“Hope in Suffering” are colossal,

distorted nightmares. I laughed, I

cried, I enjoyed every single glorious

second of this record’s catchy, often

spooky contents. (Serpentwithfeet

– Soil, Low - Double Negative)

BEST SONG

Jeremy Dutcher – “Mehcinut”

Mehcinut is a recreation of a

traditional song by the Wolastoq

First Nation. The song is full to the

brim of emotion, and even cuts out

in the middle while a sample of the

original wax cylinder recording from

1907 plays overtop.

BEST LIVE SHOW:

Amen Dunes – August 23 @

Imperial

BEST MOVIE

Hereditary

This movie is terrifying! But at the

same time is also a considered

exploration of emotions. So you get

to think critically about the human

condition while you piss your pants!

BEST MOMENT

Playing our first show at the ANZA

club with my band Watersports

over the summer. It was our first

gig as a four piece and everyone

loved it!

Graeme Wiggins

Comedy Editor

BEST ALBUM

Low - Double Negative

If you told me at the beginning of

the year that Low would release

my favourite album, I’d have been

shocked but here it is. It’s probably

cliché at this point to talk about

how it embodies the apocalyptic

vibe of the times, but that really

does feel right. Its noisy beauty just

seems right. Indie rock’s not dead.

(Runners up: IDLES – Joy As An Act

of Resistant, Jpegmafia - Veteran)

BEST SONG

Deafheaven – “Honeycomb”

Hipster black metal with poppy

hooks and Dinosaur Jr. inspired

guitar solos. It’s wonderful, super

long and probably a weird choice

for best song, but I listened to it

more than anything else. Every

listen is mini-catharsis. (Could also

have chosen “Rage Against the

Miami Sound Machine” by NEEDS

but since I appear very briefly in

the video I didn’t want to appear

biased.)

BEST LIVE SHOW

Phoebe Bridgers - April 25 @ The

Cobalt

This was my last show at the Cobalt

and Phoebe Bridgers’ music makes

me cry. Won’t lie, I cried when

“Funeral” played. Added bonus of a

Japandroids cover.

BEST MOVIE

Sorry To Bother You

Boots Riley made a surreal leftist

dark future comedy. If that doesn’t

sell you, I’m not sure what to say. It

strikes close to home as I work in a

call centre.

Jashua Grafstein

Web Editor

BEST ALBUM

Nine Inch Nails - Bad Witch

Trent Reznor channeling David

Bowie on “God Break Down the

Door.” (Runners up: The Black

Queen - Infinite Games, A Perfect

Circle - Eat the Elephant)

BEST SONG

The Aces - “Last One”

Discovered this band opening up for

COIN at the Biltmore, and DAMN

these girls can rock. They recorded

this single in both English and

Spanish, I can’t decide which version

I like more!

BEST LIVE SHOW

Desert Daze Caravan (DIIV)- May

12 @ Commodore Ballroom

DIIV was the middle band of the

night. I had never heard their music

before the show, but seeing them

live blew my mind. I now listen to

them every day.

BEST MOVIE

CLIMAX

Strap in for another Gaspar Noe’s

psychedelic thriller. This movie

made me feel like I was on drugs, I

got so nauseous during one of the

violent scenes that I had to step out

of the theatre for some water. But I

went right back in for more. I need

to see this film again.

BEST MOMENT

Stepping into AKhob, James Turrell

light installation in Las Vegas .

20

December 2018


Yasmine Shemesh

City Editor

BEST ALBUM

Prince - Piano and A Microphone

(1983)

It’s still hard to believe Prince is

gone. This album was discovered as

a cassette tape at his Paisley Park

estate and is his first posthumous

release. It’s a one-take recording of

both released and unreleased songs,

just him and his piano, providing a

rare peek into the mind of a genius.

(Runners up: Hanson - String

Theory, Leon Bridges - Good Thing)

BEST SONG

Hanson - “Reaching for the Sky

(Part 1)”

I always thought Hanson’s

harmonies would be perfectly

accompanied by a symphony

orchestra. This year, my favourite

band ever released an album that

did just that. The arrangements

on this particular song are simple

yet wonderfully grand, led by

piano and supported by swelling

strings. Taylor’s voice is hauntingly

beautiful, as he sings about chasing

after dreams. “Part 2” is just as

poignant.

BEST LIVE SHOW

John Fogerty - July 15 @

Abbotsford Centre

Fogerty’s voice hasn’t lost a bit of its

famous rasp and, damn, can he still

play a guitar. He played all the CCR

hits with sincere joy and passion,

and even had a New Orleans-style

big brass band blast through the

aisles. It was an amazing show in the

purest way.

BEST MOVIE

Won’t You Be My Neighbor

I haven’t watched many new movies

this year, but this one stands out.

I think most of us have some sort

of childhood memory associated

with Mr. Rogers, and it was both

compelling and deeply moving to

learn more about the kind man who

we all thought we knew.

BEST MOMENT

Swimming in cenotes in Mexico

with my love.

Glenn Alderson

Editor-in-Chief

BEST ALBUM

Daughters – You Won’t Get What

You Want

This noisey af band embraces

the nuances of what a punishing

hardcore band should sound like.

Be afraid, but face your fears and

you just might get what you want.

(Runners up: Pusha T – Daytona,

Amen Dunes - Freedom)

BEST SONG

Ought – “These Three Things”

Three things. What are they? I don’t

know, you decide. Everyone has

needs. These “post-punks” from

Montreal have a sound that is

delectably nuanced and this track

was my 2018 anthem.

BEST LIVE SHOW

Idles – October 4 @ Rickshaw

Theatre

Idles are a band that needs to exist

right now and they played their

Vancouver debut with purpose,

living up to all the hype. Socially

conscious punk rock out of Bristol,

if you have not fucked with this

band yet please start.

BEST MOVIE

BlacKkKlansman

Since this was a Spike Lee “joint”

and marijuana is now legal in

Canada, I naturally pressured myself

to eat a weed candy before I put this

on and it was amazing. From what I

remember, this movie hits hard on

many levels with the right amount

of irony at play. There was this one

dance scene that really stuck with

me that diffused such a terrible

awkward moment I would never

otherwise be able to experience as

a white male, but I really felt it at

that moment. Or maybe it was just

the candy.

BEST MOMENT

I’ve never been one for drinking

games but my bandmates and I

were on tour on the east coast and I

learned how to play hockey in a way

I’ve never known before one night

in an abandoned Ocean City, MD

after eating a pile of crabs.

Johnny Papan

The Skinny Editor

BEST ALBUM

Arctic Monkeys - Tranquility Base

Hotel and Casino

Arctic Monkeys have a charming

ability to constantly evolve.

Tranquility Base Hotel + Casino

feels ahead of its time, blending

sounds of the distant past with a

futuristic atmosphere. The lyrical

storytelling is also sharp, unique

and inspires clear imagination of an

otherworldly place full of interesting

characters. (Runners Up: Ministry -

Amerikkkant, Windhand - Eternal

Return)

BEST SONG

Windhand - “Grey Garden”

Produced by Jack Endino, the man

most famous for helping create

“grunge rock,” “Grey Garden” is a

droningly heavy tune that mixes

psychedelia with doom metal.

Windhand is one of the heaviest

clean-vocal female-fronted groups

in the market. The music video for

this song is like a terrifying acid trip.

BEST SHOW

Courtney Barnett - October 10 @

the Vogue Theatre

Courtney Barnett seduced her

audience with a plethora of

sounds and lighting schemes that

played with your emotions. Things

jumped from deadpan-depressive

to manically aggressive, utilizing a

Cobain-esque stage presence atop

melodramatic pop-tunes with

guitar-tones far grittier than what

can be found in her recordings.

BEST MOVIE

Drew Michael

Drew Michael’s HBO debut blurs

the line between stand-up comedy

and experimental art film. We

witness a dramatized relationship

unravel, the story is intercut with

Michael offering comedic bits of

extremely dark humour in the

form of expressive monologues.

No audience, just Drew in an

empty room introspectively doing

his thought-provoking routine as

the main-story progresses. It’s a

hilarious, enthralling, unique piece

that is just as much a comedy

special as it is alluring cinema.

BEST MOMENT

Getting a text message from Zakk

Wylde

BEST MOMENT

Someone close to me worked up

the courage to come out, and it’s

wonderful seeing them blossom

fully into who they were meant to

be.

Hogan Short

Film Editor

BEST ALBUM

Travis Scott - Astroworld

This album just slaps SO hard. IT’S

LIT! (Runners up: Lykke Li - So Sad,

So Sexy, Pusha T - Daytona)

BEST SONG

J.I.D. - “Off Deez” ft. J. Cole)

This is maybe J. Cole’s best verse

ever on maybe the best rap album

of 2018, with maybe the best album

cover of 2018, covered by the face

of one of the hottest guys of all time

(Leo) so of course I picked this.

BEST LIVE SHOW

Beach House - August 12 @ The

Orpheum

I love Beach House but had never

seen them. Hearing their melodic

classics with their new loud sound

in a venue like the Orpheum was

a fantastic concert in a year of

fantastic concerts.

BEST MOVIE

Boy Erased

This was a tough choice. There

were great indie films like Beast,

Hereditary and Mandy. At TIFF,

films like First Man and Widows

blew me away. I think it was Joel

Edgerton’s skill at taking a story

that could have been so easily

black and white and painting each

character with complexities and

nuance that led me pick this film.

Boy Erased is the true story of a

young man forced into conversion

therapy and his relationship with

his devout family. This is a poignant,

important film that is also helping

the movement to close these evil

and outdated facilities forever.

BEST MOMENT

At TIFF when Ryan Gosling stepped

out of the car and I was like three

feet away from him for 5.7 seconds.

Jordan Yeager

Managing Editor Jamila Pomeroy

Grassifieds Editor

BEST ALBUM

Brockhampton – Iridescence

The members of self-proclaimed

boy band Brockhampton put in

work to get where they are, having

dropped four full-length albums

since early 2017. Iridescence is bold

and in-your-face, with moments of

sweetness, romance, and clarity, and

the unabashed lyrics about being

gay don’t hurt either. (Runners up:

Mac Miller – Swimming, Anderson

.Paak – Oxnard)

BEST SONG

Aminé - “Campfire” (ft. Injury

Reserve)

It’s upbeat and fun, with clever lyrics

delivered in a charming deadpan.

Plus, the music video includes a

debate on the pronunciation of

“rural.” What more could you a?

BEST LIVE SHOW

Jorja Smith – April 28 @ Biltmore

Cabaret

Jorja Smith is a goddess, and

no matter where she plays the

experience is going to be an

ethereal one. But to see her at

such an intimate venue where she

was standing just feet away from

the small crowd and her voice

completely filled the space, was a

once-in-a-lifetime experience that

I’ll never forget. Plus, she covered

Frank Ocean’s “Lost,” so…

BEST MOVIE

Sorry to Bother You

I always love a critique of capitalism,

and Sorry to Bother You does this

in a way that also comments on

race, class and morality. All of this is

wrapped up in completely absurd,

over-the-top scenarios that blur the

lines between the real world and

some dystopian (very near) future,

with a nice little comedic cherry

on top.

BEST MOMENT

It’s not so much one moment, but

2018 introduced me to a handful

of new people that have become

some of the most important in

my life. Super grateful for all of my

wonderful friends, so thanks for

that, 2018.

BEST ALBUM

Ought - Room Inside The World

Ought draw nostalgic comfort from

an uncertain era with moments

of ’80s new wave, the darkness of

the Cure and a voice reminiscent

of an early Morrissey. I fell in love

with the sudden tempo changes,

catchy melodies and poetic lyrics.

(Honorable mentions: Kamasi

Washington - Heaven and Earth,

Unknown Mortal Orchestra - Sex

& Food)

BEST SONG

Ought - “Disaffectation”

BEST LIVE SHOW

Beach House - August 12 @

Orpheum Theatre

I’m unsure if it was the psychedelic

visuals, Victoria Legrand’s dreamy

voice or the fact I hadn’t seen them

since peering through the fence at

15 after my fake ID was rejected.

BEST MOVIE

What You Gonna Do When the

World’s On Fire?

The story of a community of black

people in the American South

during the summer 2017, when a

string of brutal killings of black men

sent shockwaves throughout the

country. It highlighted the American

black experience, with rawness I’ve

never seen, really showing me how

different my experience as a mixedrace

black woman in Canada is. I

was left speechless, moved by the

black and white film cinematics and

moved by the powerful storytelling.

BEST MOMENT

Nothing compares to interviewing

my longtime idol and style icon,

Dita Von Teese. We were supposed

to only have 15 minutes for the

interview, and it turned into nearly

an hour of us talking about vintage

fashion, old cars and music. People

often say you should never meet

your idols for fear of being let down,

but after speaking with Dita my

respect for what she has done as a

business worman only increased.

That is an interview I know I will

cherish for my whole life.

December 2018 21


MUSIC

CALPURNIA

RIDING THE NEW NEW INDIE WAVE

ADAM DEANE

Photo by Pooneh Ghana

Calpurnia take their required reading list from English class to heart.

Chances are, if you attended post-secondary on this continent, this

Vancouver 4-piece’s moniker will ring a tiny bell in the back of the

“file it under never” corner of your brain. Calpurnia, was not only the

Finches’ housekeeper in Harper Lee’s, To Kill A Mockingbird -- she

was also the woman who bridged the race-gap in their town, created

a positive role-model for Scout and Jem and basically held sh*t down

in a household that would have otherwise folded, leaving one to

question what would have become of your required reading list?

For Vancouver teens, Finn Wolfhard (lead vocals), Malcolm Craig

(drums), Ayla Tesler-Mabe (lead guitar) and Jack Anderson (bass),

Calpurnia is the name of their rather successful Indie-band and

Scout is the name of their smash EP produced by Cadien Lake James

(Twin Peaks), released earlier this year on Royal Mountain Records.

If the literary references are any indication that this band set out to

lead by example, they’ve done just that thus far.

BeatRoute hooked the quartet in London at the height of their

first headlining tour, wondering how a bunch of teens handle the

success and positive world-wide reception while continuing to live

out a normal adolescence. We asked what advice they have for a

younger generation of budding musicians. Of course, they answered

round-table, which was both adorable and efficient. Why can’t all

bands be that way?

“I think the music industry is getting younger,” Wolfhard (of

Stranger Things fame) says. “We’re glad that we are a part of that

culture, of young people doing it themselves. You shouldn’t be afraid

of putting yourself out there if you’re young and want to play music.

It’s very easy for someone to put down a young band. There are

other people out there that you’ll meet who will support you.”

Guitar prodigy Tesler-Mabe chimes in, “Try never to lose sight

of why you love music in the first place. If you’re doing it out of

genuine love and passion and you find yourself getting lost in other’s

opinions, grounding yourself is important.”

Sound advice from a group that just sold out the Vogue Theatre

in Vancouver for night one of their two-night hometown tour stop.

They made it clear they want everyone at their shows.

“The way that we look, you’ll assume you’re just going to drop off

your kid and leave. Even if you’re not a fan, come in and dance. We

live in a weird world now and you can only have so many days where

you can turn your brain off and have fun. We hope everyone comes.”

Wolfhard says.

Teenagers or not, it’s evident these four have their heads on

straight and they know exactly where they are heading. All of them

took a few minutes to compliment their parents towards the end

of their influence-musings. They’re proving one show at a time that

age is certainly not a factor in the amount of change you can create

in this world. Speaking with them certainly makes you question the

choices you made as a teenager. Calipurnia are taking advantage of

every opportunity, displaying their talents for whoever will listen

with an open-mind and doing wonderful charitable work in the

process. If you’re into beach-rock, alternative indie-rock, or you

could use a few smiles supporting a group of teens you wish were

your kids don’t miss this one.

Calipurnia perform at the Vogue Theatre December 21 and 22.

22

December 2018


IGNITE

SETTING FIRE TO THE AMERICAN DREAM

STEPAN SOROKA

Hungarian frontman Zoli Teglas talks socio-economic crisis and his stints with some of music’s biggest acts.

Zoli Teglas is not your average punk rock singer.

In a career spanning a quarter century, beginning

with the formation of melodic hardcore band

Ignite in 1993, Teglas has cemented himself as

one of the genre’s most versatile and respected

vocalists thanks to a voice that can be as aggressive

as it is operatic.

“I’m just lucky,” the singer explains over the

phone from his native Hungary, saying he never

took formal vocal lessons. “I was born with my

vocal cords close together.”

Throughout the years, Teglas’ extraordinary

abilities did not go unnoticed. The singer was

chosen to fill in for some of punk rock’s most

heavy-hitting bands, including a stint with the

post-Danzig era Misfits and a five-year run

with Pennywise, with whom he recorded the

album All or Nothing. Teglas even rose out of

the underground to tour with Velvet Revolver,

and recorded vocals with Lemmy Kilmeister on

Motorhead’s Kiss of Death album. When Stone

Temple Pilots offered him an audition, Teglas

jumped at the opportunity, and though he says he

nailed the vocal parts, the band was thrown off by

his demeanor.

“They called me and said, ‘Dude, you sang the

best out of anyone but you look like you want

to beat someone up on stage.’” A punk rocker at

heart, Teglas’ hardcore roots shone too strongly for

the radio-friendly rock band.

“The only thing I could ever really relate to

was punk rock,” Teglas says. “Growing up, I was a

pure-blooded Hungarian, although I was raised in

America. I had an accent, I played water polo. I was

always picked on, always beat up, so I got kind of

tough and kind of mean.”

Searching for a place to belong, Teglas was

absorbed by the burgeoning Orange County

hardcore punk scene of the late 1980s.

“I would feel calm at punk shows, while in

school in America I would get anxiety.”

Finding acceptance among outcasts, Teglas

would go on to release five full-length albums with

Ignite, the most recent being 2016’s A War Against

You. And while Ignite has always produced music

with strong socio-political overtones, delivering a

message of change has never been more important

than it is now.

“It’s a great country,” he says of the USA. “But

we as Americans are flushing it down the fucking

toilet.”

A dramatic rise in racist sentiment, emboldened

by the sitting president and his entourage, is

just one of the symptoms of a nation in decline,

according to Teglas. And as the child of immigrants

himself, he has no tolerance for the xenophobic

zeitgeist that is gripping his country.

“We destabilize all these countries in South

America, and people come up to try to get

away from it. They’re walking thousands of

miles because their backs are on fire from the

violence that we created. Let’s talk about the real

problem – our foreign policy.” Its this kind of lucid

introspection, which Teglas applies generously to

his lyrics, that make Ignite as relevant a band now

as they have ever been.

Not content to simply sing about the world’s

problems, Teglas is also a prolific activist,

performing frontline work with the Sea Shepherd

Conservation Society, the Pelican Rescue Team,

The Beagle Freedom Project and others, including

an undercover sting operation in 2010 that shut

down an LA-area restaurant serving endangered

whale meat.

“Punk rock is a social, political and

environmental movement set to music,” he says.

“It has to stay that way or it will lose all of its

meaning.”

Ignite plays the Biltmore Cabaret on December 12.

REDD KROSS

KEEPING THEIR INDIVIDUAL AESTHETIC ALIVE 40 YEARS LATER

KARINA ESPINOSA

Redd Kross is one of the greatest underrated

rock bands to come out of California. Formed by

brothers Jeff and Steven Shane McDonald (when

they were 15 and 11, respectively), the band

started out in the first wave of the Los Angeles

punk scene and got their first gig opening for

Black Flag at a middle-school party. Ever since,

the band has made music on its own terms,

combining the best elements of punk, glam rock

and ’60s power rock. In their refusal to bend to

the mainstream, Redd Kross has become one

of America’s most enduring and significant pop

rock groups.

Starting in December, the band will embark

on a West Coast and Southwest tour to promote

two re-releases on Merge Records: an early EP of

cover songs, Teen Babes from Monsanto (1984),

and a 2016 collection of rarities entitled Hot

Issue. Both albums are interesting in that they

lay the groundwork for the band’s later records.

From their unique take on hardcore on Born

Innocent (1982) to the power pop masterwork

Show World (1997), the band’s wide-ranging

catalogue is chock full of astute references.

Bassist Steve McDonald is especially enthusiastic

to revisit these Redd Kross staples with the

band’s songwriter, Jeff.

Jeff, whom McDonald affectionately calls

his “partner all along the way,” always had a

knack for mystifying his younger brother. In

the early ‘80s, at a time when hard-core punks

in California sported crew cuts, the elder

McDonald opted to grow out his hair. Years later

when the band received a cease-and-desist from

the International Red Cross, Jeff decided to add

the extra “D” in “Redd Kross” without much

of an explanation. “He ensured that our name

would be spelt incorrectly at least 60 per cent

of the time throughout our career,” McDonald

jokes.

As teenagers in Hawthorne, the pressure to

have rigidly codified taste in music never fazed

the McDonald brothers. The two listened to an

array of genres, but McDonald stresses that he

and Jeff “liked them all on the same level.” While

they dug mainstream teenage music like Led

Zeppelin and KISS, they listened to Patti Smith

and the Ramones with as much frequency.

Redd Kross’ influences are clear, and their

commitment to a hooky yet hard-edged sound

has been unwavering. And still, the band’s music

continues to sound fresh and new. The band is

currently working on an album due next year,

which will be their latest collection of new songs

since 2012’s Researching the Blues. McDonald

doesn’t offer too many details, but it’s clear that

the album will maintain the essential, innocent

fun that marked the band’s previous work.

“I’d describe it as a bit of a party album. I don’t

want to get too political, but at a time like this

I think it’s exactly what people really need,” he

says. “We’ve constantly changed over the years,

so you can’t say that it’ll sound very Neurotica

or very Third Eye. To me, it just feels like a great

Redd Kross record.”

If the past four decades were any indication,

we couldn’t expect anything less.

Redd Kross will perform at the Biltmore Cabaret

(Vancouver) on December 15.

Redd Kross’ commitment to a hooky yet hard-edged sound has been unwavering.

December 2018 23


Best of 2018 | Top 25 Local Releases

By Glenn Alderson, Lyndon Chiang, Esmée Colbourne, Heath Fenton, Keir Nicoll, Jennie Orton, Mitch Ray, Daniel Robichaud, Graeme Wiggins, Mat Wilkins, Jordan Yeager

Art d’Ecco

Trespasser (Paperbag Records)

There’s a playfulness, an almost

frustrated energy of rebellion mixed

with bedroom eyes nihilism on

Trespasser. Whether it’s the relentless

earworm that is “Never Tell,” or the

Orbison croon behind “Mary,” this

is an album that is addictive in its

all-encompassing expanse. Trespasser

is a dance floor flooded by the smoke

machine where you can almost pretend

you’re the only one there; like John

Travolta before he sold his soul. (JO)

I M U R

Thirty33 (Independent)

I M U R’s third studio album is both

a continuation of the group’s dark,

introspective electro-R&B and a step

towards the light. Where I M U R has

always made songs that are raw and

vulnerable – this project is no exception

– they continue to push forward with a

positive perspective. (JY)

Mathew V

The Fifth (604 Records)

Perhaps it’s in the high caliber emotive

vocal performances, maybe the

songwriting or the glossy production

but this album proves that we have a

big name pop star on the loose in our

town. (QT)

Humans

Going Late (Haven Sounds)

Humans deliver a mature and informed

take on electronic music with breathy

vocals, pulsating percussion and airy,

spaced out mixes, inciting you to stay

up all night and dance. (KN)

ACDATYOUNGN*GGA –

((MEmyself&ihatepeople))

(((ihatepeople))/Opposition)

Vancouver rap music sometimes comes

across as slightly behind the times.

ACDATYOUNGN*GGA is working

to lead the charge in changing that

reputation with a seven-song EP (a

format having it’s moment) of hook

laden, pulsing rap music that fits with

the finest off of the Rap Caviar playlist.

(GW)

Baptists – Beacon Of Faith

(Southern Lord)

Baptists’ third fully is their most evolved

release yet. Not many bands can

strike that balance of unhinged and

technical without losing some of each,

but this screams of a band that has full

confidence in who they are and what

they’re capable of. (MR)

ACTORS – It Will Come To You

(Artoffact Records)

A linchpin figure of the local scene

releases their best to date. Music for

dark nights, sunny days, time alone or

with the ones you love, this album is the

pinnacle of intersecting tastes. (QT)

We Are the City – At Night

(Light Organ)

Polished west coast idols We Are The

City are back at it with a collection

of their best beats yet. Dreamy, their

open-air ambiance has become fuzzier

and thorny. This is a gripping album

worthy of many listens. (EC)

Malcolm Jack - Mirror Moon

(Independent)

With Capital 6 and Dada Plan, Jack

elevated Vancouver’s indie psych scene

for years, but Mirror Moon saw him

transition from lo-fi troubadour to

progressive Americana folk mindblower.

His lyrics are cerebral as ever,

propelling him to a musical plateau as

slick as Dan Mangan or Calexico. (AR)

Jo Passed – Their Prime (Royal

Mountain)

More lyrical than Jo Passed’s earlier

work, Their Prime shifts into melodic

dream pop while staying true to their

fuzzy, jam band roots. This is a grown

up exploration of fear and transition

interwoven with tasty feedback. (EC)

WTCHDR - Failed Ambition

(Independent)

Vitriolic honesty is the ingredient that

sticks out here. Add in some frantic

rhythmic assaults and some big, fat,

spine-curving beatdown riffs and

you’ll have some very bitter, very tasty

lemonade. (DR)

Rich Hope – I Come Alive

(Planned Obsolescence)

One of Vancouver’s finest delivers a slab

of soulful wax chock full of swagger and

bluesy rock ’n’ roll. Playful and sinister,

I’m All Yours will make you cut a rug,

peel your tires and rob a bank with

nothing but a smile. (DR)

Phono Pony – Monkey Paw

(Independent)

This quirky multi-dimensional duo

has cracked the code with this spaced

out collection of polished college

rock. Monkey Paw has a healthy mix

of garage, blues, electronic and pop,

making for a truly unique musical

experience. (GA)

Autogramm - What R U

Waiting 4? (Nevado Records)

Synth heavy power pop played with

conviction, Autogramm have delievered

an album full of driving hooks and

sensible melodies. These old-timers are

making a new sound that’s sure to get

you moving. (GA)

Brass – For Everyone (Never

Go Home)

Think of “Coral” – a mild anesthetic –

and “Blue Pt. 2” – a heavy sedative – as

the medically required bookends to the

willfully reckless, manic jaunt that is

For Everyone. Beware the dangerously

contagious energy within from these

punks! (DR)

Bored Decor - The Colour Red

(Independent)

With their debut LP The Colour Red,

Bored Decor serves up a heaping

helping of energetic glam punk. Drums

crash, guitars hiss and scream, and

keyboards pound out frenetic melodies

along politically charged, new-wavestyle

vocals. (MW)

Parlour Panther – Hot Magic

(Independent)

This queer soul rock trio’s goal with Hot

Magic was an album that was to deliver

a declaration of love of being true to

one’s self and it succeeds. Their lyrics are

bold and the vocal delivery captivating.

They’ve really put themselves in that

rarified spot of creating something

uniquely their own — inspirational and

sexy. (GW)

Junk – Audio Heroin (Junk

Music)

Wit, wordplay and big beats round

out this impressive offering from Junk.

The young rapper has got a flow that

stands tall on its own but he’s also

invited some big names along for the

ride, including CyHi The Prynce. Audio

Heroin is Junk living his truth on his

best offering to date. (GA)

Kellarissa - Ocean Electro

(Mint Records)

Larissa Loyva has one of the strongest

voices in Canadian music, and she put

it to good use on her third solo album.

Ocean Electro hammered home the

weight of her progressive lyrics with

dynamic, driving synth-pop. (AR)

We Hunt Buffalo - Head

Smashed In (Fuzzorama)

Just reading the title, we knew what we

were in for with this one. The hardhitting,

bluesy, psychedelic sludge this

power trio mustered on their third

album could just about fill a tar pit or

explode a Mastodon’s heart. (AR)

The Prettys – Tapas

(Independent)

Back at the table with Tapas, The

Prettys waste no time getting into it,

serving up a generous helping of garage

pop bangers that demand your full

attention, right up until the last course.

Lié - Hounds (Mint Records)

Hostile and very aggressive, Hounds is

the album equivalent of walking down

a street on a crisp, cold night ready to

incite violence. (EC)

La Chinga - Beyond the Sky

(Small Stone)

This skuz jamming power trio has

been injecting pure ‘70s stadium rawk

in their veins since 2012, and they

practically overdosed on their third

album, Beyond the Sky. Where Greta

Van Fleet are merely boys, La Chinga

proved their manhood. (AR)

Ruby Karinto – Ruby Karinto

(Hozac)

Ruby Karinto’s Self-Titled LP is raw,

dissonant, and weirdly addictive. A

crazy collection of analog synth leads,

bilingual Japanese-English vocals, over

a garage rock rhythm section. The type

of stuff Siri and Alexa would make love

to. (LC)

Process – Structural Fatigue

(Independent)

This long awaited debut is an

unexpected headbutt to extreme metal.

With a refreshing take and a unique

stamp on the genre, Process makes

punishment fun and brutal. (HF)

24

December 2018


BeatRoute’s 2018 Holiday Gift Guide

We know you’ve been waiting all year for this! BeatRoute’s annual Holiday

Gift Guide curates the coolest goods around to help you check off all the

people on your shopping list this season. Plus, most of them are crafted by

local makers, so you’re supporting your community as well as being a great

gift giver. What’s better than that? Enjoy! And happy holidays to all.

Knifewear

Don’t let your Christmas dinner suffer at the

hands of a dull blade. Amp up your knife skills

with this Mugi Santoku knife made by steel

titans Haruyuki. Nothing compares to the

feeling of Japanese steel and this beast slices,

dices and minces like no other piece of metal

you’ve ever held in your greasy palms. Find it

at Knifewear Vancouver.

• Jeevin Johal

2plantgirls

You know those beautiful mid-century modern

planters that pop up all over your Instagram (if

you’re into plants and home decor, that is? These

two Vancouver girls – ahem, plant girls – make

their own custom, handmade ones out of wood

and fibreglass. Bonus? They also come with

tropical plants. Check out their Instagram at

@2plantgirls and DM them to place your order.

• YS

Mameyo Goods

Though this local leather brand has only been

around for a short time, it’s already made

a big impact with its thoughtful, modern

designs. Find carefully handcrafted wallets,

backpacks, tassels made from upcycled

suede, and – our favourite – the rope-leather

circle bag, Ellie. Find Mameyo on Etsy and at a

variety of craft markets.

• YS

Glerups Slippers

Your quest for peak comfort stops here.

Glerups slippers are the perfect addition to

the #teamcozy ensemble. Made of a luxurious

combination of Merino and Gotland Wool, they

are refreshing to slip on after an intense day on

the slopes or lazin’ around the house on a day

off. Best worn without socks, these warm yet

breathable slippers are a perfect gift for anyone

who has ever posted a picture of themselves

wrapped in a blanket at noon on Sunday. Check

them out at glerups.ca.

•AT

Ani Artisanal

The absolutely beautiful offerings from this

Vancouver-based lifestyle brand include

straw fans and grass shopping baskets. All

the products are designed and handcrafted

by artists in Ghana and Thailand – founder

Rhoda Obinecha, an Igbo-Canadian artist, is

committed to supporting local artists and the

use of natural materials. Find Ani Artisanal

online at aniartisanal.com or at markets like

the Eastside Flea.

• Yasmine Shemesh

The Hot Spot

Do you have a friend whose seasoning rack

is 75 per cent red bottles with names like

“Kiss Your Ass Goodbye,” “Ultra Death,” and

“Mucho Picante?” If so, look no longer for

gifts and stocking stuffers for the hot sauce

aficionados on your list. The Hot Spot in

Kitsilano is your one-stop-shop for all things

ultra spicy, or just a lil’ spicy (lots of mild sauce

options.) They also offer free samples of every

sauce so you can test your Scoville tolerance

while you shop!

• Austin Taylor

Taster’s Club

Deew

Yes, it’s “weed” spelled backwards! This cannabisinfused

beauty and wellness brand offers

products, like their Highly Nourishing Crèmes

that are crafted in Canada and made in small

batches from 100 per cent organic oil from

the hemp plant. The seeds of the hemp plant

produce an oil rich in essential fatty acids, which

promotes healthy skin and hair. Deew’s stuff is

also vegan and never tested on animals. Order

them online at youdeewyou.com.

• YS

The gift that keeps on giving. Taster’s

Club is a booze subscription service that

delivers a new bottle of the choicest

“must have” liquor to your door every

month. Accompanied with expert level

tasting, history, and distillery notes, so

you can impress your friends with your

knowledge of fine spirits. Pick your

poison – they offer plans for whisky,

bourbon, scotch, rum, tequila or bubbly.

Make 2019 one to remember… or not.

Get yours at tastersclub.com.

• AT


BPM

THE FUNK HUNTERS

SPREADING ANNUAL CHEER WITH FUNK THE HALLS

TREVOR CAMPBELL

Photo by Rob Campbell

The Funk Hunters deviate from the norm on their 2018 release, Typecast.

EDM favourites Nick Middleton and Duncan Smith, a.k.a. The

Funk Hunters will not have to ask Santa for too much this year.

2018 has already delivered unto them a new album, Typecast

(Westwood Recordings), their official remix of U2’s “Love is Bigger

Than Anything in its Way” hit number one on Billboard’s Dance

Club Chart, they were crowned Electronic/Dance Artist of the Year

at the Western Canadian Music Awards and, to top it off, they were

the first EDM act to headline the Coca-Cola Stage at the Calgary

Stampede. Let that sink in. An EDM act... headlining... a rodeo.

The Funk Hunters, like the EDM genre itself, have come a long way.

From rural areas on a remote island in the Pacific Ocean (Well,

ok, Galiano B.C.) these crazy Canucks now perform all over the

world, having become perennial performers at clubs and festivals,

including Shambhala and the upcoming Rainbow Serpent Fest in

Melbourne, Australia. Currently, touring their Funk the Halls with

stops all over Canada they will also be rolling through the U.S.A.

early next year.

An element of their live shows that Middleton feels (perhaps)

does not get enough mention is the atmospheric lighting design

and array of carefully orchestrated special effects. He and Smith met

at a film school after all.

“We definitely put those film schools to good use. Duncan does

a lot of video editing for us and creating visuals for our shows. We

actually run all of our own audio and visual stuff during our shows.

All the visuals on the screens behind us, we control while we’re

DJing and Duncan has either created or curated all of it.”

Once just a pair of cinema class nerds, now world-beaters. Are

they feeling it?

“I remember we did our first tour with Chali 2na. That was kinda

the moment where I was like ‘We were just these two white kids

who grew up on Galiano Island and we’re on tour now with this guy

who we grew up listening to from one of the most iconic hip hop

groups!’ Who could not have had a more different upbringing than

us, growing up in Chicago!” recalls Middleton. “But there’s this kinda

bond about music, music culture and art, and performance that

you can so easily share with someone. You can look back and be all

like ‘Yeah, we made it,’ because this and this happened. It’s easy to

do the same thing and think ‘We’re not even close yet,’ because we

haven’t done this. As long as the fires is still burning you can keep

going.”

For now, The Funk Hunters are on a tear and forecasting bustling

and fun-filled 2019 that will have fans on the receiving end of their

packed touring schedule feeling the positive party rockin’ beats too.

“That’s something that people loose sight of a lot. You’re so

worried about what other people are gonna think, but there’s

something authentic about you enjoying what you’re doing. If

people really love you and follow you, hopefully it’s because of your

tastes and your artistic integrity. If you’re just so concerned with

what other people think, if you’re playing or performing to that, you

kinda loose what made you authentic to begin with.”

The Funk Hunters perform December 21 at Commodore Ballroom.

26

December 2018


BPM

CONTACT FESTIVAL

WINTER MUSIC FESTIVAL TOUCHES DOWN WITH GOOD VIBRATIONS

ANDREA NAZARIAN

Looking for an epic way to close out 2018? Lucky for you, Canada’s

largest winter music festival is on its way back to Vancouver. The

biggest indoor party of its kind in Western Canada, Contact Festival

showcases some of the most notable international acts, up-andcomers

and local talent in EDM, big-room house and trap. On

Friday December 28 and Saturday December 29, Contact Fest’s

stacked lineup will be throwing down across two massive stages

at BC Place. The festival is all ages with a 19+ bar and 19+ VIP area,

with one and two-day passes available. Here is just a selection of

some of the acts we are vibing with the most.

CLUBLAND

YOUR MONTH MEASURED IN BPMS

ALAN RANTA

Forget the flu. Seasonal affective disorder is the real killer.

December is out to get you with the shortest day of the year, so

no hermiting. There’s only one way you’re going to get through

this, and that’s if you go out and get laser blasted in the face at a

club. Doctor’s orders.

Whipped Cream

December 8 at Capital Ballroom

If you were given the opportunity to see Justice or Daft Punk in

a 500 capacity venue, you wouldn’t need much time to think

about it, would you? So don’t think about this, Victoria. Just go

and see Nanaimo’s Caroline Cecil do her Whipped Cream thing.

With a technical, bass worshipping sound like hers, she isn’t

going to be hanging around here much longer. And tell your

Alberta friends ‘cause she’s playing Banff and Calgary on this ‘Bad

For Me’ tour too.

Mark Farina

December 14 at Capital Ballroom

Jazz is good for you. Mushrooms are good for you. Put them

together, and you’ve got Mark Farina. Nummers!

ALISON WONDERLAND

Before blowing up as an EDM producer,

this Australian began her musical career

as a classically trained cellist. She regularly

samples her own vocals in her tracks,

and has a knack for blending pop sonics

with dance floor bangers. Catch this

purple-haired music maven headlining

major festivals like Coachella, EDC and

Lollapalooza.

THE CHAINSMOKERS

Hailing from New York City, The

Chainsmokers caught the attention of

listeners after dropping their 2014 banger

“#Selfie.” Reaching major success with the

release of “Roses” in 2016, Chainsmokers

members Drew Taggart and Max Hall have

managed to consistently ride radio waves

and sell out shows with their EDM hits.

GALANTIS

Super producers Christian Karlsson of Miike

Snow and Linus Eklö of Style of Eye came

together to form EDM sensation Galantis

after meeting in Stockholm. The two are

known for crafting some of pop’s biggest hits;

Karlsson with Britney Spears’ Toxic and Eklöw

with Icona Pop’s I Love It. Known for their

feel-good, pop-influenced tracks, Galantis has

become a staple in the dance music world.

Ivy Lab

December 15 at Celebrities Nightclub Underground

UK bass duo Ivy Lab knows all about the SAD, being as they hail

from North London. They aren’t going to sit back and take it.

They’re going on the offensive, tenaciously, with their so-called

Jinxed tour.

Jazz Cartier

December 19 at Venue

Toronto rapper Jahmarie Adams (a.k.a. Jazz Cartier) is better than

Drake. He won’t be playing Venue the next time he’s in town, so

this may be your last opportunity to see the rising star this close

up. Guaranteed SAD beater.

sumthin sumthin

December 27 at MIA

This official Contact pre-party is going to be something. In fact,

it’s going to be sumthin sumthin, a night of top-drawer future

bass with trap swagger.

SKRILLEX

BORGORE

Born and raised in Tel Aviv, Asaf Borger

aka Borgore leveraged his background as a

drummer and started producing Metalinfluenced

EDM tracks early in his career

- a genre he calls “gorestep.” He’s released a

slew of bangers under his own record label

Buygore and has recently collaborated with

hip hop acts like Gucci Mane and G-Eazy.

TROYBOI

Known best for his bombastic trap beats

and blending sounds from around the

globe, British producer TroyBoi is a force to

be reckoned with in the world of electronic

music. This East London native has remixed

songs from chart-toppers like Missy Elliott,

ZAYN, and Danny Brown, and is showing

no signs of slowing down.

Skrillex has been the poster boy of electro

and dubstep for almost a decade now.

Taking the EDM scene by storm after

releasing “Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites”

in 2010, he’s since won Grammys and

collaborated with some of the biggest

names in music. Nowadays, catch him

touring the world and running the show at

his record label OWSLA.

Contact Music Festival takes place Dec. 28

and 29 at BC Place. For more information,

visit www.contact-festival.com

Whipped Cream

December 2018 27


MOVING MOUNTAINS

BACKCOUNTRY AVALANCHE

STAYING SAFE IN SNOWY CONDITIONS

JESSIE FOSTER

Many underestimate the abundance

of incredibly skiable terrain in the

northern quarters of Vancouver Island.

With a somewhat steady temperature

throughout the year, the snowpack can

be more consistent than places further

into the Rockies. Let’s be honest, who

wants to have to load up their gear

and head on a ferry every time they

want to squeeze in a day of riding. With

Mount Cain and Washington on the

island, there’s no need for this sort of

debauchery. David Kallai is a backcountry

guru when it comes to avalanche safety

and awareness. The Vancouver Island

Avalanche Centre (VIAC) is coming

into its 11th winter this year and with

Kallai as the president of the non-profit

organization, continually strives to better

the experience for backcountry troopers

in this part of the globe.

“Definitely the snow community

is on the rise here. Many people are

transitioning over from Sea to Sky in

the Comox Valley,” says Kallai. “Some of

them avalanche professionals, techs, ski

patrollers, there’s a couple snowmobile

guides that have come over from the

mainland.”

Amongst Kallai’s many goals is to

keep the West Coast backcountry safe

and accessible by incorporating more

in-depth research and weather stations

to help everyone get home to their coco

cabins by the end of the day. They host a

number of fundraising events throughout

the year, such as backcountry festivals,

speaker-series events and ski movie

premieres. This allows the ski community

to get together all in one tidy ribbon to

drink beer, chat about the newest gear on

the market, win some sweet door-prizes

and really just get collectively excited

28

Photo by Karsten Klawitter

Make sure to research avalanche risks before embarking on any backcountry adventures.

for a season of snow. The annual festival

at Mount Cain in February, which VIAC

graciously dishes to the population, is

their most anticipated celebration.

“We set up a transceiver search area,

there’s an avalanche rescue dog that

comes up and does a bunch of demos.

One of our forecasters does a morning

weather talk with whoever is interested.”

While right now the avalanche

centre is operated with just a few keen

mountaineers willing to sacrifice their

days off in pursuit of a better backcountry

experience for the many, they are hoping

to expand their reach through funding

into the future. They have done work

with hydrologists in the past to set up

weather stations to really stay in the know

as to how the conditions are changing

over time. Although the weather can be

more forgiving and stable than interior

BC or Alberta, the avalanche risk is still

prevalent.

“There’s danger on the island in the

trees, on the tree line and there’s lots of

alpine avalanche danger as well. Same

dangers you find on the mainland.”

So whether it’s gearing up and trekking

to regions undiscovered, blazing trails

through your local favourite backcountry

spot or dipping your toes into a pair

of snowshoes for the very first time,

remember to do your share of reading

beforehand on awareness and the local

avalanche risks. These bulletins are put

out pro bono to keep happy sliders

alive and to continue to improve our

backcountry experiences.

For avalanche reports and to further your

knowledge in the field, check out www.

islandavalanchebulletin.com or attend one

of their many fundraisers this season.

DECEMBER HILL REPORT

With riding season ramping up for the year, it’s about

time to get those dusty planks brushed off and waxed

up for a wishfully fluffy season. British Columbia

is known internationally for its incredibly unique

terrain, whether that be within the parameters of one

of our many resorts or outside exploring uncharted

backcountry regions. From the grandeur of the

Purcells to the serenity of the intrapersonal workings

of Northern Vancouver Island, there’s nothing quite

like Western Canada’s intricate topography. Here’s a

compilation of some of the best resorts surrounding

Vancouver.

WHISTLER BLACKCOMB – World-class international

hubbub for riders of all shapes and abilities to perfect

their craft. With 37 lifts and nearly 8,200 acres of

skiable terrain combined, it’s easy to get lost in the

immensity of this mountain. Whistler Blackcomb

gloats being the biggest resort in North America and

with plenty of tucked away slopes and glades, it’s even

possible sometimes not to bump into anyone else.

This mountain holds all sorts of unreal winter events

throughout the year and knows how to throw a mean

après-ski to boot.

Distance driving from downtown Vancouver: 1 hour

45 minutes • Vertical drop: 1609m • Average snowfall:

11.7m • Opened: November 22

MOUNT CAIN – Go ahead, try mentioning skiing

or boarding on Vancouver Island without someone

telling you to go check out Mount Cain. Volunteer-run

and operated, this gem is only open on the weekends

and occasional Mondays to allow snow to build up

during the week. They like to keep the lower runs

groomed for accessibility, while the upper hill stays

rather untouched. The mixture of passionate, friendly

and knowledgeable volunteer staff work hard for an

exclusively T-bar experience. Worth the trek up for the

beautiful drive and incredible atmosphere.

Distance driving from downtown Vancouver: 5 hours

30 minutes (with ferry) • Vertical drop: 457m • Average

snowfall: 11.5m • Projected opening: December 8

CYPRESS MOUNTAIN - This area is commonly

known as Cypress Bowl because of its jammy location

between Black Mountain, Hollyburn Mountain and

Mount Strachan. Nested centrally into Vancouver’s

North Shore Mountain range, this is a wonderful

little hill for beginners and intermediates to fall in

love with sliding. With an easy commute to the local

resort, there’s not much of an excuse to not get out

riding. Cypress was progressive for its time, as in 1987

Written by Jessie Foster

it was the first resort in British Columbia to permit

snowboarders.

Distance driving from downtown Vancouver: 30 minutes

Vertical drop: 612m • Average snowfall: 10.8m •

Projected opening: December 14

MOUNT WASHINGTON – Vancouver Island’s largest

ski hill is home to five chair lifts, 82 runs, not to

mention two separate terrain parks. More than half of

their runs are posted for experts and advanced riders

only, making Washington ideal for those who like a

challenge. They don’t shy away from being beginner

friendly either with four magic carpets and a slick tube

park that they keep lit throughout the night. Courtney

is the nearest town to this resort community, who

opened their floodgates in 1979 and haven’t turned

their back on providing a welcoming environment for

riders everywhere.

Distance driving from downtown Vancouver: 4 hours

(with ferry) • Vertical drop: 505m • Average snowfall:

10m • Projected opening: December 7

MOUNT SEYMOUR – This mountain is Vancouver’s

only fully family-operated bundle of frosty excitement

for those not looking to stray far from the city. This

wonderful little mecca makes it easy for people to pack

their ski suits into their briefcases for a direct office to

mountain switchover on the journey back. What’s nice

about this hill is the fact that half the terrain is open

during the night, which is great news for those with

nine-to-fivers who want to squeeze in some late night

shralp time.

Distance driving from downtown Vancouver: 50 minutes

Vertical drop: 330m • Average snowfall: 10m • Projected

opening: December 1

GROUSE MOUNTAIN - This mountain has been

supplying a fully loaded sundae treat of a resort since

1926; might as well be the banana split of skiing with

just enough vanilla toppings to get you through the

evening. Wide-open slopes with minimal hazards

make for a gentle beginners environment. This hill is

equipped with 37 snow guns to fill in the gaps where

needed to assure there’s always something to practice

on. Powder days here are superb for everyone, from

amateurs to seasoned professionals looking for a city

escape into the snowy trees.

Distance driving from downtown Vancouver: 20 minutes

Vertical drop: 384m • Average snowfall: 2.6m• Projected

opening: December 1

Photo by Karsten Klawitter

December 2018


Best of 2018

The 10 best films you (probably)

haven’t seen yet

WRITTEN BY HOGAN SHORT

Tully

Beast

Burning

You Were Never Really Here

Upgrade

1. Tully

This story from frequent collaborators Jason Reitman

and Diablo Cody is an honestly told beautiful love

letter dedicated to a rarely explored topic in film; being

a mother. Marlo (Charlize Theron) has a lovely family

but the struggles of being a middle class stay at home

expecting mom proves overwhelming. Tully, (Vancouver’s

own Mackenzie Davis) a free spirited and exceptional

night nanny helps out the selfless Marlo, not just with

motherhood, but to help her remember and love herself.

This lovingly sympathetic ode to motherhood is brilliantly

portrayed until it finishes with one of the best endings of

the year.

2. Beast

A mystery thriller about a small town murder demands a

great end. Beast asks its audience a direct question and for

the rest of the runtime we are left searching and guessing

for ourselves what that answer may be. Along the way we

watch a lonely, misunderstood girl who finally has a friend

and lover who gives her the confidence to be herself. But

is this new boy the killer in town? Could the twist be that

she is? Maybe it doesn’t matter to ether of them. We are

left wondering in suspense until the final moments of this

haunting film with a powerfully satisfying conclusion.

3. Burning

Burning is a commentary on the treatment of women

in society as we follow the interactions of three people.

This film grabs you and clings to you, burning into your

memory. The suspense slowly smolders and cooks,

flickering clues at you until what is beneath the fire

is revealed. Steven Yeun (The Walking Dead), with an

electrifyingly subtle standout performance, plays the

mysterious and charming Ben. “Ben from Burning” will

be a common answer in conversations among cinephiles

when asked when talking about their favourite…well,

you’ll see.

4. You Were Never Really Here

This film starring Joaquin Phoenix was directed by the

great auteur Lynne Ramsay (We Need to Talk About

Kevin). Phoenix who plays a low level hit man type

suffering from PTSD who performs his job with brutal

force. A job goes bad and he must fight his way to the

truth. This story shares DNA with films like John Wick and

The Equalizer, but done so with a uniquely crafted artistic

direction. It’s not just the violence that Ramsay keeps

from the audience, but often seemingly pivotal moments.

Our expectations are constantly being subverted in this

merciless interpretation of a familiar action film.

5. Upgrade

Where have all the really smart, really fun science fiction

films gone? Upgrade looks to bring the early-2000’s fun

sci-fi film back with this blast of pulp. Grey Trace (Logan

Marshall-Green) loses his girlfriend along with the use

of his limbs after an accident in a self-driving car and a

gang waiting at the wreckage. A new technology gives

him his mobility backhand with this high functioning

new mobility also comes an AI voice in his mind to help

him seek revenge on those who took everything from

him. Each scene with every victory and stumble for our

protagonist are expertly staged until the end. And every

great science fiction movie from that aforementioned era

has an amazing twist ending. Right?

6. First Reformed

The ending of this movie is really bad. Luckily, the first

90% of this story from a script written by Paul Schrader

(Taxi Driver) is so interesting and ingenious that it is still

one of the best of 2018. First Reformed is about a priest

(Ethan Hawke) who struggles with the church’s lack of

leadership when it comes to the human race destroying

the planet with climate change. This film is subdued and

often just two people speaking calmly. This calmness

changes just like the priests attitude after interacting with

an environmental terrorist. This entire film is exhilarating,

even when it’s just two people speaking around a table.

7. Thunder Road

Thunder Road is an incredibly simple story about a cop in

a small town who, to say the least, has a few issues. He has

just buried a loved one, cannot connect with his daughter,

and doesn’t seem very self aware, even if he is very sweet

hearted. These issues sporadically and unexpectedly

explode like a supernova, which is where this film really

shines. In these moments we see uncut scenes of actor Jim

Cummings crying and screaming and humiliating himself

for up to ten minutes. It is impossible to look away and

one of the best acting performances of the year.

8. Leave No Trace

A father and his daughter live in the woods in the Pacific

Northwest. Will (Ben Foster) teaches his daughter at an

advanced reading level as well as survival skills. They also

seem to live this way because Will doesn’t believe in living

according to the rigors of society and is suffering from

PTSD. They are caught and together are placed into a

program of rehabilitation back into the real world. This

film about a young girl needing to be strong for herself

and her family at such a young age in a tough landscape

has drawn comparisons to the 2010 gem Winter’s Bone.

This film is just as good and happens to be the same writer

and director, Debra Granik.

9. The Wife

There are many films about taking credit for other’s work.

The Wife is a film that expires even deeper to the role a

woman sometimes feels she has to play and what can and

should happen when she is sick and tired of not getting

the credit she is deserved. This movie had essentially no

release but hopefully when Oscar season comes Glen

Close will be given her credit as an actor, and allow this

film the audience that desperately needs this story.

10. Roma

This is a bit of a cheat. The reason you have yet seen

this is because it is not out yet. Roma is about to come

on Netflix and hopefully everyone will watch it. This

Mexican made, semi-autobiographical story from genius

auteur Alfonso Cuaron (Children of Men) is patiently

waiting to show its inspiration via the laptop screens of

people everywhere laying in their beds. The trouble is it’s

subtitled and in black and white, which doesn’t scream

Christmas cheer. Roma is an original piece of art that can

be appreciated by everyone and that is a beautiful and

rare thing.

December 2018 29


FILM

WEED THE PEOPLE

CANNABIS, PACIFIERS AND HUMAN RIGHTS

KIRA CLAVELL

THIS MONTH IN FILM

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL CINEMA

BRENDAN LEE

Mortal Engines – December 14

From the pen of one of cinema’s all-time greats, Peter Jackson

(Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit), comes the first step on a

colossal new journey. Mortal Engines speaks of a distant future

where the city of London has evolved into a massive, mobile,

destructive machine, and a girl named Hester stands before its

looming shadow.

If Beale Street Could Talk – December 14

Oftentimes our greatest strengths never show until we’re torn

apart from the ones we love. Barry Jenkins (Moonlight) returns

with the swooping tale of Tish and Fonny, two childhood

friends incontrovertibly in love and unfairly separated by a false

imprisonment. This film radiates the purest form of romance

and invites the audience to bask in it.

Filmmakers Ricki Lake and Abby Epstein raise social awareness around the health benefits of marijuana and legalization in Weed The People.

Sophie Ryan is a beautiful child. With her inquisitive blue eyes, soft

wisps of blonde angel hair, pillowy cheeks and contagious smile,

she could be straight out of an ad for Pampers or a commercial for

Johnson & Johnson. “She’s quite the special little baby,” her mom,

Tracy Ryan, says proudly. We watch as Ryan feeds Sophie just a dab

of cannabis oil in a spoonful of her baby food. Just a tiny drop on

her pacifier for while she’s sleeping. There’s a moment in the film

where Sophie, heavy-lidded and sluggish on the couch, appears...

mellow. “This is what Sophie is like when she starts to feel the effects

of her medicine. She’s not moving around as much and she’s a

little sleepy face but this is it,” says Ryan. Why would a mother be

giving cannabis to her baby? Love. Special little Sophie, at just 8 1/2

months old, has been diagnosed with Optic Pathway Glioma. The

inoperable, malignant tumor in her brain has grown in size and is

pressing against the nerve connecting to her eye. This is just one of

the families in Weed The People, trying to pursue what they believe

is the best treatment for their child. Giving them the “gift from

heaven,” a.k.a. “liquid gold” or cannabis oil.

The documentary, directed by Abby Epstein and executive

produced by Ricki Lake, gives us a glimpse of the lengths these

parents will go to cure their children. It’s the second documentary

made by the duo. The first, The Business of Being Born, was an

incredibly personal project about obstetrics and the birthing process

in the United States and featured both women giving birth in the

film. Weed the People is another intensely personal film for Lake. “It

really started from my own life experience,” she says. “That seems to

be the beginning stages of all our projects thus far. It’s so important

on so many levels but also because my beloved husband who passed

away.” Christian Evans who had battled against bipolar disorder and

took his own life in 2017 had researched and utilized cannabis for

himself to treat his chronic pain, migraines and anxiety.

Footage for Weed The People runs from 2013 through to 2017

and takes place primarily in California. Much has changed in regards

to cannabis during those years and especially now most recently

in Canada where, as of October 17, 2018, recreational cannabis

in addition to medical cannabis is federally legalized. Yet in the

United States, cannabis is still stalemated in Schedule 1 under the

Controlled Substances Act, which places cannabis alongside heroin

and LSD.

“It’s crazy,” Lake says. “The climate has changed dramatically since

we started the film in 2012. Its outrageous and I think part of it was

[Dr.] Sanjay Gupta going on CNN and apologizing for his take on

this plant really did so much to open people’s eyes and get the ball

rolling with more and more information.”

“We’re dealing with children. This is not about getting high. This

is a human rights issue. Families have a right to have access to this

plant if it helps, even if it doesn’t help, you know,” Lake stresses.

The film has already made an impact according to Lake. “We

brought the film to parliament over the summer,” she says. “It’s all

about changing the laws and educating the public and having a new

understanding of the magic that is this plant.”

The Canadian premiere of Weed The People is 6 p.m. at the Rio

Theatre. Both Lake and Epstein will be in Q&A after the screening.

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse – December 14

It’s Spiderman. It’s comedic genius Phil Lord. And with a story

that hinges on an inter-dimensional web of different Spider-

Men of all shapes, sizes, and species (yes, there’s a pig named

Spider-Ham), the sky’s the Spider-Limit.

They Shall Not Grow Old – December 17

Peter Jackson is everywhere this December with the release

of his highly anticipated World War I documentary. Years in

the making, Jackson takes restored, century-old footage and

breathes new life into a time, and an event, so catastrophically

world-defining. It’s films like these that ensure we will never

forget.

Destroyer – December 25

One of the year’s most anticipated thrillers arrives just in time

for Christmas dinner. Playing a thick-skinned LAPD detective

bent on revenge, Nicole Kidman disappears within a role she

was destined for – one that may define her career from this

point onward.

If Beale Street Could Talk

30

December 2018


MUSIC REVIEWS

TYLER, THE CREATOR

Music Inspired by Illumination & Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch

Columbia Records

Christmas music is a polarizing topic. Some like to

start blasting it at the first sign of leaves turning

colour, others boycott it until it can be boycotted

no longer, unavoidable through the speakers of

décor-drenched shopping centres everywhere. It’s

kitschy and overplayed, and the lyrics have been

engrained in our collective minds since we first

learned to put language to melody, regardless of

which holidays we personally celebrate. It’s a genre

of its own that has evaded evolution – the same set

of songs are perpetually remade and covered. To put

it simply, songs of the season are hardly inspired.

Enter Music Inspired by Illumination & Dr. Seuss’

The Grinch, a surprising holiday offering from Tyler,

the Creator. It diverts the aforementioned formula,

laced lightly with cheer and tinged with holiday

references but not over-the-top chipper with bells

chiming and carolers singing. “Hot Chocolate” is, as

its name states, an ode to the cozy, marshmallowtopped

treat, and “Lights On,” featuring Santigold

and Ryan Beatty, is upbeat and merry.

“Big Bag” is a standout on this album as the track

most recognizably created by Tyler, the Creator.

From the beat to the lyrics, it leans on the darker

side, referencing holidays past in which Tyler’s

“mom was always honest, [he] ain’t never had a

Santa Claus.” According to him, the song is actually

written from the perspective of the Grinch himself.

Perhaps fittingly, a track that didn’t make the album

but is featured in the soundtrack of The Grinch is

titled “I Am The Grinch.”

Tyler has had a big year, from expanding his

fashion line Golf Wang in a more mature direction

to curating yet another impressive lineup for his

seventh annual Camp Flog Gnaw festival, this

time in partnership with YouTube Music. He’s

becoming something of a corporation in his own

rite, a Renaissance man with boundless energy and

inspiration to channel into whatever strikes his fancy

at a given moment.

2018 seems to have inspired in him a drive to

focus more heavily on production. In October,

he re-released an expanded version of his 2015

album Cherry Bomb and included an instrumental

alongside each track, feeling it had previously

gone underappreciated. That shift is obvious on

Music Inspired by […] The Grinch, as vocals take

a back seat to production. The album’s intro,

“Whoville,” and outro, “Cindy Lou’s Wish,” are purely

instrumental, encapsulating the other four tracks

like a warm stocking.

Tyler, the Creator is a man of many talents.

He’s been making music since founding Odd

Future in 2007, with the collective’s first mixtape

being dropped in November 2008. Ever since, his

evolution has been constant and, for those paying

attention, blaringly obvious. On his first solo studio

release, Goblin, in 2011, he was writing lyrics like

“Rape a pregnant bitch and tell my friends I had

a threesome.” His intention was to be ironic and

make people talk – it’s hyper-exaggerated satire,

rooted not in reality but in a commentary on

perceived notions of hip-hop culture. Many of

the controversial remarks he’s made have been

called homophobic – according to The Fader, the

homophobic f-slur appears on Goblin nine times.

But Tyler isn’t homophobic; he isn’t even straight.

By 2017 he was more confident in his own sexuality,

stating on Flower Boy’s “I Ain’t Got Time!” that

he’s “been kissing white boys since 2004” and on

loosie “Gelato” that he “just pop[s] models, boys or

girls these days, shit, it don’t matter.” And while he

may not always have been as outspoken about his

sexuality as he has been since Flower Boy, he hasn’t

exactly been keeping it a secret, either – in 2015,

for example, he told Rolling Stone that he was “gay

as fuck” and “one hundred per cent would go gay

for ‘96 Leonardo DiCaprio and Cole Sprouse.” In

that same interview, he said “One day when I stop

talking about fucking people in the ass, I’ma go into

children’s books.” Perhaps The Grinch is his first step

in that direction.

This latest release from the Creator is short and

sweet – six tracks, none of which exceed two and

a half minutes in length. In total, it’s just over 10

minutes long. As far as holidays go, it’s about as long

as you’d want dinner with the extended family to

run: long enough to reminisce and drink some rum

and eggnog, but not quite long enough to touch

on any topics deep enough to stoke an argument.

Music Inspired by Illumination & Dr. Seuss’ The

Grinch steers free of controversy, too.

According to a tweet from Tyler, “Making

Christmas themed music, but not making it too

xmasy was the goal.” He wants these tracks “played

in June too,” and it’s feasible that they will be – their

holiday undertones are understated enough that

it won’t feel as blasphemous as it would to bump

“Let It Snow” while wearing shorts and a tee on

the beach. The songs are cheerful enough to evoke

images of Christmas without being in-your-face

about it, shoving that cheer down your throat. For a

Tyler production, it’s surprisingly understated.

• By Jordan Yeager

• Illustration by Carole Mathys

December 2018 31


Anderson .Paak - Oxnard Art Brut - Wham! Bang! Pow! Let’s Rock Out! Bauhaus - The Bela Session Daniel Romano - Finally Free

Anderson .Paak

Oxnard

Aftermath Entertainment

Easy, breezy, beautiful, like the west coast where

he was born and raised, Anderson Paak’s Oxnard

elevates the artist to new heights. Being the final

release in the trilogy of his “California” records,

with Venice (2014) and Malibu (2016) preceding,

Oxnard is easily his most decorated album to date.

This is Paak’s first release after signing with Dr.

Dre’s Aftermath Entertainment and he spared

no expense garnering all the bells and whistles

when it came to production and collaboration.

With Dre acting as executive producer, you

can hear his signature west coast production

throughout, crafting a luxurious amalgamation

of hip hop and funk. A recipe so delicious, it’s

just what the Doctor ordered. On top of all the

glamorous arrangements, the album also boasts

some impressive features, from an all-star cast that

includes Kendrick Lamar, Pusha T, Snoop Dogg, J.

Cole and Q-Tip.

A delightful boost to the contemporary hip hop

sound, Oxnard is eclectic in that it can take you

back to the ’90s era of G funk and still make time

for a trap beat or two. Paak Stated, “This is the

album I dreamed of making in high school” and it

just might bring you back to yours if you let it.

• Tory Rosso

Art Brut

Wham! Bang! Pow! Let’s Rock Out!

Alcopop! Records

In two senses Wham! Bang! Pow! Let’s Rock Out!

is somewhat of a return for Art Brut. In one sense,

it’s their first album in seven years, which in today’s

album churn, that’s a lifetime. In the other sense

it’s a return to form of sorts, with the band taking

their sound back to the basics after a few albums

of broadening their palette. The songs are barely

sung; singer Eddie Argos’ delivery a bit more of a

rant than anything resembling melody. He relies

on hyper-specific, brutally honest autobiography

with a self-deprecating humour instead of singing

chops.

Sometimes this specificity works, like the title

track, which marries high energy hooks to an

almost desperate plea of an aging hipster to stay

cool, or “Veronica Falls,” which name checks the

forgotten indie band of the title in a quiet ballad

about regrets not made, adding a little twist at the

end. Other times the honest biography can wear a

little thin. Opening track, “Absurd Breakfast,” has

Argos talking about the difficult social situations

that one-night stands present. It comes off as

the saddest humble brag ever. He’s a witty writer,

and the humour (and some good hooks) mostly

overcome some of the weaker, less relatable

moments.

• Graeme Wiggins

Bauhaus

The Bela Session

Leaving Records

Gothic anthems for the modern age, that’s

what post-punk outfit Bauhaus are famous

for. Fashioned during a gruelling six-hour

long recording session at Beck Studios in

Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, England,

none stands higher than “Bela Lugosi’s Dead.”

Some 40 years later L.A.’s Leaving Records is

reopening the crypt and the crates, unearthing the

band’s formative five-song demo EP.

S T A Y

N E W S I N G L E A V A I L A B L E N O W

NEW SINGLE AVAILABLE NOW

32

December 2018


UPCOMING SHOWS

THE CRYSTAL METHOD JANUARY 12

SAINT JHN

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

DECEMBER 11

JOHN GRANT

WITH TWO MEDICINE

DECEMBER 20

MARK FARINA

WITH JESSE HILLS, KROWN & LUKE MCKEEHAN

DECEMBER 29

KONGOS

WITH FITNESS

JANUARY 13

SNAIL MAIL

WITH SNAIL MAIL

JANUARY 27

MAD CADDIES

WITH THE BRASS ACTION

JANUARY 31

HIPPO CAMPUS

CHALI 2NA & THE HOUSE OF VIBE GUSTER

WITH NOW, NOW

WITH THE GAFF

WITH HENRY JAMISON

FEBRUARY 8 FEBRUARY 14

FEBRUARY 15

TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT IMPERIALVANCOUVER.COM


D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 8

SAT 1

DOORS @ 7:00PM

RALPH

WITH GUESTS NEON DREAMS

FRI 14

DOORS @ 7:00PM

GOLDSTEPZ EP RELEASE SHOW

WITH GUESTS JULIANO

SAT 22

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NITE*MOVES

DANCE PARTY JAMS FOR THE YOUNG, RESTLESS, AND BORED!

SAT 1

DOORS @ 10:30PM

NITE*MOVES

DANCE PARTY JAMS FOR THE YOUNG, RESTLESS, AND BORED!

FRI 14

DOORS @10:30PM

NO REQUEST FRIDAY

INDIE, ROCK, ALT, 80S, 90S, & 2000S GEMS!

SAT 28

DOORS @ 7:00PM

FAREWELL TO 2018

W/ BIG JOHN BATES, ALCHEMY CHAMBER,

AND MOMY FORTUNA

WED 5

DOORS @ 7:00PM

VALLEY MAKER

WITH GUESTS BLUE J

SAT 15

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REDD KROSS

WITH GUESTS DALE CROVER BAND

DEC 31

DOORS @ 8:00PM

200 CIGARETTES

FOOLISH FAR BACK

NEW BIG SHOES. YEARS BIG HAIR. BIG EVE ATTITUDES. PARTY!

SAT 15

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DANCE PARTY JAMS FOR THE YOUNG, RESTLESS, AND BORED!

FRI 4

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AFTON FOOLISH HIP FAR HOP BACK SHOWCASE:

FEATURING: ILLE$T, YELLAND & JAYMATTERZ, MARK DREAMZ, ACE, STORM

GORING, BIG SHOES. NYLEZ K, BIG KING HAIR. COMET, BIG ATTITUDES.

$HERLOCK, LIL MEECH, KILLAAMS,

MARSACE, W.N.8.0, HARD TRIX, ROPE$, SWAYZEACK, AND BABY FRESH

SAT SUN 17 16

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TOR MILLER

WITH GUESTS WILLOLUX

THURS 6

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MAJESTIC CASUAL

WITH DJS SUNNI COLON, STARRO, NOAH SLEE,

QUICKLY, QUICKLY, AND REI BROWN

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ROCK, ALT,

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80S, 90S,

BIG ATTITUDES.

& 2000S GEMS!

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MON

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DANCE PARTY JAMS FOR THE YOUNG, RESTLESS, AND BORED!

BIG SHOES. BIG HAIR. BIG ATTITUDES.

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SAT 817

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DANCE PARTY JAMS FOR THE YOUNG, RESTLESS, AND BORED!

THURS 20

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I SEE STARS

WITH CHASE YOUR WORDS & TULSEY PLACE

FRI 11

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STILL FOOLISH WOOZY FAR BACK

WITH BIG SHOES. SPECIAL BIG HAIR. GUESTS BIG ATTITUDES.

FRI 21

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NO FOOLISH REQUEST FAR FRIDAY BACK

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& 2000S GEMS!

WED 12

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WITH DROWN IN ASHES & OFF BY AN INCH

SAT 22

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TORSTUM CD RELEASE PARTY

WITH SLIP ONS AND GUESTS

SAT 12

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NITE*MOVES

FOOLISH FAR BACK

DANCE PARTY JAMS FOR THE YOUNG, RESTLESS, AND BORED!

BIG SHOES. BIG HAIR. BIG ATTITUDES.

TICKETS CAN BE PURCHASED ONLINE VIA BILTMORECABARET.COM, EVENTBRITE.COM OR IN PERSON AT RED CAT RECORDS OR THE VOGUE THEATRE BOX OFFICE


Davers - Davers Foxwarren - Foxwarren Heavydive - Warn the Dark

Clocking in at around three minutes a piece,

the tracks include the previously unreleased

“Some Faces,” “Bite My Hip” and “Boys.” Not to

be confused with Small Faces, “Some Faces” gets

around town with a strummy, upbeat energy that

suggests early Stones and Animals smoking hash

in a back alley. Equally short and punchy, “Bite My

Hip” was later reworked and issued as “Lagartija

Nick,” but here it’s a jukebox boogie that does

the twist in pointy leather boots. Yearning after

Blondie, the skankin’ “Harry” stirs up a caffeinated

coffin hop. The quirky sing-talk caricatures turn

cranky on “Boys” with its terse vocals and goading

percussion. Then there’s the real reason you’re

going to pick up this album, the slowly unravelling

funeral dirge for the beloved Dracula of the silver

screen, “Bela Lugosi’s Dead.”

Glory in the familiar spinal rat-a-tat and

slithering strings as their immortal muse coasts

across the room like a shadow. What had once

seemed so desolate and lonesome now explodes

with life thanks to engineer Mandy Parnell

(Aphex Twin, Björk, Brian Eno) who painstakingly

remastered the original analogue tapes. Every

tiny sound and gesture is set in high relief as the

atmospheric 9:36 runtime creeper returns to vinyl

for the first time in three decades. Cherished

phantom of fandom, The Count himself bleeds

through speakers and headphones with a

phenomenal vividness that cries out for a virgin

bride and yet another spin.

• Christine Leonard

Daniel Romano

Finally Free

New West Records

After releasing two surprise albums to ring in

2018, Daniel Romano returns with a third set of

songs to ring out this tumultuous year. Three

full-length albums in one year (plus nine solo

albums over the last 10 years, amongst EPs and

other projects) might sound like too many, but

this musical shape shifter (seriously, he even

looks strikingly different across the varying album

covers) has made every single album sound

impressively distinct from any of the others.

This time out he mostly channels ’60s folk

music (but not like Bob Dylan who he already

mimicked on 2017’s Modern Pressure) coming

across sounding like a modern James Taylor at

times and like The Birds at others. Here on Finally

Free, Romano has once again dropped the twang

and pedal steel guitar that marked some of his

earlier work and embraced soaring melodies

alongside beautifully crafted music that isn’t

afraid to occasionally go heavier than the listener

may be expecting. This prolific artist is even more

impressive when you consider that he plays and

writes almost all of the music and lyrics on his

many diverse albums.

Fans of his previous work will want to tune in to

see which way he’s steering the ship this time,

and those who may be unfamiliar with his music

would do well to check out his entire catalogue to

appreciate such a diverse and talented artist.

• Craig Douglas

Davers

Davers

Oscar St. Records

O Brother, there art thou! Meet Davers, formerly

known as David Lang, founder of indie rock

mainstay Current Swell. He’s the denim-shirted

crooner with sunshine on his shoulder and a song

in his heart. Presenting five tracks laid out under

the eye of engineer/producer Colin Stewart (Black

Mountain, Dan Mangan, Cave Singers), Davers’

eponymous EP has the vintage feel of dusty

dungarees and a mouthful of fine BC wine.

Light floods through the cracks in opening cut

“Brother Brother” with its wire and wood notes

of tobacco, oak, leather and Young. Childhood

fireside tales tug at the apron strings of truth

as Davers praises the wrinkles around your

eyes on the folksy “I Watched You Grow Up,”

flooded with solar energy and bass drum wombpulse.

The methodical uprising of “Tooth and

Nail” recalls the spiritual solidarity of a Woody

Guthrie union ballad. Meanwhile, the plucky

ivory tickling on “Heart of Glass” conjures up a

bus stop busker romance, before rolling into the

altruistic troubadour’s march, “Put Your Pain on

Me.” Accepting the weight of the world without

resignation, Davers turns out a gentle answer and

melds all the broken pieces back together with

guitar gold; kintsugi for the soul. If you see his case

ajar, be sure to toss Davers a fiver.

• Christine Leonard

Foxwarren

Foxwarren

Arts & Crafts

Regina, Saskatchewan singer-songwriter Andy

Shauf continues his poetic journey with Foxwarren,

a new acoustic/indie rock group he formed with

childhood friends Darryl and Avery Kissick and

Dallas Bryson.

After being shortlisted for prestigious honors

such as the SOCAN Songwriting Prize and the

Polaris Music Prize, it might be hard for Shauf

to shield himself from the inevitable acclaim

or backlash (or both) that could come from an

entirely new venture. Fortunately, Foxwarren

arrives without any colossal expectations and

instead just delivers a pleasurable, uninterrupted,

and coherent piece of work that he can definitely

be proud of.

While their path is certainly forged from

Shauf’s mellow, introspective lyrics and acoustic

troubadour roots, Foxwarren adds just enough

spice to distance itself from his solo work. The

songs on this debut feel fleshed out and complete,

often travelling to new heights and introducing

innovative flourishes into the fold within a four or

five minute span.

Previously released single “To Be” is sure to be a

future live staple, with it’s chilled out strumming

pattern and unexpected - but genuine - vintage

guitar solo.

Up-tempo track “Everything Apart” keeps things

interesting, mixing Radiohead breakbeats with

boogie-woogie synth soundscapes.

Handclaps drive “Sunset Canyon,” while the

swirly, phasing background of “Fall Into A Dream”

takes you to another planet and back.

Named after the small town in Manitoba,

Foxwarren’s debut is a treasure worth of addition

to your vinyl collection. Don’t be surprised if you

see this one on the Polaris shortlist next year as

well.

• Trevor Morelli

Heavydive

Warn the Dark

Independent

Shake off the sadness and gloom. Delve below

the surface, beyond image and shallow facade,

into the warm, wet heart’s blood of the matter.

That’s what post-punk trio Heavydive want you

to do with their new release, Warn the Dark.

Generating an atmosphere of rainy rendezvous

and passion-fogged car windows, “Room 213”

mounts an impressionistic painting within an ’80s

synth and drone framework. Prone to free-falling

through memory, vocalist/bassist Randall Squires,

guitarist Juan Ortiz and drummer Santiago Ortiz

conduct a hovering shoegaze séance to contact

their former selves. Soon the mellow blush of

“When the Sunsets” pinches the pallor from your

cheeks and whispers a hot breathy secret in your

ear. Their subtly persuasive soft sell continues

with the windy ruminations of “Wax Dreams,”

featuring delicate guitar threads that bow down

to the cool nonchalance of Squires’ narratives. The

instrumental interludes with nostalgia samples

deliberately divides the joy; segmenting the EP’s

tracks like the chapters of your John Hughes-pink

diary. Snagged in a complex crash of emotion,

the shimmering scales of “Sirens” drowns out

existential angst with a cascade of lush modern

RIO

THEATRE

1660 EAST BROADWAY

DECEMBER

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5

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7

DECEMBER

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DECEMBER

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DECEMBER

18

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22

PAUL ANTHONY’S

TALENT TIME

11th Annual Christmas Special!

RIKI OH: THE STORY OF RICKY

Friday Late Night Movie

Filmmakers in attendance

THIS MOUNTAIN LIFE

RABBIT

COMING TO AMERICA

Friday Late Night Movie

AMADEUS

DECEMBER The Fictionals Present:

IMPROV AGAINST HUMANITY

Ho Ho Holiday Special

#IAHATRIO

19

DECEMBER

20

DECEMBER

DECEMBER

DECEMBER

24

DECEMBER

28

JANUARY

1

STORY STORY LIE:

Family Feuds

BAD TIMES AT THE EL ROYALE

THE PRINCESS BRIDE

THE LAST UNICORN

Vancouver Premiere!

FLASH GORDON

MID90S

It’s Ricki Lake Day!

WEED THE PEOPLE

Vancouver Premiere!

John Waters’

HAIRSPRAY

THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT

DIAL CODE SANTA

Cult French classic!

The Gentlemen Hecklers Present:

DIE HARD 2: DIE HARDER

THE CRITICAL HIT SHOW!

#DNDLive

THE SOUND OF MUSIC

Singalong!

*Also Dec. 27

DIEHARD

Friday Late Night Movie

LOVE ACTUALLY

BATMAN RETURNS

IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE

*Also Dec. 22

Ralph Bakshi’s

THE LORD OF THE RINGS

40th Anniversary Screening!

Ridley Scott’s

BLADERUNNER

THE BIG LEBOWSKI

AKIRA

COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.RIOTHEATRE.CA

December 2018 35


Jacco Gardner - Somnium Jeff Goldblum and the Mildred Snitzer Orchestra Mariah Carey - Caution Mumford & Sons - Delta Rhye - Blood Remixed

textures. Scholars of goosebump-raising

intimacy, the brooding beaus behind

Warn the Dark are intensely curious

about your inner wallflower. Let’s hope

they ask you to prom and pin a Smiths

poster over your bed.

• Christine Leonard

Jacco Gardner

Somnium

Polyvinyl

For his third full length release, Jacco

Gardner has made some serious

changes. The record is entirely

instrumental, bare of even any nonverbal

vocal decorum. Instead, the

Dutch solo artist asks an array of

vintage synthesizers to do the talking.

Though Somnium is much more

cinematic than the back catalogue, it’s

not a sharp left turn but a slight change

in direction, expertly blending the

baroque pop of the Jacco we know and

ambient synth-scapes of the Jacco we

are discovering.

The record begins with “Rising,” a

Vangelis-level synthesizer trip that

may as well be the name for the LP,

as it is a seamless whole. Throughout

the tracklist, synths soar and warble,

everything grainy as an old photo.

The rhythms are simple but engaging,

endowing an energy to songs like the

second to last, “Descending,” which

brings the spacious synth high to an

end. Even without vocabulary on its

side, Somnium clearly communicates

the dialled musicianship and widespanning

vision of an artist evolving.

• Judah Schulte

Jeff Goldblum and the

Mildred Snitzer Orchestra

The Capitol Studio Sessions

Universal Music Canada

Jeff Goldblum, like a male model

Hansel, is so hot right now. It should

come as no surprise that he’s releasing

a jazz LP, his debut, The Capitol Studio

Sessions, with his band the Mildred

Snitzer Orchestra. That’s just Cool 101,

right? However, it may surprise you

that the album is actually really good.

Almost too good. An accomplished

pianist, Goldblum has been performing

live shows in L.A. with his band since

the ‘90s and this LP captures a recent

performance. Chock-full of appearances

by great guests such as trumpet master

Till Bronner sizzle throughout, while

vocalists Haley Reinhart and Imelda

May both crush it.

Still wondering about the classic

Goldblum-brand of nonsense that

true fans have come to expect? There

is some. Goldblum’s banter with

Reinhart on “My Baby Just Cares for

Me” is hysterical and his duet with

comedian Sarah Silverman on “Me and

My Shadow” is pure gold. However,

they fade most of the live show banter

to make room for, you know, songs.

Perhaps the producers thought to leave

us wanting more? Well, if do you need

more there’s a video on YouTube of

Goldblum purring for ten solid hours!

Fortunately, The Capitol Studio Sessions

is too sophisticated for that. This

production is actually about the music

and uh, uh, yes, yes, aaah… it delivers.

• Trevor Campbell

Mumford & Sons

Delta

Island Records

The inevitable trajectory of a

geographic delta is toward the opening

of a much larger body of water.

Mumford & Sons makes it to the ocean

with Delta (Gentlemen of the Road,

Island Records), their fourth studio

release. Orchestrally gigantic, swollen

really, Delta trials electronic, R&B

and quasi-experimental sensibilities,

utilizing a talent buffet of almost a

hundred musicians in recorded sessions

with the band and producer Paul

Epworth of The Church Studios in

London. There are plenty of thundering

climaxes and rousing one-liners to

identify this as Mumford-made but like

Wilder Mind (2013) before it, Delta

doesn’t pander to the cozy folk-ish

barn rattle that put the British quartet

on the mainstream map with Sigh No

More (2009) and Babel (2012). Delta is

like grumpy, tangential Coldplay, which

has its moments.

Marcus Mumford possesses one of

those satisfyingly creaky voices that

lets him get away with insipid lyrics on

otherwise thoughtful and interesting

songs like “Wild Heart” and “Darkness

Inside”. The mixed bag does perplex

though, with anthemic, country-rock

choruses on “Forever” and digital dodads

on “Picture You.” “Beloved” and

“Slip Away” have the stadium fireworks

covered, while “The Wild” revels in the

drama of its layered symphony. This is

genre-dabbling at its most luxurious

and there doesn’t appear to be any

turning back to dusty old folk rock for

Mumford & Sons.

• Sarah Bauer

Mariah Carey

Caution

Epic Records

Mariah is finally having fun again on

Caution. Nothing ruffles her feathers

anymore. Men disappoint her but she

finds it amusing. This is a simple record

with catchy tracks. It might as well have

been released in the ’90s since it sits

in the same league as “Daydream” and

“Butterfly”. Just like these albums, the

tracklist is a curt ten songs oscillating

between giving your ex the finger and

professing old-fashioned love for your

present honey. “GTFO” is a calm breakup

song about Mariah running out of

patience for drama while the sexy and

seductive title track is a manual for how

to correctly date MC. “No No” is an

infectious earworm about warding off

unwanted affections. This could be the

anthem for a #metoo movement if you

listen closely enough. On “Distance”

Mariah teams up with Ty Dolla $ign, for

a romantic snub to the haters, “they just

want to be us they don’t want to see

us going the distance.” Mariah brings

her flavour to the melody of every

song. There are some interesting names

in the song credits as well – Porter

Robinson, Skrillex and 22-year old

Ontario producer, Luca Polizzi. Mariah

has struck gold by keeping it simple on

this album and cancelling out the noise

of the last decade.

• Prachi Kamble

Rhye

Blood Remixed

Last Gang Records

Dreamy Canadian R&B duo Rhye are

capping the year off with a remixed

re-release of their emotionally cathartic

and heart-wrenching album Blood

titled Blood Remixed. What was

originally a gentle and sexy album that

personified the tears that collected

at the corners of your eyes after

heartbreak has been transformed into a

kick-ass collection of punchy and bass

heavy house tracks.

Rather than being the band listeners

seek to set the mood or reminisce on

the past, Blood Remixed makes Rhye’s

tracks less about being alone in your

feelings of unrequited love to finding

love under the flashing lights of a dance

floor at three in the morning.

The biggest surprise from Blood

Remixed is that it surpasses Blood in its

uniqueness and becomes the superior

album.

Milosh’s surreal androgynous

vocals are arguably some of the most

impressive in current R&B, but with the

added flare of break-beats and deep

house his vocals transcend to become

something much more powerful.

With features from notable

producers such as Washed Out,

Poolside, Jacques Greene and Little

Dragon, Blood Remixed is given the

funkiest treatment possible and comes

out the other side as a formidable

contender for the best release on Rhye’s

discography.

• Joey Lopez

36

December 2018


LIVE

Photo by Zee Khan

Drake with Migos and Roy Woods

Rogers Arena

November 3, 2018

Rogers Arena looked decidedly different

than usual. Instead of a stage set up to

one side, tucked away and giving some

spectators an unquestionably better view

than others, the arena’s centre had been

transformed into a massive platform,

allowing Drake to interact with the

thousands who came to hear him perform.

In his own words, though, this night wasn’t

about him – it was about all of us sharing

an experience, right then and there.

Drake’s musical catalogue is huge, and

instead of choosing a handful of hits to

focus on, he took a more indecisive-friendwith-the-aux-cord

role, bouncing from

15-second snippet to 15-second snippet.

The crowd’s energy never waned, though

– his fan base clearly knows his songs well,

and they sang along to every word right

on beat. Because of the extensive setlist,

the show seemed to go on for hours, and

Drake repeatedly told the crowd that he

would continue performing as long as they

wanted – or needed – him to. From “0 to

100 / The Catch Up” to “Controlla” to “Mob

Ties” and “Know Yourself,” there was a wide

range of songs from all the touch points of

his career.

Drake is a performer at heart, whether

through music, acting or otherwise, and at

his series of Vancouver shows, he made this

evident. At one point, a life sized Ferrari

balloon floated through the crowd. When

thousands of people show up to see you in

a city you’ve touted as your second home,

you make sure not to disappoint, and the

performance art aspect of this tour shows

that Drake knows this.

Plus, all three of the Migos actually

showed up.

• Jordan Yeager

FEATURED CONCERTS

VICTORIA, BC

THE DUDES

PLUS ACRES OF LIONS & TROPHY DAD

CAPITAL BALLROOM // FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28

Jorja Smith

The Orpheum Theatre

November 20, 2018

The illustrious carved walls of the

Orpheum Theatre housed an angel. Jorja

Smith, the 21-year old R&B sensation

emerged in 2016 with her debut single

“Blue Lights.” The song garnered serious

attention, due not only to Smith’s

breathtaking vocal form, but also to its

lyrical relevance. The following year she

appeared on Drake’s More Life, before

releasing her first studio effort, Lost

and Found (2018). Smith’s music is an

intoxicating blend of R&B, jazz and soul,

with hip-hop occasionally thrown in the

mix.

Gliding along the stage with grace

that held captive the gaze of the

audience, ingraining herself into the

memories of everyone lucky enough

to witness her. The crowd rose up with

a roar and stayed standing from the

moment Jorja sauntered on to the

moment she said her goodbyes. Be

it “Lost and Found” or “Tomorrow,”

“Teenage Fantasy” or “The One,” the

audience hung on every note, every flick

of her wrist, reciting the lyrics with an

intensity and clarity that moved even

the singer.

Smith emitted a permanent glow,

rapturing the venue on piano-led

“Don’t Watch Me Cry,” which she

wrote at 18, and “Let Me Down,” a song

she performed live for the first time

that night. She finished the set with

much loved “On My Mind,” backlight

illuminating her silhouette in a way that

could only be described as ethereal.

Without a doubt, Jorja Smith is here

to stay.

• Maryam Azizli

Photo by Darrole Palmer

TAGGART & TORRENS

PLUS GUESTS

CAPITAL BALLROOM // THURSDAY, JANUARY 17

Photo by Darrole Palmer

Andre Nickatina

Harbour Event Centre

November 17, 2018

Andre Nickatina has held his

position as the godfather of the

Bay Area Hyphy rap scene for

more than 25 years, amassing a

cult-like following across the globe.

A celebrated discography of 30+

albums, featuring co-signs from

Mac Dre, Smoov-E and E-40, Andre

has put in an impressive amount

of work. His new album, Pisces, a

sold out North American Tour and

recent resurrection of legendary 75

Girls record label are indication that

he has plans to keep it going.

Nickatina took the stage at

Harbour Event Centre to a packed

crowd of fans. Rapping the classics

“Ayo for Yayo,” “Andre N Andre”

and an acapella version of “Train

With No Love.” A large amount of

the spectators knew the words to

every song. An even larger amount

of the crowd took advantage of the

seemingly relaxed cannabis policy

at the venue, the lyrics “smokin’

weed like its legal” have taken on a

new meaning in post-legalization

B.C.

Dressed in a crisp white T and

beanie, Nickatina exudes the

calculated demeanour of a true

O.G., spitting tracks from every

era of his prolific career. He went

for quality over quantity, keeping

the set short and sweet. After

finishing his last track he quickly

exited the stage, leaving the crowd

thirsty for an encore. Other than

a few energized attempts at an

“Annnndddree” chant to lure him

back out, the show wrapped up and

the hoards went home red-eyed

and satisfied.

• Austin Taylor

THE TREWS

PLUS ALTAMEDA

CAPITAL BALLROOM // TUESDAY, JANUARY 22

OLD MAN LUEDECKE

PLUS GUESTS

CAPITAL BALLROOM // SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2

FOR FULL CONCERT LISTINGS & TO PURCHASE

TICKETS, PLEASE VISIT:

WWW.ATOMIQUEPRODUCTIONS.COM

FACEBOOK /ATOMIQUEPRODUCTIONS TWITTER @ATOMIQUEEVENTS

December 2018 37


NEW MOON RISING

YOUR MONTHLY HOROSCOPE

QUAN YIN DIVINATION

Month of the Wood Rat

In Chinese folklore, the quick-witted Rat

tricked the Ox to take first place at the

end of a long journey. Loved by many

family and friends, Rats are generous

and loyal to those they choose as family,

and enjoy living a peaceful life with

those they hold dear. Strong-willed and

optimistic, the Wood Rat will scrimp

and save money, only to spend it all in

one shot when something strikes his

fancy. This month will favour the clever

Monkey and talented Dragon with their

business interests, as well as the stable,

finish-what-you start, hard-working

Ox, who may feel more cheerful and

optimistic now. The impulsive Horse

will face trials and opportunities for

growth or change, and Rabbits face

romantic dramas. Sheep will need to lay

low to stay out of harm’s way.

RABBIT (PISCES): Preparing for

change can stir up emotional unrest

and it is wise to take one thing at a time

and proceed gradually. Growth is only

possible when we wait for the right

moment to act, but the time is here, so

act now.

DRAGON (ARIES): Fine dining and

networking can bring opportunities,

so get out into the world, attend

popular events, and feel the good vibes!

Let go of any attachments to past

circumstances, as they will only hold

you back from the new things that

await.

SNAKE (TAURUS): It’s impossible to

control others. Release attachment to

outcomes – even if they seem logical

and correct from your perspective,

illusions may interfere with clarity now.

Allow people to come and go as they

please, and look at their patterns to

reveal the truth.

HORSE (GEMINI): Highs and lows

make for a challenging yet exciting time.

Instead of being pulled off balance,

make an effort to do your part or give

support where it is due. In this way you

avoid misfortune and bring people back

to your side.

SHEEP (CANCER): Health matters take

centre stage in your world and put all

other things on second priority. Use

this time to retreat and work on what

has been spoiled through neglect or

decay. The path to recovery starts with

an apology.

MONKEY (LEO): Look for ways to

share the love you have in your heart

with everyone in your life, including

yourself. Coming from a place of love

makes all the things you say full of grace

and honour. Delight in moments of

truth.

ROOSTER (VIRGO): Inspiration for

creative endeavours will keep you on

track this month, especially if boredom

has set in. Whether it’s meal planning,

music-making, painting or fine art,

allow for spontaneous expression and

you will be at your best now.

DOG (LIBRA): It is inevitable that

certain times in life are a test of our ego.

With humility, grace, and hard work,

you can survive any storm. Patient inner

strength and quiet perseverance set you

up for future success.

PIG (SCORPIO): Letting your emotions

run wild can take you away from the

careful balance you have created for

yourself. Seek out those whose hearts

are true to share your inner fears with,

and with all else, put on a happy face!

RAT (SAGITTARIUS): Your ideas

require refinement and reflection

before they come to fruition. Leave

room for unexpected changes and

challenges and give extra time and

space for resolutions. There is wisdom

in long-term vision.

OX (CAPRICORN): Naysayers, step

aside! You’ve got energy, charisma,

integrity and charm, and those around

you appreciate your stable and

structured nature. Let your talents shine

with confidence – your friends and

family love you.

TIGER (AQUARIUS): Group dynamics

are managed best when strong leaders

take on legitimate power and authority.

Don’t be afraid to exert your influence

to achieve what is best for all, especially

when your primary motivation is the

continuance of good for its own sake.

Susan Horning is a Feng Shui

Consultant and Bazi Astrologist living

and working in East Vancouver. Find

out more about her at QuanYin.ca.

38

December 2018


CANADA’S LARGEST INDEPENDENT CONCERT PROMOTER

UPCOMING SHOWS

CALPURNIA

December 21 & 22

The Vogue Theatre

HEY OCEAN!

WITH SCHWEY & CARMANAH

December 8- The Vogue Theatre

VNV NATION

WITH HOLYGRAM & THE RAIN WITHIN

December 9 - Imperial

SAINT JHN

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

December 11 - Imperial

IGNITE

W/ DROWN IN ASHES & OFF BY AN INCH

December 12 - The Biltmore Cabaret

REDD KROSS

WITH DALE CROVER BAND

December 15 - The Biltmore Cabaret

JOHN GRANT

W/ TWO MEDICINE

December 20 - Imperial

STILL WOOZY

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

January 11 - The Biltmore Cabaret

THE CRYSTAL METHOD

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

January 12- Imperial

REMEMBER SPORTS

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

January 13 - The Biltmore Cabaret

TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT MRGCONCERTS.COM

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