World 12-12-18

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The World
World Publications
Barre-Montpelier Road
Fab-Yule-Ous Finds
Holiday Gift Gift Guide

CENTRAL VERMONT’S FAVORITE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

Vol. 47, No. 32 403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641 • 479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 • Fax (802) 479-7916 December 12, 2018

On the Web: www.vt-world.com Email: sales@vt-world.com

George Herbert Walker

Bush: A Few Memories

pages 4 & 5

Spaulding High School

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page 9

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December 22 & 23

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Collecting the teddy bears and passing them on to the Salvation Army with the help of the Barre Rotary

Club recently were, L-R: Go Calendars-Games-Toys owner Craig Hahn; assistant store manager

Karissa MacAulay; Salvation Army volunteer Jenn White; Lt. Heather West; volunteer Haley Nadeau;

and kneeling in front is Barre Rotary Club President Leeann Marchinelli.

36th World Santa Gets

Help From Its Friends

Go Calendars-Games-Toys at the Berlin Mall

have donated over 100 brand new teddy bears

to this year’s 36th annual WORLD SANTA

Project to provide new coats, hats, and mittens

to area children via the Salvation Army

of Barre. The teddy bears were made possible

by a promotion that Go Calendars-Games-

Toys held during November and December.

“Everybody loves a teddy bear,” said Craig

Robideau, store manager, “And I’m glad

this year we chose the World Santa to get the

bears!” Cheryl Peterson hand-knitted over

500 pairs of mittens and hats, while Pat Nelson

of Nelson Publishing brought in six brand

new coats for the children. The Barre Rotary

Club is helping out on all levels of this project

and will get help from the Central Vermont

Young Professionals to wrap the 160 gifts

and deliver them to the Salvation Army. Kay

Roberts Santamore and Ruth Weeks from The

World will once again organize the wrapping

extravaganza.

®

OF BARRE

The Barre & Central Vermont

Rotary Clubs along with

The Salvation Army of Barre

announce:

2018

SANTA

PROJECT

To purchase new winter

coats, hats, and mittens

for children of need in

central Vermont.

Send your check to:

WORLD Santa Project

403 US Rt. 302, Barre, VT 05641

or call Gary Hass at

479-2582 or 1-800-639-9753

for more information.

SPECIAL THANKS TO

GO CALENDARS-TOYS-GAMES

AT THE BERLIN MALL

FOR THEIR DONATION OF 100 TEDDY BEARS

Thank You To This Week’s Contributors At Press Time

Betsy Kelty & Sandra Leopold

Helene Thomas In Memory of

Perley Thomas

Barre Rotary Club

Montpelier Rotary Club

Pat Austin

Mary Perreault

Robert & Mary Ann Couture

Donald, Stephen & Jeffrey Lyons

Inabelle Peake & Patricia Peake

Aja

Beth Sabens, Kim Daniels &

Kiplyn Sabens

Bruce & Irene Haskell

Cheryl Peterson

Nelson Publishing

Patricia Poirier

Michael & Betsy Cody In Memory

of Bud & Bettie Cody

Gary & Carole Hass In Memory

of Nadine & Harry Dietrich,

Ed & Irene Cook

Nancy Couch In Memory of

Allan Couch

Christine Litchfield In Memory of

Arthur Hill Jr.

Salvation Army Lt. Heather West and volunteer Jenn White hoisted bags of new teddy bears on their

shoulders and headed back to Barre to await packing in the 36th Annual World Santa Project.

SANTA’S MAILBAG

We are organizing a very special Air Mail

to the North Pole because we know that

Santa reads and gets gift ideas from The

WORLD, too. Any child who would like to

write a personal letter to Santa, may do

so in The WORLD.

Please include your

name and age. Letters

must be received by

5pm on Dec. 13.

Send your letters to:

Dear Santa, c/o The WORLD

403 US Rte. 302-Berlin • Barre, VT 05641-2274

or email sales@vt-world.com

CENTRAL

VERMONT’S

BEST

COUNTRY

page 2 The WORLD December 12, 2018


Choquette Wins Matthew Lyon

First Amendment Award

Joseph L. Choquette III of Downs Rachlin Martin PLLC has

been selected to receive the Matthew Lyon Award for his lifetime

commitment to the First Amendment and the public’s right to

know the truth in Vermont.

The Vermont Press Association will honor Choquette at its

annual awards banquet Thursday, Dec. 13 at the Capitol Plaza in

Montpelier.

Choquette has spent three decades in governmental relations

work, including 19 years as the director of external affairs at

Downs Rachlin Martin, one of the state’s top law firms.

Choquette serves as a lobbyist for several major organizations,

including the Vermont Press Association, which represents the

interests of 11 daily and about four dozen non-daily newspapers.

VPA President Lisa Loomis of The Valley Reporter in

Waitsfield said Choquette has been a key figure over the years on

the front lines in the fight by the press association and other

groups seeking greater public accountability in state and local

government.

Loomis said Choquette’s work involved a wide range of

efforts, including that courts and government officials ensure

public records are made easily available to Vermonters. Also that

government meetings and court hearings are open to Vermonters,

she said.

“Joe has been the eyes and ears at the Vermont Statehouse

when it comes to public records, open meetings, court access and

identifying some ill-advised proposed legislation,” Loomis said.

The Lyon award honors people who have an unwavering

devotion to the First Amendment and to the principle that the

public’s right to know the truth is essential in a self-governed

democracy, Loomis said. Lyon’s portrait hangs in the first floor

hall at the Statehouse.

Earlier Choquette served as executive director of the Vermont

Petroleum Association and director of marketing and communication

for the Vermont Chamber of Commerce.

He also previously worked for the University of Vermont initially

as director of sports information and later as the director of

news media relations. He also worked as a sportswriter for the

Rutland Herald and Eagle Times in Claremont, N.H. He is a past

president of the Vermont Sportswriters and Sportscasters

Association, the Vermont Society of Association Executives, the

Montpelier Rotary Club and the Montpelier Chamber Orchestra

Society. Choquette lives with his wife, Tammie, in Barre.

• • •

Passumpsic Bank Announces

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Credit for a casino, and small business experience as the owner

of a coin and jewelry exchange. His community service has

included teaching financial responsibility classes to junior and

senior high school classes. Joel looks forward to becoming an

active member of the central Vermont community.

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December 12, 2018 The WORLD page 3


George Herbert Walker Bush: A Few Memories

By Tim Hayward

As I watched the State funeral of the late President

George H. W. Bush, I, like I’m sure so many others,

was moved to tears. The decency and dedication of

this man knew no bounds: to his Country, his family, to all

those he knew and touched, and to everyone else. We were

truly blessed by his life. He led by example, and we are forever

in his debt.

I had the good fortune of first meeting George Bush in

probably 1978. He was making the rounds as he explored

seeking the 1980 Republican nomination for the presidency.

At the time, I was on the staff of Governor Dick Snelling. I,

and perhaps a dozen others, met with him in the executive

suite of the Montpelier Tavern. It was an intimate gathering;

he talking about his life, his recent experience as the U.S.

envoy to China, and a bit about why he’d like to be president.

I was already prepared to like him. Dick Mallary, whom I

worked with in the Governor’s office, got to know him when

he, Dick, served in Congress. Dick thought highly of him, and

that was my cue. I never regretted it, not for a moment. A year

later, Jim Douglas joined me on Snelling’s staff and we conspired

to get the Governor to support Bush. We failed, even

after getting Bush to fly to Montpelier to seek his support!

In the end, though, Ronald Reagan received the GOP

nomination, and selected Bush as his running mate. Seven

years later, Vice President Bush was again seeking the

Republican nomination for president. Needless to say I had

stayed in touch with certain folks in the Bush organization and

was pleased to be appointed the Vice President’s Finance

Chairman in Vermont. My two Co-Chairs were the late Bob

Gannett of Brattleboro and Hilton Wick of Burlington, both of

the same decency mold that shaped Bush himself. Jack

Lindley of Montpelier was appointed the State Chairman.

The Vice President visited Vermont a number of times during

the campaign but to me the most meaningful was a luncheon

fundraiser we held in Burlington at the then Radisson

Hotel. It was a $500 a plate event, and as I recall, we had

about 100 guests. The VP flew into Burlington in the late

morning of July 16, 1987, and my wife, Sue, and I and a few

others greeted him at the airport. Sue and I had the pleasure of

riding with the VP in his limo to the Radisson.

What a ride!

Small talk with the Vice President, and, if you don’t like

traffic, a very fast trip to the hotel! Once there, a reception and

the luncheon. I made some introductory remarks and introduced

the VP. He was very well received by just the folks we

were hoping would support him. After presenting him with a

jug of the purest Vermont maple syrup it was off to the airport,

and soon thereafter Air Force II departed. But the impression

he left stayed with all those he touched.

Now George Bush was well-known for his notes and thank

yous. Three days after the event a hand written note arrived in

our mail box. It was dated 7/16/87 “flying to D.C – AF II”.

Dear Tim-

Great job - I am very proud of what you wrought and very

pleased. I believe we can and will win that ‘beauty contest.’

(What Vermont’s presidential primary was then called).

Besides, it was great seeing so many friends again.

My thanks for all you’ve done – and are doing –

Love and thanks to Susan.

George B

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He was right! On March 1, 1988 George H. W. Bush garnered

49% of Vermont’s Republican beauty contest votes,

followed by Senator Bob Dole with 21%. He then went on to

secure the party’s nomination for President, and ultimately

win a landslide victory for the presidency. The 43rd Vice

President of the United States became its 41st President.

What a standard he set. Yes, the times have changed, but we

can’t stop striving. History, and the memory of George

Herbert Walker Bush, demand nothing less.

Tim Hayward and his wife Susan have lived in Middlesex,

with a twelve year hiatus in Montpelier, since 1969. He is a

graduate of Middlebury College, served in the U.S. Marine

Corps, and has worked for then Congressman Jim Jeffords,

Governor Dick Snelling, served as chief of staff for Governor

Jim Douglas and managed Phil Scott’s transition to the governor’s

office. He represented Middlesex in the Vermont

House of Representatives for one term in the 1970s. He, also,

worked at National Life Insurance Company and was for

many years the president of the Vermont Bankers Association.

He has served on numerous boards and commissions. He is an

avid hiker and enjoys “working in the woods.” He and Susan

have three grown children and seven grandchildren.

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A Sober Reckoning of George H. W. Bush’s Presidency

I

was

disappointed by the overwhelmingly positive bi-partisan

coverage of George H. W. Bush last week.

I know we are not supposed to speak ill of the dead.

And, since I didn’t know the guy personally, I will agree that

he was a nice guy and a loving family man. For all I know

he’s in heaven right now, chatting with the angels about why

the Astros couldn’t get the third out in some of those key

innings of the ALCS.

But he was a lousy president.

George H. W. Bush was a one-term president who got

37.7% of the popular vote when he ran for reelection. He left

office with the country mired in a recession.

Pat Buchanan was the undisputed intellectual champion of

the Republican Primary - successfully attacking President

Bush from the Left and paving the way for the Populist direction

the GOP would eventually move. In the general election,

more than a third of Republican voters jumped ship and voted

for Ross Perot.

Americans did not want four more years of President Bush.

“Read my lips, no new taxes.” Politicians lie. I am not

going to tear down President Bush because he lied and signed

a huge tax increase into law. I am going to tear down President

Bush because he was a Republican who raised taxes!

Many of you don’t care for Republicans. I have some serious

issues with the Grand Old Party myself. However, we

really do need one party to show restraint and keep the government

from taking all of our money. A Republican President

who raises taxes is like a homeless shelter with no beds that

is just as cold as outside; it’s a deeply troubling surprise.

Politicians talk a good game about making the rich “pay

their fair share.” But they don’t want fairness; they want as

much money as they can get from whomever they can steal it.

$5 per pack cigarette taxes and State Lotteries are aimed

squarely at poorer Americans, trying to move as much spare

cash from poor pockets into the hands of rich politicians.

A Republican politician who agrees to raise taxes isn’t

being responsible, he is being rapacious.

President Bush had a splendid opportunity to usher in a

new era of peace after the Cold War. With his imperialist

domination plan called New World Order, he eagerly accomplished

the exact opposite.

Instead of extending a sincere offer of friendship to Russia,

Bush cynically supported drunken buffoon Boris Yeltsen.

Instead of doing the right thing and disbanding NATO,

President Bush began to extend the belligerent alliance right

up to Russia’s doorstep. We have perpetual hostility with

Russia and no one deserves more blame than President Bush.

The Bush Administration quietly promised their old buddy

Saddam Hussein that the US military wouldn’t interfere in

any little Arab wars. When Hussein took the bait and conquered

Kuwait in 1990, President Bush reneged on his promise

Ḋesert Shield is remembered as a splendid little war, wiping

away the humiliation of Vietnam. On the battlefield, it

was a success. But the blowback was terrible.

The always amoral Saudi monarchy was perfectly happy to

let the US military use the Muslim holy land as a staging

ground for Desert Shield. Devout Muslims weren’t so keen on

the idea.

Have you ever wondered when and why Islamic terrorists

like Osama Bin Laden began calling Americans “Crusaders”?

This is when and this is why. I am not saying that Desert

Shield was a grand evil scheme to lead us into perpetual hostility

with the Muslim world. But I do know that no one

deserves more blame than President Bush.

I am not trying to spread hate here. I honestly hope that Mr.

Bush is in heaven right now having a lovely conversation

with Saint Michael about Justin Verlander’s slider. But he

was clearly a bad President. We agreed on that in 1992,

remember?

He Will Be Missed

By William D. Moore,

President & CEO

Time stood still for

many last week as

we considered the

life and times of a truly

remarkable man,

President George H. W.

Bush. Many watched or

listened to the ceremonies

as the nation paid

tribute to an American hero, the former

leader of the free world.

The ceremonies of bidding farewell to an

American President have only happened 40

times since the birth of the Republic. Twelve

years ago, we honored President Gerald

Ford.

The full display of government turned out

to honor President Bush. His body lay in

state in the Rotunda of the Capitol. He was

only the 32nd person to receive such a distinction

in the last 166 years. The last person

to lie in state at the Capitol was Senator John

McCain who died in August. Eleven presidents

dating to Abraham Lincoln and two

vice presidents have lain in state there. Six

other members of Congress, three military

leaders, and the unknown soldiers from

World Wars I and II, the Korean War and the

Vietnam War are the only others.

I had the honor of meeting President Bush

twice. He truly was an extraordinary man. I

honestly believe that he was the most qualified

person elected president since George

Washington.

By now, everyone is familiar with his

story. He postponed going to college while

enlisting in the Navy at the outbreak of

America’s involvement in World War II. He

was the youngest Navy pilot at 18 years old

to earn his wings. He was shot down in the

Pacific Theater and received the Distinguished

Flying Cross for bravery. In total, he flew 58

combat missions and, besides the DFC,

received three Air Medals and the Presidential

Unit Citation awarded to the USS San

Jacinto.

After the war, he married his beloved

Barbara Pierce. Together, they had six children:

George; Robin (who died as a child);

Jeb (John); Neil; Marvin and Dorothy. He

captained the Yale baseball team where he

was Phi Beta Kappa. He and his family left

New Haven and headed to west Texas where

he founded a successful oil company.

He was elected to the House of

Representatives before losing in two attempts

at the U.S. Senate. He served as Ambassador

to the United Nations, Chairman of the

Republican National Committee, Chief of the

U. S. Liaison Office in the People’s Republic

of China, and Director of the Central

Intelligence Agency. Although he was unsuccessful

in his 1980 presidential bid, Ronald

Regan selected him as his vice president

where he served with distinction for eight

years.

As President of the United States, George

Bush was in the center of history. His White

House biography points out that, “Bush faced

a dramatically changing world, as the Cold

War ended after 40 bitter years, the

Communist empire broke up, and the Berlin

Wall fell. The Soviet Union ceased to exist;

and reformist President Mikhail Gorbachev,

whom Bush had supported, resigned. While

Bush hailed the march of democracy, he

insisted on restraint in U. S. policy toward

the group of new nations.” President

Gorbachev wrote last week in Time magazine,

“Our main accomplishment was our

agreement to destroy thousands of nuclear

weapons, both strategic and tactical. Together,

we helped to end conflicts in various parts of

the world. We laid the groundwork for a partnership

between our countries.”

The coalition that President Bush assembled

to push Iraq out of Kuwait was unprecedented.

Thirty-four nations – including

many from the Middle East – joined together

to free Kuwait.

On the domestic front, among other things,

he signed the American with Disabilities Act,

the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and

he oversaw the bailout of the failing savings

and loan banks. His efforts led to the enactment

of the No Child Left Behind Act. He

agreed to increase taxes after famously

declaring that when Congress would try to

raise taxes, they should read his lips, “No

new taxes!” The move likely cost him his

second term.

In retirement, when not jumping out of

planes or running his boat at high speeds off

the coast of Maine, he mostly stayed out of

the limelight. He did enter into a partnership

cum friendship with the man who defeated

him, President Bill Clinton, as they worked

together to raise hundreds of millions of dollars

for disaster relief efforts.

President Bush had a unique perspective,

putting the good of the nation ahead of his

own personal objectives. He was a decent

man with respect for all he came in contact

with, a deep almost reverence for the office

of the presidency, an unparalleled love of

country and an unbridled optimism that

working together, America could and would

achieve great things. He will be missed.

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403 U.S. Rt. 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641-2274

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December 12, 2018 The WORLD page 5


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Touched by Love International

Launches Shoe Drive Fundraiser

Touched by Love

International, Inc. (https://www.

touchebyloveinternational.com)

is conducting a shoe drive fundraiser

from now until Feb 1,

2019 to raise funds for orphan

care and prevention in Africa.

Touched by Love International

will earn funds based on the

total weight of the pairs of gently

worn, used and new shoes

collected, as Funds2Orgs will

issue a check for the collected

shoes. Those dollars will benefit

impoverished orphans and vulnerable

children and their caretakers

in Africa. Anyone can

help by donating clean, gently

worn, used and new shoes in the collection

box at the Barre City Police Department.

All donated shoes will then be redistributed

throughout the Funds2Orgs network of microenterprise

(small business) partners.

Funds2Orgs works with micro-entrepreneurs

in helping them create, maintain and grow

small businesses in developing countries

where economic opportunity and jobs are

limited. Proceeds from the sales of the shoes

collected in shoe drive fundraisers are used to

feed, clothe and house their families. One

budding entrepreneur in Haiti even earned

enough to send to her son to law school.

“We are excited about our shoe drive,” said

Holly Stockett, Founder and President of

TBLI. “We know that most people have extra

shoes in their closets they would like to

donate to us. By doing so, we raise money to

feed, clothe. educate, and improve lives of

orphans and vulnerable children and their

caretakers, as well as to develop measures

toward orphan prevention. We also have the

chance to help families in developing nations

who need economic opportunities. It’s a win-

• • •

win for everyone.”

By donating

gently worn, used

and new shoes to

the Touched by

Love International,

the shoes will be

given a second

chance and make a

difference in people’s lives around the world.

About Touched by Love International:

Touched by Love International is a registered

501c-3 humanitarian aid organization. Its mission

is to alleviate poverty and the spread of

HIV/AIDs in developing nations. By improving

orphan care and prevention measures and

by empowering the women who care for

them, TBLI hopes to make a difference in this

world.

Want to know how you can help or get

more involved? Please Contact: Holly

Stockett, Founder and President, Touched by

Love International, Inc., Office: (802) 476-

9699. Email: stockettholly@gmail.com.

VPIRG Applauds Bibens Ace

Hardware on Paint Stripper Policy

Bibens Ace Hardware has announced a

new policy ending the sale of paint strippers

containing the toxic chemicals methylene

chloride and N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP),

effective immediately. Bibens Ace is their

own buyer, which allows them to personally

and efficiently stock their locations, which

few other retailers can match. Their recent

decision supports their tradition of being “the

helpful place with a family face.”

Methylene chloride and NMP have been

found to pose unacceptable health risks to the

public, including cancer, harm to the nervous

system and childhood development, and

death.

Bibens Ace Hardware is the twelfth retailer

to ban these chemicals since May, joining

Lowe’s, Sherwin-Williams, The Home Depot,

Walmart, True Value, PPG Paints, AutoZone,

Kelly-Moore Paints, Canadian Tire, Home

Hardware, and Amazon.

“We applaud Bibens Ace Hardware for

prohibiting the sale of these harmful products,”

said Samantha Hurt, Environmental

Associate with the Vermont Public Research

Group. “As a well-respected local company,

they are setting the example for other local

businesses to follow suit.”

“Bibens Ace is not only committed to the

safety of our customers and residents of

Vermont, but also to reducing the usage of

hazardous chemicals to ensure the viability of

our environment in the future,” said Rick

Bibens, President of Bibens Ace Hardware.

“All of us at Bibens Ace are trying to help

where we can to make Vermont a safer environment

to live and work.”

Earlier this year, VPIRG held a press conference

outside a Lowe’s store in South

Burlington as part of a national campaign to

encourage the retailer to stop selling dangerously

toxic paint strippers. Lowe’s ended up

taking the requested action shortly thereafter.

Since 2017, Safer Chemicals, Healthy

Families’ Mind the Store campaign has led

the national campaign to persuade retailers to

phase out the sale of dangerous paint strippers.

Advocates have sent letters to top retailers, met

with over a dozen companies, organized

continued on next page

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page 6 The WORLD December 12, 2018

• • •

Vermont Climate Economy

Action Team Announces 2019

Action Priorities

The Vermont Climate Economy Action Team (CEAT) has

announced their 2019 agenda for advancing economic progress

and making Vermont more affordable by helping

Vermonters use energy more efficiently and meet their heating

and transportation needs with renewable energy sources.

“While the national economy is bustling, many areas of

Vermont are searching for new approaches to create jobs,

make communities more livable, and to attract and retain

young people. Vermont can be a leader in developing innovative

strategies to tackle climate change, and in doing so we

can help secure our economic future,” said CEAT Chair Joe

Fusco. “Through deeper investments in weatherization and

incentivizing a rapid transition to electric vehicles, Vermont

takes important steps to improve its aging housing stock and

make rural transportation more affordable. This agenda is

carefully targeted towards those Vermonters struggling to get

by who stand to gain most dramatically from reductions in

their heating and travel costs.”

The Vermont Climate Economy Action Team (CEAT)

serves as the leadership team of the Vermont Climate

Economy Partnership. Since 2016 it has been working to

advance initiatives to expand distributed energy generation

and efficiency, cultivate climate economy entrepreneurs and

startup businesses, and reduce Vermont’s carbon impact while

boosting innovation, creating jobs, and attracting youth to the

state. For a full outline of CEAT’s 2019 Action Agenda, vtrural.org.


Annual Holiday ARC/FUN Winter Dance

This Saturday at Bethany Church

The 33rd Annual Holiday Dinner Dance,

a fun holiday event coordinated by the

Central Vermont ARC and Families and

Friends United (FUN), will take place this

Saturday, Dec. 15, 6-9 p.m. at the Bethany

Church in Montpelier.

The “potluck affair” will start at 6 p.m.

and draw members of the ARC/FUN plus

family, friends, supervisors, supporters from

other associations with master of ceremony,

Jim Miller.

Miller, a Barre native, is a well known

multi-media rock musician and producer. He

has been helping with monthly events for

ARC/FUN for 32 years, and again will have

the dual role of being the DJ and MC.

“I always have the greatest feeling after

this event, and I know it’s the same for

everyone else,” Miller said, who is currently

mixing over 30 years of unreleased

music.

“Jim thoughtfully and successfully involves the audience in

parts of his performance and they respond with great enthusiasm,”

says Jim Lund, Executive Director of ARC.

Always receiving great support from the community for

these monthly events, Miller noted for the fifth time that the

State Launches Rural

Wastewater Infrastructure

Investment Program

A new village wastewater infrastructure program will invest

$350,000 to boost rural economic development in Vermont

and protect the environment. The Vermont Department of

Environmental Conservation (DEC), in collaboration with

other state agencies, federal partners and local organizations,

launched a pilot program earlier this month in Wolcott, East

Burke and West Burke.

“The Town of Wolcott is very excited to partner with DEC

to find wastewater solutions for our Village,” said Linda

Martin, Wolcott Town Clerk. “It is paramount to retaining

values of existing homes and businesses and to revitalize our

village businesses.”

Investing in wastewater infrastructure in village centers

protects Vermont’s historic village development patterns and

allows villages to treat sewage more effectively, preventing

discharges to groundwater and rivers.

“Community wastewater systems keep our villages healthy

and economically vibrant for a sustainable future,” said

Lynnette Claudon, an engineer for DEC. “This is an exciting

opportunity to partner with these villages to find wastewater

solutions. We’re looking forward to working with each community

to collect the necessary information to decide what

feasible, affordable options exist.”

The design and installation of rural wastewater infrastructure

projects is distinct from that of Vermont’s larger communities.

Many villages face significant hurdles, including the

high cost of installation compounded by a small user base.

This pilot program will help combat obstacles like these by

working with towns to collect data and complete preliminary

engineering designs for wastewater system improvements. For

the more than 150 villages that do not have community wastewater

systems, this pilot program is an important step forward.

The information gathered during the initial three-year phase

can be applied to future rural wastewater infrastructure projects

across the state.

“Vermont’s rural communities account for 61 percent of the

state’s population,” said Governor Phil Scott. “This pilot project

is an important step in working together to ensure residents

of these small towns and villages have access to clean, reliable

water to ensure safe communities and strong local economies.”

Recognizing the importance of this work in shaping the

state’s future, officials from Burke and Wolcott are partnering

with the DEC, the Vermont Agency of Commerce and

Community Development, the Vermont Department of Health,

the Vermont Rural Water Association, Rural Community

Assistance Program Solutions, and regional planning commissions

to embark on this three-year pilot project. Funding is

provided by the Northern Border Regional Commission

(NBRC) and Regional Engineering Planning Advance grants.

“One Burke is excited to collaborate with the DEC, the

NBRC and the town of Burke as we investigate wastewater

solutions for East and West Burke villages,” said Desiree

Hertz, chair of the One Burke community group. “Our task

force, Village Infrastructure Revitalization stands at the ready

to support the work ahead.”

For more information, visit villagewastewatersolutions.

vermont.gov

• • •

VPIRG continued from previous page

online petitions signed by hundreds of thousands of consumers,

and held a national “week of action” in more than a

dozen states.

Methylene chloride has been linked to more than 60 deaths

nationwide since 1980 and is linked to lung and liver cancer,

neurotoxicity, and reproductive toxicity. Since EPA proposed

its ban last year, at least four people in the U.S. have died

while working with methylene chloride-based paint strippers.

NMP, which is sometimes substituted for methylene chloride

in paint removers, impacts fetal development and can cause

miscarriage and stillbirth. According to the EPA, more than

60,000 U.S. workers and 2 million consumers are exposed to

methylene chloride and NMP annually.

Jim Miller (R) and Resource Store Manager, Dan Frost, pick out prize items for this

year’s Holiday ance.

Holiday Dance will have many donated Christmas raffle items

from ReSOURCE Household Goods and Building Material

Store in Barre.

For more information, or to register for this public event,

contact James Lund, Executive Director of ARC/FUN at 802-

223-6149.

• • •

VT F&W Has Online

License Gift Certificates

Finding a gift that will continue to give for a full year is a challenge,

but the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department says it has a solution.

Fish & Wildlife now has a license gift certificate for annual

licenses on their website.

“People have long requested hunting and fishing license gift certificates

so we created one that is easy to use on our website,” said

Vermont Fish & Wildlife Commissioner Louis Porter. “You can fill

the application out and pay for it online and then print the certificate

to present to your recipient.”

The gift certificate has a link on the front page of the Vermont Fish

& Wildlife website (www.vtfishandwildlife.com). The person who

receives the certificate must to the Fish & Wildlife website to print

their license.

“If you have a friend or relative who hunts or fishes, this is an easy

gift-giving solution,” said Porter. “The gift certificate will cover

licenses for 2019, and it will be available each year in the future.”

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December 12, 2018 The WORLD page 7


Ainsworth

Public Library

Williamstown

2-6PM Mon. & Thurs., 9-6PM Wed., 2-7PM Tues. & Fri.,

9-2PM Sat. On Facebook: Ainsworth Public Library

(802) 433-5887, library@williamstownvt.org

www.ainsworthpubliclibrary.org.

Holiday Tree: Help people on a local level, bring us your new

and gently used hats, mittens, and scarves to decorate our

holiday tree. We are also collecting nonperishable goods for

the local food shelf. Let’s make a beautifully decorated tree.

Need to Get a Letter to Santa? Stop in the library and make

a card for Santa, pop it in our special mailbox and we will

make sure that Santa gets your letter on time.

Looking for a Nice Holiday Gift? We have a beautiful basket

full of goodies for raffle at the library for Christmas. Check

our website or Facebook page to see a picture. 1 ticket for $1,

6 tickets for $5, 12 tickets for $ 10. All proceeds benefit the

library.

Board of Trustees Meeting: Thursday, Dec. 13 10AM. Open

meeting. Check for the agenda on our website.

Fiber Arts: Saturday, December 15 10AM. Come and work

on a project from home or come and learn to make something

new. Free. You must register 433-5887.

Route 5, Lyndonville, VT

Mon. thru Fri. 9-5, Sat. 9-3, Sun. Closed

1-800-439-5996

296 Meadow St., Littleton, NH

4584 U.S. Rte. 5, Newport, VT

PUZZLES ON PAGE 32-33

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Answers to this week’s

UNRAVEL THE TRAVEL

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2. The Metropolitan

Museum of Art

3. California

FEAR KNOT

SUPER CROSSWORD

page 8 The WORLD December 12, 2018

Brown Public

Library

Northfield, VT • (802) 485-4621

Thank you Tom Trombly and Trombly’s Greenhouse for the

donation of a beautiful holiday tree!

We’re Lending Snowshoes!

Would you like to try snowshoeing, but don’t have access to

snowshoes? We are now a lending library for SNOWSHOES!!

Stop in and check them out. Have relatives/friends visiting for

the holidays? Stop and borrow from us if you don’t have

enough for your company.

Holiday Raffle Basket!

Stop in & buy tickets, all proceeds support the library. $2 ea

or 6 for $10 Basket includes Maple Syrup from Highland

Sugarworks, Granola from 2 Wooden spoons, Yankee votive

candle w/ holder, Air Freshener from Scentsy, Xmas decoration,

Sock Monkey, matching dishcloth, dishtowel and potholder,

Snowman basket from Thirty One. Drawing is Dec

21st.

Twin Valley Senior Center

4583 US Route 2, E. Montpelier, VT

802-223-3322

twinvalleyseniors@myfairpoint.net

Recipes and Remembrances Cookbook

The new TVSC Cookbook has arrived! Get your copy now!

Stock up for Christmas gifts, birthdays and other holiday gifts.

344 recipes from as far cooks as far back as the 1830’s plus

some new ones, too. Only $ 10.50 which benefits TVSA. To

purchase a copy, please call the Center at 802-223-3322 or

email twinvalleyseniors@myfairpoint.net. If paying by check,

please note “Cookbook” in the memo line.

Charlie Bothfeld Turns 100!

Charlie Bothfeld Turns 100! TVSC is so honored to have

Charles Bothfeld in our life at the Center. This brings me to a

very special event that will happen this month. Charlie

Bothfeld will turn 100 years old on December 13th. Yes, I said

100 years old and going strong like the Energizer Battery!

Please mark your calendar for December 14th to come to Twin

Valley Senior Center and join us in celebrating Charlie’s birthday

with him. We will have cake & ice cream at 1PM. Please

bring a birthday card for his box or mail him a card at TVSC,

P.O. Box 152, East Montpelier, VT 05651. You are welcome

to join us for lunch. We ask a donation of $5.00 age 60 + and

all others $6.00. We would appreciate a call at 223-3322 so we

may plan accordingly. Let’s make this a very special day for

him!

Holiday Tree

Help us decorate with mittens, hats and scarves. These are

donatedto people who are in need this winter. We are also collecting

non-perishable food items under our tree. The food

items will be donated to our local CERV Food Shelf.

The BPL Crochet & Knitting Club

We meet from 6-7PM at the library on every second and

fourth Thursday. Come learn to crochet or knit. Our service

project is making mittens, scarves and hats for the library

Holiday Tree. We’d love your help! All skill levels are welcome

to come from beginner to expert. Meet new friends.

Hope to see you there!

Don’t Miss Storytime

Mondays and Thursdays with our youth librarian, Britta

Eberle. Storytime is from 10-11AM. We read a story & do a

craft. Bring your children/grandchildren. Themes: Dec. 13th:

Winter; Dec 17th: Winter Holidays; Dec 20: Holiday Party!

BPL Book Store

When visiting the library, stop in to our BPL Book Store. We

have some great donated books for all interests. When the

library is open, the bookstore is open. We have gift certificates

for a holiday gift. Stop in!

We will be closed on monday, Dec 24th & Dec 25th to enable

our staff/volunteers to enjoy the Holidays with family and

friends.

The Cycles of Life Café

Meets the third Friday of the month, from 11:45-1PM, at Twin

Valley Senior Center, 4583 US Route 2, East Montpelier.

Everyone is welcome! Join us to listen, talk, and share experiences.

No need to register, just drop by. Lunch is available

during the meeting or bring your own. For more information,

call (802) 223-3322 or email twinvalleyseniors@myfairpoint.

net. All Café conversations are confidential.

Classes

The following are all free and take place at Twin Valley Senior

Center, 4583 US Route 2, East Montpelier. Questions? Call

223-3322 or email: twinvalleyseniors@myfairpoint.net.

Mondays: Bone Builders Exercise Classes: 7:30-8:30AM,

9AM, and 10:40AM-11:40AM. Advanced Sun Tai Chi73

Class 1-2PM. Wednesdays: Bone Builder Exercise Classes:

7:30-8:30AM, 9AM, and 10:40AM-11:40AM. Fridays: Bone

Builders Exercise Classes: 7:30-8:30AM and 10:40-11:40AM.

Sun Tai Chi73, 1-2PM. December 11, and 18 – Mediation

Class 6:30-7:30PM.

Please note: there will be no Beginners Tai Chi on Tuesday or

Thursday for the month of December.

Other Activities

You are welcome to join the Cribbage Teams that play

Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, at 10AM. If you don’t know

how to play, they will teach you! Pinochle and Rummy are

also play Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, at 10:00. For more

information, call TVSC at (802)223-3322 or email: twinvalleyseniors@myfairpoint.net.

The Vermont Arts Council Announces FY2019

Grant Awards to Artists and Organizations

The Vermont Arts Council has awarded grants to artists, arts

organizations, and communities throughout Vermont. The projects

funded through these grants are as vital and varied as the

state’s creative sector -- ranging from a Cultural Facilities Grant

that helps fund the installation of an ADA-compliant elevator

to a Creation Grant of $4,000 that will enable a poet to create

new work. FY2019 grants were awarded in the categories of

Artist Development, Artists in Schools, Arts Impact, Arts

Partnership, Creation, Cultural Facilities, and Head Start Arts

Integration. The Council awarded 110 grants totaling $518,688.

A full list of grantees is available on the Vermont Arts Council

website.

“Through these grants we are working to bring rich arts

experiences to Vermont children, enliven communities, increase

access to the arts, and to support Vermont’s artists and our

lively creative sector,” said Vermont Arts Council Executive

Director Karen Mittelman. “Programs supported by these

grants are reaching people in every corner of our state, particularly

those who might not otherwise have the opportunity to

engage in life-enriching creative experiences.”

Vermont Arts Council grants are funded by a grant from the

National Endowment for the Arts, which requires a 1:1 match

from the Vermont State Legislature. Council grants, programs,

and statewide arts promotion would not be possible without the

critical funding provided by these government agencies.

Information on grantees in each category:

Artist Development: 16 grants to support activities that

enhance an artist’s professional career.

Artists in Schools: 26 grants to impact student development

through in-class artist residencies.

Arts Impact: 12 grants to support organizations, municipalities,

and schools in their efforts to create a more

vibrant quality of life by providing equal and abundant

access to the arts.

• • •

• • •

• • •

Arts Partnership: 26 grants to support the annual operations

of Vermont arts organizations through three-year grants.

Creation:10 grants to support new work by Vermont artists.

Creation Grants can fund time, materials, and space

rental for artists and artist groups.

Cultural Facilities: 13 grants to help Vermont nonprofit

organizations and municipalities enhance, create, or expand

the capacity of an existing building to provide cultural activities

for the public.

Head Start Arts Integration: 7 grants to support student

learning through arts-integrated instruction.

The Vermont Arts Council envisions a Vermont where all

people have access to the arts and creativity in their lives, education,

and communities. Engagement with the arts transforms

individuals, connects us more deeply to each other, energizes

the economy, and sustains the vibrant cultural landscape

that makes Vermont a great place to live. Since 1965,

the Council has been the state’s primary provider of funding,

advocacy, and information for the arts in Vermont.

www.vermontartscouncil.org.


Ryan Heraty, the new Principal of Montpelier’s Union Elementary School, addressed the Montpelier

Rotary Club last week. He spoke about changes underway, including the playground project,

“Responsive Classroom School,” Positive Behavioral Interventions, and Support, with an Outdoor

Education Focus. He commended the Rotarians for their Backpack Food Assistance program which has

grown to support 80 students. Heraty (center) is flanked by Rotarian Nat Frothingham (L) and Club

President Kody Lyon. The Rotary Club meets Mondays at 12:15 at the Capitol Plaza Hotel. Guests are

invited.

Vermont Students Invited to Apply

• • •

for Governor’s Institute Winter

4-H Sewing Clinic Fosters Creativity

A dozen young people gathered on Dec. 1

for a sewing clinic at University of Vermont

(UVM) Extension’s office in Berlin.

The clinic was coordinated by UVM

Extension 4-H in Orange and Washington

Counties and open to both 4-H’ers and non-

4-H members, ages 8 to 18. Projects and

instruction were based on level of sewing

experience.

The intermediate and advanced sewers

worked with Chris Pratt, Bradford, and Betty

Hammond, Barre, to design and create their

own bags from scratch. They drafted sketches,

learned how to make their own patterns

and measured and cut their own fabric to sew

a custom-designed bag.

Novice sewers explored the inner workings

and functions of the sewing machine through

a fun exercise in which they were given a list

of parts and definitions to try to identify parts

of the machine. They also worked on several

simple sewing projects.

With Cecile Johnston, owner of Jumping

Raindrops Sewing and Design in Montpelier,

they sewed quilt block potholders. Sally

DeCicco, also from Montpelier, worked with

them to make no-sew dog chew toys and

• • •

The Governor’s Institutes of Vermont

(GIV) would like to announce their annual

Winter Weekend. The enrollment period will

be opening soon! All Vermont high school

students are eligible to attend. Students will

explore their interests and passions from a list

of ten different topics, all while having fun

and meeting new and like-minded peers.

Enrollment for all 9th-12th graders began

December 10th and runs through January

15th. Applications are considered on a rolling

basis. Institutes fill up quickly, so students

can gain an advantage by applying early.

While attendance is limited to 1 Weekend

Program per year, students should make a

back-up selection in case their first choice is

unavailable. Students can visit www.giv.org/

apply to begin the application process.

What’s it all about?! Students will be

actively engaged in various topics during the

two-day residential programs. Winter

Weekend events will be held at Goddard

College in Plainfield, Vermont, from February

8th-10th, and February 22nd 24th. Both programs

start Friday evening and conclude

Sunday afternoon. Arts and Humanities topics

include: Digital Journalism and Ethics;

Youth Leadership; Directing Theatre;

Biological Illustration; Chaos Art;

Songwriting Boot Camp; and Global

Education and Youth Voice. STEM offerings

include: Microcontrollers; Disaster Health &

Epidemiology; and Neuroscience.

The programs are guaranteed to be affordable

for ALL Vermont families. A sliding

scale tuition model enables families to pay

only what they are comfortable paying. In

2018, 86% of GIV attendees received tuition

assistance. For more information concerning

tuition and affordability, please visit our website

at www.giv.org/winterweekendtuition/.

The Governor’s Institute of Vermont is an

independent non-profit working in partnership

with the Vermont Agency of Education,

Vermont Department of Labor, VSAC, private

donors, and all Vermont high schools. For

more information, please visit our website at

www.giv.org.

holiday stockings out of jean pant legs.

Several participants worked on their own

creations, repurposing old clothing such as

t-shirts, ties, and jeans into accessories and

other new items. Others learned how to use

conductive thread to sew LED lights into

their finished products, which included a

wristband bracelet and dog bandana with a

light for visibility.

Taking part in the clinic were Hannah and

Lucy Badger, Lessa Dreimiller and Ella

Reynells, all from Waitsfield; Sieanna Forkey

and Cassie Richland-Pizano, both from

Waterbury; Nadia Gongleff-Doolittle, Calais;

Mirabelle Hamilton, Middlesex; Corinna

Hobbs, Hinesburg; Alessandra Hoffman and

Hannah Smiley, both from Milton; and Adam

Messier, Braintree.

The Washington County 4-H Foundation

helped sponsor the clinic, including purchasing

materials. Allison Smith, 4-H youth learning

experiences coordinator, and Molly

McFaun, 4-H educator for Orange and

Washington Counties, assisted with the event.

To learn more about the 4-H sewing project

in Vermont, contact the State 4-H Office at

(802) 656-8343 or (800) 571-0668.

Holiday Tips for Parents

DON’T SUPPLY ALCOHOL OR

MARIJUANA TO YOUTH

Both are illegal for youth under 21,

even in your own home.

Enabling underage drinking is

dangerous, sends the wrong

message, and is illegal.



or giving alcohol to a minor.

Allowing drinking in your home,

even if you take away car keys, does

not make underage drinking safe.

Central VT New Directions

HELP KEEP KIDS SAFE

www.cvndc.org

• • •



One-third of underage drinking

deaths involve auto crashes. The

remaining two-thirds involve alcohol


unintentional injuries.

Underage drinking can lead to risky


sexual assaults, and violence.

Plainfield Community Supper on the Third

Tuesday of December

The following honors list is provided from the school. Any questions or concerns should be addressed directly to the school.

SPAULDING

HIGH SCHOOL

QUARTER 1 HONOR ROLL - 2018-2019

Seniors: Trey Armbrister, Natasha Balandra, Samuel Bigglestone, Makayla Boisvert,

Jordan Boyea, Megan Brier, Lydia Brown, Austin Bryan, Emily Cetin, Natasha Chase,

Makayla Chouinard, Molly Cleveland, Madison Cooley, Colleen Couture, Alexander

Coyle, Jesse Dindo, Tucker DuBois, Evan Emerson, Amanda Gerrish, Samantha Gill-

Owen, Cam Gosselin, Madison Heath, Ella Hilton-VanOsdall, Cellan Hogan, Molly Hood,

Ashley Houle, Dominic Hutchins, Colby Jones, Jesse King, Kristina King, Lindsay LaPan,

Carmellitta Le, Ashlyn Liimatainen, Michaela Linares, Zoë Macdonald, Ella McCarthy,

Riley McFaun, Amber McGinley, Evan Parent, Grace Pierce, Emma Poirier, Steven

Poulin, Kyle Proteau, Faith Redmond, Lillian Riddle, Jonathan Rieder, Thomas Royea,

Lia Rubel, Ryan Shirlock, Casey Simpson, Abigail Spencer, Brianna Storti, Kassidy Swift,

Tina Taylor, Justin Thurber, David Toborg, Jillian Tosi, Isabella Usle-Wolfel, Devon White,

Rachel White, Elizabeth Wilder, Taylor Winter, Mason York

Juniors: Myles Aja, Lauren Allen, Nathaniel Arthur, Ethan Asselin, Emily Bailey,

Damien Barnett, Ethan Benoit, Briana Bouffard, Iris Carter, Hunter Chase, Cody Collins,

Daniel Copping, Anna DeAlmeida, Jack Dodd, Taylor Dunster, Jaylynn Emmons, Cooper

Farnsworth, Camryn Fewer, Bryanna Giacherio, Gavin Glosser, Cassandra Graves,

Vanessa Greig, Gustavo Hahn, Jenna Hallstrom, Megan Hammarstrom, Grace Hardaker,

Dylan Hebert, John Hebert, Madison Henderson, Riley Hodgkins, Benjamin Hopkins,

Destiny Isabelle, Jordan Jones, Rachel Kelley, Micah Kezar, Hailey LaFaille, Kyaira

LaRochelle, Aliza Lindley, Jada MacDonald, Conner Magoon, Elizabeth Malnati, Zecor

Margolin Berger, Morgan Mast, Brittany Matott, Natalie Mattson, Kyle May, Madelyn

Mayfi eld, Ella Mayo, Nicholas McKelvey, Emily McMahon, Kaiden Morse, Trevor Moyes,

Nicholas Norwood, Marley Ostrout, Grant Otis, Grace Parsons, Grace Paterson, Oscar

Peake, Attilio Perantoni, Makena Plant, Elizabeth Poirier, Hayleigh Pollard, Christopher

Prufer, Caelan Radigan, Emma Riddle, Ethan Santor, Gregory Silk, Brianna Spaulding,

Abigail Stacy, Kiana Stevens, Matthew Tacey, Danielle Trottier, Olivia Verret, Lee

Walbridge, Christopher West, Elaina White, Raine Willis

Sophomores: Eusebio Aja, Jacob Allen, Zane Arthur, Chesnee Barney, Jordyn Beede,

Madeline Benoit, Ezra Bernier, Mia Blow, Elizabeth Bradley, Marcel Brault, Brandon

Burns, Madeline Cooper, Gaberiel Cotnoir, Kailey Craig, Jake Darling, Josie Diego,

Nicholas Dvorovy, Indira Dzano, Abigail Ellsworth, Allison Everett, Allyson Felch, Natalie

Folland, Brooke Forrend, Jacob Fuller, Christian Gagne, Gabriel Guyette, Rebecca

Harley, Theresa Hoar, Kyree Hutchinson, Jenna Illsley, Benjamin Isabelle, Madison Jarvis,

Audrey Jones, Camden Kelley, Carson King, Emily LaRose, Savannah Light, Katelyn

MacIver, Taite Magoon, Amina Malagic’, Trent Malone-Hedges, Kiana Martin, Noah

Partridge, Zoey Pickel, Halle Pletzer, Willem Pontbriand, David Poulin, Emma Proteau,

Dorothy Reil, Olivia Rousse, Anastasiya Simonenko, Zachary Stabell, Matthew Stevens,

Brian Sweeney, Emily Tansley, Natalie Taylor, Jennah Thompson, Brandon Trepanier,

Amer Verem, Emily Wilson, Alyssa Winkler

Freshmen: Aidan Ahearn, Taylor Audet, Tasia Avery, Logan Bailey, Emily Bartlett,

Taylen Bennett, Colby Berard, Jacob Bisson, Emma Blaisdell, Ashley Boisvert, Abigail

Burachowski, Kyle Coache, Charles Codling, Ethan Codling, Christian Day, Steven

Derouchie, Julia Dunn, Landen Farnham, Cydney Ferrer, Julia Fewer, Alexander Fleury,

Kolby Flynn, Ethan Godfrey, Cameron Govea, Zoey Henry, Kayla Hood, Brandon Isaac,

Riley Jarvis, Aliyah Jewett, Bella Kamont, Olivia Kuban, Brady Lamberti, Emily Lamberti,

Payton Lamberti, Jacob Lamphere, Gene Lumbra III, Haley MacAuley, John Malnati,

Jamison Mast, Gabrielle Mathews, Chloe Mattson, Alexander Maurice, Jonathan Maurice,

Anna Mayo, Ned McCarthy, Emily Morris, Brandon Noury, Delaney Partlow, Jake Picard,

Nicholas Pierce, Madison Plant, John Poirier, Emily Poulin, Alexander Pouliot, Ezme’

Quittner, Michael Rea, Carter Reaves, Hunter Roya, Lexie Royce, Noah Rubel, Ryan

Sanborn, Alyson Savoie, Camden Simpson, Zachary Slayton, Jameson Solomon, Emily

Grace Spaulding, Samuel Starzec, Eleanor Steinman, Hazel Sutton, Zoe Tewksbury, Ty

Thornton, Ariana Thurber, Christian Titus, Matthew Toborg, Chandler Wallin, Zachary

White, Isabelle Wightman, Justice Womer

CONGRATULATIONS, STUDENTS, ON YOUR EDUCATIONAL ACHIEVEMENT!

14 North Main Street

Suite 1003

Barre

229-0366

Open Mon.-Fri. 9am-7pm,

Sat. 9am-2pm

We’re Very

Proud Of You!

Your Hard Work

Is Paying Off!

L.L. Felch

Electric

793-7455

Plainfield’s Community Supper will be

hosted in December by Rhythm of the Rein, a

Marshfield-based organization, assisted by

the Community Supper Support Group

(CSSG). Unlike typical months, this

December our supper will be on December

18th, the third Tuesday of the month. As usual

the supper is free. Money and dessert potluck

donations are always welcome but not necessary.

Servings begin at 6 p.m. at Plainfield’s

Grace United Methodist Church.

Rhythm of the Rein is a therapeutic riding

and (horse) driving program. They use equine

assisted activities and therapies to improve

the physical, social and emotional well-being

of youths and adults with challenges - through

interaction with horses. Their riding rings

(indoor and outdoor) and stables are located

in Marshfield.

These hosted community suppers are supported

and produced with CSSG volunteers.

The group welcomes help from all interested

persons to make this series possible along

with our local hosts and donors. This month’s

supper features beef stew and home-baked

bread along with vegetable soup. For further

information and to volunteer, write Michael

Billingsley at michaelbiix@gmail.com.

www.poulinautosales.com

476-8159

OPEN EVERY DAY

Large Inventory

of Cars & Trucks

Route 302

East Barre

Road

December 12, 2018 The WORLD page 9


Daniel J. Lemieux

Daniel Joseph Lemieux, 91, of Owen

Drive passed away on Saturday,

November 10, 2018 at his home.

Born January 1, 1927 in Berlin,

NH, he was the son of Peter and

Emile (Couture) Lemieux. Daniel

attended St. Monica’s graded school

where he was an altar boy and went

to Spaulding High School for two

years before the family moved and

bought a farm in Middlesex. He graduated from St.

Michaels High School with the class of 1945.

After graduating, Daniel continued to work on the

farm until he moved back to Barre where he became

employed at the local IGA Grocery Store.

On May 9, 1946, he was drafted into the U.S. Army.

After basic training at Fort Belvore, VA engineering

camp, Daniel was shipped to the Philippines to serve as

the Quarter Master in Battery A 538th Field Battalion as

part of the rotating guard duty for Japanese prisoners.

He was honorably discharged in June of 1947.

Returning to Barre, Daniel began working at the First

National Stores for 13 years, 10 of which as Assistant

Manager. In June of 1960, he went to work for

Howard’s Market in South Barre as the personnel manager

working there for six years – never missing a day!

In May of 1966, he began working at Capitol City Press

in Berlin, working there full-time for 26 years, he semiretired

in 1992 but continued to supervise the shipping

department part-time for another four years, fully retiring

in 1996.

On June 11, 1960 he married Louise Crete in the St.

Monica Catholic Church in Barre. Their son Peter was

born in 1964 and daughter Renee in 1968. Daniel and

Louise bought a home in Barre Town in 1967 and

always enjoyed sharing in the upkeep of their home and

property, which was always immaculate. Louise passed

away on May 27, 1991.

In his spare time, Daniel enjoyed time spent with his

family snowmobiling, swimming in Groton or Caspian

Lake, foliage rides and the occasional trip to the Hidden

Valley Dude Ranch for some horseback riding.

Survivors include his daughter Renee and her husband,

James O’Keefe of Barre; and his nieces Charlene

Buttura of Montpelier and Louise Mar of Clovis, CA

along with many in-laws and extended family.

In addition to his parents, he was predeceased by his

wife Louise Lemieux, his son Peter Lemieux, his two

sisters Elaine Robinson and Dolores Colbert, and his

nephew Ira Robinson.

As per his wishes there will be no calling hours. A

graveside committal service will be held in the Spring

in the St. Sylvester Cemetery in Websterville.

In lieu of cards, memorial contributions may be made

in his name to the Central Vermont Humane Society,

PO Box 687, Montpelier, VT 05601.

A loving tribute from your son-in-law, “On a late fall

day in 1996, I rounded the corner on Owen Drive to

meet my future wife’s father (he was not expecting me).

In the driveway was a man about 5’2” tall and 115 lbs.,

he had spent the day bringing in the wood that he had

stacked that spring from outside to inside his garage, 4

cords all by himself, he was almost 70, but looked 55.

Our conversation wasn’t all that long that day, but he

was very polite, even when he asked me to leave so he

could finish his work. Let’s just say sparks didn’t fly

that day, but it wouldn’t take long for me to realize just

how special a man I’d met. Over the next 22 years, we

would come to know each other very well. He would

tell me often about his journey through life, one of

amazing fortitude, Faith and hard work… now it’s my

honor to tell you about it…” please visit www.hookerwhitcomb.com

to read more about Daniel’s journey

through this world.

The Hooker and Whitcomb Funeral Home, 7

Academy Street, Barre is in charge of the arrangements.

ROBERT W. BULEY, 85, died recently at his

home. He was born on Dec. 3, 1932, the son of

Charles and Corrine (Campbell) Buley. He graduated from St.

Michael’s High School. He enlisted into the United States

Navy, where he served on the USS Champlain aircraft carrier,

until his honorable discharge. Bob worked for a short time for

the railroad before becoming a postal carrier for many years

PRUNEAU-POLLI

FUNERAL HOME

Serving All Faiths

Family Owned & Operated

58 Summer Street • Barre, Vermont

802-476-4621

Proud Member

National Funeral Directors

Association

Handicap Accessible

page 10 The WORLD December 12, 2018

at the Montpelier Post Office. He coached Little League for a

number of years, played softball, golf, and was on several

bowling leagues. Survivors include his brother, David Buley

and wife Roberta, of Rutland; nieces and a nephew as well as

great-nieces and -nephews.

REGINALD KEITH “REG”

DROWN, 74, died Nov. 17, 2018.

He was born Aug. 13, 1944, the son of Keith &

Bernice (Puffer) Drown. Reg was the oldest

child of Keith and Bernice. He married Mary

Bruso Clayton in Arlington on July 1, 1979. Reg

served in the United States Air Force and was a

lifelong salesman. He worked for Economy Auto Sales,

Cetrangelo Granite and was also a bus driver for Northfield

schools. Reg also owned and operated a hunting and archery

business named “Wild Wood Sports,” as well as the “Northfield

Taxi.” He loved spending time with family & pets, driving

back roads, watching boxing, hunting, fishing, crafts, and collecting.

He loved spending time fishing at the “floating

bridge” and going to yard sales. Survivors include his mother,

Bernice Drown, of Northfield; his loving wife, Mary, of

Northfield; five children Danette Hardin and husband Mike,

of Wetumpka, AL, Dana Drown and wife Rebecca, of

Winooski, Paul Clayton, of Northfield, Dalyn Drown and

wife Emily, of Orland Park, IL, Taylor “Birdie” Drown, of

Northfield; four siblings Roger Drown, of NC, Frank

Drown, of Northfield, Fred Drown, of Northfield, Ashton

Drown, of Graniteville; eight grandchildren and many

nieces and nephews.

SHELLEY ELAINE (PREVOST) HENRY,

62, passed away on Dec. 3, 2018. Born May 20,

1956, in Montreal, Canada, she was the daughter

of Gordon and Joan (Widgington) Prevost.

Following graduation, she made her home in

Pointe Claire, Quebec. She was employed by

the Royal Bank of Canada. On May 9, 1978, she

married Lynnford Henry. Shelley moved to Barre in 1986. She

was employed by Global Values, Adams Granite and Rouleau

Granite. She enjoyed needlepoint, color art and crafts.

Survivors include her partner, Victor Chaput, of Ferrisburgh;

her sons Jeremy Henry and wife Kim, of Naples, FL, and

Logan Henry, of Randolph; a grandson; her mother, Joan

Kennell and husband Arthur, of Barre; her siblings Bradley

Prevost, of Montreal, Wade Prevost and wife Elena, of

Toronto, ON, Corey Prevost, of Atlanta, GA, Martin Prevost

and wife Linda, of Barre, Chrysanne Hedberg and husband

Erik, of Durham, NC, Susan Cole and husband Chuck, of

West Boylston, MA, and Danny Kennell, of Montreal,

Quebec; as well as many nieces, nephews, and cousins.

THOMAS R. LONG JR., 66, passed away

Nov. 22, 2018. Tom was born in Newport. He

was the son of Elaine Miles Long and the late

Thomas R. Long Sr., residents of Westport, CT.

Tom had been a VT resident for over 40 years.

He graduated from Staples High School in

Westport, in 1970. He received a bachelor’s

degree in electrical and electronic engineering from UVM. He

also earned an associate degree in electrical engineering from

VTC. Tom had a long career working for Digital Equipment

Corp., Nikon Precision and Bio Tek Instruments in VT. Tom

loved music and was a talented piano and guitar player. For

many years, he was a member of Central Vermont Amateur

Radio Club, where he served as president. Tom loved hunting,

fishing and spending time out of doors. He enjoyed taking his

dogs to the dog park to play. Tom in survived by his wife,

Jacqueline H. Long; his mother, Elaine M. Long; his two

brothers Edward A. Long and wife Andree V. Long, of

Westport, and Dana R. Long and wife Melinda Long, of

Belmont, MA; three nieces; and his wife’s daughter, Elizabeth

Thompson.

MONA L. MAYO, passed away Nov. 7, 2018. She was born

March 4, 1936, in Randolph, VT, and was the middle of three

sisters. Mona was employed by the State in the Materials and

Research Department, and was a member of the United

Church of Northfield for many years. She was an exceptional

painter, enjoyed gardening and was an avid fan of the

Baltimore Orioles and New England Patriots. She was the

mother of six children. She leaves behind her daughter, Dawn

Rebello (Ron), son Larry Mayo, daughter Kathy John (Peter),

daughter Shannon Haught, son Glenn Mayo; her sisters Leah

Jennings and Ruth Nye (Peter). She was the grandmother of

10 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren.

JOHN G. PELLON, 89, passed

away on Dec. 2, 2018. Born on May

6, 1929, in Barre City, he was the son of Paul

and Josephine (Galli) Pellon. He attended elementary

school in Barre and graduated from

Spaulding High School as part of the Class of

1947. John then went on to attend Burdett

College in Boston where he earned his Associate degree in

Business in 1950. Following his schooling, John enlisted in

the United States Army where he served with distinction in

the Korean Theater during the war. He was honorably discharged

in 1953. On Oct. 20, 1956, he married Patricia

Downing, in the St. Sylvester Catholic Church in Graniteville.

John worked for the State for over 34 years. Throughout life,

John had many hobbies and interests, including golf, summers

at the Lone Pine Campground and being with his family and

friends. Survivors include his wife of 62 years, Patricia

Pellon, of Barre Town; two sons Brian Pellon and wife Peggy,

of Conroe, TX, and Bradley Pellon and partner Darlene Stone,

of Murfreesboro, TN; his grandchildren and his great-grandchildren.

He also leaves his sister-in-law, Janet Lambert and

husband Maurice, and brother-in-law Richard Downing, FL;

as well as numerous cousins, nieces and nephews.

RASSOUL RANGAVIZ passed away on Dec.

2, 2018. He was born on May 23, 1957, in

Ardabil, Iran, to Horieh and the late Habib

Rangaviz. As an Iranian naval-cadet in the

1970s, he came to the US on a military scholarship.

Without speaking English, Rassoul moved

to Northfield to attend Norwich University. He

learned English, completed a degree in accounting and fell in

love with Ann Lauzon of Barre. Although they were only 18

and 21, Ann and Rassoul knew they had found something

special in each other. But after only 10 months, history intervened.

As the Iranian Hostage Crisis played out in 1979, the

US government canceled Iranian military exchange visas and

Rassoul was forced to leave the country. For Ann and Rassoul,

the separation only served to clarify their relationship. Ann

traveled to the church of Senator Patrick and Marcelle Leahy

and begged Marcelle to help her bring Rassoul back. Moved

by the story, Marcelle and Senator Leahy helped Ann secure a

fiancé visa. In 1981, Rassoul flew back where an overjoyed

Ann was waiting for him at JFK. Although Rassoul knew that

he was returning on a fiancé visa, Ann had another surprise for

him at the airport: she had already booked the church where

they would get married three weeks later, in 1981. From there,

life moved quickly. Rassoul and Ann had two children,

Sheilah and David, whom they raised in Montpelier. Rassoul

rose to become the chief financial officer of Copley Hospital,

where he worked for over 20 years. He is survived by his

mother; two brothers Mohammed and Bahman; his sister,

Nadia; six nieces and nephews; and many extended family

members in Iran. He also leaves behind Ann’s very large family,

who became his family. He was everyone’s favorite friend.

STEVEN M. RICH, 71, passed away on Dec.

3, 2018. He was born on Aug. 17, 1947, the son

of Donald and Lorraine (Desilets) Rich. He

lived in Berlin all his life. On Sept. 22, 1967, he

married his high school sweetheart, Susan

Nuissl, at the First Congregational Church of

Berlin. Prior to opening his business, he worked

in several capacities in central VT as a mechanic and small

engine repair. Beginning in 1985, he opened his home business

as Steve Rich Sales and Service. He did love to laugh and

humor was a huge part of his life. He was a gun enthusiast, an

avid reader and an endless resource of info about many topics

not limited to guns and hunting. He had a small hobby farm

where he and his family raised chickens, turkeys and pigs. He

loved his home of 45 years that he built in Berlin on a piece

of the old Nuissl farm and spent so much time outside.

Survivors include his mother, Lorraine Rich, of Berlin; his

wife of 51 years, Susan Rich, of Berlin; his daughter, Katie

John and husband Patrick and their son, Isaac, of East

Montpelier, with whom he was so very close and incredibly

proud. He also leaves behind his sisters Bonnie Hall and husband

Richard, of East Montpelier, Pam Rich, of Berlin; brothers

Gary Rich and wife Judy of Anchorage, AK, Kim Rich and

wife Pat, of Nelson, NH; several nieces and nephews. He also

leaves his beloved German Shepherd, Denali.

DOUGLAS MYRON ROWELL, 60, died Dec. 3, 2018. He

was born Oct. 6, 1958, in Calais, the son of Merle and Lillie

(Jacobs) Rowell. He attended Calais public schools, New

School in Plainfield and Union 32 in East Montpelier. Mr.

Rowell was a farmhand and a carpenter. For many years, he

was employed by Vermont College of Fine Arts Campus

Relations Department. He enjoyed hunting, fishing, country

music concerts and the Tunbridge Fair. Survivors include

three daughters Diana Rowell, of Hardwick, Lisa Rowell, of

Calais, Ashley Rosa, of Townville, of SC; five grandchildren;

five siblings Edward Rowell, Millie Brumback, both of

Calais, Richard Rowell, of East Montpelier, Shirley Collier, of

Greensboro, Betty Chase, of Barre; numerous nieces, nephews,

and cousins.

DANIEL “DAN” RUBALCABA, 67, died

Dec. 3, 2018. Born Nov. 14, 1951, in Barre, he

was the son of Marcelino “Chink” and Catherine

“Kitty” (Bullis) Rubalcaba. He was a graduate

of Spaulding High School in Barre. On Oct. 29,

1989, he married Kathy Robinson in Calais.

They made their home all their married life in

East Barre where they raised four children. Dan worked many

years in sales. Most recently, he worked at Washington

County Mental Health. His interests included hunting, attending

NASCAR events and following sports. Survivors include

his daughters Danielle Rubalcaba and companion David

Brooks II, and Hallie Rubalcaba and companion Caleb

Millington; two sons Michael Rubalcaba and companion

Alicia Compo, and David Rubalcaba; a brother, Gary

Rubalcaba and wife Mary, of Barre Town, their three daughters

and families; as well as three grandchildren.

AVERY H. (DUFFY) SCHEIB passed away on

Nov. 29, 2018. She was a loving wife, mother,

daughter, sister and friend, always willing to

share her beautiful smile, quick wit and brilliant

mind with everyone. She loved to spend time

watching her boys play sports, attending charitable

events, volunteering in the schools, board

member and scheduler for the Minnetonka Baseball

Association and simply spending time with family and

friends. She loved to travel, especially to her family’s home in

Lake George, New York, or their annual family trip to Hawaii.

Survived by husband Dervis and sons Will and Sam, mother

Kate Duffy and brother Charles Duffy (Jamie Mosher); nephews

Rye and Luca, niece Ayla; as well as many other relatives

and friends. Avery was born in Hartford, CT. She graduated

from Spaulding High School in Barre, VT, completed an

undergraduate degree in Psychology from Carlton College

and a master’s degree from the Carlson School of Management

at the University of Minnesota. She was a dedicated employee

and leader in her careers at Rosemount and Wavecrest.

continued on next page


continued from previous page

RONALD EVERETT WARD, 84, passed

away on Dec. 5, 2018. Born in Moretown on

Nov. 16, 1934, he was the son of the late Forrest

and Harriet (Shonio) Ward. On July 30, 1954, he

married the former Vera O. Luce in Warren and

enjoyed 62 years together. Vera passed away in

2016. Ron graduated of Waitsfield High School.

As a young man entering the workforce, he was employed at

the former Weyerhaeuser Co. in Hancock before working 12

years for Barre City Creamery. In 1969, Ron went to work at

Brothers Building Co. in Waitsfield as a plumber, receiving

his Master Plumbing License in 1973. Ron served his community

of Moretown as a member of the Volunteer Fire

Department, tax collector and first constable. He enjoyed

hunting, deer camp, fishing, snowmobiling, auto racing, and

camping at Kampersville. Ron is survived by his children

• • •

Brian Ward, of Moretown, Kathy Carton, of Warren, Calvin

Ward and wife Sharon, of Moretown; three grandchildren; two

great-grandchildren; a sister, Lorraine Downer, of Morrisville;

a brother, Kenneth Ward and wife Rosie, of Barre; as well as

nieces, nephews and extended family.

LYDIA BOWIE WOOD, 2, passed away on

Nov. 30, 2018. She is survived by her loving

parents Matthew Wood and Kelley Keating;

Grandparents Wendy and Don Campbell of

Tunbridge, Gerard and Regina Keating of

Topsham; Great Grandparents Karleen Dawson

Wood, Nadine Keating, and Gordon and Blanche

Bagley; all of Lebanon, NH, Great Grandmother Marion

Kelley of Bar Harbor, ME; Lydia’s aunts and uncles; Rod

Keating, Zach and Meghan Waldner, Thomas Wood, and

Charland Wood, and her best little buddy Finley (Cousin).

Lydia loved singing songs, reading from her favorite books,

her dog Louise, all things Dr. Seuss, making new friends every

day, being outside, and spending quality time with those who

loved her. Memorial donations may be made to Barre City

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Vermont Symphony Orchestra Celebrates Holiday

Season with Festive Musical Program

The Vermont Symphony Orchestra (VSO), joined by its

choral counterpart, will be spreading holiday cheer in an

exciting and entertaining celebration of the season from

December 14 - 16 in the communities of Barre, Burlington,

and Rutland. This program, Holiday Pops, will feature traditional

festive favorites and iconic arrangements, with José

Daniel Flores-Caraballo leading both the orchestra and chorus,

and stand-up comedian and storyteller Hillary Boone

hosting the show.

From an a cappella version of “Jingle Bells” to the Vermont

premiere of “Little Tree” — an endearing ballad by Steve

Onion River Chorus Presents Baroque Masterworks

by Zelenka and Charpentier

Montpelier’s Onion River Chorus presents two versions

each of two of the most loved sacred texts – “Magnificat” and

“Te Deum” - by the Baroque masters Jan Dismas Zelenka

(1679-1745) and Antoine Charpentier (1643-1704). The concerts

will be held Saturday, December 22 at 7:30 pm and

Sunday, December 23 at 4:00 pm, both at the Montpelier

Unitarian Church, 130 Main Street. Tickets are $20 for general

admission and $17 for students, seniors and low-income.

Advance tickets are available at North Branch Café (cash or

check only) for the discounted prices of $18 and $15.

The 60-voice chorus and 16-piece Baroque-instrument

orchestra is led by Larry Gordon. Vocal soloists are Mary

Bonhag, soprano, Lindsey Warren, mezzo soprano, Lysander

Jaffe, tenor, and Zeb McLellan, bass.

Zelenka worked most of his life at the royal court in

Dresden, which was, at the time, the richest musical establishment

in Europe. He was highly regarded by Bach, and most

musicologists trained in the music of the Baroque period

agree that his compositions are on a par with those of his

contemporaries Bach, Handel, Vivaldi and Telemann in their

advanced use of counterpoint, their extreme demands on the

players and singers, their ingenuity and resourcefulness, and

their overall beauty.

Charpentier is widely regarded today as the foremost

French Baroque composer. Early in his life, he went to Italy

where he studied with the Italian composer Carissimi.

Returning to France, he worked for eighteen years under the

patronage of Mademoiselle de Guise. After that, he served as

the chief composer for the Jesuits. He also collaborated with

Molière on music for the theater. Charpentier’s music is

remarkable for its lyricism, constant rhythmic energy and

variety, sometimes startling harmonies, and constant contrast

of mood and texture. After several centuries of obscurity, a

Charpentier renaissance began in 1953 when the overture to

his “Te Deum” became the theme music for French Eurovision

TV.

The “Te Deum,” a hymn of praise, thanksgiving and supplication,

has been used since the 4th century as a solemn act

of praise after the mass, for the consecration of a bishop or

abbot, and on other festive occasions. In the Baroque period,

• • •

Murray — the spirit of the season will be in the air throughout

every performance. The orchestra and chorus will also pay

tribute to the late Robert De Cormier, the VSO Chorus’

founder and acclaimed conductor, arranger and director, with

three of his arrangements.

The VSO’s Holiday Pops will be at the Barre Opera House

on December 14, the Flynn Center for Performing Arts in

Burlington on December 15, and the Paramount Theatre in

Rutland on December 16. For more information, please visit

www.vso.org/events.

settings of the “Te Deum” text were often used to celebrate

important military victories or other state occasions, Zelenka’s

and Charpentier’s settings are both appropriately grand and

magnificent, using an expanded orchestra of trumpets, tympani,

oboes, flutes, and strings. Both also divide the text into

successive movements, alternating solos and small ensembles

with full chorus and orchestra.

The well-known “Magnificat” text, attributed to Mary, has

inspired composers continuously through the centuries.

Zelenka’s and Charpentier’s settings are quite different from

each other. Zelenka’s composition is concise, yet grand, using

the same full orchestration as his “Te Deum.” A heroic opening

chorus leads to a lyrical soprano solo, which in turn leads

to a long fugal “Amen.” Charpentier’s setting uses a pareddown

orchestra (no trumpets or tympani), but it divides both

singers and orchestra into two choirs. In the choral movements,

the two choirs answer each other back and forth before

combining at the cadences. These large movements alternate

with many different combinations of lyrical solo voices.

Heightening the contrast between the Zelenka and

Charpentier works, the chorus and soloists will be using

French Latin pronunciation in the French works and standard

church Latin in the Zelenka pieces.









In partnership with:

Hunger Mountain Co-op

623 Stone Cutters Way

Montpelier, VT 05602

(802) 223-8000

hungermountain.coop

December 12, 2018 The WORLD page 11


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Contacting Congress

U.S. Rep. Peter Welch

Mailing address:

128 Lakeside Ave, Suite 235

Burlington, VT 05401

Web site: www.welch.house.gov

Phone: (888) 605-7270 or (802) 652-2450

U.S. Sen. Bernard Sanders

Mailing address:

1 Church St., Third Floor,

Burlington, VT 05401

Web site: www.sanders.senate.gov

Phone: (802) 862-0697

U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy

Mailing address:

199 Main St., Fourth Floor,

Burlington, VT 05401

Web site: www.leahy.senate.gov

Phone: (802) 863-2525

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Drive Sober This Holiday Season &

All Year Long

Dear Editor

The holidays are a time for friends, family, and co-workers

to come together in celebration. Wherever you are—whether

at an office party, a family member’s home, or out at a bar—it

is essential that you make the lifesaving choice to drive sober

when the party ends.

The Washington County Sheriff’s Department, along with

local and state law enforcement partners, will be stepping up

highway safety efforts and their DUI campaign during the

2018 Holiday Season from December 13th through New

Year’s.

Vermont’s fatal crashes now involve more than drunk driving.

Drug-impaired driving is also an increasing problem on

our nation’s roads and here in Vermont with marijuana and

prescription drugs having an increased presence. It is not safe

to drive high. If drivers are impaired by any substance—alcohol

or drugs—they should not get behind the wheel of a

vehicle. Driving while impaired is illegal and unsafe. If You

Feel Different, You Drive Different.

In an effort to save lives, our community members are

reminded to slow down, buckle up, plan ahead for a designated

driver, and be safe on all roads with no texting so every

family can enjoy the holidays.

Ann Gilbert, Director

Central Vermont New Directions Coalition, Montpelier

Encouraging healthy behavior and decreased substance

abuse in Washington County.

VTEP Statement on Approval of Vermont Yankee Sale

Public Utilities Commission Approves

Sale of Vermont Yankee

In response to the Vermont Public Utilities Commission

(PUC) approval of the sale of Vermont Yankee to NorthStar,

Guy Page, Communications Director for the Vermont Energy

Partnership, said:

“Today’s decision is a tremendous opportunity for the Town

of Vernon and for Vermont. After two years of regulatory

negotiations, Vermont Yankee will be transferred to NorthStar

for decommissioning, and Windham County can enjoy the

benefits of a restored site decades ahead of the original timeline.

“This agreement was endorsed by many local and state

government and non-governmental partners that recognized

the benefits of an accelerated decommissioning, and we’re

pleased that the PUC approves of this contract. We look forward

to Vernon’s future as it transitions from the host town of

Vermont Yankee to the next stage of its energy legacy.”

The Vermont Energy Partnership (www.vtep.org) is a

diverse group of business, labor, and community leaders committed

to finding clean, safe, affordable and reliable electricity

solutions. Its mission is to educate policy makers, the

media, businesses, and the general public about why electricity

is imperative for prosperity, and about the optimal solutions

to preserve and expand our electricity network. Entergy,

owner of Vermont Yankee, is a member of the Vermont Energy

Partnership.

SAM-VT Applauds Vermont Medical

Society Resolution Opposing

Commercialized Marijuana in VT

At its 205th annual meeting, the 2000-plus members of the

Vermont Medical Society (VMS) passed a resolution opposing

the commercialization of non-medical marijuana in

Vermont. Smart Approaches to Marijuana–Vermont applauds

the resolution, which cites the “decades of litigation regarding

tobacco control efforts” and the “safety risks and negative

health impact of marijuana on the health of children, adolescents

and families” among its reasons for opposition.

First and foremost, the VMS resolution describes how a

commercialized retail system puts profit over public health,

quoting senate finance committee testimony by Beau Kilmer

of the RAND Corporation: “Daily and near daily users

account for 80% of all the marijuana expenditures. For-profit

companies can be expected to focus on creating and maintaining

these heavy users; dependence is good for the bottom

line.” And, “Our free speech doctrine makes it very hard to

restrict advertising and marketing.”

Industries that sell addictive substances do not make a

profit on moderate users, so they have to increase the number

of heavy users. That is already playing out for marijuana. The

recent National Survey of Drug Use and Health (NSDUH)

found that over one-quarter of current marijuana users report

symptoms of cannabis use disorder – what we used to call

“abuse, dependence, and addiction” – a rate that now exceeds

the rate for alcohol use disorder.

In addition, the NSDUH found that use rates in the states

that have commercialized non-medical marijuana have gone

up steeply in all age groups, particularly the vulnerable

18-25-year-olds, but also for younger teens. In the states that

have not legalized marijuana, the rates for youth have actually

gone down.

Finally, there is the fact that the black market is still going

strong in the states with commercialized non-medical marijuana,

even though marijuana prices are the lowest they have

ever been. The only way to undersell the black market would

be to reduce marijuana taxes, thus reducing revenue to the

state.

These are some of the reasons why commercialized marijuana,

as with alcohol and tobacco, can never pay for itself. In

fact, it will create an ever-growing budget deficit year after

year.

On top of the costs of administering the system and enforcing

its regulations, there are the costs of running prevention

and educational programs that will keep young people from

using marijuana in the first place. This will reduce harms but

also reduce tax revenues. And what are the costs to treat

marijuana’s harms?

Once established, marijuana addiction can be as hard to

break as nicotine addiction. According to the 2017 report by

the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and

Medicine, and a score of studies that have been published

since, marijuana can also cause psychosis, schizophrenia,

increased mania in bipolar sufferers, increased severity of

social anxiety disorder, and increased suicidality.

These mental health issues are all expensive conditions to

treat. Looking at the increase in use rates projected by the

2015 RAND report for Vermont, Dr. Christine Miller of Johns

Hopkins estimated that the cost for treating new schizophrenia

cases alone would be $4.9 to $11.1 million each year. Most

families could not afford to cover these expense, so the debt

would fall on the state.

Smart Approaches to Marijuana – Vermont (SAM-VT) is a

statewide coalition of Vermonters who believe that commercializing

non-medical marijuana will harm the health, wellbeing,

and economic future of Vermonters. Follow SAM-VT

on Facebook, Twitter, or at sam-vt.org.


Follow These Tips to Protect Data When Shopping Online

Cybercriminals want to turn stolen data into quick cash.

They do this by draining financial accounts, charging credit

cards, creating new credit accounts or even using stolen identities

to file a fraudulent tax return for a refund.

Here are steps taxpayers can follow to help protect their

accounts and their money:

Avoid unprotected Wi-Fi. Unprotected public Wi-Fi

hotspots may allow thieves to view transactions.

Shop at familiar online retailers. Generally, sites using the

“s” designation in “https” at the start of the URL are secure.

User can also look for the “lock” icon in the browser’s URL

bar. That said, some thieves can get a security certificate, so

the “s” may not always vouch for the site’s legitimacy.

Beware of purchases at unfamiliar sites or clicks on links

from pop-up ads.

Learn to recognize and avoid phishing emails. Thieves

send these emails, posing as a trusted source, such a financial

institution. or the IRS. The criminal’s goal is to entice users to

open a link or attachment. The link may take users to a fake

website that will steal usernames and passwords. An attachment

may download malware that tracks keystrokes.

Keep a clean machine. This applies to computers, phones

and tablets. Taxpayers should use security software to protect

against malware that may steal data and viruses that may

damage files.

Use passwords that are strong, long and unique. Experts

suggest a minimum of 10 characters but longer is better.

Only weeks ago we climbed the stairs,

To the attic, behind the old door.

And went to the corner, where Christmas is kept,

In boxes stacked high on the floor.

We brought the stack down to the living room,

Two flights from its cold storage spot.

And opened it up, just like every year,

Quite amazed at all weʼd forgot.

The boxes held ornaments, bound for the tree,

And garlands and wreath bows and wire.

Most things quite familiar from years of use,

Like the stockings we hang by the fire.

We opened up memories, box after box,

But some things I could barely recall.

Did we use these lights on the tree last year,

Or the archways in the hall?

It’s Time to Get Your Flu Shot

Wintertime has arrived in Vermont, and so has flu season.

With cases already reported in the state, health officials are

urging Vermonters to get their annual flu vaccine.

“Getting a flu shot is the best way to protect ourselves from

the flu,” said Health Commissioner Mark Levine, MD.

“When we all take this one simple step, we do more than just

protect ourselves – we help keep the people around us healthy

and safe from potentially deadly flu complications.”

Flu is more than just a bad cold. It can be a dangerous illness

for anyone, but it can be especially harmful for babies

who are too young for the vaccine, older adults, pregnant

women, and people who have chronic medical conditions

such as asthma, diabetes and heart disease, or a weakened

immune system. Anyone at risk of complications from flu

should talk with their health care provider. Older adults can

receive flu vaccines that are specially designed for people age

65 and older.

Flu caused nearly 80,000 deaths and more than 950,000

hospitalizations around the country last season, the highest

numbers in decades, according to recently released data from

the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In Vermont,

nearly 40 deaths had flu as an underlying cause. The decrease

in the number of people getting an annual flu shot may be

contributing to more people getting the flu.

“I’m very concerned about our vaccination rates for flu,

especially among young children, which dropped 4 percent

last year alone,” said Dr. Levine. “If we don’t get vaccinated,

we are needlessly putting ourselves at risk of serious illness,

• • •

The Ornament

By G. E. Shuman

• • •

• • •

People should also avoid using a specific word in the password.

They should also use a combination of letters, numbers

and special characters.

Use multi-factor authentication when available. This

means users may need a security code, usually sent as a text

from a financial institution or email provider to a mobile

phone. People use this code in addition to usernames and

passwords.

Encrypt and password-protect sensitive data. If keeping

financial records, tax returns or any personally identifiable

information on computers, this data should be encrypted and

protected by a strong password.

Capstone Community Action hosts tax preparation at eight

sites around the community including Barre, Montpelier,

Northfield, Waitsfield, Randolph and South Royalton. These

informational articles are produced by the IRS and supplied

by the Tax Program at Capstone Community Action. For tax

information call their tax line at 802-477-5148. Tax

Preparation begins February 4th, 2019.

but we are also gambling with the health of children and others

around us who can’t get vaccinated. For some, their lives

depend on the rest of us taking responsibility.” Of the 180

pediatric deaths reported in the U.S. last season, 80 percent

occurred in children who had not had a flu shot.

The flu vaccine takes two weeks to become fully effective,

so now is the time to get your flu shot, before packed shopping

centers and holiday gatherings are in full swing. And do

it with confidence – the vaccine is safe, you can’t get flu from

the vaccine.

More than 300 sites in Vermont offer flu vaccine, including

supermarkets, pharmacies and health care providers. Dial

2-1-1 or visit healthvermont.gov/flu and use the Flu Vaccine

Finder to find a nearby place to get a flu shot.

If you do get sick, take steps to keep the flu from spreading:

Stay home from work or school until you no longer have a

fever or symptoms.

Cover coughs and sneezes with your elbow or a tissue.

Wash your hands often with soap and water.

Learn more about flu:

Prevention tips and vaccine information, videos and posters

in multiple languages: healthvermont.gov/flu

Outbreak management resources for long-term care facilities,

K-12 schools and child care facilities: healthvermont.

gov/fluoutbreak. Flu activity and surveillance: cdc.gov/flu.

For health news, alerts and information, visit healthvermont.gov

And then, there it was, as it always is,

One more thing I forgot to remember.

It waited so patiently, most of a year,

To be shown just the weeks of December.

The small ornament, I admire so much,

And display on the mantle each year;

A ceramic love story, proclaimed without words,

With a meaning quite beautifully clear.

For there Santa kneels, in most worshipful prayer,

By the tiniest manger of hay.

His gaze toward the infant lying there,

On that very first Christmas Day.

Not a sign of a bow, or a gift, or a sleigh,

Not a reindeer at all to be seen.

Just St. Nick, with his furry hat tossed to the ground,

In a show of what this day should mean.

When Christmas has passed, weʼll just go get the stack,

to pack up the ribbons and lights.

And Santa will wait, to remind us next year,

Jesus came on that most holy night.

Climbing

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Lung Cancer?

Asbestos exposure in industrial,

construction, manufacturing jobs, or the

military may be the cause. Family in

the home were also exposed.

Call 1-866-795-3684 or email

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monies may not require filing a lawsuit.

INTOLERANCE TEST

Food Sensitivity Test

NEW - In house visit $100.

Now we can test out of the office for $70. Just mail in a hair

sample and contact information to Many Words Herbs c/o

First In Fitness Building, 652 Granger Rd., Barre VT 05649

and you’ll receive your test results with in 5 business days.

Food intolerances can also lead to chronic diseases by

creating inflammation within the body. It’s a well-known fact

that all disease starts with Inflammation. It’s like putting

watered-down gas in your vehicle. We all know what

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Imagine what years of inflammatory

foods can do to your body over time? We’ll

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immune system and reduce your intolerance

levels simply by adding recommended foods

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Therapeutic Practice & Apothecary

Rosalene Bussiere

Certified in Herbalism & Reiki III

652 Granger Rd., Berlin, VT 05641

802-793-9371 manywordsherbs1.weebly.com

December 12, 2018 The WORLD page 13


MICHAEL DERIENZO

May 29, 1986 ~ December 22, 2007


The love, laughter and pleasure you

brought into the lives of all who

knew you cannot be expressed in

words. Our lives will never be the

same without you. The emptiness

in our hearts will remain forever.

You are sadly missed by all

who knew you ~ especially Mom,

Steve, Dillon, Jacki & Grampy

Whoever said being

a parent is easy?

For help call

Circle of Parents TM

1-800-CHILDREN

1-800-244-5373

SAVE $$$$!

Curt's Drop-Off

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Faith Community Church

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See You 7:30AM to 1PM!

HAPPY

21 ST

BIRTHDAY

Michael

Hutchinson

Love, Mom & Dad

SAMBEL’S! SAMBEL’S!

Book Your Holiday Parties

and Other Special Occasions

Sambel’s Catering 249-7758

Your baby’s first

Christmas should be

extra special, for him

or her and for you.

Make it a keepsake

by sending your

baby’s photo to us.

Each week we’re

placing photos of first-

Christmas babies in

our special holiday

sections. Just fill out

the short form

below and mail it

with your $9.95 fee

for publishing costs. Your baby’s

NOAH SMITH

6/29/2018

Carli & Esteban Smith

Barre, VT

picture will appear in our Holiday editions.

Only babies born after December 2017 qualify.

Pictures will be returned.

FIll out this form and send with a photo of your baby and $9.95.

All entries must be received no later than December 13, 2018.

Baby’s Name _______________________________________________

Women and Children First Consignment Shop hosted hot chocolate

and cookies during the Barre Holiday Events this past weekend.

The haystacks were delicious!

Jodi's

(802)793-7417 Barre

Text or Call

BIRTH

ANNOUNCEMENTS

The following birth announcements were submitted by Gifford Medical Center

on December 2, 2018. Any questions or concerns should be addressed directly to Gifford.

Gifford Medical Center

A boy, Riley Jay Griffen, was born November 20 to

Celsi Pratt and Michael Howe Jr. of Randolph.

A girl, Hayleigh Jean, was born November 23 to

Stacy Olmstead and Scott Olmstead of Randolph.

A girl, Sophia May Berry, was born November 25 to

Athena Hanson and Owen Berry of Bradford.

Happy Birthday!

FROM

BARRE-MONTPELIER RD.

Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The WORLD would like to help you wish someone

special a Happy Birthday. Just send their name, address & birthdate. We’ll publish the

names in this space each week. Plus, we’ll draw one (1) winner each week for a FREE

BIRTHDAY CAKE from Price Chopper (Berlin, VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Just

send birthday names two (2) weeks prior to birthdate, to: The WORLD, c/o BIRTHDAY

CAKE, 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please provide your name, address

& phone number for prize notification.

NOVEMBER 30

DECEMBER 14

Brynn Fleury, 7, Middlesex

DECEMBER 10

Colten V. Verdon, 6, Williamstown

Pammy Sue Stiffler, 60, Barre Kelly Whitcomb, West Danville

DECEMBER 12

Lisa Deforge, East Montpelier DECEMBER 15

Byron Nutbrown, 80, Graniteville

Beverly Coon R.N., Williamstown

DECEMBER 13

Walter Mills, Bethel

Isidore Hochschild, 10, Plainfield

This Week’s Cake Winner:

On DECEMBER 15, DWAYNE GIBSON of BERLIN

will be 58 YEARS OLD!!

CAKE WINNER: Please call Price Chopper (Berlin, VT)

at 479-9078 and ask for the Bakery Department

by Thursday, December 13th to arrange for cake pick-up.

PRICE CHOPPER

“BIRTHDAY DRAWING”

Mail this coupon to: The WORLD c/o Birthday Cake

403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin

Barre, VT 05641

Open to people of all ages. Just send in the entry blank below, and we will

publish it in this space each week. Plus, we will draw one (1) name each week

for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from the Price Chopper Super Center (Berlin,

VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks prior

to birthdate. Telephone calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.

BIRTHDATE______________________________

NAME___________________________________

AGE (this birthday)_________________________

ADDRESS________________________________

________________________________________

PHONE__________________________________

page 14 The WORLD December 12, 2018

Birthdate ___________________________________________________

Parents’ Name _____________________________________________

Address ____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

Phone (Home)______________________________________________

Send completed form to:

THE WORLD c/o 1st Christmas

403 US Rt. 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641-2274

or email to sales@vt-world.com

Happy

Anniversary

Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts and The WORLD would like to help you wish

a special couple a Happy Anniversary. Just send their name, address & wedding

anniversary date. Each week we publish the names, plus we’ll have a

monthly winner for a 1/2 dozen wrapped red roses at Forget Me Not Flowers

& Gifts, 171 N. Main Street, Barre. No obligation, nothing to buy. Just send

anniversary names two (2) weeks prior to anniversary date, to: The WORLD,

c/o HAPPY ANNIVERSARY, 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please

provide name, address & phone number for prize notification.

Forget Me Not

Flowers & Gifts

171 N. Main St., Barre • 476-6700

Mon.-Fri. 9-6 | Sat. 9-1

We belong to the Flower Shop Network!

www.forgetmenotflowers.barre.com

Please Send Us Your December Anniversaries

And Be Automatically Registered To Win A 1/2 Dozen Wrapped,

Red Roses From Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts

DECEMBER 13

DAVID & KAY SANTAMORE, PLAINFIELD, 4 YEARS

DECEMBER 15

JIM & CAROLE POITRAS, INVERNESS, FL, 58 YEARS

MARK & PAT AUSTIN, MORETOWN, 39 YEARS

DECEMBER 16

SCOTT & PATRICIA WHEELER, BROOKFIELD, 24 YEARS

FORGET ME NOT FLOWERS & GIFTS

“HAPPY ANNIVERSARY”

Mail this coupon to: The WORLD

c/o Happy Anniversary

403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641

Just send in the entry blank below, and we will publish it in this space each week.

Plus, we will draw one (1) couple each month for a 1/2 dozen wrapped red roses

from Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts, 171 N. Main St., Barre. No obligation, nothing

to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks prior to anniversary date. Telephone

calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.

ANNIVERSARY

DATE_______________________# YEARS______

NAMES___________________________________

ADDRESS_________________________________

_________________________________________

PHONE___________________________________

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ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Careful,

Lamb. Don’t let your generous nature

lead to some serious overspending

as you contemplate your holiday giftgiving.

Your social life kicks off into

high gear by week’s end.

TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) A positive attitude helps you

weather annoying but unavoidable changes in holiday plans. Aspects

favor new friendships and reinforcement of existing relationships.

GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Demands on your energy level

could be much higher than usual as you prepare for the upcoming

holidays. Be sure to pace yourself. Friends and family will be

happy to help.

CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Don’t allow a suddenly icy reaction

from a friend or family member to continue without learning

what caused it -- and what can be done to restore that once warm

and caring relationship.

LEO (July 23 to August 22) A relationship seems to be unraveling,

mostly from a lack of attention. It might be a good idea to ease up

on whatever else you’re doing so you can spend more time working

to mend it.

VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) New facts emerge that not

only help explain the recent rift with a trusted colleague, but also

might provide a chance to wipe the slate clean and make a fresh

start in your friendship.

LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A family member’s personal

situation is, fortunately, resolved in time for you to get back into

your hectic round of holiday preparations. An old friend might

bring a new friend into your life.

SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Pace yourself in meeting

holiday pressures and workplace demands to avoid winding

up with a frayed temper and a Scorpian stinger that lashes out at

puzzled kith, kin and colleagues.

SAGITTARIUS November 22 to December 21 A nancial matter

requires close attention. Also, news from a trusted source provides

the means to help sort out a long-standing state of confusion

and put it into perspective.

CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) This is a good time

to reinforce family ties. Make it a priority to assess and resolve all

outstanding problems. Start the upcoming holiday season with a

full measure of love.

AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Don’t be pressured into

a so-called solid-gold investment. Wait until the holiday distractions

are over. Then take a harder look at it. ou might nd that the

“gold” is starting to flake off.

PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A former friend might be trying

to heal the breach between you by using a mutual friend as an

intermediary. Best advice: Keep an open mind despite any lingering

bad feelings.

BORN THIS WEEK: You have a way of saying the right thing at

the right time. Your friendships are deep and lasting.

(c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc.


Things to Consider When

Hosting for the Holidays

Holiday hosts have a lot on their

plates. The work of holiday hosting

does not begin when the first guest

arrives. It starts weeks before,

when homeowners begin preparing their

homes for overnight guests.

Because the holiday season can be so busy, it’s easy for

hosts to overlook certain things as the day their rst guests

are set to arrive draws nearer. But the following are a few

things hosts should consider in the weeks before their guests

show up.

ACCOMMODATIONS

It’s hard to overlook accommodations when hosting for

the holidays, but it’s best to inspect linens and other items

that might go largely unused throughout much of the year.

Check foldout couches or air mattresses a few weeks before

your guests are slated to arrive. This gives you ample time to

address any issues and also allows you to comparison shop and

nd great deals on any items you need to replace. Hosts who

are parents to young children may want to discuss sleeping

arrangements before guests arrive if kids will be asked to sleep

in different beds. Kids might embrace the change, while others

might be less enthusiastic. If younger cousins will be staying

over, let kids choose their new roommates, which might make

them more excited about sharing rooms with their guests.

Explaining the situation in advance gives youngsters time to

ready themselves for their temporary move.

DIETS

Ask guests before they arrive if they have any particular

food allergies or items they need to avoid because of any medications

they might be taking. This is especially important for

youngsters, who may forget to avoid homemade cookies with

nuts despite having nut allergies. By asking in advance if your

guests have any food allergies or foods and ingredients they

must avoid, you will know to avoid serving particular dishes

so no one accidentally eats foods that might make them sick

and you can prepare alternative dishes for people who must

avoid certain foods.

ACTIVITIES

If guests will be staying for several nights, explore a few

local activities so everyone can get out of the house for a night

or two. Time spent with family is one of the best parts of the

holiday season, but spending all of that time inside in cramped

quarters can grow uncomfortable over time. Plan a family

night or two out that everyone can enjoy.

PETS

When hosting for the holidays, let your guests know if you

have any pets. Some people have dog and cat allergies, and

those allergies may make it difcult for them to enjoy their

stay. Others’ allergies might be so severe that they have to nd

alternative lodging. Let guests know about your pets when you

invite them to stay at your house so no one is surprised at the

last minute. In addition, let guests know if they can bring their

own pets along to your house.

www.twincitylanes.com

Holiday Hazards for Your Pets

By the Vermont Veterinary Medical

Association

Erin Forbes, DVM

The holiday season has arrived and brings

not only celebrations, presents, and decorations

but also concerns for pet safety. There

are many dangers to be aware of as you begin

to celebrate this year.

Chocolate is in great abundance during

many holiday celebrations and is a wellknown

toxin. If ingested it can cause mild

signs, such as vomiting and diarrhea, but can

also cause more serious signs such as seizures

and even death. Keep chocolate away from

anywhere your pets may get it and call your

veterinarian right away if your pet does eat

some.

Grapes and raisins are used in many holiday

recipes and if given to a pet can cause

kidney failure and even death. Make sure to

not feed your pet any holiday sweets with

raisins or grapes in them and remind your

guests they are toxic to pets. The specific

toxin in grapes has not been identified yet so

any ingestion is cause for concern.

Tinsel is a common decoration used on

many a Christmas tree, but this shiny item can

cause a problem if ingested, specifically in

cats. The long thread type material looks like

a toy to a cat and if the cat eats it, it can get

stuck in the stomach or intestines, requiring

emergency life- saving surgery.

Xylitol is a sugar alternative found in lowfat

sweets, gums, peanut butter, and even

recipes. Xylitol can cause an animal’s blood

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sugar to drop which may make your pet have

a seizure. It can also cause severe damage to

the liver. Not all pets survive xylitol ingestion

and those that do require intensive care and

hospitalization.

There are many plants we see during the

holidays that can cause issues with pets.

Lillies are extremely toxic to cats and cause

kidney failure. Holly and mistletoe can cause

vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and in

very rare cases, seizures and death. Poinsettias

are actually not that toxic, despite the hype,

and generally just cause mild GI upset.

Some holiday hazards are overlooked,

including open flames and electric cords.

During the holiday season many people light

multiple candles and put them in places pets,

especially cats, can reach. If a pet comes into

contact with an open flame fur can quickly set

on fire, causing burns and potential lung damage.

Consider keeping candles in places your

pets cannot get to them or using decorative

candle shades. Many people will also use

decorative lights inside and outside their

house, which means there will be electrical

cords in many places. Puppies and kittens are

curious and may chew on them, which can

cause fluid accumulation in the lungs from

electric shock. Keep wires taped down and

use protective cases when possible.

These are just a few of the holiday hazards

facing our pets this season. If you have any

concerns or questions about your pets and the

holidays, please contact your veterinarian.

The need is greater

than ever to help the

homeless animals at

Central Vermont

Humane Society.

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3 Tips to Manage Kids’ Party Guest Lists

Drafting guest lists for children’s parties is no small task. Parents may hope to

include all the kids in their child’s class, only to be met with some difficult

decisions due to budgets and space. Parents planning their kids’ birthday parties

can keep these three tips in mind as they work toward finalizing a guest list.

1. Pick the venue rst. The size and

scope of the party venue can help

parents determine just how many

children they can invite to the party. An

intimate party at home may mean fewer

children, while a big party center can

comfortably and safely accommodate

lots of kids.

2. Consider the budget. Determining

how much you want to spend on the party can help you

decide on the guest list. Children’s party centers may charge

anywhere from $10 to $25 per head. BabyCenter.com found

that roughly one-quarter of parents surveyed spend more

than 500 for a child’s rst birthday, and the U.K. rm

Vouchercloud TM found the average kid’s party runs $400

before presents. Much like with weddings,

one of the easiest ways to cut birthday

party costs is to trim the guest list.

3. Focus on the child. Rather than the

party being a who’s who of guests, let the

guest of honor create the guest list. This

way the guest lists reflects the child’s preferences.

If you’re concerned kids might

add too many names to the guest list,

explain in advance that you do not have a limitless budget,

so some names may need to be trimmed to accommodate the

money available for the party.

The guest list for kids’ parties can sometimes be tricky to

negotiate. But three simple strategies can make the task that

much simpler.

Save the Homeless Animals this Holiday Season

Executive Director.

“Spay and neuter costs

have risen along with

other animal care costs.

Adoption fees alone do

not cover all of these expenses, in fact there is fun crafts, and you can say hello to Santa and

a gap of about $670 dollars, on average, for Mrs. Claus. You can also spend time visiting

every animal we take in.”

with the adoptable animals.

To help bridge that gap CVHS is thrilled to Sponsor a Pet. If you have an animal-lover

announce that three generous donors have created

a Save the Animals Challenge of $15,000.

on your gift list, you can sponsor an animal in

Every donation made by Saturday, December

that person’s name. You will get a giftable

22 to the Holiday Fund Drive will be matched certificate that you can share with that special

dollar-for-dollar up to $15,000. Every dollar someone.

donated will have double the impact to save Holiday Raffle. Purchase Holiday Raffle

twice as many animal lives.

tickets and you have a chance to win exciting

Some additional ways you can help these prizes while helping homeless animals; 100%

needy animals:

of proceeds from your ticket purchases will

Holiday with the Animals. Sat. Dec. 15, 10

am – 2 pm. Bring donations of canned pet

provide vital services for the animals at

food and other supplies to the CVHS Adoption Central Vermont Humane Society.

Center in East Montpelier. This family-friendly

holiday party will feature yummy snacks, ties go to www.centralvermonthumane.org.

For information on all of these opportuni-

December 12, 2018 The WORLD page 15


Roger Hill of Weathering Heights and Radio Vermont

A look back at November 2018 Weather Statistics Barre-

Montpelier VT

Highest temperature: 5 degrees on the 2nd

Coldest daytime high: 9 degrees on the 22nd

Lowest temperature: 0 degrees on the 22nd, 23rd

Warmest minimum: 42 degrees on the 2nd

Monthly average 29.6 degrees which was 5.8 degrees below

normal

Heating Degree days 1052 Normal 890

Cooling degree days 0 Normal 0

Average daytime sky cover: 8/10ths Mostly cloudy

Heaviest precipitation: 0.91” on the 3rd

Accumulated November precipitation 5.35” Normal 3.1”

this was 169 of normal

Largest snowfall: 8.” on the 2th

November snowfall: 32.9” in dispute Normal for November

9.0”

Thunderstorm days: 0

Strongest winds 42 mph on the 13th from the Northwest

November 2018 Weather –

November broke the back and then some of warmer than

normal months which came in decidedly much colder. In fact

it was a very cold, cloudy November and rather snowy as

well. Many wet snowfall were recorded and this also set up

two nights of zero degrees being reached on the 22nd, and

23rd.

There were two separate arctic outbreaks unusual for November

especially for recent years. The rst notable one hit

November 14th, which tied the record for that date and broke

a record for November 15th at 4 degrees above.

The second arctic outbreak occurred 21st, 22nd, and 23rd.

Temperatures this time bottomed out at zero which tied the

record for the 22nd. The daily high only reached 9 above for

the 22nd. Another very cold day was observed on the 23rd.

Snowfall in dispute as to actual numbers was healthy.

Some observations include a total of 32.9”which seems to be

a bit high. In Worcester Vermont snowier than Montpelier, the

snowfall total was still well above normal at 25.2”.

The storm track and jet stream location shifted to overhead

and eventually south. This created one of the cloudier November’s

which is par for the course. November and December

are the two cloudiest months in central and northern Vermont

owed to moisture streaming off the Great Lakes and high pressure

system will strong subsidence inversion trapping moisture

in the lowest layers of the atmosphere.

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2)…

Early December 2018 measurement for Carbon Dioxide CO2

was 408.32 ppm as measured at the Mauna Loa Observatory.

Climate Change Notes...

A reghter is silhouetted

by a burning home along Pacic

Coast Highway Highway

1) during the Woolsey

Fire in Malibu, Calif., on

Nov. 9. Robyn Beck/AFP/

Getty Images)

Monstrous weather events have crowded 2018. While many

coastal residents in the East were still recovering from Hurricanes

Florence and Michael, raging res in California killed

a record number of people and destroyed thousands of structures.

Climate change has worsened the dry and hot climate

in the West, directly contributing to more frequent and severe

wildres. The Fourth National Climate Assessment, which the

U.S. government recently released, states that extreme weather

events will intensify and become more frequent.

How do these disasters affect people’s perceptions of climate

change? To those already convinced by climate change

science, extreme weather events are evidence that it’s already

changing our world. Climate skeptics, however, do not always

see the link, as when President Trump insisted that the California

wildres resulted from poor forest management, not climate

change. Can 2018’s extreme weather persuade skeptics

that the climate is changing?

Last month, the fourth National Climate Assessment for the

United States was released to the public

By 2035, the northeastern U.S. is projected to warm more

than 2 deg. C 3.6 deg F. above pre-industrial levels. This is

about two decades faster than the global average based on the

most likely global emissions scenarios.

--Winters have warmed three times faster than summers in the

northeastern U.S.

--Fewer cold extremes are anticipated by mid-century.

--Early emergence of plants can make them more susceptible

to later cold spells as their tolerance to cold air is reduced.

--Many deciduous trees are projected to experience an overall

increase in their amount of autumn foliage color.

--More intense precipitation events have increased the risk of

some types of inland floods in the region, especially in valley

locations.

--Many of the larger cities in the Northeast, especially New

England, were developed along rivers, canals and on the coast.

The predicted increase in flood frequency or severity could

increase the spread of contaminants into waterways, which can

result in greater risks to health of nearby ecosystems, animals

and people.

--Precipitation is expected to increase during winter and spring

but with little change in summer.

--Less early winter snowfall and earlier snowmelt is predicted,

based on the latest climate projections for this region. This will

also result in decreased snow depth and a shorter snow season

with fewer days of snow on the ground.

--The proportion of winter precipitation falling as rain has already

increased across the Northeast and will likely continue

to do so.

--The report also expects a trend toward less lake ice.

--The earlier snowmelt and related runoff may lead to lower

spring peak stream flows for the 2014-2095 period compared

to the 1951-2005 period.

Ski resort impacts

--Activities that rely on natural snow and ice cover are projected

to remain economically viable in only far northern parts

of the region by the end of the century under the higher greenhouse

emissions scenario. This will put even more focus on

more costly man-made snowmaking capabilities.

--However, the capacity of some vulnerable southern and lowelevation

locations to adapt in the long-term is expected to be

limited by higher nighttime temperatures.

Impact on Northeast U.S. Agriculture

According to the report, the Northeast agriculture sector

will benet from the changing climate over the next half century

due to greater productivity over a longer growing season.

However, excess moisture is already a leading cause of crop

loss in the Northeast waterlogged elds.

In addition, warmer winters are not killing off as many

pests, which is leaving a higher number of pests to attack crops

during the growing season.

The Ocean

--The coastal waters along the Northeast continental shelf

warmed at a rate of 0.033 deg. C 0.06 F. per year from 1982

to 2016, which is three times faster than the global average.

This increase in warming has been greatest during the summer

months.

--Sea level rise along the Middle Atlantic and northeastern

U.S. coast has been three to four times higher than the global

average.

--There has been a 100 to 200 percent increase in high tide

flooding in some coastal locations.

--The report projects anywhere from a 2 to 4.5-foot increase in

sea-level along the Northeast coast by the end of this century.

Policy and Opinion –

It is obvious that climate change adaptation efforts by local,

state and federal governments will be critical from now

through the end of this century. In this regard, younger generations

and not older baby boomers will best serve to effect

policy who will deal with the future of the planet, the state of

Vermont, the regional commissions, and the towns and local

commissions. Metrics on politicians elected to promote policy

show lots of talk but little to no actual change. The “slow as

you go” attitudes of elected ofcials in their 40s, 50s, 60’s and

0s that when weighted onto the youngest and future generations,

is effectively myopic, weighted toward economic solutions

for a future climate that is unsustainable ~ Roger Hill

Vermont Weather Trends – Rest of December into January...

Expecting a quieter overall weather pattern than what started

out this fall. The snowier colder November very “frontloaded”

was most likely to be less extreme, but exhibiting serious

cold from time to time and warmer than normal scenarios

which feature mixed precipitation and even rain.

Sudden stratospheric warming and effectively a perturbed

polar vortex was looking fairly likely later in January and may

continue at times into February and March. This would then

translate to periods of cold and story conditions with trends for

decent skiing conditions. However, this is not yet absolutely

predictable. Studies continue to show relative decent predictability

in the longer range. What is at odds for this winter is

the El Nino that is weak but substantial in its effects see temperature

projection) and many contradictory weather patterns

at this time. Thus overall condence was lower than usual.

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page 16 The WORLD December 12, 2018


A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE WORLD

Using Credit at

Christmas Time

Favorite Wines

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December 12, 2018 The WORLD page 17


HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE | THE WORLD

Holiday Giving for Reluctant Recipients

Quite a number of people take

pleasure from finding gifts under

the tree and then having the

opportunity to tear open the

wrapping paper and see which treasures are

inside. ut there also is a category of people

who claim they have all they could ever

need and want and insist that gifts are not

necessary. n such instances, what are gift

givers to do

Some people prefer to eschew gifts because they simply do

not have the funds to reciprocate the generosity. Seniors may

be reticent to accept gifts because they’ve already obtained

many things throughout their lives and could be at a point

where they’re downsizing and simply do not need any more

material things. Others could be overwhelmed with clutter

and have decided that a minimalist approach is the way to go.

A little investigation may be necessary to get to the root of

the no-gift mindset and then gift-givers can decide whether

they should buy a loved one a gift or nd another way to

show how much they car.

• Offer something handmade. Gifts come in all shapes and

forms, and handmade gifts — particularly the consumable

kind — won’t take up space and can show just how much

you care. Craft a personalized batch of wine, bake a cherished

family recipe, develop a uniquely scented bath zzy,

or harness another creative talent you may have. If the gift is

handmade, there is a bigger chance it will be received with

grace, even from someone who is reluctant to receive gifts.

• Give new life to a cherished item. Think about an item that

may be a loved one’s most prized possession. Perhaps it is a

porcelain doll from childhood or a photograph that can use

reframing? Offer to have such an item repaired or restored if

it’s starting to show its age.

• Offer an experience as a gift. Research from Harris says

three-quarters of millennials prefer experiences over material

items, and are spending more on travel, cultural events and

dining out than objects. Even people who are reluctant to

receive gifts may appreciate the gift of an experience that can

broaden their horizons.

• Explore useful gifts. These types of gifts may include gift

cards to a frequently used supermarket, membership to a tness

center or even enrollment in a roadside assistance club.

A subscription to a streaming movie service also is a great

and useful gift.

• Gift of company. Sometimes the best present is the gift of

one’s presence. If a recipient really wants nothing, perhaps

an evening spent together in one another’s company will

make a great gift.

It’s not too late to think

about Christmas giving

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page 18 The WORLD December 12, 2018

A Family Season Ticket

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HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE | THE WORLD

Great Gifts for Beloved Seniors

By the time they reach senior status,

many adults have amassed a ton of

stuff along with their irreplaceable

knowledge. Come their golden

years, grandparents and other aging loved

ones probably don’t need much in the way

of material possessions, which can make it

challenging to find them holiday gifts.

Finding great gifts for seniors may take a little more effort,

but with these ideas at the ready, it’s likely gift-givers can

make this holiday merry for everyone on their shopping lists.

FAMILY PHOTO MEMORIES

Many seniors love to talk about their life histories. What

better way to be the catalyst for conversation than to create

a photo album that chronicles their lives? Photos can be

included alongside historical documents, such as old school

projects, military discharge papers, awards, and even genealogical

information. Photo puzzles, photo calendars and any

home decor with a photo printed on it are variations on this

theme.

ASSISTANCE GIFTS

Seniors want to remain as independent as possible. By

giving items that help them do just that, you can bring smiles

to their faces.

One idea is motion-sensing light switches and xtures. If

and when nature calls in the middle of the night, hallways or

bathrooms can be illuminated effortlessly.

Shower and bathroom grab bars are another idea. These

provide extra security and stability when getting in and out

of the shower or when using the toilet.

For seniors who just need a little extra reach, a grab tool

can easily snag packages from a top shelf or pick up items

that may have dropped to the floor, eliminating bending or

straining.

PRACTICAL TECHNOLOGY

Seniors may not be as immersed in technology as young

people, but they purchase their share of gadgets and increasingly

rely on tech to get through the day. To free up more

time for rest and relaxation, invest in an iRobot Roomba

Robot Vacuum. This simple device will clean floors easily,

moving from room to room without the need for a bulky

canister or upright vacuum.

Consider an easy-to-use tablet, pre-loaded with handy

applications. Grandparents can use video chatting to keep in

touch with grandchildren living across the country. Easily re-

ll prescription medication with a pharmacy app just a click

away. Stream favorite movies or channels through video

streaming sites, like Netflix or Amazon Prime. Tablets tend

to be lightweight, portable and user-friendly.

PERSONAL CARE

Even independent seniors may benet from a little extra

companionship and assistance when family members are not

able to make frequent visits. Hiring a visiting care worker,

who can do everything from organizing pills to making dinner

to tackling some laundry, can provide the help seniors

need with their daily errands .

Seniors are a thriving and growing demographic. It may

seem challenging to purchase gifts for older loved ones, but

with a little know-how, it’s easy to nd the right present.

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December 12, 2018 The WORLD page 19


HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE | THE WORLD

How to Buy Clothes as Holiday Gifts

Holiday shopping lists are being

made, and there is a strong

chance that clothing has made

many of those lists. Year after year,

apparel, along with technology and books,

dominate the top giving categories, according

to Nielsen Global Holiday Spending

Expectations. However, before rushing out

to buy that new sweater or pair of slacks,

shoppers are urged to follow a few tips that

can make clothing shopping easier.

• Mimic the recipient’s sense of style. Take your

shopping cues from the types of clothing your

loved one typically wears. Now is not the time to

try to impart your own fashion sense on someone

else. Enlist help if you’re not exactly sure of your

loved one’s sense of style; retail associates are

there to help.

• Stick with classics. Instead of mimicking his

or her style, you can always select from classic

apparel or general categories if they seem like

they might be the right t. Certain pieces, such

as classic black pants or a skirt or a camisole and

cardigan, always work seamlessly in a wardrobe.

A gentleman might appreciate a new dinner jacket

or blazer for those special occasions like a night

out on the town. Opt for muted colors unless the

recipient to make a statement.

• Find out the right size. This can take some

investigatory work, but enlist other friends or

family members to determine which size clothing

your loved one wears. Otherwise, do some subtle

sleuthing. Indirectly inquire as to size in general

conversation. Or you can be forthcoming and say,

“I’d like to get you clothing as a gift, what sizes

do you wear?”

• Discover his or her favorite stores. Through

your relationship, you may have learned about

your loved one’s favorite clothing stores. Such

knowledge can give you a better sense of where

to shop.

• Get gift receipts and learn the exchange policy.

Even items purchased with the best intentions

might not be right or t correctly. Give the gift

recipient an easy out by including a gift receipt

with the present. This way he or she can exchange

the gift for something else at full purchase price.

Avoid retailers with especially stringent exchange

policies.

• Enroll in a clothing subscription service. You

don’t need to buy clothes to gift clothing. Another

way to gift clothing is to enroll your loved one

in a trial for a clothing service. Clothing services

ask members a few questions, and then fashion

specialists will choose select pieces to ship each

month. The clothing can be kept or returned for

new items.

Clothing gifts are very popular. Gift-givers can

help ensure they’re well received by selecting

items with care.

SHAVING MUGS,

BRUSHES, CREAMS

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Serious tools for the everyday cook.

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page 20 The WORLD December 12, 2018

Now Available: LAMY

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Mon-Fri 10-6 Sat 10-4 Sunday 11-3

ACCESSORIES FOR HOME, SELF, AND SPIRIT


Great Gifts at Great Prices!


Holiday Cards, Ornaments, Stockings,

Nativity Sets, Nesting Dolls, Tarot Decks,

Wool Hats, Gloves & Mittens.

An amazing array of gifts from around the world!


9 LANGDON STREET • 229-2777


OPEN SEVEN DAYS!


HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE | THE WORLD

Stay Safe this Holiday Season

The holiday season is an exciting time

of year, and it is easy to get swept

up in the decorations, crowds and

social engagements. Despite the

joviality and revelry of the holiday season,

there is also the potential to become a

target of theft. Allstate Insurance says breakins,

package theft, online hacking, and pickpocketing

incidences increase around this

time of year. As a result, it’s imperative that

celebrants exercise caution come the holiday

season.

STOP THE “PORCH PIRATES”

Shoppers are not the only ones eagerly awaiting the arrival

of packages come the holiday season. Thieves are ready and

waiting to snatch up items once they are delivered. Dubbed

“porch pirates,” these criminals take packages off of porches

when the delivery services leave them behind. According

to a study by Blink, a video security company, residents of

rural areas have a higher chance of being victimized by these

crimes, which can occur anywhere. A 2016 survey from

InsuranceQuotes.com found that roughly one in 10 adults has

had a package stolen from his or her home before they were

able to open it.

To avoid such crimes, consider having packages sent to a

business location where there are more people around to receive

them or to a neighbor who is home all day. Other suggestions

include requiring a signature through the shipping

service upon deliver or requesting the package be dropped

off in a concealed area.

BE ALERT OF YOUR SURROUNDINGS

While shopping in busy malls and other stores, keep track

of the people close to you. Consider keeping credit cards

and cash in an inside pocket rather than a back pocket or in

a purse, which is more easily snatched. Exercise caution at

ATM machines, guarding PIN codes and retrieving and storing

withdrawn funds quickly. When checking out at the store,

ensure that your card never leaves your hand. Many retailers

now have chip-imbedded card readers that enable customers

to complete transactions without handing over their cards.

CHECK RECEIPTS AND STATEMENTS

Because digital theft and identity theft spike this time

of year, be sure to cross-reference purchases made against

banking and credit card statements frequently. Alert banking

institutions to any fraudulent purchases immediately so you

will not be responsible. Then have new cards issued and

prior accounts closed. Shop from secured sites, and only use

secure WiFi connections.

KEEP GIFTS AND PURCHASES OUT OF SIGHT

Do not leave bags in the back seat of a car in plain sight of

thieves. Hide purchases in the trunk or under a cargo cover in

an SUV or truck. Also, do not advertise what you’ve bought

or received to thieves by leaving the empty boxes outside.

That big-screen TV box is a big giveaway that you now have

expensive electronics in the house.

Shoppers must be vigilant during the holiday season to

avoid being victimized by thieves.

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GUY’S FARM and YARD

Williston Store

21 Zephyr Road

Farm

& Yard

Williston, VT 05495-7336 Montpelier, VT 05602-3504 Morrisville, VT 05661

Mon. - Fri. 8-6

Mon. - Fri. 8-6

Mon. - Fri. 7-5

Sat. 8-5 Sun. 10-5

Sat. 8-5 Sun. Closed

Sat. 7-2 Sun. 9-1

19 Barre St., Montpelier 229-0567

Phone: 802.878.5112

Montpelier Store

19 Barre Street

Morrisville Store

155 Portland Street

Phone: 802.229.0567

Phone: 802.888.2025

Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-5, Sun. 10-2

VISIT US ONLINE AT www.guysfarmandyard.com

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December 12, 2018 The WORLD page 21


HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE | PARENT

© ADOBE STOCK

The Dad Who’s Still a Kid at Heart

Being a dad can be a

tough job. Show the

dads in your life that it’s OK

to be a kid at heart by

gifting them items that

remind them of childhood.

And don’t forget to get the

kids involved.

NOSTALGIC GIFTS

When dad was a kid, he probably had

a favorite book. Perhaps, it was one his

father used to read him or that his

grandparents gave him as a gift. There

are many resources available to track

down these classics. To add an element

of surprise and fun for the kiddos,

secretly ask his family members about

his favorites which included fun activities

like, a book of constellations or

choose-your-own adventures.

Board games are another way to

remind dad of his time as a child. Bring

home one he played with his family and

encourage a family board game night.

BACKYARD PLAYGROUND

Maybe dad has grown too old for

swings and slides, but he will still enjoy

outdoor games to entertain guests

during barbecues or other get togethers.

Look for pre-packaged games like

horseshoes, cornhole or ladder ball and

encourage him to hold tournaments

with his friends.

TRIPS TO THE BALLPARK

Is there a better way for dads and

children to bond than enjoying a sporting

event together? The sportsmanship,

delicious food and incredible atmosphere

are enough to excite anyone.

Gift him tickets to his favorite team and

make sure to provide enough for the

whole family.

WEEKEND SPECIALS

Maple Syrup, Maple

Candy, Maple Sugar,

Maple Cream and More!

Farm Fresh Trees,

Wreaths, Kissing Balls

and Boughs

“Our sap is sweet and our

guarantee is strong... you

will love our Vermont

Maple products! Let us

introduce you to the finer

experience of Morse Farm

Maple Sugarworks.

Share our roots.”

Enjoy!

Stocking Stuffers, Toys

and Books

Think Morse Farm

Mail Order!

Corporate Gifts

Customized for You

Open 9 am - 6 pm daily through the Holidays | (802) 223-2740

1168 County Road, Montpelier, Vermont 05602

Just 2.7 miles from downtown Montpelier

www.morsefarm.com

page 22 The WORLD December 12, 2018

Stop by

to shop

our full

selection

of gifts!

Gold Reserved: $285

General Season Pass: $245

Kid’s Pass (ages 6-12): $ 25

Call: 802-244-6963

E-mail: tb@thunderroadvt.com

To receive for Christmas

order by December 14!


HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE | THE WORLD

Get to Know Favorite Wines for Giving

A

glass of wine makes a nice

accompaniment to a meal or

something to enjoy and sip while

conversing with friends in social

situations. Many people have a favorite style

of wine, and some even have a favorite

vineyard. In addition, the popularity of wine

makes it a versatile gift for the holidays or

something to bring along to a holiday party

as a hostess present.

Novice wine enthusiasts may be interested in learning

more about wine so they can choose their wine selections for

gifting and enjoyment more readily. According to the experts

at Wine Enthusiast, learning to taste wine and differentiate

between flavors is similar to appreciating art or music. Understanding

the varietals can simplify the process of selecting

wines.

Cabernet Sauvignon: This is a full-bodied red grape heavily

planted in the Bordeaux region of France. Cabernet generally

has high levels of alcohol and tannins.

Merlot: The smoothness and mild flavor of this red wine

make it a great option for those who need an introduction to

red wine. This wine is lower in tannins than Cabernet Sauvignon,

and it tends to have a more fruity flavor prole as well.

Cabernet Franc: This is a light- to middle-weight wine that

features a high acid content and savory flavors.

• Malbec and Carménère: Similar to Merlot, these grapes

originated in France but then made their way to other regions

of the world. Malbec is most popular in Argentina, while

Carménère is grown in Chile.

• Zinfandel: Although mostly associated with the rosé wine

White infandel, infandel is actually a medium-bodied red

wine that originated in Croatia.

Pinot Noir: Soft tannins and high acid give this light-bodied

red wine its appeal. The grapes were rst widely planted in

France but can now be found elsewhere.

• Chianti: Chianti is the most famous Italian red wine in

North America. It’s a dry red that pairs very well with food.

Chianti, which comes from the Chianti region in Tuscany,

is made exclusively with Sangiovese grapes, or at least 80

percent of them and other blends.

Chardonnay: This is a medium- to full-bodied dry white

wine. The Chardonnay grape is a white grape from the Bur-

gundy region of France.

Sauvignon Blanc: Citrus-driven and often light-bodied,

Sauvignon Blanc is another dry white grape planted widely

in France. It also is a parent grape to Cabernet Sauvignon.

• Pinot Gris/Pinot Grigio: Pinot Grigio is a zesty, dry white

wine that is particularly associated with Italy even though it

originated in France, where it is thought to be a mutation of

the Pinot Noir grape. Pinot Grigio skins are not green like

other white grapes, but have a gray hue, hence the name.

• Reisling: Those who prefer a sweet white wine can opt for

Reisling, which can be traced to Germany. It can be a good

match for those who appreciate other sweet white wines,

such as Moscato or Gewürztraminer.

There are many wines to tempt palates. When gifting, the

selections mentioned above can tempt foodies and budding

sommeliers alike.

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WE HAVE THE LAREST SELECTION IN CENTRAL VERMONT

Happy

Holidays

From All

The Staff

Vermont

Liquor

Stores

* = +Tax ** = +Tax+Dep.

Specials Good Thru 1/1/2019

We Sell Hunting & Fishing Licenses

Checks By Courtesy Card Only!

LP Gas Grill Bottle Drives Welcome

Cylinder Advance notice appreciated

BEVERAGE BARON

From The Wine Cellar

Vendange Ass't Flavors, 1.5 liter ......................... $ 7 99*

Crane Lake Ass't Flavors, 1.5 liter ...................... $ 7 99*

Yellow Tail Ass't Flavors, 1.5 liter ................... $ 10 99*

Josh Cellars Ass't Flavors 750 ml $ 11 99-$ 16 99*

Cavit Ass't Flavors, 1.5 liter ............................... $ 12 99*

90+ Wines

Ass't Flavors - 750ml

$ 999* 2/ $ 18 99*

OR

Excluded: Pinot Noir

117 and Cabernet

Sauvignon 116

90+ Prosecco, Rosé Prosecco

& Moscato D. Asti

750 ml ............................ $8.99* or 2/$16.99*

André 750 ml .............................................. $6.29*

Cook's Ass't Flavors 750 ml ....................... $8.99*

Barefoot Bubbly Ass't Flavors 750 ml ...... $9.99*

Freixenet Champagne

Ass't Flavors 750 ml .................................... $9.99*

Korbel Ass't Flavors 750 ml ......................$11.99*

ATM

ON PREMISES

EBT

Fast, Courteous

Bottle Redemption

Mix or

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BOX WINES:

Flower Box

3 LITER .............................. $ 12 99*

Franzia Crisp White, Sangria,

Sunset Blush,

Chiilable Red, 5 LITER ....... 15 $ 99*

Pepperwood

Ass't Flavors, 3 LITER ....... 16 $ 99*

Peter Vella

Ass't Flavors

5 LITER ................ $ 17 99* - $ 18 99*

Bota Boxes

Ass't Flavors, 3 LITER ....... 18 $ 99*

Black Box

Ass't Flavors, 3 LITER ....... 19 $ 99*

Beverage

411 North Main St., Barre

479-9227 • 476-4962 • Fax 479-9348

Hurry, Limited Supply

On All Specials!

Open Everyday!

Monday-Friday 6AM-9PM

Saturday & Sunday 7AM-9PM

BOTTLE RETURN HOURS

8AM TO 6PM DAILY!

Other Store Specials Too Numerous To Mention!

Champagne

& Sparkling

Wines

Baron

Christmas Eve 6am-6pm

Bottle Redemption 8am-2pm

CHRISTMAS DAY CLOSED

BOTTLE REDEMPTION CLOSED

New Years Eve 6am-7pm

Bottle Redemption 8am-2pm

New Years Day 8am-8pm

BOTTLE REDEMPTION CLOSED

December 12, 2018 The WORLD page 23


HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE | THE WORLD

5 Reasons It’s Smart to Use Credit When Holiday Shopping

The average American shopper will

spend around $975 on holiday gifts,

according to past spending trends

and estimates from the American

Research Group and the National Retail

Federation. Although shoppers have various

payment options at their disposal, the use of

credit cards remains a popular and financially

savvy way to handle purchases, albeit when

done correctly.

BUILD YOUR CREDIT HISTORY.

Creditors look at how individuals use credit cards when

determining credit scores. One of the biggest components

of a credit scoring model is payment history, or the pattern

of using credit and paying it back on time. Making repeated

purchases on credit cards and then paying the bill when it is

due can result in a spike in credit score and help consumers

build a healthy credit history. The key is to make payments in

full and on time.

CREDIT IS SAFER THAN CARRYING CASH.

Stores are very busy during the holiday rush, and consumers

are easily distracted. Carrying around large sums of cash for

purchases can put you at risk for theft or losing the money

along the way. There’s little chance of having lost or stolen

cash returned, but a credit card can be cancelled and replaced.

Plus, nancial institutions have security protocols in

place to freeze accounts and erase purchases that were made

under fraudulent scenarios.

Sterling Silver

Jewelry

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Main Entrance

at the

Berlin Mall

TRACK YOUR PURCHASES.

Credit card companies track all purchases and will itemize

shopping excursions on cardholders’ statements. This can

make it much easier to keep track of your spending. In addition,

some stores do not require receipts for purchases made

with credit cards.

EARN REWARD POINTS WHILE SPENDING.

Competition in the credit card world is stiff, and many nancial

institutions are trying to entice customers with special

deals for signing up and using their cards. Some credit cards

give cash back. Others accrue points based on spending on

particular categories, such as dining or travel. Rewards can

be redeemed in various ways and can be a big bonus of using

credit over cash.

CARDS MAY COME WITH WARRANTIES.

Credit cards can provide built-in warranties on purchases

made on the card, such as replacement coverage for an

electronic device or cancellation insurance on a trip. What’s

more, if you have a dispute with a merchant or aren’t happy

with something you bought, you can often request a chargeback

through the credit card company.

Credit cards have many advantages, but it’s imperative that

consumers pay their balances in full and on time.

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128 MILL ST. EAST BARRE • M-F 8:30 - 5:30 • SAT 9 - 4 • CLOSED SUN

page 24 The WORLD December 12, 2018

Barre

622-0730

DRIVE

UP

B-M Road-Berlin

622-0250

DRIVE

UP

Montpelier

223-0928

DRIVE

UP


Holiday Worship Directory

Shepherd of the Hills

Lutheran Church

115 Northfield Street, Montpelier • 229-5440

ChristmasWorship Service

Monday, December 24, 5:00 p.m.

Our traditional Christmas Eve service of

lessons, carols, candlelight and Communion.

THE OLD MEETING HOUSE

We are are a a welcoming congregation ~ - please join us:

Blue Children’s Christmas, Pageant, December December 16, 7:00pm 17, 9:30am

A musical Outdoor longest Service night with service live animals

Children’s Blue Christmas, Pageant, December 23, 17, 9:30am 7:00pm

A Outdoor musical Service longest with night live service animals

Christmas Eve Eve Candlelight Morning Worship Service, 9:30am

Christmas 4:30pm Eve Candlelight Family Service Worship

7:00pm 5:00pm Traditional Family Service with full choir

9:00pm 7:00pm Intimate Traditional Service Service of Lessons with & full Carols choir

www.oldmeetinghouse.org

1620 CENTER

ROAD

EAST MONTPELIER

CENTER

229-9593

St. John the Evangelist, Northfield

& St. Edward, Williamstown Catholic Churches

(802) 485-8313

Welcome Everyone to Our Christmas Masses

St. John the Evangelist ~ ie t rtfie

a ec : esa ec :

Cristas iit ass

Eve Mass

9AM - Christmas

Morning Mass

t ar ecett t iiast

a ec :

Cristas e ass

Old Brick Church

East Montpelier, VT

Located near Dudley’s Store at the junction of Routes 2 & 14

Candlelight Christmas Eve Service

6:30 PM

Come experience the Hope, Peace,

Joy and Love of the Christmas Birth!

Questions call Pastor Herb Hatch 223-1232

email: brickchurchvt@gmail.com

A LIGHT IN THE DARKNESS

The world can be a dark place. We see it in the news. We see it in our

lives. But on the first Christmas, a brilliant light pierced the darkness.

The child born in a Bethlehem stable had come to bring the light of

forgiveness and peace to a darkened world. Join us to celebrate the

birth of Jesus Christ! Our Christmas worship will feature an inspiring

message, favorite Christmas carols, and a place to bask in the light of

the Christ-child.

A Savor has been born to you; he is Christ the Lord.

Christmas Eve Worship: Dec. 24, 6:30 pm

Christmas Day Worship: Dec. 25, 10:00 am

46 Warner Road (off Airport Road)

www.CTRLutheranVT.com

The Wise Still

Seek Him

St. Monica Church

79 Summer Street, Barre 479-3253

Christmas Eve Masses:

4:00PM Mass

6:30PM Mass

11:30PM Christmas Concert

(45 Voice Choir, Flutes,

Trumpets, Bells & Drums)

12:00AM Midnight Mass

Christmas Day Masses:

8:00AM Mass

10:00AM Mass

St. Sylvester

Church

223 Church Hill Rd.

Graniteville

476-3913

December 24:

5:00PM

December 25:

9:30AM

Join us

Dec. 23 at 10 am

or Christmas Eve

at 6 pm

to Celebrate

Christmas!

30 Jones Brothers Way

Barre, VT

near the Granite Museum!

(802) 476-8228

St. Augustine Church

16 Barre Street, Montpelier 223-5285

Christmas Eve Masses:

4:00PM with Christmas Pageant

7:00PM

Christmas Day Mass: 10:00AM

New Year’s Eve Mass: 4:00PM

New Year’s Day Mass: 8:00AM, 10:00AM

North American

Martyrs Church Marshfield

Christmas Day Mass: 8:00AM

New Year’s Eve Mass: 8:00PM

Christ Episcopal Church

64 State Street, Montpelier (802) 223-3631 www.christchurchvt.org

Schedule of Christmas Services

Christmas Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols

7:00PM, Thursday, December 13, 2018.

Children’s Christmas Pageant and Eucharist

10:00AM, Sunday, December 16, 2018.

Christmas Eve Eucharist & Carols

Children & Family Friendly

5:00PM, Monday, December 24, 2018.

Christmas Eve Eucharist & Carols

Choir with Festive Music

9:00PM, Monday, December 24, 2018.

Christmas Day Eucharist with Carols

10:00AM, Tuesday, December 25, 2018.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST

Welcomes Everyone to our

Christmas Worship Service

Sunday, December 23, 2018

10:30 AM

Bible Reading, Music,

Light Refreshments to follow.

Corner of Bailey & State Street

Montpelier, VT

802-223-2477

Christmas & Christmas Eve Services


December 23, 2018

10:30 AM

December 24, 2018

6:00 PM

Covenant Orthodox

Presbyterian Church

249 Airport Road

Barre, VT 05641

Directions: Turn towards Airport on Airport Rd. at the hospital intersection

of Route 62. Go 2.2 miles and look for the church on your left.

www.copcvt.org

Oh Come, Let Us Adore Him

Worcester United Methodist Church

PO Box 125 • Worcester Village Road

Worcester, Vermont 05682

www.worcesterumc.com

Christmas Eve Service

at 7:30PM



C E S AM

Pastor: David Adams

802-888-1764 psatordavid3@comcast.net

Please join us to celebrate the joy

of the birth of Jesus Christ, our Savior!

Monday, December 24th Services

7:00 PM... Come and hear the familiar story, sing the beloved

carols, including “Silent Night” by candlelight.

Don’t forget your sleigh bells!

9:00 PM... An intimate service of lessons

and carols with holy communion.

Tuesday, December 25th

Free Community Christmas Meal

from Noon until 2:00 PM downstairs at the church

Every Sunday: worship at 10:00 AM

40 Washington St., Barre, VT 05641

802.476.8156 heddingumc@hotmail.com

www.heddingumc.org

December 12, 2018 The WORLD page 25


SHOPPING LOCAL GIFT IDEAS

Fabulous Flowers, Gifts Galore

and Local Maple Syrup

Proud Flower

80 S. Main S., Waterbury

802-244-6853

Now Offering WeatherTech ®

Floor Mats For most cars & trucks!

Midstate Service

Barre-Montpelier Rd.

802-476-4724

www.midstatedodge.com

Keep It Local

Give The Gift of Vermont Made

Capitol Stationers

Downtown Montpelier

Great Gifts For Pets!

• Toys • Treats • Beds

• Coats • Boots & More!

Plus many gifts for the people

in their lives!

Guy’s Farm ard

19 Barre St. • Montpelier

229-0567 • Open Every Day!

Farm Toys

CHAMPLAIN VALLEY

EQUIPMENT

72 Kubota Drive, Berlin

802-223-0021

Morse Farms

Sugarworks

1168 County Rd, Montpelier

223-2740

www.morsefarm.com

For the Musician In Your Life

• Guitars • Banjos • Ukuleles

• Mandolins • Percussion

• Keyboards and Accessories

GuitarSam

71 Main Street

Montpelier (802) 229-0295

Open Every Day

Bragg Farm Sugarhouse

Gift Shop

1005 VT 14N, East Montpelier

802-223-5757

www.braggfarm.com

Jewelry, Accessories and

Fashionable Clothing

No. 9 Boutique

75 Main Street, Montpelier, VT

(802) 229-0019

OPEN 7 DAYS

Furniture, Home Decor & Gifts

The Alley

75 Main Street

Montpelier, VT

(802) 229-0019

Maplewood’s

V T’ S

Centers

Located off Exit 7 of I-89

Berlin, VT So. Barre, Waterbury and

other locations in Central Vermont

Great Stocking

Stuffers

3

lbs. $ 19 99

for

+ appl. taxes

Gift Certificate

MONTPELIER

2

boxes $

15 99

for

+ appl. taxes

Morse Farms

Sugarworks

1168 County Rd, Montpelier

223-2740

www.morsefarm.com

Christmas Special:

Purchase a $25 Certifi cate

and Get Another $5 ($30 total!)

AGWAY OF MONTPELIER

190 E Montpelier Rd, Route 2

Montpelier, VT 05602

802-229-9187

montpelieragway.com

page 26 The WORLD December 12, 2018

1,000a of Cool Items Upstairs at

Beavin Sons

A R P

River Street, Montpelier • 229-6745

Customized Shirts, Jackets,

Sweatshirts Hats

River Street, Montpelier • 229-6745

We also have Travel Mugs,

Apparel, DD Cards

Barre • Montpelier • Berlin

622-0259 223-0928 622-0250


YOU MATTER MORE | SHOP LOCALLY

Shop Where You’re Truly Valued

There’s one final reason to spend

your money locally you matter

more a lot more to local

businesses than you do to those outof

town stores.

When you do your shopping closer to home, you’re not

just buying stuff. You’re interacting with your friends,

your neighbors and your co-workers — the very people

who make up the fabric of your community.

YOU’RE ALSO SOMETHING SPECIAL.

By supporting local businesses, you’re not just a tiny

number on a prot-and-loss sheet, but someone who

plays an integral role in the success of your city and your

local economy. Whatever you purchase locally, no matter

how small, can make a big difference to mom-and-pop

merchants who are trying to succeed in business, pay

their employees and improve their community.

DEALING WITH ‘THE BOSS’

Instead of being ambushed by a pushy salesperson, the

shopper at a small, local store is instead greeted by the

jovial owner and sometimes by their friendly dog or cat,

as well.

The shopping experience itself can be a lot of fun. You

get to interact more with the “boss” at small mom-andpop

shops, so you’re treated like a real person, rather

than cattle herded through a chute. They encourage the

shopper to take their time and meander through the store.

While they are in business to earn money, they generally

will not pressure the shopper to buy a lot of extra stuff or

try to force them to sign up for a store credit card.

Local shops also frequently go that extra mile for their

customers by doing things like gift wrapping and providing

coffee or donuts at no additional charge.

HOMETOWN FEELING

Shopping in the local stores often provides an opportunity for

people to run into old friends or neighbors that they have not

seen in a while. They can mingle on the streets and catch up on

the local gossip. The store owners get to know their customers,

as well. It is a family atmosphere.

In other words, you’re not just a nameless customer. You

matter. You’re someone from church, someone from the school

PTA, or someone who works in the ofce down the street.

To encourage shoppers to patronize the local stores, many

towns will make street parking free and put on events that are

sure to draw a crowd. It’s part of this unique feeling that makes

shopping so enjoyable when you spend your time and money

close to home.

9mm Ammo, 50 ct. $10

R&L Archery

0 Smith Street, Barre, T

1-800-269-9151

www.RLArchery.com

For All Occasions

FORGET ME NOT

FLOERS GIFTS

11 No. Main Street, Barre, T

802-476-6700

Our Prices Will Simply Floor You

DELAIR’S CARPET & FLOORING

Route 2, East Montpelier

802-223-7171

ooringvt.com

Charming Gifts

Richard J. Wobby Jewelers

124 N. Main St., Barre, Vt 05641

(802) 476-4031

Bury

The

Needle

136 North

Main

(Suite 2)

Barre

(802)

622-0204

COMPANY NAME

MESSAGE GOES HERE

Richard J.

Wobby

Jewelers

124 N. Main St.

Barre, Vt 05641

(802) 476-4031

Buy 1 Ornament, Get 1 of Equal or

Lesser Value for 1/2 Price

NORTHFIEL PHARMAC

epot Suare Northeld, T

802-485-4771

Made in Vermont

Most Affordable, All Natural CBD

Product On The Market.

Great For Humans and Pets

in Relieving Joint Pain

himsy ermont

NELSON ACE HARDWARE 12 No. Main St., Suite 2

10 No. Main Street, Barre, T

Barre

802-476-5700

622-0680

December 12, 2018 The WORLD page 27

Address | Phone | Website


1. In what city will you nd Coit Tower?

2. What is the most visited attraction in New ork City

.. The Statue of Liberty, The National September 11th

Memorial and Museum, The Empire State Building,

The Metropolitan Museum of Art?

3. What is the only state to have hosted both the summer

and winter Olympics?

Answers included with other puzzle answers

HAPPY HOLIDAYS

DICK

www.facebook.com/vtworld.news

CHERYL RENEE PAT

TOM

FLAT TOPS • HIGH & TIGHTS • CREW CUTS • FADES

BARBERSHOP &

HAIR SALON

page 28 The WORLD December 12, 2018

Don’t forget!

GIFT

CERTIFICATES

for the Whole

Family

HOLIDAY

HOURS

OPEN MON., DEC. 17

6:30AM - 5PM

MON., DEC. 24

6:30AM - Noon

325 Main St.

Barre 479-0855

TUES.-FRI. 6:30AM-5PM

SAT. 6:30AM-NOON

(Next to Rite-Aid)

Plenty of FREE Parking •

Walk-Ins Welcome

WHEEL CHAIR ACCESSIBLE

BOOTH RENTAL: Beauty Shop looking for 2 hairstylists

with following, part-time &/or full-time (booth rental)

All calendar submissions should be sent to editor@vt-world.com

or mailed to The WORLD, Attn: Calendar, 403 U.S. Route 302,

Barre, Vt. 05641. The deadline is 5:00 p.m., Thursday preceding

publication. The Ongoing section is for free/low cost community

events, which should be verified monthly. We are no longer able

to include ongoing classes.

Ongoing Events

BARRE- Weekly Business Networking in Central Vermont at

Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce, 33 Stewart Ln.

8AM-9:30AM. Thurs. Free. Info: mikeeternitymarketing.com.

Granite Center Garden Club, the Barre Congregational Church.

Runs Apr.-July Sept.-Nov., 2nd Mon., 6:30PM. Info: www.facebook.com/granitecentergardenclub.

Church of God of Prophecy, 241 Quarry Hill Rd. Sunday School:

9:30AM; Service: 10:30AM; free potluck dinner: 12PM on 2nd

Sun. Info: 814 428-2696.

Sons of the American Legion Squadron #10 Meetings. Barre

Legion Post 10, 320 N. Main St. 3rd Wed. of each month. 6PM.

Women & Children 1st: Senior Day Every Wed. Seniors 55

older receive 10 off their purchases. 114 N. Main St.,

Central VT Adult Basic Education. Free classes. Pre-GED and

high school diploma prep classes at Barre Learning Center, 46

Washington St. Info./pre-register 46-4588.

PAWS. Support for those grieving the loss of a pet. Universalist

Church. 1st Thurs. of month. p.m. Info. beyondthedog9gmail.

com.

Rainbow Umbrella of Central Vermont, an adult LGBTQ group,

bowls at Twin City Lanes on Sunday afternoons twice a month. For

dates and times: RUCVTAdminPrideCenterVT.org

Central Vermont Woodcarving Group. Free instruction projects

for all abilities. Barre Congregational Church, Mon. 1-4pm. 49-

9563.

Heart of Vermont Quilt Guild meets 3rd Tues. of the month at

First Presbyterian Church, Seminary St. 5:30-:30PM.

Step ‘n’ Time Line Dancers of Central Vermont. Thurs. at The

Old Labor Hall, 46 Granite St. 6:30-8:30PM.

Playgroup. Aldrich Children’s Library, Every Wed. 9:30-11AM

Only during school year.. Sponsored by The Family Center of

Washington County. www.fcwcvt.org

Additional Recyclables Collection Center. Open for collection

Mon., Wed., Fri. 12-6PM, 3rd Sat. 9AM-1PM. 540 N. Main St.,

Barre. Visit www.cvswmd.org for list of acceptable items.

Jabbok Christian Center Prayer Meeting. 8 Daniel Dr. 6:30-

8PM. 1st 3rd Thurs. Info: 49-0302.

Medicare and You. Have questions?

We have answers. Central

Vermont Council on Aging, 59

N. Main St., Suite 200, 2nd and

4th Tues. of the month. Call

49-0531 to register.

Wheelchair Basketball. Barre

Evangelical Free Church, 1 S.

Main St., Every other Tues.,

5:30-PM. Info: 498-3030

David or 249-931 Sandy.

Aldrich Public Library

Activities. 6 Washington St.,

46-550. Story Hour: Mon.

Tues.,10:30AM. Reading Circle

Book Club: 3rd Wed., 6:30PM.

Living Learning Series: 1st

Sun., 1PM. Senior Day: 1st

Wed. 1PM.

Central Vermont Business

Builders. Community National

Bank, 1st 3rd Tues., 8-9AM.

Info: -5419.

Weekly Storytime. Next

Chapter Bookstore, 158 North

Main St., Sat., 10:30AM. Info.

46-3114.

Play Group. St. Monica’s

Church, lower level, Thurs. during

school year, 9:30-11AM

Vermont Modelers Club.

Building flying model airplanes

year-round. Info: 485-

144.

Community Breakfast. First

Presbyterian Church, 8

Summer St., 3rd Sun. FREE,

:30-9AM. 46-3966.

Friends of Aldrich Public

Library. Aldrich Library, 2nd

floor boardroom, 4th Tues.

6:30PM. Info: 46-550.

Circle of Parents. Confidential

support group for parents and

caregivers. Tues. evenings. Info:

229-524.

Mothers of Preschoolers.

Monthly get-togethers for

crafts, refreshments, etc.

Christian Alliance Church, 46-

3221.

Alcoholics Anonymous.

Meetings in Barre, daily; call

802-229-5100 for latest times

locations; www.aavt.org.

Hedding United Methodist

Activities & Meetings. 40

Washington St., 46-8156.

Choir: Thurs. PM; Free

Community Supper: Fri. 5:30-

6:30PM; Community Service

Food Shelf Hours: Weds

Thurs. 3-5PM.

Turning Point Recovery

Center. 489 N. Main St., Barre.

Safe supportive place for

individuals/families in or seeking

substance abuse recovery.

Open Mon/Tue/Thur: 10AM-5PM; Wed/Fri: 10AM-9PM; Sat:

6PM-9PM. For info programs, call 49-33.

Green Mountain Spirit Chapter. National women bikers club.

2nd Wed. Info: grnmtnspirithotmail.com.

Grief & Bereavement Support Group at the Central Vermont

Home Health Hospice office, 600 Granger Road. This group is

open to anyone who has experienced the death of a loved one.

Group 1 Meets every 3rd Wed. 10AM-11:30AM, Group 2 meets

every 2nd Mon. 6PM-:30PM. Free. Info: 223-188.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs. Barre City Police, 15 Fourth

St., 46-6613. Get rid of old or unused meds at these local permanent

safe disposal sites.

BERLIN- Drop-in Meditation Sitting Group. W/Sherry Rhynard.

CVMC, conf. room 2, Thurs., 6-PM. sherryeaseofflow.com or

22-236.

Barre Tones Women’s A Capella Chorus. Capital City Grange 6612

Rt 12. Mon., 6:30-9PM. www.barretonesvt.com 223-2039.

NAMI-VT Connection Recovery Support Group. Central

Vermont Medical Center Boardroom, 130 Fisher Rd. 2nd Thurs.,

4PM. Free. 90-minute recovery support groups for people living

with mental illness. Also at CVTMC, NAMI Vermont Family

Support Group, Room 3, . 4th Mon., PM. For families and

friends of individuals living with a mental illness.

Cancer Support Group w/ potluck. 2nd Wed., 6PM. Info: 229-

5931.

Living w/ Advanced or Metastatic Cancer: Lunch provided, 2nd

Tues. 12-1PM Writing to Enrich Your Life: For anyone

touched by cancer, 3rd Tues., 12-1PM. Both held at CVMC Cancer

Center resource room. Info. 225-5449.

Central Vermont Rotary Club. Visitors potential members

welcome. Steakhouse Restaurant, Mon., 6:15PM. 229-0235.

Parkinsons Support Group. Woodbridge Nursing Home, 142

Woodridge Rd, 3rd Thurs., 10AM. Info: 439-5554.

Diabetes Support Program. CVMC, conf. rooms, 1st Thurs.,

-8PM. Free. Info: 31-4152.

Civil Air Patrol. At the airport blue hangar, Tues., 6-8:30PM.

Info: 229-5193.

Pregnancy & Newborn Loss Support Group. CVMC conference

room 3, 4th Mon., 6:30-8:30PM. 31-4304.

Partners for Prevention-Alcohol & Drug Abuse Coalition.

CVH, 2nd Weds., 11:30AM.-1:30PM. Info: 49-4250.

Savvy Speakers Toastmasters Club. BC/BS conf. room, Industrial

Ln., 1st 3rd Tues., 5:30-PM. Info: 802 46-0908 or mlferguson2002yahoo.com.

Birthing Center Open House. For parents, sibs, grandparents, etc.

CVMC, 1st Wed., 5:30-PM. RSVP/Info. 31-4613.

Total Joint Replacement Class. CVMC. Conference Rms 1 2.

Free. 1st 3rd Thurs., 2-3PM. Info: 31-435.

Breastfeeding Support Group. CVMC Garden Path Birthing

Center, 1st Mon., 5:30-PM. Info: 31-4415.

Infant & Child Car Seat Inspections. Berlin Fire Station. Free.

1st Fri., 12-4PM. Appointments required: 31-4198.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs. Berlin Police, 108 Shed Rd.,

223-4401. Get rid of old or unused meds at these local permanent

safe disposal sites.

BETHEL- YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program. United Church

of Bethel, Church St. Thurs., 11AM-12PM. Free. Info: 28-14.

BRADFORD- Rockinghorse Support Circle. Grace Methodist

Church. For young women w/ or w/o kids, childcare transportation

available. Wed., 1-2:30PM. Info: 49-1086.

New Hope II Support Group. Grace United Methodist, Mon.,

-9PM. Info: 1-800-564-2106.

BROOKFIELD - Mothers of Preschoolers. Meal childcare

provided. New Covenant Church, 2252 Ridge Rd., 3rd Fri., 6PM.

Info: 26-3022.

Health-focused Group. Learn to cope w/ life’s passages. Wed.,

-8PM. Info: 26-3142.

CABOT- Fiddle Lessons with Katie Trautz: Mon., Info: 29-

2236; Dungeons & Dragons, Fri., 3-5:30PM. All at Cabot Library,

563-221.

CALAIS- Men’s & Women’s Bible Study Groups. County Road,

Wed., PM. Info: 485-5.

CHELSEA- Story Time. For ages 0- 5. Chelsea Public Library,

Wed., 1:15PM. Info: 685-2188.

Take Off Pounds Sensibly. Nonprofit support grp. United Church of

Chelsea, North Common, Wed., 5:45PM. Info: 685-221.

Chronic Conditions Support Group. Chelsea Senior Center, in

the United Church of Chelsea, 13 North Common. Free. Fri. 8:30-

11AM. Info:28-14.

Chelsea Historical Society House/Museum. Open 3rd Sat. May-

Oct., FREE, 10AM.-12PM. Info: 685-444.

EAST BARRE- Story Hour. Aldrich Library ork Branch, Tues.,

ages 0-3. 10AM., ages 3-5 10:30AM. Info: 46-5118.

E. HARDWICK- Touch of Grace Assembly of God Church,

corner Rts. 15 16.Sun. worship 10AM; Tues. Bible study call for

info. Wed. youth group: 5PM dinner, 6PM activity. Info: 42-5550.

E. MONTPELIER- Men’s Ministry. Crossroads Christian Church.

Mon. -9PM. Men’s Breakfast: 2nd Sat., 8AM. Sun. Service: 9:30-

11AM. Info: 46-8536.

Twin Valley Senior Center. 4583 U.S. Rte 2. Open Mon., Weds.,

Fri., 9AM-2PM. For class listing and info: 223-3322.

GROTON - A Book Club: 3rd Mon., 6:30PM; Book Discussion

Group: 4th Mon., PM; Crafts Conversation, Wed., 1-3PM.

Round Robin Storytime for kids age 0-5: Tues., 10AM. All at

Groton Public Library. Info: 584-3358.

HARDWICK - Caregiver Support Group. Agency on Aging,

rear entrance Merchants Bank, 2nd Thurs. 229-0308 x306.

Peace and Justice Coalition. G.R.A.C.E. Arts bldg old firehouse,

Tues., PM. Info: 533-2296.

Nurturing Fathers Program. Light supper included. Thurs.,

6-8:30PM. Registration/info: 42-5229.

MARSHFIELD- Playgroup. Twinfield Preschool, Mon.,

11AM-12:30PM. except when school not in session.

Story Time & Playgroup. Jaquith Public Library. Wed.,

10-11:30AM. For kids age 0-6. Program not held days Twinfield

Union is closed.

Jaquith Public Library Activities. Old Schoolhouse Common,

Story Play Group: Wed. 10-11:30AM. Book Group for Adults:

stop by for copy of the book, 4th Mon., PM. Info: 426-3581.

continued on page 30


Celebration Planned for

Barre Hannaford

The Barre Hannaford Supermarket & Pharmacy will

host a Grand Reopening event on Saturday, Dec. 15, starting

at 7 AM to celebrate the completion of a renovation

project that introduced a wide range of improvements,

including hundreds of new natural and organic items.

The supermarket has added nearly 700 new organic and

natural products, and added in-store produced sushi, salads

and sandwiches, as well as hand-battered chicken. The

Barre Hannaford also has added gluten-free items.

Fresh food is highlighted in the new design, and

Produce now has the feel of an abundant market within the

supermarket. Pharmacy customers now have access to a

private consultation room to speak privately with their

pharmacist or receive an immunization.

“The store looks brand-new, with fresh décor throughout

and an easy-to-shop layout,” said Store Manager Bob

Molinario. “We hope that customers will come see all that

their Barre Hannaford now has to offer.”

The first 200 customers will receive gift cards randomly

valued between $5 and $250; product sampling;

sweepstakes; and other activities.

Ryleigh and Addie visiting with Santa at Richard J. Wobby Jewelers on Saturday in Barre.

OPEN

SUNDAY

11-4

FREE HORSE DRAWN

CARRIAGE RIDES

SATURDAYS 1:00 - 3:00

through DEC. 15

Pick-up /Drop-off at Depot Square

sponsored a local merchants

Barre Merry

HOLIDAY EVENTS

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15

10:00 AM - 3:00 PM Write your LETTER TO

SANTA & REINDEER FOOD BUFFET BAR

at Whimsy Vermont, 124 N. Main St., Barre

10:00 AM - 3:00 PM FREE HOLIDAY

ORNAMENT DECORATING

at Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts, 171 N. Main St., Barre

10:30 AM STORY TIME at Next Chapter Bookstore,

162 N. Main St., Barre with The Logger, Rusty Dewees

11:00 - 2:00 VISIT WITH SANTA at Next Chapter

Bookstore, 162 N. Main St., Barre

1:00 PM - 3:00 PM FREE HORSE DRAWN

CARRIAGE RIDES, sponsored by local merchants.

Pick-up /Drop-off at Depot Square

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16

1:00 PM - 3:00 PM VISIT WITH SANTA

at Nelson ACE Hardware, 188 N. Main St., Barre

2:00 PM STORY TIME at Next Chapter Bookstore,

162 N. Main St., Barre with Katy Faber “Salamander Sky”

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21

ALL DAY NATIONAL UGLY CHRISTMAS

SWEATER DAY - participating merchants

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22

10:30 AM STORY TIME at Next Chapter Bookstore,

162 N. Main St., Barre with Grannie Snow

HAPPY HOLIDAYS

Mary & Barry, the Holiday Elves, say,

“Thank you for playing

Find the Elves In

Downtown Barre!”

UP

TO 50%off

EVERYTHING MUST GO!

No Reasonable Offer Refused

Barre Auto Parts, Inc.

17 Ayers Street, Barre

802-479-0133 Noon

Mon.-Fri.

8AM to

A Complete Line Of Auto Parts & Accessories

Here is where they were hiding:

•Exile On Main Street

•Forget Me Not Flowers

•Maria’s Bagels

•Nelson Ace Hardware

•Next Chapter Bookstore

•Quarry Kitchen &

Spirits

•Richard J. Wobby Jewelers

•Vermont Bicycle Shop

•Women & Children First

•Whimsy Vermont

•Harry & Lloyd’s

Thanks to everyone who played and thanks to the

following businesses who donated prizes:

•Nelson Ace Hardware

•Vermont Bicycle Shop

•Women & Children First

4 x 5.5

•TD Bank

•Richard J. Wobby

Jewelers

December 12, 2018 The WORLD page 29


Reduced Shakespeare Company @ Spruce Peak

Performing Arts Center

December 15 @ 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

Donna the Buffalo @ Chandler Music Hall

December 15 @ 7:30 pm - 11:00 pm

Rodney Marsalis Philadelphia Big Brass @ Fuller

Hall

December 21 @ 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

Into The Mystic: A Tribute to Van Morrison @

Higher Ground

December 21 @ 8:00 pm - 11:00 pm

Kat Wright @ Higher Ground

December 30 @ 9:00 pm - 11:30 pm

Kat Wright @ Higher Ground

December 31 @ 9:00 pm - 11:30 pm

Pink Talking Fish @ Strand Theatre

January 18, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 11:00 pm

Havana Cuba All-Stars & Dancers @ Fuller Hall

January 29, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

Young the Giant @ Flynn Center

January 29, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 11:00 pm

The Logger and the Fiddler @ Fuller Hall

February 2, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

oncert

Connections

A Beatles Tribute @ Higher Ground

February 2, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 10:30 pm

California Guitar Trio and Montreal Guitar Trio @

UVM Recital Hall

February 8, 2019 @ 7:30 pm - 10:30 pm

Shanghai Opera Symphony Orchestra @ Lyndon

Institute Auditorium

February 13, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

Kurt Vile & The Violators @ Higher Ground

February 14, 2019 @ 8:30 pm - 11:00 pm

Matt Nathanson @ Higher Ground

February 28, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 11:00 pm

Ranky Tanky @ UVM Recital Hall

March 8, 2019 @ 7:30 pm - 10:30 pm

Storm Large @ Flynn Center

March 9, 2019 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Québecfest @ Flynn Center

March 15, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 11:00 pm

Dervish @ Barre Opera House

March 16, 2019 @ 7:30 pm - 11:00 pm

The Secret Sisters @ Barre Opera House

March 23, 2019 @ 7:30 pm - 11:00 pm

Frankenstein @ Fuller Hall

March 27, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

For venue phone numbers, call

The Point at 223-2396 9:00 to 5:00

Mon.-Fri., or visit our web site at

www.pointfm.com

ART EXHIBITS

BARRE- Studio Place Arts Presents: Rock Solid XVIII. This

annual stone sculpture exhibit, since 2000, showcases stone

sculptures and assemblages by area artists and other work

that depicts the beautiful qualities of stone. Second Floor

Gallery:Finding the Quiet by Linda Finkelstein - works in

rust, eucalyptus and indigo. CELEBRATE! Enjoy this 3-floor

fine art and craft extravaganza with work created by more than

80 Studio Place Arts (SPA) member artists, and CELEBRATE

3X: (1) Find one-of-a-kind handmade gifts & treasures; (2)

Support local artists and crafts people and fortify our local

economy; & (3) Boost the programs for all ages and abilities at

SPA, your nonprofit art center. Runs 11/13-12/27. Studio Place

Arts (SPA) 201 N. Main St. Info: www.studioplacearts.com.

Studio Place Arts presents: Scrap Yard: Drawings by Mark

Heitzman. An exhibit of 10 large-scale graphite or charcoal

drawings of tools and other objects, including a tire iron, the

bottom of an ancient oil can, and a drill bit. On display through

March 2, 2019, at The Morse Block Deli, located 260 N. Main

Street, Barre. Info: www.studioplacearts.com.

CHELSEA- Julia M. Pavone: “Mixing it Up... Encaustic,

Cold Wax and Found Object Paintings.” On exhibit 11/1-

12/31 at the Chelsea Public Library. Info: 685-2188.

JEFFERSONVILLE- GEMS and GIANTS: An Exhibition

of Small Paintings and Large Paintings at the Bryan Memorial

Gallery, 180 Main St. An exhibition of 150 artworks by its gallery

members in a small format and in a large format. New this

year is the addition of “Giants” to the mix, with works by gallery

members juried into this aspect of the show. Both exhibits open

11/8. Runs 11/8-12/23. Info: www.bryangallery.org.

Bryan Memorial Gallery Presents Heartbeet Felts, an

Exhibition of Wall Hangings Created by the Members of

the Heartbeet Lifesharing Community. Heartbeet is a

vibrant lifesharing- community and licensed therapeutic residence

that includes adults with developmental disabilities and

interweaves the social and agricultural realms for the healing

and renewing of our society and the earth. Bryan Memorial

Gallery is honored to present this exhibition of felted wall

hangings as an expression of the gallery’s commitment to the

community. Runs 11/8 – 12/23. Bryan Memorial Gallery is

located at 180 Main St. Info: www.bryangallery.org.

MARSHFIELD- Digital Photography Exhibition Work By

Twinfield Digital Photography Students at the Jaquith Library,

122 School St. Runs 11/3-1/2/2019. Info: 426-3581.

MONTPELIER- Current Paintings by Mary McKay Lower

and Elizabeth Nelson Holiday Pop-Up of Vermont Artists

and Silent Auction at the T.W. Wood Gallery, 46 Barre St. The

in Montpelier, VT announces an upcoming exhibit of two

Vermont artists, Mary McKay Lower and Elizabeth Nelson.

Nelson will feature works from her travels to Iceland. Lower

will exhibit landscapes and still life paintings. Runs 10/30-

1/4/19. Info: www.twwoodgallery.org & 262-6035.

Dee Christie & Robin Leone at the Cheshire Cat, 28 Elm St.

Dee Christie repurposes old books into visual works of art ~

painting, collaging and drawing within the pages to create art

infused with positivity and whimsy. Robin Leone of Robin’s

Hoods handcrafts felted wool hats that are one of a kind. Runs

through Dec. Info: www.cheshirecatclothing.com.

Thomas Waterman Wood – The Master Copies at the T.W.

Wood Gallery, 46 Barre St. Wood created commissioned portraits

across the United States and Canada which lead to a trip to

Europe in 1858 with his wife. While Wood was in Europe he fell

in love with the paintings of the European Masters, including

Rembrandt and Turner. Info: info@twwoodgallery.org, 262-

6035. Runs 10/30– 6/1/2019.

Interior/Exterior: Paintings and Drawings by Diane Fitch at

the Vermont Supreme Court Gallery. Explores a disciplined

lifetime of painting and drawing. With strong influences from

paintings of 18th and 19th century domestic interiors, Fitch

moves her subject matter into modern motifs and meaning. Runs

10/1-12/21.

The Vermont Arts Council Presents 7Women 7Walls, an

exhibit featuring work by seven Vermont artists whose techniques

range from fiber art and collage to encaustic and frottage.

Their work is deeply personal, expressing explorations into their

life experiences, spirituality, and responses to both the natural

and digital world. The exhibit runs through 12/28.

WATERBURY- Worcester Pastel Artist Marcia Hill’s

Display “Through the Seasons” at the Waterbury Public

Library, Hill’s exhibit depicts pastel paintings through the

seasons and is aptly titled. Info: www.marciahillart.com, 244-

7036. Marcia’s paintings will be on display until the end of

December.

page 30 The WORLD December 12, 2018

continued from page 28

MIDDLESEX - Food Shelf. United Methodist Church, Sat.,

9-10:30AM.

MONTPELIER- Vermont College of Fine Arts Friday Night

Reading Series at the Cafe Anna, 1st floor of College Hall, 36

College St. 5:30-7:30PM. Free snacks.

Overeaters Anonymous: 12-step program for people who identify

as overeaters, compulsive eaters, food addicts, anorexics, bulimics,

etc. All welcome; no dues or fees. Info re: place & time: 863-2655.

LGBTQ Veterans Group, Christ Episcopal Church. 6PM-8:30PM.

2nd & 4th Wed. Info: 825-2045.

1st Friday Folk Dancing. Montpelier Senior Activity Center. 1st

Friday of the month. Donation: $3-5. Info: 223-2518.

Irish Session. Sat.,2PM-5PM & Southern Old Time Music Jam.

2nd and 4th Sun., 10AM-12:30PM. Both take place at Bagitos, 28

Main St.

Sunday School. Christian Science Church, 145 State St., Sun.,

10:30AM.

Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup. North Branch Nature Center.

Mon. 9:30-11:30AM. Info: 229-6206.

Montpelier Kiwanis Club. Tues., 6PM. at The Steak House. All

are welcome. Info: 229-6973.

Onion River Exchange Tool Library. 46 Barre St. Over 85 tools.

Wed., 10AM-2PM, Thurs., 10AM-2PM.

Rainbow Umbrella of Central Vermont, 58 Barre St. An LGBTQ

group. 3rd Tues., 5:45PM for a casual dinner at a local restaurant.

Info: RUCVTAdmin@PrideCenterVT.org.

Friday Night Group. Open to all LGBTQ youth ages 13-22. Pizza

& social time, facilitated by adults from Outright VT. Unitarian

Church, 2nd & 4th Fri., 6:30-8PM. Info: 223-7035.

Meditation. Mon.,1PM.; Intro to Yoga, Tues. 4PM; Consults, Fri.

11AM. Free classes, limits apply. Fusion Studio, 56 East State St.

Info: 272-8923.

Open Library. Resurrection Baptist Church. Sun. 12:30-2PM.

CVTV Channel 192 • BARRE, VT

Wednesday

6:00AM - News

8:00AM - Science &

Technology

10:00AM - Education

12:00PM - Entertainment

2:00PM - History

4:00PM - Health

6:00PM - News

8:00PM - The Curious Giraffe

Show Season 1

10:00PM - Entertainment

Thursday

6:00AM - News

8:00AM - The Curious

Giraffe Show Season 1

10:00AM - The Folklorist

12:00PM - Entertainment

2:00PM - Sports

4:00PM - Adventures

6:00PM - News

8:00PM - Grace & Truth

Ministries

10:00PM - The Curious

Giraffe Show Season 1

Friday

6:00AM - News

8:00AM - Grace & Truth

Ministries

10:00AM - Cooking Show

12:00PM - Entertainment

2:00PM - Health

4:00PM - Vermont State

House

6:00PM - News

8:00PM - History

10:00PM - The Curious

Giraffe Show Season 1

Saturday

6:00AM - Barre

Congregational Church

8:00AM - Science &

Technology

10:00AM - First Presbyterian

Church

12:00PM - Cooking Show

2:00PM - Barre

Congregational Church

4:00PM - History

6:00PM - Cooking Show

8:00PM - Paranormal Activity

Show

10:00PM - Grace & Truth

Ministries

Sunday

6:00AM - Washington Baptist

Church

8:00AM - First Presbyterian

Church

10:00AM - Cooking Show

12:00PM - Barre

Congregational Church

2:00PM - Grace & Truth

Ministries

3:00PM - First Presbyterian

Church

5:00PM - Christ Community

Church

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also be viewed online at cvtv723.org

“All schedules are subject to

change, please call us

with questions - 479-1075.”

6:00PM - The Curious Giraffe

Show Season 1

10:00PM - Barre

Congregational Church

Monday

6:00AM - The Curious Giraffe

Show Season 1

8:00AM - Health

10:00AM - Science &

Technology

12:00PM - Entertainment

2:00PM - Grace & Truth

Ministries

4:00PM- The Folklorist

6:00PM - The Curious Giraffe

Show Season 1

8:00PM - Health

10:00PM - Science &

Technology

Tuesday

6:00AM - News

8:00AM - History

10:00AM - The Curious

Giraffe Show Season 1

12:00PM - Entertainment

2:00PM - Sports

4:00PM - Yoga

6:00PM - News

8:00PM - Grace & Truth

Ministries

10:00PM - The Curious

Giraffe Show Season 1

CVTV CHANNEL 194

Wednesday

6:00AM - Community Bulletin Board

7:00AM - News

9:00AM - Barre City Council

12:00PM - Barre City Council

3:00PM - Barre City Council

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Williamstown

10:00PM - Williamstown

Thursday

6:00AM - Williamstown

9:00AM - Williamstown

12:00PM - Williamstown

2:00PM - Community Bulletin Board

3:00PM - Barre Supervisory Union

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Barre Supervisory Union

10:00PM - Barre Supervisory Union

Friday

6:00AM - Barre Supervisory Union

9:00AM - Barre Supervisory Union

12:00PM - Barre Supervisory Union

3:00PM - Barre Town Select

5:30PM - Community Bulletin Board

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Barre Town Select

10:00PM - Barre Town Select

Saturday

6:00AM - Barre Town Select

9:00AM - Barre Town Select

12:00PM - Barre Town Select

3:00PM - Community Bulletin Board

4:00PM - Washington Baplist

Church

5:00PM - Barre Congreg Church

7:00PM - News

09:30PM - First Presbyterian

Church

11:30PM - Barre Town Select

Sunday

6:00AM - Barre Congreg Church

9:00AM - Washington Baplist

Church

10:00AM - First Presbyterian

Church

12:30PM - Barre Congreg Church

2:30PM - Washington Baplist

Church

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also

be viewed online at cvtv723.org

3:30PM - Christ Community Church

6:00PM - First Presbyterian Church

9:30PM - Barre Congreg Church

10:50PM - First Presbyterian

Church

Monday

6:00AM - Statehouse programming

9:00AM - Statehouse programming

12:00PM - Statehouse programming

3:00PM - Barre Act 46

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Barre Act 46

10:00PM - Barre Act 46

Tuesday

6:00AM - Barre Act 46

9:00AM - Barre Act 46

12:00PM - Barre Act 46

3:00PM to 5:00PM - Statehouse

programming

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Barre City Council “Live”

CHARTER COMMUNICATIONS OF BARRE

ALL PROGRAMING SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE

ONION RIVER COMMUNITY ACCESS MEDIA CHANNELS 15, 16, 17

• Bethel • Braintree • Montpelier • Randolph • Rochester • U-32 District Towns • Waterbury Schedules subject to change without notice.

ORCA Media Channel 15 3:00p Democracy Now!

10:00a A Conversation with the Ski

8:00p Waterbury Selectboard

Public Access

4:00p Bill Doyle on VT Issues

Industry

Fri, December 14

Weekly Program Schedule 5:00p A Conversation with the Ski Industry 12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

7:00p Understanding Vermont's Opioid

7:00a Bethel Selectboard

Wednesday, December 12

Crisis

10:00a Moretown Selectboard

6:00a Understanding Vermont's Opioid

8:30p Gay USA

1:00p Central Vermont Internet

Crisis

9:30p Creating a Future Beyond Prisons

6:00p Rochester Selectboard

7:30a Eckankar

11:00p House at Pooh Corner

8:00a Democracy Now!

8:00p Montpelier Planning Commission

9:00a Celluloid Mirror

Saturday, December 15

Sat, December 15

10:00a Moccasin Tracks

6:00a Wednesday Night Live

6:00a Central Vermont Regional Planning

11:00a Bill Doyle on VT Issues

7:30a Abled to Cook

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program 8:00a Greater Burlington Women's Forum

Commission

1:00p Bread and Puppets

9:30a Ecosocialist Seminar

8:30a Vermont State House

3:00p Democracy Now!

10:30a Improbable Theater

12:00p Randolph Selectboard

4:00p Creating a Future Beyond Prisons 12:30p House at Pooh Corner

5:00p Calais Selectboard

5:30p Greater Burlington Women's Forum 1:30p Extempo

8:00p Green Mountain Care Board

7:00p A Conversation with the Ski Industry

9:00p Silver Maple Community Housing

Project

10:30p Wednesday Night Live

Thursday, December 13

6:00a Words On Film

7:00a Your Spark of Humanity

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Extempo

10:30a Silver Maple Community Housing

Project

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p Ecosocialist Seminar

2:30p Eckankar

3:00p Democracy Now!

4:00p Understanding Vermont's Opioid

Crisis

5:30p Improbable Theater

7:00p Bread and Puppets

9:00p Senior Moments

11:00p Celluloid Mirror

Friday, December 14

6:00a Bread and Puppets

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Abled and on Air

10:00a All Things LGBTQ

11:00a Talking About Movies

12:00p Brunch With Bernie

1:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

2:00p Energy Week

3:00p Bear Pond Books Events

4:30p Roman Catholic Mass

5:00p Washington Baptist Church

6:00p Words On Film

7:00p A Christmas Carol

8:00p All Things LGBTQ

9:00p Vote for Vermont

10:00p Octagon St. Laveau

10:30p Betty St. Laveau's House of Horror

Sunday, December 16

6:00a A Christmas Carol

7:00a Bear Pond Books Events

8:30a Energy Week

9:30a Washington Baptist Church

10:30a Roman Catholic Mass

11:00a House at Pooh Corner

12:00p The Telling Project

3:00p Senior Moments

5:00p Vote for Vermont

6:00p Your Spark of Humanity

6:30p Yoga For You

7:00p Ecosocialist Seminar

8:00p Abled to Cook

8:30p Abled and on Air

9:30p Improbable Theater

11:00p Words On Film

Monday, December 17

6:00a Senior Moments

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Vote for Vermont

1:00p Celluloid Mirror

2:00p A Christmas Carol

3:00p Democracy Now!

4:00p Moccasin Tracks

5:00p Wednesday Night Live

6:30p Yoga for You

7:00p Major Jackson

8:00p Christ Church Concert Series

9:00p The Telling Project

Tuesday, December 18

6:00a Christ Church Concert Series

7:00a Your Spark of Humanity

7:30a Yoga for You

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a The Telling Project

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p All Things LGBTQ

2:00p Major Jackson

3:00p Democracy Now!

4:00p Silver Maple Community Housing

Project

5:30p Abled and on Air

6:30p Abled to Cook

7:00p Moccasin Tracks

8:00p Bill Doyle on VT Issues

9:00p Bear Pond Books Events

10:30p Extempo

ORCA Media Channel 16

Education Access

Weekly Program Schedule

Wednesday, December 12

12:00p East Montpelier School Board

3:00p First Wednesdays

5:00p Yestermorrow Speaker Series

6:30p Montpelier/Roxbury School Board

Thursday, December 13

12:00p Harwood Unified

4:00p Berlin School Board

8:00p Washington Central Supervisory

Union

Friday, December 14

12:00p Washington Central Supervisory

Central VT Roller Derby’s Wrecking Doll Society. Intro to roller

derby, gear supplied, bring mouth guard. Montpelier Rec. Center,

Barre St., Sat. 5-6:30PM. Info: www.twincityriot.com.

Celiac Support Group. Tulsi Tea Room, 34 Elm St., 2nd Wed.,

4-5PM. Info: 598-9206.

MSAC Public Activities. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 58

Barre St. FEAST Together: Tues. & Fri.,12-1PM (EXCEPT July

24, July 27, July 31, August 3). RSVP 262-6288. Living Strong:

Mon. 2:30-3:30PM. & Fri. 2-3PM; Crafters Group: Wed., 12-2PM.

Photography Club: Thurs., 12-1PM; Ukulele Group: Thurs., 6-8PM;

Walks with Joan: Tues., 10-11AM; Italian Group: Tues., 1:15-

2:45PM; Trash Tramps: Tues., 2-3PM.For info on a listing: 223-

2518.

A Course in Miracles at Christ Episcopal Church, 64 State St.,

each Tues., 7-8PM. Info: 622-4516.

Parent’s Group & Meet-Up. Connect with local parents to share

advice & info. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Hayes Rm, 1st Mon.,

10-11:30AM. Info: mamasayszine@gmail.com.

Families Anonymous. For families or friends who have issues with

addiction, alcohol and/or mental illness. Bethany Church, 2nd floor

youth room, Mon., 7-8PM. Info: 229-6219.

Freeride Montpelier Open Shop Nights. Need help w/a bike

repair? Come to the volunteer-run community bike shop. 89 Barre

St., Wed. 4-6PM. Info: freeridemontpelier.org.

Free Community Meals. Mon: Unitarian Church, 11AM-1PM;

Tues: Bethany Church, 11:30AM-1PM; Wed: Christ Church,

11AM-12:30PM; Thurs: Trinity Church, 11:30AM-1PM; Fri: St.

Augustine Church, 11AM-12:30PM; Last Sun., Bethany Church,

4:30-6:30PM.

Grandparents Raising Their Children’s Children. Support

group, childcare provided. Resurrection Baptist Church, 144 Elm

St., 2nd Thurs., 6-8PM. Info: 476-1480.

Calico County Quilters. All skill levels welcome. 2nd Sat. Sept.

through June, 1-3PM. Location info: 244-7001.

Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA). Bethany Church basement,

Tues., 6:30PM. Info: 229-9036.

Kellogg-Hubbard Library Activities. 135 Main St., Story Time:

Tues/Fri, 10:30AM. Info:223-3338.

CHADD ADHD Parent Support Group. Childcare not available.

Woodbury College, 2nd Tues., 5:30-7:30PM. Info: 498-5928.

Resurrection Baptist Church Weekly Events. 144 Elm St. Sun.,

9:45AM. Bible Study; 11AM. Worship Service; Wed., 7PM. Prayer

Meeting.

Good Beginnings of Central VT. 174 River St. Drop-In Hours at

the Nest. 1st floor Weds/Thurs/Fri., 9AM-3PM. Babywearers of

continued on next page

Union

3:00p Berlin School Board

6:00p U-32 School Board

10:00p Game of the Week

Saturday, December 15

12:00p Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

3:00p Yestermorrow Speaker Series

5:30p Rochester-Stockbridge Unified

District

8:00p U-32 School Board

Sunday, December 16

12:00p Orange Southwest Supervisory

Union

3:30p East Montpelier School Board

6:00p Higher Education

7:00p Montpelier/Roxbury School Board

Monday, December 17

12:00p Middlesex Town School District

Board

3:30p Higher Education

4:00p VT State Board of Education

Tuesday, December 18

12:00p Rochester-Stockbridge Unified

District

2:30p Osher Lecture Series

5:00p Orange Southwest Supervisory

Union

8:00p Middlesex Town School District

Board

ORCA Media Channel 17

Government Access

Weekly Program Schedule

10:00p Racial Disparities Advisory Panel

Wed, December 12

7:00a Bethel Selectboard

10:00a Green Mountain Care Board

2:00p Berlin Development Review Board

3:00p Berlin Selectboard

6:30p Montpelier City Council LIVE

Thu, December 13

7:00a Randolph Selectboard

11:00a Vermont State House

4:00p Central Vermont Internet

Community Media (802) 224-9901 Check out our Web page at www.orcamedia.net

Sun, December 16

7:00a Waterbury Selectboard

10:00a Rochester Selectboard

12:00p Vermont State House

3:00p Montpelier Development Review

Board

6:30p Montpelier Design Review

Committee

9:00p Montpelier City Council

Mon, December 17

7:00a Moretown Selectboard

10:00a Racial Disparities Advisory Panel

12:00p Berlin Development Review Board

2:00p Berlin Selectboard

5:30p Montpelier Design Review Committee

LIVE

7:00p Montpelier Development Review

Board LIVE

Tue, December 18

7:00a Calais Selectboard

11:00a Central Vermont Regional Planning

Commission

1:30p Vermont State House

5:30p Montpelier Planning Commission

LIVE

10:00p Racial Disparities Advisory Panel


Central Vermont meet upstairs, 4th Mon., 5:45-7:45PM & 2nd

Thurs., 9:30-11:30AM. Info: 595-7953. Breastfeeding support: 3rd

Thurs., 9:30- 11:30AM; Nursing Beyond a Year: 3rd Fri., 9:30-

11:30AM (802-879-3000).

Al-Anon. Trinity Methodist Church, Main St., Sun., 6:15-7:30PM.

Info:1-866-972-5266.

Al-Anon. Bethany Church basement, 115 Main St., Tues. & Thurs.

12-1PM., Wed. 7-8PM. Info: 1-866-972-5266.

SL AA. 12-step recovery group for sex/relationship problems.

Bethany Church, Wed., 5PM. Info: 249-6825.

Survivors of Incest Anonymous. Bethany Church parlor, 115

Main St., Mon., 5PM. Please call first: 229-9036 or 454-8402.

Brain Injury Support Group. Unitarian Church, 3rd Thurs., 1:30-

2:30PM. Info: 1-877-856-1772.

Playgroups: Dads & Kids, Thurs., 6-7:30PM. and Sat., 9:30-

11AM, at Family Center of Washington County. Held during school

year only.

Kindred Connections Peer to Peer Cancer Support for patients

& caregivers. Info: 1-800-652-5064.

Christian Meditation. Christ Church, Mon., 12-1PM.

Mood Disorders Support Group. 149 State St., Last Entryway,

First Floor. Peer & professionally led support for people coping

with mental illness. Wed. 4-5PM. Free. Info: 917-1959.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs. Montpelier Police, 1 Pitkin

Court, 223-3445 & Washington County Sheriff, 10 Elm St., 223-

3001. Get rid of old or unused meds at these local permanent safe

disposal sites.

MEMORY CAFE. is no longer at the Montpelier Senior Activity

Center, 58 Barre St. It is now called MEMORABLE TIMES

CAFE hosted Central Vermont Council on Aging and the State of

Vermont ABLE Library and will be held the 3rd Wednesday of each

month October through March at the Vermont History Center, 60

Washington St., Barre, VT. Contact Barb Asen, CVCOA Family

Caregiver Support Director, at basen@cvcoa.org or 802-476-

2681

Community Song Circle. Center for Arts & Learning, 46 Barre St.

1st Sun. except July/Aug., 6-8PM. Info: vtcommunitysing@gmail.

com.

MORETOWN- Mad River Chorale. Rehearsals at Harwood

Union H.S., Mon., 7-9PM. Info: 496-2048.

MORRISVILLE - “The Role of Power, Authority and Control

in Groups” Monthly Meeting at the Morristown Centennial

Library, 20 Lower Main St. 1st Tues. 5:30PM-7PM. Info: gerette@dreamhavenvt.com.

Overeaters Anonymous: 12-step program for people who identify

as overeaters, compulsive eaters, food addicts, anorexics, bulimics,

etc. All welcome; no dues or fees. Info re: place & time: 863-2655.

River Arts Events. Photo Co-op Drop-in 3rd Thurs., 6PM-8PM.

$5 suggested donation. Poetry Clinic Drop-in 1st & 3rd Tues.,

6PM-8PM. $5 suggested donation.

NORTHFIELD- Bingo. Northfield Senior Center. Mon., 4PM.

Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program. Ages 12-18. Readiness &

Regional Technology Center, Norwich campus, Tues., 6-8:30PM.

Info: capitalcomposite@yahoo.com.

Clogging & Irish Step Lessons. W/Green Mountain Cloggers,

ages 8-78. Sun., 5-8PM. Info: 522-2935.

Playgroup. United Church of Northfield. Wed., 9:30-11AM. Held

only when school in session. Info: 262-3292 x113.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs. Northfield Police, 110 Wall

St., 485-9181. Get rid of old or unused meds at these local permanent

safe disposal sites.

PLAINFIELD- Farmers Market. Fri., 4-7 P.M., Mill Street.

Local produce, plants, crafts, maple syrup, teas and tea service,

and more.

Community Supper Support Group, Grace United Methodist

Church. 4th Tues., 6PM-7PM. Info: michaelbix@gmail.com.

Cardio Funk Class. the Community Center. Fri., 5-6PM. Info:

email shannonkellymovement@gmail.com.

Cutler Memorial Library Activities. Classic Book Club: 1st

Mon., 6PM; Tuesday Night Knitters (except 1st Tues.). Info: 454-

8504.

Diabetes Discussion & Support Group. Everyone welcome. The

Health Center conf. room, 3rd Thurs., 1:30PM. Info:322-6600.

RANDOLPH- Health Support Groups. Maple Leaf Room at

Gifford Medical Center. Tobacco Cessation Program regularly

offers four-week “Quit in Person” group sessions. Info: 728-7714.

Caregiver Support Group at the Gifford Medical Center.

2PM-3PM. Meets 2nd Wed. of the month. Info: 728-7781.

Diabetes Management Program. Kingwood Health Center (lower

level conf. room), 1422 VT Route 66. Thurs., 10AM-12:30PM. Six

week program for people diagnosed with type-2 diabetes. Info/

register: 728-7714.

New Business Forum. Vermont Tech Enterprise Center, 1540 VT

Rte 66, 2nd Wed.s, 11:30AM-1PM. Info: 728-9101.

Yoga Classes. All ages & levels. Donations benefit Safeline. VTC

Campus Center, last Sun. of month, 2-3:30PM.

Randolph Senior Ctr.

Activites, 6 Hale St., Lift for

Life Exercises: 8:30AM,Tu/Th

& Weds/Fri; Cribbage: Mon.,

10AM; Bingo: Mon., 10:30AM;

Bridge: Mon., at the Joslyn

House, 2:15PM;Mahjongg:

Tues., 10AM; Crafts: Wed.,

10:30AM; Knit-Wits: Thurs.,

10AM; Foot Clinics: 1st Wed.,

call to sign up; Book Club: 1st

Wed., 12:45PM. Info: 728-9324.

Cancer Support Group.

Gifford Conference Ctr, 2nd

Tues., 9:30-11AM. Info:728-

2270.

Storytime. Kimball Library.

Wed., 11AM, ages 2-5; Toddlertime,

Fri., 10:30AM; Gathering

for handwork, 2nd & 4th Mon.,

6PM.

WAITSFIELD - Community

Acupuncture Night. Free

assessment & treatment.

Donations welcome. Three

THE AMERICAN

LEGION

BARRE POST 10

320 NORTH MAIN ST.

BARRE, VT

Fri., Dec. 14 • 6:30 pm

MEAT BINGO

$20 for 18 Games

Sat., Dec. 15 • 7-11 pm

FAKE

NEWS

$6 COVER

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

21 & OVER

For information, call the Post at

479-9058

Moons Wellness, 859 Old County Rd., 2nd fl., last Weds., 4-7PM.

RSVP: 272-3690.

WARREN- Knit and Play. Warren Public Library. Bring your kids

& your projects. All levels. Thurs., 9:30-11:30AM.

WASHINGTON- Central VT ATV Club. Washington Fire

Station, 3rd Tues., 6:30PM. Info: 224-6889.

Calef Mem. Library Activities. Art & Adventure w/ April: 3rd

Sat., 1AM; Storytime: Mon., 11AM; Tech Help Drop-In: Sat.,

10AM-2PM. Info: 883-2343.

WATERBURY - Waterbury Public Library Activities. Preschool

Story Time: Thurs., 10AM. Baby & Toddler Story Time: Mon.,

10AM. Crafts: Tues., 3-4PM. Info: 244-7036.

WATERBURY CTR- Bible Study Group. Waterbury Ctn

Grange. Sun., 5-6PM. Bring bible, coffee provided. Info: 498-4565.

WEBSTERVILLE- Fire District #3, Prudential Committee.

Monthly meeting, 105 Main St., 2nd Tues., 6PM.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs. Barretown Police, 149

Websterville Rd., 479-0508. Get rid of old or unused meds at these

local permanent safe disposal sites.

Weekly Guided Nature Walks, Barre Town Forest. 9AM. Meet at

44 Brook St. Websterville. All ages & dogs on leashes welcome.

Easy to moderate. Tues. (unless it’s raining enough for an umbrella)

through September. Info: 476-4185.

WEST TOPSHAM- Bible Study. New Hope Methodist Church, 2

Gendron Rd. Wed., 6:30PM.

WILLIAMSTOWN- Bible Study. Christian Alliance Church,

Sun., 6PM. Info: 476-3221.

WOODBURY- Woodbury Community Library Winter Hours:

Mon/Wed., 1-5PM, Sat., 10AM-12PM. Knitting/Handworkers’

Circle: Sat., 10AM-12PM. All ages & abilities.Valley Lake Road.

Info: 472-5710.

WORCESTER- Knitting Night. The Wool Shed, Tues., 6:30-

8:30PM.

Wednesday, December 12

BARRE- GED Testing at the Barre Learnng Center, 46

Washington St. 4PM-9PM. Info: 476-4588.

GREENSBORO- Mid-Week Movie: Hidden Figures at the

Highland Center for the Arts, 2875 Hardwick St. 6PM-8:30PM.

$5. Info: www.highlandartsvt.org.

MONTPELIER- DANCE Studio Open House: Contemporary

Dance and Fitness Studio, 18 Langdon St. 3:30PM-8:30PM. We

welcome friends, family, and prospective students to observe

classes and learn more about us. Info: www.cdandfs.com.

OLLI Film Presentation: “L’Enfant” at the Savoy Theater, 26

Main St. 12:30PM. A young couple living on the edge who have

a baby, and the drastic steps the father takes to make money. $5.

Info: gracewgreene@comcast.net.

Thursday December 13

BARRE- Chris Powers Acoustic at Gusto’s, 28 Prospect St.

5PM. Free, all ages. Also at Gusto’s: DJ Rome 802 Dance Hits.

8PM. Free. 21+

CALAIS- Open Mic, Whammy Bar, 31 W. County Rd. 7PM.

Info: 229-4329.

MONTPELIER- DANCE Studio Open House: Contemporary

Dance and Fitness Studio, 18 Langdon St. See 12/12 listing.

Wilhelm and Friends with Organist Lynnette Combs Free

Concert at the Christ Church Episcopal, 64 State St. 12PM. all

are welcome to bring a bag lunch. Coffee, tea, (and sometimes

cookies) are provided. Info: 223-3631.

Traditional Service of Nine Lessons and Carols at the Christ

Episcopal Church. 7PM. Features the Christ Church choir and

community readers. Info: Christchurchvt.org, 223-3631.

Annual Holiday Art Sale at the Front, 6 Barre St. 9AM-7PM.

RANDOLPH- Chandler’s 17th Annual Holiday Artisans

Market at the Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 Main St. Hours

& info: www.chandler-arts.org.

Friday December 14

BARRE- Dave Keller at Mulligans, 9 Maple Ave. 7PM. Dave

will be playing all sorts of tasty grooves, including many from his

new CD, Every Soul’s A Star.

Joe Sabourin, Acoustic, at Gusto’s, 28 Prospect St. 5PM. Free.

Also at Gusto’s: Supernatural Cover Rock. 9PM. $5. 21+

Vermont Symphony Orchestra Holiday Pops at the Barre

Opera House. 7:30PM. José Daniel Flores-Caraballo leads the

Orchestra and Chorus in a festive program that ranges from an a

cappella “Jingle Bells” to the blockbuster “Many Moods of

Christmas.” Info: www.vso.org.

BERLIN- Laugh Local VT Open Mic Comedy Night at the

Dog River Brewery, 1400 US Route 302, Suite 4. 7PM sign-up.

Please support local comedy. May contain some adult themes and

is recommended for mature audiences. Free, but donations welcome.

Info: 793-3884.

continued on next page

Open Mic Comedy Night

Wed., Dec. 12 at Dog River Brewery

A new venue for Laugh Local - VT comedy this

month is the Dog River

Brewery in the Central

Vermont Shopping Plaza.

Please support local

comedy by performing

or watching those that

do. This event may

contain some adultthemed

material and is

recommended for mature

audiences. Sign-ups @

7:00pm. Show at 7:30pm.,

Dog River Brewery,

1400 US Rt. 302, Suite 4,

Berlin, VT.

Admission is FREE, but

“dough nation$” welcome.

MATINEES SATURDAY - SUNDAY - WEDNESDAY

CAPITOL MONTPELIER

For Showtimes 229-0343 or www.fgbtheaters.com

Audio Descriptive Available on certain movies...

WED. - THURS. DEC. 14 - 20

MATINEES SAT. & SUN. & WED.

Buy tickets Online now for

MARY POPPINS RETURNS

at 4:00 & 7:00 on Wed. Dec. 19

BUMBLEBEE --PG-13--

Advance Showing On Thurs. Dec. 20 7:00

MARY POPPINS RETURNS --PG--

Wed. Dec. 19 4:00 & 7:00 Thurs. Dec. 20 6:30

INSTANT FAMILY --PG-13--

-- Ends Tues. Dec. 18

Fri. 5:30 & 8:30 Sat. 11:00 & 1:30, 6:00 & 8:30

Sun. 11:00 & 1:35 & 6:40 Mon. & Tues. 6:30

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY" --PG-13--

Fri. 5:30 & 8:30

Sat. 11:10 & 2:10, 5:25 & 8:20

Sun. 11:10 & 1:45, 4:20 & 7:00

Mon. & Tues. 6:30 Wed. 4:00 & 7:00 Thurs. 6:30

FANTASTIC BEASTS THE CRIMES

OF GRINDLEWALD --PG-13--

Fri. 6:00 & 8:20

Sat. 11:30, 2:40, 5:40 & 8:35

Sun. 11:10, 3:55 & 6:30

Mon. & Tues. 6:25 Wed. 4:00 & 7:00 Thurs. 6:25

RALPH BREAKS THE INTERNET --PG--

Fri. 5:40 & 8:00

Sat. 11:00 (2D) 1:25 (3D), 2:40 (2D) , 6:15 & 8:30

Sun. 11:00 (2D), 1:25 (3D), 4:20 (2D) & 6:35

Mon. & Tues 6:30 Wed. 4:00 & 6:45

CREED 2 --PG-13--

Fri. 5:30 & 8:30

Sat. 11:30 & 3:45 & 5:20 & 8:15

Sun. 11:15,1:50, 3:50 & 6:35

Mon. & Tues. 6:15 Wed. 4:00 & 7:00 Thurs. 6:15

24 Hour Movie Line 229-0343 BUY TICKETS ONLINE: www.fgbtheaters.com

SAMBEL’S! SAMBEL’S!

Book Your Holiday Parties

and Other Special Occasions

Sambel’s Catering 249-7758

THURSDAY - SATURDAY

11AM-8PM

Serving Breakfast SUNDAYS ONLY 8am-2pm

2678 River Street, Bethel (2.6 mi. on VT Rt. 107)

802-234-9400 www.toziersrestaurant.com

CANADIAN CLUB

BINGO

•Flash Ball 1: $450.

•Flash Ball 2: $150.

•MEGA Jackpot: $3,500.

•Jackpot: $1,200.

Thursday Night

•Doors Open at 4:00 PM

•Premies at 6:00 PM

•Regular Games at 7:00 PM

CANADIAN CLUB

ROUTE 14 • 479-9090

Just outside of Barre

Exclusively for FGB Theaters Movie

Card Owners....

Because of movie lovers like you we

are proud to announce

$5 TICKET TUESDAY!

All year long, tickets are just five dollars

every Tuesday with FGB THEATERS

MOVIE CARD.

Replenish with $25 or more and receive

a FREE MEDIUM POPCORN to go along

with that $5 Tuesday ticket.

Our FGB Theater MOVIE Card is for the

movie lover. Tuesday is your $5 ticket to

savings to see the hottest releases.

PARAMOUNT BARRE

For Showtimes 479-0078 or www.fgbtheaters.com

WED. - THURS. DEC. 14 - 20

MATINEES SAT. & SUN. & WED.

Buy Tickets Online for the Advance Showing

Of AQUAMAN On Thurs. Dec. 20 7:00

THE GRINCH --PG--

Fri. 6:00 & 8:15

Sat. 11:00 1:40, 3:45 & 6:00 & 8:15

Sun. 11:15, 2:05 4:10 & 6:20

Mon. & Tues. 6:30 Wed. 4:00 & 6:45

AQUAMAN --PG-13--

Thurs. Dec. 20th 7:00

SPIDER-MAN INTO THE

SPIDER-VERSE --PG--

Fri. 6;05 & 8:40

Sat. 11:10 (2D), 1:00 (3D), 3:35 (2D), 6:05

& 8:40 Sun. 11:30,1:20 (3D), 3:55 (2D) & 6:35

Mon. & Tues. 6:35 Wed. 4:00 & 6:50 Thurs. 6:35

MATINEE EVERY

WEDNESDAY 4:00 PM

AT THE CAPITOL AND THE PARAMOUNT.

Wednesday Bargain Matinees.

Free small popcorn with admission.

THIS WEEK'S

SPECIAL

CHICKEN &

BISCUIT

December 12, 2018 The WORLD page 31


Give the Gift of Adventure and Support Vermont State Parks

Wrap up an experience this holiday season. The Vermont

State Parks 2018 holiday gift guide makes it easy to give an

unforgettable outdoor experience or comfortable adventure

gear to friends and family. Not only will these gifts benefit

the recipient, but they’ll also benefit the parks. All proceeds

of gift sales go directly to support the parks.

For the day tripper: For $59, this gift package is a

ticket to several weekends of adventures. The package contains

punch card good for 10 state park day visits, a notebook

and pen set, and a Vermont State Parks travel mug.

For the weekend warrior: Give 2 nights of tent, lean-to

or RV camping in a state park, a coupon for a free armload

of firewood, 2 Vermont State Parks water bottles and a LED

mini-flashlight for $89.

For the whole family: Grab this family fun package at

$139 and unlock an entire season of adventure. The package

includes 1 season vehicle pass, good for entry into any

SPEAKING OUT | The WORLD

What’s your favorite holiday treat?

Gary H. - E. Montpelier

I love those little wrapped bacon

and scallops or water chestnuts

with a bit of teriyaki drizzle.

Jim - Barre

Chex Party Mix

Gloria - Roxbury

Having all my family at my

house on Christmas Eve.

Marshall C. - Barre

Holiday Cookies

Vermont State Parks day use area for up to 8 people in a

vehicle, two 1-hour boat rental coupons, an insulated backpack

with mesh top, a deck of cards and a frisbee.

For the beverage buff: Help friends and family stay

hydrated on all their 2019 outdoor adventures with blue

enamel State Park mugs, stoneware beer steins, and Nalgene

water bottles with colorful state park logos starting at $14.

For the hat lover: Get a trucker hat emblazoned with the

retro Vermont State Parks logo, a camouflage ball cap, or a

brushed cotton hat with the classic State Parks image for

just $14.

Whether you give the gift of adventures this holiday season,

or simply want to experience the parks for yourself,

incredible outdoor explorations await at Vermont’s 55 state

parks. Order online and find a park near you at https://www.

vtstateparks.com/shop.html

Rick - East Barre

Mincemeat Pie

Loreli H. - Marshfield

Mine comes in a bottle

Ruth - Barre

My homemade fudge ~

everyone loves it!

Leo S. - Marshfield

Rum balls. I also like to make

my own kahlua.

CALAIS- Marc Delgado (Singer, Songwriter) at the Whammy

Bar, 31 W. County Rd. 7:30PM. Info: 229-4329.

MONTPELIER- DANCE Studio Open House: Contemporary

Dance and Fitness Studio, 18 Langdon St. See 12/12 listing.

Annual Holiday Art Sale at the Front, 6 Barre St. 9AM-7PM.

RANDOLPH- Chandler’s 17th Annual Holiday Artisans

Market at the Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 Main St. Hours

& info: www.chandler-arts.org.

Saturday, December 15

BARRE- Hannaford Grand Reopening Celebration, 456

South Barre Rd. 7AM. 1st 200 customers receive gift cards randomly

valued between $5 - $250; product sampling; sweepstakes;

and other activities.

Grand Opening of Rise Up Bakery at the Old Labor Hall at 46

Granite St. 4PM-9PM. Come celebrate! Ribbon cutting, slide

show, special recognitions, tours of the bakery. 6:30PM: live

music and dancing with Colin McCaffrey, Doug Reid and Don

Schabner, who join forces to play swing, blues, country and western

music on guitars and fiddles.

CALAIS- Anachronist (Electric Alt-Rock) at the Whammy Bar,

31 W. County Rd. 7:30PM. Info: 229-4329.

CRAFTSBURY- Chickweed Performs at the Music Box.

7:30PM. Chickweed brings three wonderful women’s voices in

three-part harmony to the stage. Suggested donation at the door

$10, kids free. You can always BYOB. Info at www.themusicboxcraftsbury.org,

586-7533.

E. MONTPELIER- Holiday with the Animals at Central

Vermont Humane Society, 1589 VT Route 14S. 10AM-2PM.

There will be festive treats to eat, fun animal-related crafts, and

plenty of shelter animals to greet. Info: www.centralvermonthumane.org/donate-now/.

GREENSBORO- The Best Christmas Pageant Ever at the

Highland Center for the Arts, 2875 Hardwick St. 7PM-9PM. Info:

www.highlandartsvt.org.

MONTPELIER- Felting Fiber Workshop lead by Vermont

artist and Educator Neysa Russo, Author of Felted Fiber

Menagerie and Needle Felted Tapestries at the T.W. Wood

Gallery, 46 Barre St. 10AM-3PM. Cost/Reg./Info: https://www.

twwoodgallery.org/adult-art-classes.html.

DANCE Studio Open House: Contemporary Dance and

Fitness Studio, 18 Langdon St. 8:30AM-3:30PM. We welcome

friends, family, and prospective students to observe classes and

learn more about us. Info: www.cdandfs.com.

Live Music: Tammy Award Winner Michael T. Jermyn’s

Aristocratic Peasants Silent Auction and Holiday Shopping,

T.W. Wood Gallery. 1PM-3PM. Come enjoy quirky clever lyrics

and melodic storytelling set to Jermyn’s soulfully haunting voice.

Free & Open to the public. Info: www.twwoodgallery.org.

continued on next page

GO 4 x 4.25” FIGURE

The idea of Go Figure is to arrive at the figure given at

the bottom and right-hand columns of the diagram by

following the arithmetic signs in the order they are given

(that is, from left to right and top to bottom). Use only the

numbers below the diagram to complete its blank

squares and use each of the nine numbers only once.

page 32 The WORLD December 12, 2018


Annual Holiday Art Sale at the Front, 6 Barre St. 11AM-5PM.

RANDOLPH- Donna the Buffalo at the Chandler Center for the

Arts, 71-73 Main St. 7:30PM. With roots deep in old-time fiddle

music and the string band sounds of Appalachia, the Celtic realm,

French Canada, and Louisiana, Donna the Buffalo has woven

together a soulful mix of rock, folk, reggae, country, Cajun, and

zydeco sounds. Info: 728-6464. Also at Chandler: 17th Annual

Holiday Artisans Market Hours & info: www.chandler-arts.org.

STOWE- Bud of The Kind Buds at Tap 25, 151 Main St. Free.

Info: http://thekindbuds.com.

Sunday, December 16

GREENSBORO- The Best Christmas Pageant Ever, Highland

Center for the Arts, 2875 Hardwick St. 2PM-4PM. Info: www.

highlandartsvt.org.

MONTPELIER- Annual Holiday Art Sale at the Front, 6 Barre

St. 11AM-5PM.

RANDOLPH- Chandler’s 17th Annual Holiday Artisans

Market at the Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 Main St. Hours

& info: www.chandler-arts.org.

STOWE- RBG Documentary at the Jewish Community of

Greater Stowe, 1189 Cape Cod Rd. 2PM. Free, accessible, and

open to the public. Refreshments served. Info: www.JCOGS.org.

Monday, December 17

STOWE- Annual Messiah Sing at the Stowe Community

Church, 137 Main St. 7PM. Audience members encouraged to

join in. Bring your own score/some are available at the door. The

orchestra, soloists and choruses will be conducted by Daniel

Bruce. All welcome. $8/adults. Info: 253-7257.

Tuesday, December 18

GREENSBORO- Trivia Tuesdays at the Highland Center for

the Arts, 2875 Hardwick St. 6:30PM-7:30PM. Every Tuesday!

Free. Teams up to 6. Info & Reserversations: 533-9399.

RANDOLPH- GED Testing at the Randolph Learning Center,

10 S. Main St. Reg: 10:30AM; Test: 11AM-4PM. Info: 728-4492.

Wednesday, December 19

GREENSBORO- Mid-Week Movie: Murder on the Orient

Express at the Highland Center for the Arts, 2875 Hardwick St.

6PM-8PM. $5. Info: www.highlandartsvt.org.

MONTPELIER- Lost Nation Theater Presents Stories for the

Season – a Special Holiday-Inspired Special Event at

Montpelier City Hall Arts Center. 7PM. Join favorite LNT artists

and fans for cozy dramatic readings of stories from around the

world that celebrate the return of the light from a host of traditions.

Info: www.lostnationtheater.org.

OLLI Presents the film, “The Unknown Girl” at the Savoy

Theater, 26 Main St. 12:30PM. A young doctor is determined to

discover the identity of an African woman found dead near her

office. Rick Winston will facilitate a discussion following the

film. Info: gracewgreene@comcast.net.

WARREN- VSO Brass Quintet/Counterpoint at the Warren

United Church, 339 Main St. 7:30PM. The ensemble is pleased to

present the VT premiere Nancy Tillman’s beloved children’s

book, “On the Night You Were Born.” Info: Visit www.vso.org.

Thursday December 20

BARRE- Jason Baker Acoustic at Gusto’s, 28 Prospect St. 5PM.

Free. Also at Gusto’s: DJ Rome 802, Dance Hits. 8PM. Free. 21+

CALAIS- Open Mic at the Whammy Bar, 31 W. County Rd.

7PM. Info: 229-4329.

GREENSBORO- Music @ The Café: Sam Bulpin at the

Highland Center for the Arts, 2875 Hardwick St. 6PM-8PM. No

cover, please tip performers and servers. Sam Bulpin is local student,

musician, and aspiring actor. With his youthful energy, prepare

for a night of jazz, contemporary, and festive tunes to kick up

the holiday season! Info: www.highlandartsvt.org.

MONTPELIER- Harpist Judi Byron Free Concert at the

Christ Church Episcopal, 64 State St. 12PM. all are welcome to

bring a bag lunch. Coffee, tea, (and sometimes cookies) are provided.

Info: 223-3631.

RANDOLPH- Chandler’s 17th Annual Holiday Artisans

Market at the Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 Main St. Hours

& info: www.chandler-arts.org.

Friday December 21

BARRE- Elizabeth Renaud Acoustic at Gusto’s, 28 Prospect St.

5PM. Free. Also at Gusto’s: Heartless Tribute to Heart & Led

Zeppelin.9PM. $10. 21+

CALAIS- Papa’s Porch (Bluegrass) at the Whammy Bar, 31 W.

County Rd. 7:30PM. Info: 229-4329.

RANDOLPH- Chandler’s 17th Annual Holiday Artisans

Market at the Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 Main St. Hours

& info: www.chandler-arts.org.

Saturday December 22

BARRE- Moving Light Dance Company Presents The 12th

Annual Green Mountain Nutcracker at the Barre Opera House.

7PM. Experience the joy of one of Vermont’s most cherished

holiday traditions, The Green Mountain Nutcracker, a classic

story with an enchanting local twist. Tickets & Info: barreoperahouse.org,

476-8188.

DJ LaFountaine Dance Hits at Gusto’s, 28 Prospect St. 9:30PM.

Free. 21+

CALAIS-Liz Beatty and the Alternates (Electric Blues, Soul)

at the Whammy Bar, 31 W. County Rd. 7:30PM. Info: 229-4329.

MONTPELIER- Onion River Choral Concert at the Unitarian

Church, 130 Main St. 7:30PM. $20. Followed by reception. Info:

www.onionriverchorus.org.

RANDOLPH- Chandler’s 17th Annual Holiday Artisans

Market at the Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 Main St. Hours

& info: www.chandler-arts.org.

Grand Opening of Rise

Up Bakery, Dec. 15

Come celebrate the revival of the Barre Historical

Society’s Union Cooperative Bakery, renamed the Rise Up

Bakery! Italian granite workers cooperatively built the

bakery in 1913 so the community could have hearty wood

fired bread. The bakers fed bread to Barre and Montpelier

for 30 years, but eventually closed in the 1940’s due in part

to the rise of industrialized bread baking. The wood fired

oven was taken out and the building became a storage shed

for granite companies. In 2004 the Barre Historical Society

bought the building and in 2012 a campaign was started to

revive the bakery. Over the next 6 years, with numerous

grants, many donations and countless volunteer hours, the

community has brought the bakery back to life, and once

again the smell and taste of the bread will be coming out of

the newly constructed wood fired oven.

The renovation of the bakery has a focus of including

teens in the project. Students through YouthBuild, the

Central Vermont Career Center in Barre and the U-32 technology

class have helped repair the building and constructed

furniture for the bakery. The bakery will become a

baking and historical educational center and will house a

small commercial bakery with opportunities for youth

apprentices.

The new oven was fired up for the first time on Labor

Day. People still remember the smell and taste of the bread!

The grand re-opening of the bakery will be December 15,

which is 105 years from the day the bakery made its first

loaves of bread. There will be plenty of bread, finger foods,

tributes, live music with Colin McCaffrey and friends and

dancing! The Rise Up Bakery is behind the Old Labor Hall,

48 Granite St., in Barre. Festivities will start at 4 PM.

• • •

Sunday, December 23

BARRE- Moving Light Dance Company Presents The 12th

Annual Green Mountain Nutcracker at the Barre Opera House.

2PM. Experience the joy of one of Vermont’s most cherished

holiday traditions, The Green Mountain Nutcracker, a classic

story with an enchanting local twist. Tickets & Info: barreoperahouse.org,

476-8188.

MONTPELIER- Onion River Choral Concert at the Unitarian

Church, 130 Main St. 4PM. $20. Followed by reception. Info:

www.onionriverchorus.org.

RANDOLPH- Chandler’s 17th Annual Holiday Artisans

Market at the Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 Main St. Hours

& info: www.chandler-arts.org.

Concepts Kakuro

Best described as a number

crossword, the task in

Kakuro is to fill all of the

empty square, using numbers

1 to 9, so the sum of

each horizontal lock equals

the number to its left, and

the sum of each vertical

block equals the number

on its top. No number may

be used in the same block

more than once.

December 12, 2018 The WORLD page 33


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page 34 The WORLD December 12, 2018

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continued on next page


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continued on next page

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Opportunity for growth

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Find out what NSB can offer you

NSB offers a competitive compensation and benefi ts package

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Human Resources

P.O. Box 7180

Barre, VT 05641-7180

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December 12, 2018 The WORLD page 35


SNOWBLOWERS

Snowblowers

START

AT

Choose from

7 Available Models

Rugged, Dependable

Hydrostatic Transmission

Joystick Shoot Control

$ 1149 99

SALES & SERVICE

85 SOUTH MAIN ST. • BARRE, VT

802-476-5400

BIRCH

Birch is a friendly, young, and enthusiastic

boxer mix, with the common exuberance

that boxer owners know very well. He's

a little overexcited to meet everyone,

and we're working on his manners, and

has come along way! Birch has lived

with other dogs, and loves to play. True

to his Boxer blood, his vertical jumping

skills are amazing – so much so that he

might be able to clear a 6-ft fence. His

play style is active and "in your face,"

which doesn't appeal to all dogs. Like all

adoptions, he needs to meet any canine

already in the house.

MISCELLANEOUS

WE CAN remove bankruptcies,

judgments, liens, and

bad loans from your credit fi le

forever! The Federal Trade

Commission says companies

that promise to scrub your

credit report of accurate negative

information for a fee are

lying. Under FEDERAL law,

accurate negative information

can be reported for up to

seven years, and some bankruptcies

for up to 10 years.

Learn about managing credit

and debt at ftc.gov / credit. A

message from The World and

the FTC.

HOME

APPLIANCES

STAND UP & Chest FREEZ-

ERS For Sale, Different Sizes,

$80 — $130. Closed Business.

Call 802-279-2893 Please

Leave A Message.

MUSICAL

MICHAEL RICCIARELLI,

Fretted Instrument Repair.

802-229-0952 or

802-272-1875 www.northbranchinstruments.com

1589 VT Rte 14S, East Montpelier

476-3811 • centralvermonthumane.org

Tues.-Fri. 1pm-5pm,

Sat. 10am-4pm

CLASSIFIEDS

STORAGE

A STORAGE PLACE

Williamstown

Route 64.

802-505-1921

HUNTING/GUNS/

ARCHERY

LIVE BAIT

Pike and Perch bait, Shiners,

Crawlers, Spikes, Tackle.

OPEN EARLY — OPEN LATE

call anytime.

Route 12, Putnamville.

802-229-4246

MUZZLE LOADER THOMAS

CTR HAWKEN 50CALIBER,

Good Condition, many extras,

$250.00 obo. Call or Text 802-

793-4967.

WOOD/HEATING

EQUIP.

ANTHRACITE COAL

4 Sizes in stock

Bulk Only

BLACK ROCK COAL

www.blackrockcoal.com

1-800-639-3197

802-223-4385

BEWARE OF The Vermont

Land Trust. You shake hands

with them be sure to count

your fi ngers when you are

done. 802-454-8561.

DAE’S LOGGING

FIREWOOD

Green & Seasoned

802-454-1062

DON’T NEED a Full Cord

1/3 Cord & Up, Dry wood.

802-454-8561

FIREWOOD All Hardwood

cut, split and delivered in

Montpelier and Barre. Green

$235 / cord. 802-485-8525 or

1-800-707-8427

WOOD/HEATING

EQUIP.

FIREWOOD being processed

from JULY cut logs 275 per

cord; cut, split & delivered locally

1 1/2 cord min or single

cord 300 per cord Also have

green wood available Chaloux

Bros. Williamstown. 802-433-

6619

GET READY Vermont Land

Trust, ell’s Coming and

Charley’s Coming with Them.

NEW YORKER Wood Boiler,

130,000 BTU, Good Condition.

$2500.00. 802-249-7101

PELLETIER’S PELLETS

Will be open on Saturdays

for your pellet needs. 8-noon.

East Barre (back of car

wash. 0--5

CHRISTMAS TREES

We have ALL SIZES of Christmas

trees. Tall, short, slender

and plump. You choose & we

cut. Really fresh. LH Stowell &

Son, Twin Pond Road, Brookfi

eld.

802-276-3382

We also accept credit & debit

cards. www.lhstrees.com. or

facebook.com / stowelltrees

FARM/GARDEN/

LAWN

FOOD GRADE Barrels totes,

We have over 700 in stock

from 2 1/2Gal — 275 Gal totes.

Call for Info; Bicknell Barrels

The Barrel Man. 802-439-

5149/802-439-5519.

ANIMALS/PETS

AUSTRALIAN CATTLEDOG

PUPPIES $595, Vet Checked

& dewormed, 802-888-7258.

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

Country

Pampered

Paws

Pet Grooming &

Boarding

East Montpelier

802-229-0114

Radiant Heated Floors For Winter,

Air Conditioning In Summer

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

LABRADOODLE PUPPIES

Girls $1200. Boys $975. Vet

Checked. Puppy shots. Ready

to go December 17. Now taking

deposits. 802-222-1834;

josiah@daystar.io

GOLDEN DOODLE PUPPIES

17 weeks old, For Sale; Last

Of The Litter! Priced Reduced!!

No Sunday Calls

Please, Call Gerald 802-272-

9696

LOOKING FOR A DOG

WALKER, 2-3 times a week,

can be fl eible on times. Call

802-279-6237

ANIMALS/FARM

BROKEN IRON Ranch. Certifi

ed organic, 1st cut bale,

$5 / bale second cut at the

barn. 802-839-0409.

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

$A1-CASH PAID

UP TO $300+

CARS, TRUCKS

For More Info, 802-522-4279

$FOR JUNK VEHICLES$

Pay up to 300.00 for Junk

Vehicles, Barre VT

802-476-4815 Bob

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

ANTIQUE & VINTAGE

CLOCKS

Professionally Cleaned &

Repaired. Reasonable Prices,

Pickup / Delivery Available,

ClockWork Wayne,

802-431-5416

Northfi eld, T

CHIMNEYS CLEANED, lined

built, repaired. Free Estimates.

Insured.

802-349-0339

DmFURNACE

MAN

•Oil Furnace Tune-Ups

•Cleanings •Repairs

•Installations

Fully Licensed & Insured

Reasonable Rates

Call Daryl

802-249-2814

Painting / Staining-Interior

Wallpaper Removal / Drywall

Repairs, Carpentry and more.

Quality Work.

Free Estimates - Insured

JMR 802-793-1017

ROOF SNOW Removal +

Quality Full Tree Services. Insured.

Call Randy @ 802-479-

3403 or 249-7164.

ROOF SNOW REMOVAL

30 Plus Years Experience

Single Wide Trailers $45.00

Double Wide $85.00

House Roofs Depends on

Sie and Diffi culty.

Free Estimates.

802-522-3864

SMALL JOB Snow Removal

Walkways, Decks, roof edges

etc. Free Estimate

Bob Morin 802-522-9753

SNOW & ICE REMOVE from

Roof or Walks. Call Joe

802-498-3692

BLUE RIDGE CONSTRUCTION

BUILDING AND EXCAVATION

Site Work • Concrete

Driveway Repairs • Septic Systems

Custom Homes • Modular Homes

Design Build Services

Kitchens • Bathrooms

Renovations • Additions

Roofing • Siding

Land/Home Packages Available

Call 229-1153

for free estimates

Gendron

Building

SERVICE

DIRECTORY

Quality In

Concrete

Concrete business since 1972.

Repairs New floors and walls Decorative concrete

Crane work Consulting ICF foundations

11 Three Mile ridge Rd., Middlese, T

0 -00 gendronconcrete.com

Classifi ed

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM


J. Waters

Upholstery

FURNITURE

REUPHOLSTERING

Also doing auto, home, recreation


802-883-2286

WASHINGTON, VERMONT



Arbor Certied

TREES CAN BE PRUNED SEPTEMBER - APRIL

802-586-2345

Nancy Murray

Business Technology & Cyber-Security Services

Located in the historic Hangar Building

1970 Vermont Rt. 14 South 802.223.4448

East Montpelier, VT 05651

rbtechvt.com

BUILDING GARAGES

FROM FLOOR TO ROOF

Starting At $ 10,500

24 x 24 garage, 6” concrete floors with steel

rebar, (2) 7 x 9 garage doors, one entry door.

Garages to your specifications, any size.

House Framing & Addition Work

Call 802-296-1522 • Ask for Ray

Troy West

Carpet Cleaning

SEE THE DIFFERENCE!

802-498-3718

Dry Low Circular Moisture Foam

Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning

https://www.facebook.com/TroyWestCarpetCleaning/

RENTING

The Smart Way To Get Things Done.

★Tables & Chairs

★Chafing Dishes

★Coffee Pots

★Extensions & Ladders

Barre-Montpelier Rd. • 476-6580 (across from Fassetts bread store)

Mon.-Fri. 7:30am-4:30pm • Closed Saturday

Happy to Help You with your Special Projects!

GREG’S

PAINTING & STAINING

CARPENTRY

• Handpaint or Spray

• Metal Roof Painting

• Interior/Exterior

• Guarantee

★Wallpaper Steamers

★Tents & Canopies

★Mowers & Grass

Trimmers

★Sheetrock Jacks

★Carpet Cleaners

★Floor Sander

★Chainsaws

…and

Many Items

for Every

Season!

American Rental

Association Member

• Free Estimates

• Reasonable Low Rates

• Neat, Quality Work

• References • Insured

Call 802-479-2733

gpdpainting@aol.com EPA, RRP, EMP Certified

page 36 The WORLD December 12, 2018


AUTOMOTIVE

CAMPERS &

MOTORHOMES

1990 Class A

“Bounder”

Good Shape.

We’re Upgrading.

$5500

238-1015

TRUCKS/VANS/

JEEPS/ACCESS.

4-COOPER DISCOVERER

Snow tires, 275/65R18 2 have

1/2 tread, 2 have 1/3 tread.

$85.00 802-479-0979

CARS / TRUCKS WANTED!!!

All Makes / Models 2002-2018!

Any Condition. Running or

Not. Top $$$ Paid! Free Towing

We’re Nationwide Call

Now: 1-888-985-1806

GLASS PICKUP CAPS

One will fi t S-10 Chevrolet and

GMC and other small pickups,

5” long. One will fi t Silverodo

short box and other the same

size, 82”

Ṅo phone calls

Can be seen at

4 Taplin St

Montpelier

across from car wash on

River St.

CARS &

ACCESSORIES

$ A1-CASH PAID

UP TO $300+

JUNK CARS, TRUCKS

802-522-4279.

CARS / TRUCKS WANTED!!!

2002 and Newer! Any Condition.

Running or Not. Competitive

Offer Free Towing We’re

Nationwide! Call Now: 1-888-

416-2330

CASH FOR CARS: We Buy

Any Condition Vehicle, 2002

and Newer. Nation’s Top Car

Buyer! Free Towing From Anywhere!

Call Now: 1-800-864-

5960

DONATE YOUR CAR —

FAST FREE TOWING 24hr

Response — Tax Deduction

UNITED BREAST CANCER

FOUNDATION Your donation

can help save a life! 877-654-

3662

Donate Your Car to Veterans

Today! Help and Support our

Veterans. Fast — FREE pick

up. 100% tax deductible. Call

1-800-245-0398.

Classifi ed

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

CARS &

ACCESSORIES

ERASE BAD CREDIT

FOREVER!

Credit repair companies make

false claims and promises to

erase a trail of unpaid bills or

late payments from your credit

report. However, only time can

erase negative, but accurate

credit information. In addition,

federal law forbids credit repair

companies from collecting

money before they provide

their service. TIP: If you have

questions about your credit history

or you want to know how

to get a free copy of your credit

report call the ATTORNEY

GENERAL’S CONSUMER

ASSISTANCE PROGRAM at

1-00--. Don’t send

any money to a credit repair

company until you check it out.

FREE JUNK CAR REMOVAL,

Move Equipment in Central

Vermont Area, Reasonable

Rates, Fully Insured. 802-249-

7112

JUST GOOD AUTOS

296 East Montpelier Rd • Rt. 14 North - Barre

802-479-0140

2012 FORD FOCUS SE

HATCHBACK

4-dr., auto., PW, PL, AC, sunroof,

low miles

$5,995

2005 FORD FOCUS

2-DR. HATCHBACK

5-spd., PW, PL, sunroof, only 83K

$3,695

2010 CHEVY MALIBU LTZ

auto., PW, PL, sunroof, 4 cyl.

$5,495

2009 CHEV. COBALT LS

2-door, auto., low miles

$4,995

2009 BUICK LUCERNE

auto., PW, PL, AC, leather & heated

seats! sunroof, low miles

$6,295

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auto., PW, PL, AC, low miles, 36K, 8

1/2 ft. Fisher SS V plow, one owner

$15,995

2007 BUICK LUCERNE CXL

auto., PW, PL, AC, leather, heated

seats, low miles

$5,495

2006 FORD F150 XCAB

XLT 4X4

auto., AC, PW, PL, one owner,

low miles, NY title, warranty

$9,995

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LL BEAN

auto., PW, PL, cruise, sunroof,

leather, low miles, 108K

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auto., PW, PL, low miles

$4,495

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CARS &

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NEW & USED TIRES ALL

SIZES, Used Rims,

802-883-5506

DEALING WITH WATER

DAMAGE requires immediate

action. Local professionals

that respond immediately.

Nationwide and 24/7. No Mold

Calls. 1-800-506-3367

FREE SCRAP METAL

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No oil tanks. Will also take

furnaces, boilers, and do

mobile home demolition for a

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VERMONT

Tire & Service

VERMONT

12

IS DUE

FREE PICKUP &

DELIVERY

HOURS:

Mon-Fri. 7:30-5

Sat. 8-4

JUST EAST OF MONTPELIER ON RTE 2 • BERLIN, VT

TIRES

OIL & FILTER CHANGE

$

19.95

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• Up to 5 qts. 5W30

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Offer Good With This Coupon Through 12-29-18.

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• We Service All

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• Fleet & Commercial

Accounts Welcome

• We Honor All

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PRICES

BEST

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GUARANTEED PRICE MATCH - 110% OF THE DIFFERENCE

FOR UP TO 30 DAYS, All prices compared. Must include all fees, tires,

installation, shipping, wheel weights, tax & shop charges.

PLUS UP TO A $100 REBATE

#12, YOU ARE DUE!

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$

24 95

PLUS TAX

• Most Cars & Light Trucks • Pass or Fail

Offer Good With This Coupon Through 12-29-18.

OFFERS VALID AT THIS DEALERSHIP ONLY. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH OTHER OFFERS. TAX & SUPPLIES EXTRA.

Call Toll Free 866-764-7509

MONDAY - FRIDAY 7 - 5 • SATURDAY 7 - 12. OFFERS GOOD WITH AD UNTIL 12-29-18.

for more information, go to

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cooper tires

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Montpelier

90 River St.

229-4941

1800-639-1900

November 15–December 31, 2018

The cold temperatures of winter may be back, but so

is the Cooper ® Take the Money and Ride ® promotion.

For a limited time, you can get up to a $70 prepaid virtual

account or card when you buy a new set of four qualifying

Cooper ® tires. For reliable traction in the snow,

ice or slush...COUNT ON COOPER ® .

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discoverer true north TM

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December 12, 2018 The WORLD page 37


YOKOHAMA GOODYEAR MICHELIN PIRELLI

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New & Good Used Tires

Passenger, Performance & Lt. Truck

Winter Tires Arriving

Your Tires Or Ours

NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY

WE DO

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Mon. - Fri. 8:30-4:30

Saturday 8:30-1:00

Closed Sunday

FRED BUDZYN

TIRE

Corner No. Main &

Seminary Sts., Barre

479-1819

CALL FOR PRICES

WRANGLER HANKOOK COOPER

page 38 The WORLD December 12, 2018

WORLD AUTOMOTIVE

TIRE CHANGEOVERS

Mounted &

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WE

ACCEPT

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MILITARY PERSONNEL

- May not be

combined

with any

other offer

CAPITOL CITY KIA

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CAPITOL CITY KIA

DON’T GET CAUGHT IN THE DITCH...

MAKE THE SWITCH!

4-TIRE WINTER TIRE $

44 95

CHANGEOVER

OFFER GOOD WITH THIS COUPON AT CAPITAL CITY KIA.

Please present coupon at vehicle write-up. Offer expires 12/29/18.

M&S

Auto

‘09 Kia Spectra

automatic, 164K,

good condition

$1,995 00

05 VW Beetle

Convertible

good condition, 154K

$2,295 00 See

Classifi ed

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MONDAY

Before 10AM

BEST

PRICES

IN TOWN

GUARANTEED PRICE MATCH - 110% OF THE DIFFERENCE

FOR UP TO 30 DAYS, All prices compared. Must include all fees, tires,

installation, shipping, wheel weights, tax & shop charges

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www.captiolcitykia.com

Bear Ridge Speedway Honors

51st Season Champions

Bear Ridge Speedway honored the champions

from its 51st Season of dirt track stock

car racing on Saturday, December 1st. More

than 300 drivers, crew members, sponsors,

fans, and officials filled a sold-out banquet

hall at the FireSide Inn W Lebanon NH for

the gala, where more than $25,000 in prizes

and point fund purses was awarded.

Kevin Chaffee of Bradford VT headlined

the guest list as the Sabil & Sons DIRTcar

Sportsman Modified Champion. Chaffee beat

out runner up Robert Tucker of East Corinth

VT, claiming his first Bear Ridge

Championship. Richie Simmons of Bradford

VT came home in third, with Ryan Christian

of Canaan NH coming home in fourth and

Jordan Fornwalt of Bradford VT completing

the top five.

Melvin Pierson of E Corinth VT was honored

as the DIRTcar Wells River Chevrolet

Sportsman Coupe Champion. Pierson was

one of thirteen different drivers to record a

victory and beat out Todd Hayward of

Bradford VT. Josh Harrington of Topsham

VT came home in third with Chris LaForest

of Barre VT and Tanner Siemons of Orford

NH completing the five.

Rookie sensation Jason Goff of Preston

Hollow NY claimed his first USAC Dirt

Midget Association Championship. Goff beat

out Will Hull of Plainfield VT and Joe

Krawiec Bristol CT by seventeen points. Hull

and Krawiec both claim the honors of the runner

up position as they were tied in the points

standings. Derek O’Hearn of Dorchester NH

is scored in third with Seth Carlson of

Brimfield Ma in fourth, and Adam Whitney

Waitsfield VT in fifth.

Ryan Christian of Canaan NH who won the

most Features of any driver in 2018 finally

made it to the top and is crowned the 2018

champion in the CA Miller Limited Late

Models.Rookie George Osgood of Vershire

VT came home in the bridesmaid position

with Kelly Miller of Morrisville VT third.

John Neddo Barre VT and Nicholas Longley

of Orange NH completed the top five.

Jason Porter of Freeport ME gets his first

championship in Weglarz Property Service

Four Cylinders. He beat out Jesse Durkee of

So Royalton VT who finished in the bridesmaid

position. Robert “Buddy” Welch from

Topsham VT is recorded in third with Bobby

Bell of St Johnsbury VT and Danny Doyle of

Chelsea VT completing the top five.

WYKR Sprint Cars of New England were

recognized present from the top five were

Will Hull of Plainfield VT who was crowned

the champ. Matt Hoyt Campton NH came

Jerry Dudley's Auto Connection

Robert Dudley

Jerry Dudley

Find Us Online at dudleyauto.com

CARS

★ Warranties Available ★

We Repair All

Snowplow

Brands

395 Washington Street

Barre, VT 05641

Phone: 802.476.8114

30+ Years In Satisfying Customers

TRUCKS, SUVs & VANS

Snowplows

SALES & SERVICE

For Superior Snowplowing Performance

McLEODS

SPRING & CHASSIS

“Your Truck Chassis Specialists”

32 BLACKWELL ST., BARRE, VT 05641 • 1-802-476-4971

home in second Jake Williams in third. Jordan

Fornwalt of Bradford VT and Denis McLeod

completed the top five.

Special awards were given in several categories,

headlined by the prestigious John

Poor Memorial Award, given annually to one

driver from each of the Modified and Coupe

divisions. John Poor was an important official

at Bear Ridge Speedway for many years and

the award bearing his name is given to drivers

who elevate the sport of stock car racing

through exceptional conduct on and off the

track. Robert Tucker and wife Mae won John

Poor Memorial trophy in the Modified division,

with Earl Maxham taking the honors in

the Coupe division.

The Bob Shepard “Drive, Desire,

Determination and Dedication” award, given

by an anonymous sponsor was awarded to a

special man who was taken from us unexpectedly

this year. He had the drive to take the

bull by the horns and get in his machine every

week despite his decreasing health, the determination

to make it too the front, a strong

heat race winner, and an unwavering dedication

to Bear Ridge Speedway. This year’s

winner Robert “Buster” Kathan.

The Sportsmanship Award was given this

year to Steve Lary in the DIRTcar Sabil &

Sons Sportsman Modified division, with

Robert Kilburn earning the honors in the

DIRTcar Wells River Chevrolet Sportsman

Coupes. Will Hull in the USAC DMA

Midgets, Ryan Christian in the CA Miller

Limited Late Models, and Kelly Miller Jr in

the Weglarz Property Service Four Cylinders

were other recipients.

The Rookie of the year based on points was

awarded to Tanner Siemons in the DIRTcar

Sabil & Sons Sportsman Modified division,

with Tad Kingsbury in the DIRTcar Wells

River Chevrolet Sportsman Coupes. Jason

Goff in the USAC DMA Midgets, George

Osgood in the CA Miller Limited Late

Models, and Cody Copeland in the Four

Cylinders.

The Big Al’s Photos “What A Picture”

Hard Luck Awards were given to Richie

Simmons in the DIRTcar Sabil & Sons

Sportsman Modified division, with Jason

Horniak earning the honors in the DIRTcar

Wells River Chevrolet Sportsman Coupes.

Derek O’Hearn in the USAC DMA Midgets,

Kelly Miller Sr in the C.A. Miller Limited

Late Models and Owen Carbee in the Four

Cylinders took home plaques.

The Raymond /Cliff Bullis Memorial

Award for performance on the track and conduct

in the pit area was awarded to Terry

Williams in the DIRTcar

Sabil & Sons Sportsman

Modifieds, Todd Hayward in

the DIRTcar Wells River

Chevrolet Sportsman Coupes,

Seth Carlson in the USAC

DMA Midgets, George

Osgood in the CA Miller

Limited Late Models, Garrett

Brown in the Fours Cylinders.

The Bear Ridge Speedway

Hall Fame has been created

with five members being

inducted in. Bob Doyle Parts

truck and photographer, Ted

Wynott Chief Flagman,

Ralph Stygles long time

racer, track supporter and former

track champion, Ervine

“Brother” Eastman long time

racer and nine time track

champion, and Norman

Roulx long time announcer.

More than 60 prizes were

given to racers by random

draw. The night was capped

with the deal or no deal event

for 5 lucky drivers the top

award of a $1000.00 Bear

Ridge Speedway gift certificate

was taken home by Tad

Kingsbury.

Bear Ridge Speedway’s

51st season of stock car racing

is now officially complete.

The 2019 season begins

on Saturday, May 4, 2019.

Season Passes for 2019 are

now available; information

and order forms are online at

www.bearridgespeedway.

com or by calling (802) 222-

4052.


Updated Weekly

REAL ESTATE

Rate APR Term Points Home Mortgage Rates

Downpayment

LAST

DOWN

LENDER UPDATE RATE APR TERM PTS PAYMENT

Community Natl 5.000% 5.008% 30 YR Fixed 0 5% Community National 11/30/17 5.000% 5.008% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

4.625% 4.639% 15 YR Fixed 0 5%

Bank 1-800-340-3460 4.625% 4.639% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

NE Fed CR UN 4.750% 4.775% 30 YR Fixed 0 5% New England Federal 11/30/17 4.750% 4.775% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

APARTMENTS 4.250% 4.294% 15 HOMES

YR Fixed 0 5%

Credit Union 866-805-6267 4.250% 4.294% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

PUBLISHER’S

NOTICE

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this

newspaper is subject to the fair housing

act which makes it illegal to advertise

“any preference, limitation or discrimination

based on race, color, religion,

sex, handicap, familial status or

national origin, or an intention, to make

any such preference, limitation or discrimination.”

Additionally, Vermont’s Fair Housing

and Public Accomodations Act prohibits

advertising that indicates any preference,

limitation or discrimination based

on age, marital status, sexual orientation

or receipt of public assistance.

This newspaper will not knowingly

accept any advertising for real estate

which is in violation of the law. Our

readers are hereby informed that all

dwellings advertised in this newspaper

are available on an equal opportunity

basis.

To file a complaint of discrimination,

call the Vermont Human Rights

Commisson toll-free at 1-800-416-2010

(voice & TTY) or call HUD toll

free at 1-800-669-9777 (voice)

or 1-800-927-9275 (TTY).

APARTMENTS

ROOMS/HOUSES

FOR RENT

2 BEDROOM HOUSE in Orange

for rent. Washer / dryer

Refrigerator & gas stove included.

$1000 / mo w/1st, last

and $700 damage deposit,

references. No Pet.

Ask for Fred 802-498-4550

APARTMENTS

ROOMS/HOUSES

FOR RENT

3 BEDROOM HOUSE for

Rent in Barre. 1 and 3/4

baths. 1800 sq. ft. in Residential

Neighborhood near Camp

St. Newly Renovated Kitchen,

with all New Appliances.

Washer / Dryer, Garage, Finished

Basement, Lots of

Storage, Woodsy Backyard.

$1350 Monthly plus Utilities.

Six month to one Year Lease,

you choose. Possibility for

additional year lease. Non-

Smoking. Will Accept Small

Breed Dog or Cat. Credit

Check Contact: apdbarre@

gmail.com

APT for RENT No. Montpelier

illage Unfurn 1 bdrm nd fl

$820 includes heat hot water

electricity no pets non smokers

Call p.m. 454-7364

BARRE. 3bdrm, $900. heat

and utilities not included, no

pets, non-smoking.

802-476-2092.

ARRE. GROUND fl oor,

$850. 3bdrm, heat and utilities

not included, no pets, nonsmoking.

802-476-2092.

Classified Deadline

Is Monday

Before 10AM

• • •

ROOMS/HOUSES

Northfield Savings 4.875% 4.916% GROTON: 30 YR Fixed Secluded 0 farmhouse,

215 acres, YR Fixed $69,000.00 0 5%

5% Northfield Savings 11/30/17 4.875% 4.916% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

FOR RENT 4.125% 4.194%

Bank (NSB) 4.125% 4.194% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

Owner / broker. 802-222-5065

FOR 802-485-5871

VSECU RENT. Roommate 4.875% to 4.917% 30 YR Fixed 0 5%

share 2 bedrooms. Graniteville.

802-249-9214.

Calais, VT. Spring, Septic, off VT State Employees 11/30/17 4.875% 4.917% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

4.375% 4.446% HOUSE 15 & YR 10 Fixed WOODED 0 Acres 5%

grid. $85,000.00. 802-272- Credit Union (VSECU) 4.375% 4.446% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

MONTPELIER. 2bdrm, 1 bath, 1653

1-800-371-5162 X5345

kitchen, living room, coin-op in

basement. All utilities included.

Free parking. $1,150.

Call 802-917-8505.

RULE OF THUMB......

Describe your property,

not the “appropriate” buyer or

renter, not the landlord,

not the neighbors.

Just describe the property and

you’ll almost always obey the

law.

SOUTH BARRE 3 bedroom

dulex Apartment quiet dead

end street, parking, back yard,

sun porch, washer and dryer.

Some furnishings. Barre Town

School. Convient to Hannafords

and McDonalds. No

smoking or pets. $950 plus

utilities. 802-476-4814

VACATION

RENTALS/SALES

WARM WEATHER is Year

Round in Aruba. The water

is safe, and the dining is fantastic.

Walk out to the beach.

3-Bedroom weeks available.

Sleeps 8. email: carolaction@

aol.com for more information.

Make Moving Much Easier

It should come as no surprise that spring kicks off one of the

busiest times of year in the housing market. Warm weather makes

it more comfortable to see and display homes, leading to more

listings and open houses.

WILLIAMSTOWN.

BRAND NEW HOME

3bdrm, 2ba, beautiful lot, good

access to I-89 and recreational

activities, great neighborhood.

1,000. Won’t last

802-272-7422

WORRIED ABOUT FORE-

CLOSURE?

Having trouble paying your

mortgage? The Federal Trade

Commission says don’t pay

any fees in advance to people

who promise to protect

your home from foreclosure.

Report them to the FTC, the

nation’s consumer protection

agency. For more information,

call 1-877-FTC-HELP or click

on ftc.gov. A message from

The World and the FTC.

FAX

US!

Now Placing Your

Classified Or Display

AD

Is Even Easier!

Rates can change without notice.

***APRs are based on 20% down payment. Some products are available with as little as

5% down, with purchase of Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI). The cost of PMI is not

included in the APR calculations.

AFFORDABLE

APARTMENTS

WITH HEAT

INCLUDED

Highgate

Apartments

located in Barre, is currently accepting applications

for 2 & 3 bedroom apartments

Hardwood floors, fresh paint, modern kitchen & baths, yard space,

ample closets, & washer/dryer hook-ups. Laundry room on site.

Rent includes heat/hot water, 24-hour emergency maintenance,

parking, snow removal, & trash removal. Income limits apply.

To request an application, call 476-8645 or stop by the on-site

rental office at 73 Highgate Drive, #121, Barre, VT.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

Foreclosure: 1BR House/Camp

with Detached Garage and Shed



6640 Mack Mountain Road, Cabot, VT

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the

average person in the United States changes

residences more than 11 times in his or her

lifetime. With each move, the process of

moving may become more familiar. But

even the most practiced nomad can nd

moving to be an overwhelming experience.

Those on the cusp of moving and nervous

about packing up and leaving can employ a

few tricks to make moving much easier.

RESEARCH AREAS CAREFULLY

Buyers are advised to do their research

when seeking new towns or cities to call

home. There are many factors to consider,

including school district ratings, proximity

to shopping, distance from work/commute

times, availability of transportation, climate,

and crime ratings.

Before falling in love with a particular

home, potential buyers can visit the area in

which the home is located during a typical

weekday to get a feel for the atmosphere.

Check out shopping centers, observe the

residents and drive by the schools and

businesses. This can help paint an accurate

picture that may or may not differ from that

depicted in the real estate listing.

STACK THE DECK

Working with qualied professionals who

have gone through the moving process before

can make for easier work for buyers and

sellers. Ask for recommendations regarding

real estate companies, real estate attorneys,

home inspectors, insurance agents, and all

of the other people who will assist with buying,

selling and moving. Carefully vet these

professionals, relying on third-party reviews

as well as any information provided by the

Better Business Bureau.

SECURE TEMPORARY STORAGE

It can help to put some belongings into

a storage center prior to moving, and then

gradually take items from the storage unit to

your new home. This will free up space to

make repairs to your new home and give you

time to gure out decorating schemes while

ensuring clutter won’t get in the way of

renovation projects. New homeowners also

can take their time sorting through boxes

and getting rid of items they may not need in

their new homes.

GET ESTIMATES AND VERIFY LICENS-

ING

The BBB advises consumers to verify all

licensing for movers. Solicit at least three

in-home estimates and get those gures in

writing. Conrm insurance coverage for

the company chosen, and be sure to have

all agreed upon information spelled out

explicitly in a written contract. Red flags to

consider include movers who don’t make

on-site inspections for estimates and those

who demand payment in advance before the

move.

HAVE A FIRST-WEEK SURVIVAL KIT

New homeowners can pick up takeout

restaurant menus and premade grocery store

meals. In addition, stock up on staples such

as paper plates, toilet tissue, light bulbs, and

cleaning supplies in advance of the move

so you won’t have to unpack everything at

mealtime or when you want to clean after

arriving at your new home.

Our Fax Number Is

802479-7916

Please Include Contact

Person & Payment Info

VISA, MasterCard & Discover

Ernie’s Listing

OPPORTUNITY

Want to do “your own thing,” be your own boss, use your creativity to run & maybe expand

a business that has been “in business” for 20+ years? Here it is--situated on a prominent

corner lot in downtown St. Johnsbury, this unique building hosts an equally unique

business. Natural food store with full deli with a sit-down dining area, gift shop. On-site

parking as well as street parking. Financial info available to pre-qualified buyers who sign a

confidentiality agreement. Building, business equipment, inventory included.

$989,000--ML4726597

ST. JOHNSBURY

309 Portland St, Suite 101; 802-748-2045

DANVILLE

10 Route 2 West, P.O. Box 68; 802-684-1127

beginrealty.com

Cute 1BR house/camp on a 0.67± acre corner

lot. Kitchen/dining, living area, 3/4 bath with

laundry, 1-car detached garage and shed. Country

setting. Former one-room school house.

Thomas Hirchak Company

802-888-4662

REALTY ASSOCIATES

December 12, 2018 The WORLD page 39


PRICE

REDUCED

PRICE

REDUCED

Barre City - $112,500 Price Reduction

ere’s your opportunity to make a good investment. This

unit building offers bedrooms each with the potential

to increase to bedrooms each. This property has been

upgraded to include a standing seam roof, vinyl siding and

newer windows.

MLS #4708901

Williamstown - $285,000 Price Reduction

This beautifully renovated 5-bedroom 150 istoric Farm

ouse has numerous updates. The kitchen boasts an antique

wood cook stove that also heats much of the home. There is

plenty of room to entertain family and friends on the front and

back decks, overlooking amaing mountain views. The large

level lawn is beautifully landscaped and is lined with large,

century year old trees.

MLS #4648832

Hardwick - $249,000

This wonderfully maintained R, A Cape offers an

attached car garage, Stone patio and perennial gardens

on . open acres. Save on your electric bill with the newly

installed solar panels and bring etra income with the etra

space above the garage.

MLS #4699724

PRICE

REDUCED

Barre City - $114,900

This bedroom, bath home has nice hardwood floors, high

ceilings, large rooms and newer windows throughout. Private

back deck for grilling and relaing.

MLS #4718634

Plaineld 215,000 Price Reduction

This bedroom, bath home has a great camp-like feel and

is very coy. Located in a private setting on 5 acres but only

minutes to downtown arre, Montpelier and I-.

MLS #4697203

Barre City - $130,000

This affordable city home offers large bedrooms, beautiful

wood work, new electrical, some hardwood fl oors, new

appliances, 1 baths and much more. Close to downtown

and local schools.

MLS # 4725758

John Biondolillo

Butch Churchill Courtney Brummert Kevin Copeland Kevin Petrochko Michelle Hebert Rich Ibey Sarah Pregent Lisa Brassard

Sue Arguin

Marcia Biondolillo

BARRE • BURLINGTON ESSEX JCT. • • ST. ST. JOHNSBURY • • STOWE • • STRATTON •• WOODSTOCK

802.479.3366

BARRE • ESSEX JCT. • ST. JOHNSBURY • STOWE • STRATTON • WOODSTOCK

802.479.3366

page 40 The WORLD December 12, 2018

Independently Owned and Operated

Independently Owned and Operated

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