World 12_19_18

coolvt

The World
World Publications
Barre-Montpelier, VT
Worship Directory
Last Minute Gift Ideas

MOVING LIGHT D

ANCE C

OMPANY P

RESENTS

THE TH 12

ANNUAL GREEN MOUNTAIN

NUTCRACKER

December

22-23

BARREB

OPERA

OUS

BARRE OPERA HOUSEH

TICKETS

B

BARREOPERAHOUSE.ORGAHOUSE.ORG

CENTRAL VERMONT’S FAVORITE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

Vol. 47, No. 33 403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641 • 479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 • Fax (802) 479-7916 December 19, 2018

On the Web: www.vt-world.com Email: sales@vt-world.com

Salvation Army

Kettle Drive

Needs Final

Push

page 2

®

Hunger Mountain Co-op

Fills 650 Grocery Bags

page 6

Wildlife in Winter

How Vermont’s Wild

Animals Survive Our

Harsh Winter Weather

page 13

Holiday Worship Directory

pages 18 &19

Just in the

“Nick” of Time

SHOP LOCALLY FOR

LAST MINUTE GIFTS

pages 20 & 21

INSERTS IN THIS

WEEK’S WORLD

May not be available in all papers

Sears Hometown

Lost Nation Theater …

this ad courtesy of The World. Discounts Fly Away Dec. 31, 2018

Engaging Gifts

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LNT underwriters: Capitol Copy, City of Montpelier, National Life Group, The Point, Times Argus,, The World

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A S P E C I A L S U P P L E M E N T T O T H E W O R L D

403 U.S. Rt. 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641-2274

802-479-2582 www.vt-world. com e-mail: sales@vt-world.com

Name of Business _____________________________

On Page # _______________________

ONE ENTRY PER EMAIL OR PHYSICAL ADDRESS

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of The WORLD

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Salvation Army Kettle Drive

Needs Final Push

The Salvation Army Kettle Drive, both locally and national,

is behind last year and local leaders are hoping for a small

miracle to meet their goal. “It’s ironic that donations are down

on a year where the need is up so much,” reports Barre

Salvation Army Lieutenants Heather and Chris West (above),

adding “It could be the cold weather since we started in

November or the economy.” The Barre Salvation Army is

responsible for Kettles in Barre, Montpelier, Northfield,

Waterbury, Randolph, and West Lebanon. Groups, individuals,

and service clubs are urged to volunteer at a nearby Kettle

location. Both Kiwanians and Rotarians have stepped up

locally to help the cause of needy families and individuals.

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page 2 The WORLD December 19, 2018

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plus Mohawk Laminate® Mohawk Wood®

CW Print + Design Is Moving!

CW Print + Design is excited to share the big news: CW

Print + Design is moving! While the move is not far - just

across the street - the move is BIG. The new storefront will be

at 48 North Main Street, Barre (next to TD Bank).

The new space will allow double the production floor to

support the addition of new state-of-the-art digital production

equipment in the coming years. Additionally, the new location

is more accessible and convenient, with more dedicated parking

in the rear of the building.

During the transition, business will run mostly as usual with

very few interruptions. They will be closed on December 28th

to begin the moving process, and will be up and running at the

new store on January 4th, 2019.

As always, they thank you for your support and continued

business.

• • •

Attorney General’s Office

Issues Guidance on Data

Broker Regulations

The Vermont Attorney General’s Office has released a guidance

to assist Data Brokers in complying with Vermont’s new

Data Broker Regulations, Act 171 of 2018. These regulations

go into effect on January 1, 2019.

The new law requires Data Brokers to register with the

Secretary of State annually and maintain certain minimum

data security standards. The deadline for registering is January

31, 2019, and, starting in January registration can be completed

on the Secretary of State’s website. A copy of the registration

form is also attached to the guidance and may be

completed and delivered by mail or in person to: the Vermont

Secretary of State, Corporations Division, 128 State Street,

Montpelier, VT 05633-1104.

Businesses that are unsure whether they fall within the

definition of “Data Broker” should review the guidance, and

may contact the Attorney General’s Office with questions.

The “Guidance on Vermont’s Act 171 of 2018 Data Broker

Legislation” can be found on the Attorney General’s Data

Broker website: http://ago.vermont.gov/blog/2017/12/05/

data-brokers/.


VSAC Study of College

Completion Rates Sparks

Conversation About

Improving Higher

Education Outcomes

The Vermont Student Assistance Corp. and the Vermont

State Colleges System were joined by state leaders in the education,

business, and policymaking communities at a summit

recently to discuss results of a comprehensive VSAC study

that looked at college retention and completion rates among

Vermont’s high school class of 2012.

The study was based on enrollment data from the National

Student Clearinghouse and responses to the VSAC 2012

Senior Survey, which was completed by 85% of Vermont high

school seniors. The results of this unique longitudinal look at

Vermont college students revealed good news about the state,

as well as significant opportunities for improvement.

“I want to thank our partners for joining us at today’s summit,”

said Scott Giles, president and CEO at VSAC, Vermont’s

only statewide organization dedicated to helping Vermonters

save, plan and pay for college. “VSAC is all about supporting

Vermont students, whether it be through career and education

counseling, grant programs, or student loan offerings. This

research is one more critical part of that support structure,

because it helps us identify where we can improve throughout

our education system.”

Jeb Spaulding, chancellor of the Vermont State Colleges

System and co-host of the summit, added, “Experts estimate

that by 2020, 65% of jobs will require education or training

beyond high school. The Vermont State Colleges System is on

the front lines of helping all Vermonters, including first generation

and non-traditional students, prepare for a fulfilling

professional life, and we must do more to ensure they can be

successful.”

Obtaining a college degree is associated with higher levels

of homeownership, better health, and lower unemployment.

Students who take longer to graduate accumulate more student

loan debt, and those who never finish accrue the debt but

never receive the economic benefit of a college degree.

Vermont outperforms other states, but still has plenty of

challenges – and potential solutions. Statewide, 60% of students

from the class of 2012 who enrolled full-time at a fouryear

college obtained their degree “on time,” or within four

years – a completion rate that is 13 points higher than the

national average. However, when you broaden the population

to include all members of that high school class, including

those who did not go to college at all, the 4-year completion

rate drops to 34%.

Graduation rates also varied by the type of institution that

students attended in Vermont. St. Michael’s College had the

highest competition rate while Vermont State Colleges lagged

behind indicating that more work is needed to support those

students to ensure they achieve a degree.

The summit included a conversation about how parents,

high school educators, school counselors, and legislators can

act differently to help improve student outcomes. Some of

those ideas included a possible focus on one decision point –

when a student is contemplating a college transfer – where

additional counseling may help to improve completion rates,

and where policy changes at the state and institutional level

may further improve the odds of success.

The study also suggests that, at the high school level, more

attention should be given to upper-level math and AP courses,

particularly in Vermont’s most rural counties. Finally, the

results underscored the important role that parents play in setting

their children up for success; notably, by talking to their

kids about college plans well before the 9th grade.

Further discussion: Importance of math; rural counties falling

behind; and “transfer penalty.”

The study revealed a handful of demographic factors,

including gender, geography (urban or rural), and whether the

student’s parents attended college, that each had an influence

on whether the student would complete their degree.

Females from families who have a parent with a 4-year college

degree are most likely to continue their education after

high school; nearly 7 out of 10 immediately enrolled. Least

likely to continue their education are males from families who

don’t have a parent with a college degree. Only 4 in 10 firstgeneration

males enrolled immediately. Much more work is

needed to close this gender gap and encourage more boys

from economically disadvantaged families to enroll in college

and finish on time.

Not surprisingly, high school preparation and achievement

also played a key role. In fact, completion of upper-level math

courses and Advanced Placement courses, as well as high

school GPA, had stronger associations with college completion

than did the demographic factors of gender or parental

education – reinforcing the notion of education as “the great

equalizer.” The completion rates of the most demographically

disadvantaged group in this study – males whose parents did

not go to college – increased almost 30 percentage points

when those students had completed Algebra II and had earned

an overall GPA of A.

The study also showed that the county in which the student

attended high school was an important factor in predicting

postsecondary degree completion, even among students who

grew up in households headed by college-educated parents.

The more rural areas were the more challenged, with 32% of

students from Essex County and 38% of students from

Orleans County completing their degrees within four years, as

opposed to 51% percent of students from Chittenden County.

Another notable risk factor for non-completion included

transferring schools, a decision made by 10% of Vermont’s

class of 2012 who began college that fall. However, students

who transferred schools were almost 30 percentage points less

likely to graduate within four years than those who remained

at their starting schools. This likely stems from the fact that,

according to the federal Government Accountability Office,

students lose about 40% of their credits when they transfer.

“Today’s meeting is the start of a very important conversation

about the work we must do together to improve the support

structures and ultimately the outcomes for our students,”

Giles concluded.

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Styles vary by store. Sale prices valid in-store only December 19-24, 2018. Stores close at 5pm 12/24. Stores closed 12/25. 359 N Main St. Sale Dec. 19-24 th

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December 19, 2018 The WORLD page 3


HOLIDAY PARTY

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page 4 The WORLD December 19, 2018

The Barre & Central Vermont

Rotary Clubs along with

The Salvation Army of Barre

announce:

2018

SANTA

PROJECT

To purchase new winter

coats, hats, and mittens

for children of need in

central Vermont.

Send your check to:

WORLD Santa Project

403 US Rt. 302, Barre, VT 05641

or call Gary Hass at

479-2582 or 1-800-639-9753

for more information.

SPECIAL THANKS TO

GO CALENDARS-TOYS-GAMES

AT THE BERLIN MALL

FOR THEIR DONATION OF 100 TEDDY BEARS

Thank You To This Week’s Contributors At Press Time

Cody Chevrolet-Cadillac

Vermont Granite Museum

Pratt Leasing Partnership

Eleanor Perreault & Patricia

Wheeler

Carolyn Wells

Hope Loso

Arlene & Andy Rouleau

Gordon & Nancy Olsen

Susan & Jeffrey Tucker

Barbara Donnelly & Susan

Tucker

Edward & Sally Leszko

Gary & Anita Rogers

Robert “Toad” Spaulding In

Memory of My Brothers

Raymond & Dougie

Betsy Kelty & Sandra Leopold

Helene Thomas In Memory of

Perley Thomas

Barre Rotary Club

Montpelier Rotary Club

Pat Austin

Mary Perreault

40

WINGS

Simply

the

Best!

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

Robert & Mary Ann Couture

Donald, Stephen & Jeffrey Lyons

Inabelle Peake & Patricia Peake

Aja

Beth Sabens, Kim Daniels &

Kiplyn Sabens

Bruce & Irene Haskell

Cheryl Peterson

Nelson Publishing

Patricia Poirier

Michael & Betsy Cody In Memory

of Bud & Bettie Cody

Gary & Carole Hass In Memory

of Nadine & Harry Dietrich,

Ed & Irene Cook

Nancy Couch In Memory of

Allan Couch

Christine Litchfield In Memory of

Arthur Hill Jr.

Laurel & Wally Farnum

Vermont Buildings & General

Services

Abby’s Self-Storage/James &

Donna Daniels

Lost Nation Theater Presents Stories

For The Season, Dec. 19

On Wednesday December 19th at 7pm,

many of your favorite Lost Nation Theater

artists will gather to present dramatic readings

of stories from around the world. The return

of the light and the peaceful magic of this

winter season is heralded in tales from a host

of different traditions.

In Stories of the Season, you’ll hear works

from O’Henry, Hans Christian Anderson,

Isaac Bashevis, and even Dr. Seuss, alongside

Native American, Pagan, and African legends,

poems, and myths, and maybe even a Beatle

tune or two!

The evening is made possible by these

fabulous performers! Some of the community’s

very favorite LNT stars! We’re overjoyed

that our alumni cast of It’s A Wonderful Life,

Kim Allen Bent (Red), Cher Laston (Stone),

Michael Manion (Our Town), Maura O’Brien

(Becoming Dr Ruth), Mark S Roberts

(Judevine), and Kim Ward (Disappearances)

are all taking part. They are joined for this

evening by G. Richard Ames (Silent Sky,

Hairspray) - who will also host, and actorsinger

Carolyn Wesley (Lyddie, Into the

Woods). The event is directed by Kathleen

Keenan and Stevie De handles the lighting.

Stories for the Season carries on Lost

Nation Theater’s tradition of a holiday show

after the close of It’s A Wonderful Life last

year. The company hopes to return with a

“live radio show” play version of A Christmas

Carol in 2019.

Also, join LNT on December 19th to hear

Gift of the Magi, The Power of Light, The

Pine Tree, Herschel and the Hanukkah

Goblins, The Pull-Together Morning, Why

Hummingbird Has a Red Throat, How the

Grinch Stole Christmas, and more.

When asked why she chose “The Pine

Intro to Strings Class Offered Through Joint Venture

The Green Mountain Youth Symphony

(GMYS) has partnered with Monteverdi

Music School, Vermont Violins, and Paul

Perley Cellos to pilot a new Intro to Strings

class. “The fall session was such a great success

that we’re going to run a new session

starting in January,” says GMYS Artistic

Director, Bob Blais.

This group class is for 8-12 year olds who

have never played a stringed instrument, but

would like to try it out. Blais, will teach the

9-week class in space donated by Monteverdi.

Students can choose to try violin, viola, cello,

or bass and will learn in a mixed-instrument

group. Discounted short-term rentals are

available through either Vermont Violins or

Paul Perley Cellos. According to Blais, “This

is a great opportunity to try out a stringed

instrument without families needing to make

a huge commitment up front. So kids can just

try it and see if they like it. It’s an affordable

way to explore playing music.”

Students who would like to continue with

their instrument after this introductory period

will be referred to private teachers through

Monteverdi, can join their school music program,

will be able to work toward joining the

• • •

Photo by Stefan Hard

Tree” by Hans Christian Anderson, actor

Carolyn Wesley offered, “It’s a good little

morality tale on living in the moment, peppered

with some wry Danish wit!” Much

humor and wit, tenderness and wisdom will

be peppered through this entire evening, fun

for the whole family.

Admission is free, but tasty treats and warm

beverages will be available for sale – along

with Lost Nation Theater’s 2019 Season

Tickets, Gift Cards, and Youth Theater Camps.

Come on Down! Wednesday, December

19th, 2018. Stories of the Season begins at

7pm. The lobby & box office (for checking in)

open at 6pm, seating will begin at 6:30pm.

The show is recommended for ages 7+. Lost

Nation Theater is wheelchair accessible,

offers an assisted listening system, and large

print programs.

For reservations & more information: call

802-229-0492 or visit lostnationtheater.org.

GMYS Repertory Orchestra, and may choose

to extend their instrument rentals through the

regular rental programs at either shop.

Class begins on Tuesday, January 15th and

runs through Tuesday, March 19th (no class

on February 26th). For more information or to

register, contact GMYS Executive Director,

Leah Wilhjelm leah@gmys-vt.org or 888-

4470.

The mission of the Green Mountain Youth

Symphony is to create a community of young

musicians from throughout Central and

Northern Vermont through the performance

of great music. Since 2001 under the leadership

of Artistic Director Robert Blais, GMYS

has offered a rich musical experience where

children can pursue their interests and talents,

find a vehicle for self-expression, and learn

teamwork. Each year GMYS serves nearly

100 student musicians from thirty towns

throughout Vermont and New Hampshire in

three separate orchestras for students of all

skill levels, ages six to eighteen. There is

always room for more!

PO Box 384, Montpelier, VT 05601-0384

~ info@gmys-vt.org ~ www.gmys-vt.org ~

802-888-4470

Gifford Gallery Features Tina Grant Photography

Wildlife photographs taken by East

Roxbury resident Tina Grant are on display

through Jan. 9, 2019, in the Gifford Gallery at

Gifford Medical Center. The exhibit, titled

“My Love for Animals,” is free and open to

the public.

Born and raised in New Hampshire, Grant

spent most weekends and summers of her

youth on Mink Island on Lake Winnipesaukee,

where she observed deer—often swimming

from island to island, loons, raccoons, ducks,

and mink. Her love of animals grew as she

worked on local farms. Later, when Grant

bought a home in East Roxbury, she put up

• • •

feeders and “started my love for birds,” photographs

of which dominate the exhibit at

Gifford.

“I have been blessed by being able to photograph

them,” Grant said. “You never know

when a great shot will come.”

The Gifford Gallery is located just inside

the hospital’s main entrance at 44 S. Main St.,

Route 12, in Randolph. Artwork may be purchased

by contacting the Gifford

Development, Marketing and Public Relations

Department, weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4:30

p.m. For more information, call 802-728-

2380 or email contactus@giffordmed.org.


Photo of Dave Keller is by Laura Carbone.

Dave Keller with Ira Friedman

on New Year’s Eve

On New Year’s Eve, renowned Vermont soul blues artist

Dave Keller will be performing a special early evening seated

concert at the Unitarian Church of Montpelier, accompanied

by his longtime bandmate Ira Friedman on the church’s beautiful

piano.

Keller, who hosted a New Year’s Eve dance party at

Montpelier City Hall for the past five years, says, “The dance

parties were such a blast, and I want to thank everyone who

made them such a success. But I felt like it was time to try

something a little different. I’m really excited about singing in

the Unitarian Church’s sanctuary. It’s got such a gorgeous

resonance to it. And with Ira on piano, it’s gonna be extra

special.”

Keller will be singing songs from his new album, Every

Soul’s a Star, which hit #1 on the Roots Music Report Soul

Blues Chart in October. Released on esteemed soul blues label

Catfood Records, and produced by triple-Grammy-winner Jim

Gaines (Santana, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Tower of Power), the

album has been receiving rave reviews.

Downbeat magazine awarded Keller’s album a coveted

4-star rating, and AXS.com recently named Keller as one of

“The Best 13 Blues Singers.” Elmore magazine calls Keller,

“a magnificent soul singer, his luxuriant voice rising flawlessly

to every occasion,”, and Living Blues describes Keller’s

album as, “moving and powerful...confirms his rightful place

in the soul universe...Steve Cropper-like riffs and soaring

vocals... songwriting genius... straight-to-the-heart soul.”

Ira Friedman is well known throughout Vermont for his

soulful playing with The Dave Keller Band, as well as his

performances with The Montpelier Community Gospel Choir

and his own Ira Friedman Trio. He’s also an in-demand piano

teacher at his private studio.

Doors will open at 5:00 pm, with the concert starting at 5:30

pm. Tickets can be purchased for $15 in advance at www.

davekeller.com/shows, or for $20 at the door. All ages are

welcome. The Unitarian Church of Montpelier is located at

130 Main Street. For more info, email info@davekeller.com.

• • •

Scrag Mountain Music Presents Joy,

Pleasure, and Sweet Nourishment: A

Concert of Early Music Concerts

Scrag Mountain Music rings in the New Year with a concert

of heartwarming early music. “Joy, Pleasure, and Sweet

Nourishment: A Concert of Early Music” welcomes celebrated

interpreters of early music for a performance of works by

Jean-Baptiste Barrière, John Dowland, John Eccles, George

Frideric Handel, Guillaume de Machaut, Henry Purcell, and a

piece that invokes the spirit of early music by the young New

York City-based Canadian composer Matthew Ricketts.

Concerts are on Friday, January 11, 2019 at 7:30 pm (Bread &

Butter Farm, 200 Leduc Farm Rd., Shelburne, VT), Saturday,

January 12, 2019 at 7:30 pm (Christ Episcopal Church, 64

State St., Montpelier, VT), and Sunday, January 13 at 4 pm

(Warren United Church, 339 Main St., Warren, VT).

Joining Scrag Mountain Music’s co-Artistic Directors Mary

Bonhag (soprano) and Evan Premo (double bass and composer),

who will also perform on the viola da gamba (the

precursor to the modern-day cello), are guest artists Paul

Holmes Morton on theorbo, lute, and baroque guitar, Priscilla

Herreid on baroque oboe and recorders, and Michael Unterman

on the cello.

Scrag Mountain Music is pleased to be able to bring back a

program of early music following two popular early music

concerts presented in previous seasons. Scrag Mountain

Music co-Artistic Director and soprano Mary Bonhag says,

“Music of the Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque periods

has the ability to truly transport us back in time to when rules

of harmony and rhythm were still being adapted and when life

moved at a different pace. During these times (and really up

until recent eras), music was an integral part of daily life - created

and played for both practical and artful purposes. “Joy,

Pleasure, and Sweet Nourishment” explores Medieval,

Renaissance, and a bit of Baroque music from France and

England. This is music of the courts - sounds to entertain,

delight, and fuel the souls and senses of royalty and nobility. I

so enjoy singing early music and love sharing this repertoire,

new sounds (and new instruments!) with our audiences.”

“Joy, Pleasure, and Sweet Nourishment: A Concert of Early

Music” will present three concerts between January 11-13,

2019. All concerts are “Come as you are. Pay what you can.”

with at-will donations collected at intermission. Securing

your seats in advance at www.scragmountainmusic.org is

encouraged.

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December 19, 2018 The WORLD page 5


Holiday Tips for Parents



DON’T SUPPLY ALCOHOL OR

MARIJUANA TO YOUTH

Both are illegal for youth under 21,

even in your own home.

Enabling underage drinking is

dangerous, sends the wrong

message, and is illegal.



or giving alcohol to a minor.

Allowing drinking in your home,

even if you take away car keys, does

not make underage drinking safe.

Central VT New Directions

HELP KEEP KIDS SAFE

www.cvndc.org

Kristian Page

Body Shop Manager

Shaw’s

Reinhart Food Services

and their suppliers

Freihofer’s Bakery

Louis Graham

Barre Elks Lodge 1535, VFW

MacKenzie-Webster Post 790 and

Auxiliary, American Legion Post 10,

Unit 10, Squadron 10

Mason Square and Compass

Barre Auditorium

Barre City Police

Barre City Fire Department

Vermont Army National Guard

Combat Veterans 26-1

Yipes Stripes

Aubuchon’s Hardware

Cody Chevrolet

Veterans Inc.

Joe and Lorna Jerome

Hemlock 3rd Vermont

One-third of underage drinking

deaths involve auto crashes. The

remaining two-thirds involve alcohol


unintentional injuries.

Underage drinking can lead to risky


sexual assaults, and violence.

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The Barre Area Veteran’s Council

would like to thank the Green Mountain Council

of the Boy Scouts of America and the

following members of our community for

their generosity and participation in the 20th

Annual 2018 Scouting Salute to Veterans’

Parade. The parade was held in honor of

the brave men and women who continue to

preserve freedom enjoyed by Americans on

November 3, 2018.

Barre Scout Troop 714

Barre Scout Troop 795

Spaulding High School Band

Barre City Elementary

School Band

Barre Town Elementary

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JD Green, 101.7 The One

TJ Michaels, Frank FM

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HONORARY CHAIRS

This years Scouting

Salute to Veterans

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Tis The Season For Giving! At their December 6th meeting, members of the Catholic Daughters of the

Americas (CDA) Court St. Veronica #1273 were in a giving mood as you can see by the many items

above. For a small Court, its members were very generous to the Hardwick Area Food Pantry. CDA is

a spiritual and charitable organization and this Court is comprised of ladies from Mary Queen of All

Saints Parish and Most Holy Name of Jesus Parish. Photo courtesy of Doris Voyer.

• • •

Ring, Christmas Tower Bells!

For the eighth consecutive year, noon-hour

recitals of Christmas carols will be played on

the historic tower bells of Montpelier’s Trinity

United Methodist Church. The programs will

began at 11:58 on December 17 and runs until

December 22, Christmas Eve, and Christmas

Day.

The bells will also be played for half an hour

before the ten o’clock worship services on the

third and fourth Sundays of Advent and after

the Christmas Eve service.

Michael Loris will play the unrestored 1908

McShane chime of ten bells (the only completely

original tower bell instrument in

Hunger Mountain Co-op Provides 650

Grocery Bags Filled With Pantry Staples to

Local Schools and Nonprofits

Every December for the past 15 years,

Hunger Mountain Co-op has supported local

organizations and area schools by donating

grocery bags filled with nutritious food.

To fill the Holiday Grocery Bags with

high-need, healthy staples, the Co-op collaborates

with Northfield Savings Bank, Co-op

members, shoppers and vendors, including

Cabot Creamery, Vermont Coffee Company,

La Panciata Bakery, McKenzie Natural

Artisan Deli, Sunrise Orchards, Organic

Valley, and Albert’s Organics. Through these

partnerships, the Co-op sources high quality,

nutritious products, including organic peanut

butter, local apples, and freshly baked bread,

to fill 650 grocery bags. The retail value of

each Holiday Grocery Bag is over $30.

Last Wednesday, volunteers and Co-op

staff gathered at the Vermont Foodbank’s

warehouse in Barre to assemble the holiday

Funding Available for Organizations and Programs that

Support Career Pathways for VT Women and Girls

Funding is now available from the Vermont

Women’s Fund at the Vermont Community

Foundation for growth-stage efforts and programs

that support viable career pathways

and career prospects for Vermont women and

girls.

The Vermont Women’s Fund was established

in 1994 as an enduring resource to

support women and girls in the state. The

Fund remains the largest philanthropic

resource dedicated exclusively to this mission.

A council of women from around

Vermont advises the Fund and participates in

its grantmaking and leadership work, including

the work of its partnership with the

Vermont Commission on Women and

Vermont Works for Women—Change The

Story—an initiative seeking to fast-track

• • •

• • •

Vermont), and the matching 1872 bass bell (or

bourdon), one of the largest bells in the Green

Mountain State (2,552 lb.).

The eleven untuned bronze bells weigh

more than five tons, and are played by hand.

The diatonic chime is completely mechanical,

and was designed for the keys of C major and

F major:

Bb B C D E F G A B C D

Each recital will begin with two four-bell

peals using the five notes of the Introit of the

Christmas Midnight Mass, Dominus dixit ad

me, and Psalm 2, Quare fremuerunt gentes?

bags. Seven local organizations and three area

schools picked up the packed grocery bags

that afternoon for direct distribution to their

clients, students, and families. This year’s

recipients are Barre City Elementary, Barre

Town School, Central Vermont Home Health

and Hospice, Downstreet Housing &

Community Development, Family Center of

Washington County, Good Beginnings of

Central Vermont, Montpelier Food Pantry,

Montpelier Senior Activity Center, Union

Elementary School, and the Washington

Elves.

When customers shop at Hunger Mountain

Co-op now through December 30, they can

choose to “Give Change” by rounding up

their total to the nearest dollar. All of the

change collected in December will help fill

this year’s Holiday Grocery Bags.

women’s economic security in Vermont.

To achieve a deep and strategic impact, the

Vermont Women’s Fund will continue to

focus its grantmaking on an area highlighted

by the research of Change The Story: women

and girls on the pathway to viable careers.

There are significant funding gaps in this

area, and the Women’s Fund believes it is

uniquely positioned to make a difference. The

2019 competitive grant program will award

grants of up to $10,000 to support growthstage

efforts and programs seeking funding to

pilot a model, demonstrate effectiveness, or

expand program delivery.

Nonprofits may apply online at any time;

applications will be accepted through

February 7, 2019 at 5:00 p.m. Visit vermontcf.org/VWFGrantmaking

to learn more.

page 6 The WORLD December 19, 2018


VT Ranks No. 2 of Peace Corps’ Top

Volunteer-Producing States in 2018

Peace Corps has announced

that Vermont ranks No. 2

among states with the highest

number of Peace Corps volunteers

per capita. There are

43 volunteers from Vermont

currently serving worldwide

and 1,622 Vermonters have

served in the Peace Corps

since the agency’s founding

in 1961.

Notably, Vermont has

ranked as a top volunteerproducing

state per capita for

the last five years and held

the No. 1 spot from 2014-

2016. Vermont volunteers are

among the more than 235,000

Americans who have served

around the world in areas

such as agriculture, community

economic development,

education, environment,

health and youth development

volunteers since 1961.

“Encouraging all

Americans, from every corner

of our country, to become

involved in international service is something

that continues to be at the forefront of my

mind,” said Peace Corps Director Jody Olsen.

“At the Peace Corps, we recognize the leaders

who cultivate a culture of service in their

states. Communities across America are

embracing the domestic dividend of returned

Peace Corps volunteers and, today, we celebrate

these global citizens who contribute so

much to our country.”

Worcester, Vermont, resident Jocelyn Hill

serves as an English language facilitator in

Tonga. “Values of loyalty, and humility run

deep throughout the Tongan culture and in

every interaction,” says Hill. “The Tongan

hospitality is so strong and welcoming, it is a

kindness and generosity I have never experienced

before. I am supposed to be the one

coming to serve my country of service, yet my

host country nationals have helped me more

than I could ever reciprocate.”

Peace Corps is unique among service organizations

because volunteers live and work at

the community level. Service in the Peace

Corps is a life-defining, hands-on leadership

experience that offers volunteers the opportunity

to travel to the farthest corners of the

world and make a lasting difference in the

lives of others. Applicants can apply to specific

programs by visiting the Peace Corps

website and connecting with a recruiter.

Dan Driscoll

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• • •

Barre Gardens enjoyed a wonderful afternoon with Willem Lange.

Willem recited excerpts from his book “Favor Johnson, A Christmas

Story.” Good friend Tom Wales came along to provide music and

the Gardens dietary staff provided homemade Christmas cookies

and hot cocoa.

• • •

Vermont Care Partners

Welcomes Sarah Squirrel as

Incoming Commissioner for the

Department of Mental Health

Vermont Care Partners Welcomes Sarah Squirrell as the

incoming Commissioner for the Department of Mental Health.

Governor Scott and Agency of Human Services Secretary

Gobeille made an excellent choice in choosing a leader in

community-based care to head our State Mental Health

System.

Sarah’s far-reaching expertise in developing statewide care

collaborations, strengthening the use of evidenced-based practices,

and in managing community programs -- along with her

commitment to supporting children, youth, and families -- will

be an excellent complement to Deputy Commissioner Fox’s

extensive expertise in adult mental health services. Their combined

leadership will strengthen the continuum of care for all

Vermonters affected by mental health conditions and advance

our system of care as an integral component of the health care

system in partnership with schools, law enforcement, corrections,

and the Department of Children and Families.

Vermont Care Partners looks forward to maintaining a

strong partnership with the Department of Mental Health,

Agency of Human Services, peers, advocates and community

partners in striving to fight stigma and meet the mental health

needs of all Vermonters in parity with health care.

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December 19, 2018 The WORLD page 7


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page 8 The WORLD December 19, 2018

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Congress passed a strong, bipartisan Farm Bill that protects the federal nutrition programs and supports

farmers and agricultural economy. Senator Patrick Leahy, Anore Horton, ED of Hunger Free VT,

and John Sayles, CEO of the Vermont Foodbank applaud the hard work of their fellow advocates across

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Congress has overwhelmingly passed a

strong, bipartisan Farm Bill that protects the

federal nutrition programs and supports our

farmers and agricultural economy. The bill

that passed is a testament to nearly two years

of strong and unwavering advocacy by antihunger

and farmer organizations, and the

steadfast and vocal support of many members

of Congress like Vermont’s own Senator

Leahy, Senator Sanders, and Congressman

Welch. Hunger Free Vermont and the Vermont

Foodbank applaud the hard work of their fellow

advocates across the country and

Congress on this Farm Bill.

After months of congressional debate, and

proposals that aimed to devastate our nation’s

nutrition safety net and take food away from

2 million Americans, the Farm Bill that is

heading to the President’s desk protects the

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program

(known as SNAP, and called 3SquaresVT in

Vermont), provides a modest increase in

funding for food assistance through The

Emergency Food Assistance Program

(TEFAP), expands programs that connect

SNAP participants with local food, and will

help millions of Americans put food on the

table.

The Farm Bill includes many programs

that are critical to the health and wellbeing of

millions of Americans. SNAP is the nation’s

first line of defense against hunger, and provides

more than 74,000 Vermonters and 40

million Americans with money to spend on

food in grocery stores and farmers markets

each month. For every one meal provided by

a member of Feeding America’s national network

of 200 food banks and 60,000 agency

partners, of which the Vermont Foodbank is a

member, SNAP provides 12. TEFAP plays a

critical role as well, providing food banks and

food shelves with nutritious US grown foods

to distribute to families in need, including

more than 16 million individuals who do not

qualify for SNAP assistance.

With the passing of this Farm Bill,

Vermonters participating in 3SquaresVT will

see no cuts to their food benefits. The bill

improves program integrity and also invests

in proven approaches to employment and

training programs. The approaches were tested

in pilots authorized in the 2014 Farm Bill,

including Vermont’s successful Jobs for

Independence program (JFI). Vermont recently

launched the Individual Career

Advancement Network (ICAN), building on

the work of JFI. ICAN helps participants gain

the skills and education they need to obtain

stable, good paying jobs, and attain economic

self-sufficiency. The bill will also increase

access to nutritious, local food, through programs

funded by the Food Insecurity Nutrition

Incentive Grant Program (FINI), like

Vermont’s Crop Cash program, which

increases 3SquaresVT participants’ purchasing

power at farmers markets across the state,

helping more Vermonters buy local food.

“By supporting TEFAP, this Farm Bill will

help food banks like the Vermont Foodbank

and our partner food shelves to provide more

nutritious food to our neighbors in need,”

says Vermont Foodbank CEO, John Sayles.

“We are grateful to our congressional delegation

and to the hardworking anti-hunger

advocates who pushed to ensure that this

critical five-year bill preserves the federal

nutrition programs that support Vermonters

struggling with hunger.”

Here in Vermont, work on the Farm Bill

began nearly two years ago. The Vermont

Farm Bill Nutrition Coalition, made up of

anti-hunger advocates, agriculture organizations,

state agencies, and community service

providers, came together in 2017 to develop a

set of priorities that reflect the true needs and

values of Vermonters. Over 700 individuals

and organizations throughout the state signed

on in support of these recommendations. The

Coalition worked with the Vermont congressional

delegation to make sure these recommendations

were represented in Washington.

“Hunger Free Vermont is proud to see many

of the Vermont Farm Bill Nutrition Coalition’s

recommendations reflected in the Farm Bill

passed by Congress this week,” says Horton.

“This victory proves the power and critical

necessity of collective advocacy. We are

grateful for Vermont’s congressional delegation’s

work to highlight the recommendations

and thank advocates across Vermont and the

nation for standing together to protect federal

nutrition programs.”


The Phoenix-Vermont and Partners Launch New Fitness Program

On Saturday, December 8th, a line of new athletes reached

out the door and into the stairwell at Green Mountain CrossFit.

These new athletes were there to take part in a CrossFit class

for the inaugural launch of The Phoenix – Vermont. What

looked like any Saturday at the gym for some looked new and

very different than their typical Saturday to others. Each of the

athletes in line was there because they are in recovery from

substance misuse disorder. This event was a new step in their

recovery journey.

The Phoenix is a national nonprofit organization founded

by Scott Strode, an athlete and leader who found recovery

through fitness and discipline in a boxing gym in Boston.

Based on his personal experience, Strode founded The

Phoenix Multisport in Denver in 2006. Since then Strode and

his team have been steadily expanding the reach of their program

to include many different sports and locations in 20

states. “We have built a community of people in recovery

across the country that are committed to helping individuals

overcome substance use disorders by providing a nurturing

atmosphere and support through the intrinsic power of physical

activities,” said Scott Strode, Founder and Executive

Director of The Phoenix. “By bringing The Phoenix to

Vermont, we are providing a proven program to help build a

safe, welcoming, nurturing and healing environment that is

full of hope for people who have suffered from a substance

use disorder and to those who choose to live sober.”

Their philosophy is simple: offer free fitness classes to

those in recovery who have been sober for the last 48 hours.

But the focus is not solely on fitness. As participants work out,

they begin to build new connections with others who are living

in recovery and sobriety. These connections are a powerful

way for participants to build a new support network to continue

their success in recovery.

For several years, Shannon Brennan, a licensed clinical

mental health counselor at Central Vermont Substance Abuse,

had contacted The Phoenix Multisport asking that they expand

to Central Vermont. She “was tired of seeing her clients die”

because they did not have the support systems to sustain their

Athletes and volunteers celebrate the first workout with The Phoenix - Vermont at Green Mountain

CrossFit on December 8th. Photo courtesy of Green Mountain United Way.

recovery and often fell back on old, unhealthy relationships.

Brennan saw the potential that the Phoenix could bring to her

clients. It wasn’t until she found partners at Green Mountain

United Way and Green Mountain CrossFit that it became possible

to bring The Phoenix to Central Vermont.

Tawnya Kristen of Green Mountain United Way met with

Brennan and not only saw how this could be life-changing for

Brennan’s clients, she saw how The Phoenix had the potential

to change the recovery landscape in Vermont. As a key member

of several Accountable Communities for Health in the

Green Mountain United Way service region, Kristen was very

familiar with data demonstrating the value of building healthy

community and the impact on population health. She called a

meeting with Nick Petterssen, the co-owner of Green

Mountain CrossFit, who she knew would be supportive.

Together, these three community partners worked with The

Phoenix to plan, train, and prepare for the launch of this first

event on December 8th.

More than 25 athletes and

half a dozen volunteers

showed up to launch The

Phoenix-Vermont. According

to The Phoenix’s national

office, attendance at this

inaugural event was one of

the two largest they have seen

since expanding this programing

nationwide.

Athletes who attended

Saturday’s event were from

many walks of life; some

were experienced with

CrossFit, many were not, but

all showed up ready and willing

to tackle a new challenge.

In the opening circle just as

many people responded to

Kristen’s introductory question of “What are you looking

forward to this week?” with “celebrating 2 months sober” or

“10 years sober” as did those who were looking forward to

family time or holiday shopping. The pride with which they

spoke reinforced one of the main goals of The Phoenix – to

eliminate the stigma of being in recovery. In the Phoenix,

recovery is not something to hidden; by stepping into a

Phoenix Event, athletes are not only joining a new, supportive

community, but they are part of sharing and creating that community

themselves.

Phoenix events will continue to happen every Saturday

from noon – 1:30 pm at Green Mountain CrossFit. Those interested

should go to www.thephoenix.org/participate/ to enroll

prior to attending. Sign in opens at 11:30 am each Saturday.

Those interested in volunteering to support events can go to

Green Mountain United Way’s Volunteer Connection to sign up

for dates and times at www.gmunitedway.org/volunteer.

NATURAL HEALTH CORNER | JOSHUA SINGER

Consider yourself unique if you get a

sufficient amount of restorative sleep.

This amount is different depending

on your age. How many times a

night do you wake up? Do you fall back asleep

within ten minutes? Is your mind overly active

when you awake in the middle of the night?

Is it your bladder that wakes you up multiple

times a night? Are you getting hot flashes or

sweating that wakes you up? Does it take you

over an hour to initially fall asleep? Do you feel

tired during the day because of lack of good quality sleep?

Here are some statistics from the American Sleep Association:

• 50-70 million US adults have a sleep disorder.

• 48.0% report snoring.

• 37.9% reported unintentionally falling asleep during the day at

least once in the preceding month.

• 4.7% reported nodding off or falling asleep while driving at least

once in the preceding month.

• Drowsy driving is responsible for 1,550 fatalities and 40,000 nonfatal

injuries annually in the United States.

• Insomnia is the most common specific sleep disorder, with shortterm

issues reported by about 30% of adults and chronic insomnia by

10%.

• 25 million U.S. adults have obstructive sleep apnea.

• 9-21% of women and 24-31% of men have obstructive sleep

apnea.

• 3–5% of the overall proportion of obesity in adults could be attributable

to short sleep.

• 37% of 20-39 year-olds and 40% of 40-59 year olds report short

sleep duration.

• 35.3% adults (who require 7-9 hours of sleep per night) report


We are the largest

La-Z-Boy dealer

in Northeastern

Vermont

Route 5, Lyndonville, VT

Mon. thru Fri. 9-5, Sat. 9-3, Sun. Closed

1-800-439-5996

296 Meadow St., Littleton, NH

4584 U.S. Rte. 5, Newport, VT

PUZZLES ON PAGE 30-31

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SUDOKU

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Answers to this week’s

UNRAVEL THE TRAVEL

1. Oklahoma

2. True … Pensylvania

3. The British Museum

FEAR KNOT

Barre Area Senior Center

131 S. Main St. #4, Barre • 479-9512

Mondays

Seniors in Motion: 9:30-10:30AM. Cardio & strength exercises;

$30 for 12 sessions/members; nonmembers, $6/session.

Coffee Café: 10:45AM. Join Nancy and the group for coffee,

tea, snacks and engaging conversation.

Pitch: 1PM. Join our Pitch group for fun and friendship.

Yoga w/Katie: 4-5PM. This class is appropriate for all levels

with modifications offered for beginner and advanced yogis,

all under the direction of Katies’ gentle guidance. Mats provided,

or you may bring your own. Please register - $30

members ($5 per class) /$36 for non-members.

Tuesdays

Bone Builders: 8:30-9:30AM. This program from Tufts

University focuses on prevention against bone deterioration

and may help increase bone density and muscle strength;

improve balance, flexibility and energy; and increase social

connections and reduced isolation. Rise and shine and give

your day a boost! Free.

Tuesday Lunch: 12:00 *reservations must be made by 9AM

Monday mornings.

December 18th: Baked Ziti, Side Salad, Garlic Bread .

December 25th – CLOSED – Happy Holidays.

Knitting Group: 1PM. This is a Volunteer Drop In Group,

led by Diane DesBois. We will be working on scarves for the

Christmas Tree. All are welcome, beginners to advanced.

Casual, laid back atmosphere and a time to enjoy a cup of

coffee or tea and knit, crochet and socialize.

Tai Chi Fall Prevention–Levels 2 & 3 – (class is on Holiday

break) **Pre-Register for classes beginning in January -

Tuesdays with Diane DesBois. This class resumes where it

left off by reviewing movements 1-12. You will learn three

new movements then combine them to complete a sun-style

21 movement sequence. We will also expand our understanding

of the Yin and Yang, balance transfer, internal meditation

strength and breathing techniques taking our Tai Chi experience

to a new level of enjoyment. Please register.

Wednesdays

Seniors in Motion: 9:30-10:30AM. Cardio and strength exercises;

$30 for 12 sessions/members; nonmembers, $6/session.

Mah Jongg:10:AM. Join the Mah Jongg group for fun, friendship

and conversation.

Chair Yoga w/Cathy: 11AM. Our focus will be on balance,

breath, posture, flexibility and meditation. No prior experience

needed. Wear comfortable clothing. BASC provides all

yoga equipment needed. FREE (Class will only be held with

a minimum of four participants…so each week you will need

to sign up if planning to attend.)

Square Dancing: 1-3PM. Join in on this fun and exciting

class! No partner needed. Square dancing is not only a good

way to foster new friendships but is also good exercise for

your mind and body. Please register – By Donation

Woodworking: 3-5PM (class ongoing)** Pre-Register for

classes starting in January/February This class is currently

ongoing. The group chose to build a large outdoor work table

and two movable planters. All three pieces are simply amazing!

The participants have all expressed how much fun they

are having so we are hoping to offer another woodworking

class either in January or February so be sure to sign up. Class

size is limited to 6 people.

Line Dancing: 3:30PM (class is on holiday break) ** Pre-

Register for classes starting in January - every Wednesday at

3:30. Come and join us as Cheryl brings back this very fun &

popular class! $5 Please Register.

Thursdays

Bone Builders: 8:30-9:30AM. This program from Tufts

University focuses on prevention against bone deterioration

and may help increase bone density and muscle strength;

improve balance, flexibility and energy; and increase social

connections and reduced isolation. Rise and shine and give

your day a boost! Free.

Holiday Tai Chi Review/Group Practice – ALL LEVELS -

Every Thursday at 3:15 Led by BASC Falls Prevention

Instructors, this is a time for Falls Prevention Tai Chi students

to review and practice what they have been learning while

regular classes are on holiday break. We will warm up together

followed by multi-level break-out sessions for practice,

then cool down together. Please register.

Book Club: 1PM. Come join John Poeton as he leads the

The Barre Area Senior Center

Has Been Getting Crafty!

Members of the Barre Area Senior Center took part in two

Holiday Centerpiece Making Workshops this past week. One

class led by Cathy Hartshorn & Jeannie McCool had participants

working with fresh cut evergreens, cones, and festive

trim to produce live, fresh centerpieces. The other class was

Book Folding to create unique centerpiece candle holders

taught by Cheryl Cloutier. A great turnout for both classes and

a fun time was had by all! Check out all the fun & exciting

programs at www.barreseniors.org.

• • •

discussion! Book Club meets the second Thursday of each

month at 1PM.

Cribbage: 10:30 – Come join in on the fun!

Meditation w/Sherry: 4-5PM (class is on Holiday

break)**Pre-Register for classes beginning in January - Every

Thursday from 4-5pm with Sherry Rhynard. With a meditating

history of over 35 years Sherry brings a wealth of knowledge

and experience. Learn more about Sherry at sherryrhynard.com

Members $30/non-members $36 for 5-week session

– Please Register.

Tai Chi Fall Prevention – Beginner & Intermediate Levels

– (class is on Holiday break)**Pre-Register for classes beginning

in January - Every Thursday from 3:45-4:45. Instructors

Bernadette Rose and Marcia Drake welcome Beginners – new

and reviewing, as well as Intermediate level, to be determined

per student interest. We will focus on weight transference, balance,

strengthening, loosening the joints, and mindfulness.

Students will gain greater confidence in their physical environment

as well as enjoying a social and relaxing atmosphere.

This is a 10-week session that runs from Jan. 3rd through Feb.

28th. Please Register

Fridays

Seniors in Motion: 9:30-10:30AM. Cardio and strength exercises;

$30 for 12 sessions/members; nonmembers, $6/session.

Writers Block: 10-11:30AM. Come join other scriveners to

share your essay, short stories, one-act plays, poems or any

other form worthy of note. Your work, along with others will

be critiqued in a positive mode with a supportive audience.

Please Register

Tai Chi Studio w/David (class is on Holiday break) **Pre-

Register for January classes – every Friday at 11:30 - presented

by David Hartnett. Tai Chi Studio is practice time for

anyone registered for beginners, intermediate, or advanced Tai

Chi. The purpose of the studio is to practice on your own, with

limited guidance, steps that you are beginning to learn. The

reason for the Studio is to allow at least two days of practice:

one with your instructor and one on your own. Please Register.

Movie Night: 4:30PM. Come out every other Friday for dinner

and a movie $5 per person. Call for info on what’s playing!

Events in December

Chinese New Year

Tuesday, January 8th. Attention Tai Chi Enthusiasts & Curious

Life-Long Learners! 11AM: Learn about Qi Gong with Mela

Brady; 12PM: Special Oriental Theme Lunch

Chicken Stir Fry, Crab Rangoon, Egg Rolls & Sesame Ginger

Side Salad; 1PM: Learn about Chinese Calligraphy with Ellie

Hayes; Tai Chi Demonstrations.; 2PM: Let’s Play Tai Chi. All

levels – Observers and curious are welcome. $6 for Lunch –

Reserve by Thursday, January 3, 2019. Event is open to the

public.

SUPER CROSSWORD

page 10 The WORLD December 19, 2018

Christmas

Early Deadlines

PUBLICATION DATE:

Dec. 26, 2018

DISPLAY DEADLINE:

Wed., Dec. 19 5:00 P.M.

CLASSIFIED DEADLINE:

Thurs., Dec. 20 5:00 P.M.

THE OFFICE WILL BE

CLOSED DEC. 24 & 25

403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin

479-2582 • Fax 479-7916

Email: sales@vt-world.com

• • •

Girls on The Run Vermont

Seeks Volunteer Coaches

The 2018 Girls on the Run of Vermont’s spring Coach

Registration is now open. Girls on the Run is a physical

activity-based, positive youth development program that

inspires girls in 3rd through 8th grade to be joyful, healthy and

confident. The ten-week program incorporates running to

teach critical life skills, encourage personal development and

foster team building and community service. Volunteer coaches

utilize a curriculum to engage teamsa of girls in fun, interactive

lessons. Teams meet twice a week for 90 minutes and

the program culminates with all teams participating in a 5k

event.

Girls on the Run Vermont serves girls at 90 sites in Northern

Vermont and is in need of 350 more coaches to ensure that

every girl will have an opportunity to participate in its transformative

program this spring. Schools/sites, in need of

coaches in Washington County: Barre City Elementary and

Middle School, Berlin Elementary, Cabot School, Crosset

Brook Middle School, Doty Memorial School, East Montpelier

Elementary, Fayston Elementary, Moretown School,

Northfield Elementary, Rumney Memorial School, Thatcher

Brook Primary, Warren School.

Coaches do not need to be runners but are required to be a

minimum of eighteen years old to serve as an assistant or

twenty one years old to serve as a head coach. All volunteer

coaches must complete a background check and attend a training

session.

For more information about coaching and Girls on the Run

of Vermont visit www.gotrvt.org/coach.


A place to connect,

inspire, and learn

28 N Main St., Waterbury

(802) 244-7036

Healthy Ladies’ Night Series

The “Healthy Ladies’ Night” returns for a winter series at the

Waterbury Library, for three consecutive Tuesdays from 7-8

pm beginning January 8th. The series addresses a different

topic for each of the Tuesdays, from getting a restful night’s

sleep, movement for stress reduction and cleansing to

strengthen immunity. Led by health coach instructors Kate

Greenleaf and Becky Widschwenter, the series can get your

new year off to a great start. The first class will give tips for

optimizing sleep time, so as to begin the next day with

increased productivity and a better mindset. The second class

will be a demo class, addressing mindful movement both

seated and standing, from the systems of yoga, Pilates, core

strengthening, and breathing techniques. The last class will

address cleansing techniques to better strengthen your immunity

during the cold, dark, winter months. Detoxification is a

normal part of the body’s process and does not have to be

difficult. Learn ways to incorporate detoxing and cleansing

into your body’s natural rhythms. Call the library to register

for the series as space is limited. 244-7036.

Twin Valley Senior Center

4583 US Route 2

E. Montpelier, VT

802-223-3322

twinvalleyseniors@myfairpoint.net

Updated Class Schedule

The following are all free and take place

at Twin Valley Senior Center, 4583 US

Route 2, East Montpelier. Questions?

Call 223-3322 or email: twinvalleyseniors@myfairpoint.net.

Bone Builders Exercise Classes

Mondays and Wednesdays: 7:30AM-8:30AM, 9-10AM,

10:40AM-11:40AM

Fridays: 7:30AM-8:30AM and 10:40AM-11:40AM

Beginners Tai Chi Classes

Tuesdays and Thursdays: 10AM-11AM

Please note: there will be no Beginners Tai Chi on Tuesday or

Thursday for the month of December.

Advance Sun Tai Chi 73

Mondays and Sundays: 1PM-2PM

Ethan Asselin makes the rank of Eagle Scout l at the headquarters

of the Green Mountain Council in Waterbury, VT. With him (L-R):

Porter Walbridge and Joe Aldsworth.

• • • • • •

Aimee Toth Cathie Pelchat Glen C Hutcheson

T.W. Wood Gallery Adds

New Board Members

The T.W. Wood Art Gallery of Montpelier,

Vermont, is excited to announce the appointment

of three new members to its Board of

Trustees. Joining the board are Glen Coburn

Hutcheson, Cathie Pelchat, and Aimee Toth.

Glen Coburn Hutcheson is a Montpelier

city councilor, picture framer and artist.

Hutcheson is also a founding member of The

Front, a co-operative gallery in Montpelier.

He grew up in Weston, MA, and holds

degrees in painting and sculpture from

Haverford College and the New York Studio

School.

Cathie Pelchat is passionate about making

art and education accessible to everyone. Her

work is built on the belief that, together, we

can create a brighter and more equitable

tomorrow. Pelchat comes to the T.W. Wood

Gallery with experience in philanthropy,

facilitation and organizational development.

Aimee Toth started her career in Art

Education after developing a passion for

watercolor and pastels. Graduating with a

degree in Elementary Education she has since

achieved National Board Certification for

Teachers, earned a Masters in Curriculum and

Instruction, is a published author, and has

taught preschool to graduate level. Toth is

• • •

excited to join her two areas of passion in

serving on the TW Wood Gallery Board.

“All of our newest Board members bring

talent, expertise and commitment to community

and the arts. They have a strong desire to

share their passion for the arts and education

“said Ginny Callan, the Gallery’s Executive

Director. The full slate of 2018 Board members

include Theo Kennedy, President; Phillip

Robertson, Vice President; John Landy,

Treasurer; Cindy Griffith, Secretary; Bertil

Agell, Elliott Bent and Linda Paradee.

The T.W. Wood Gallery houses a large

permanent collection of art as well as being

the repository for Vermont’s portion of the

Federal Works Progress Administration artwork.

In addition the Gallery features changing

exhibits of contemporary Vermont artists

work. The Gallery’s mission is to preserve

our artistic heritage and to bring the best of

today’s art to Central Vermont.

The Gallery is located at 46 Barre St.,

Montpelier, in the Center for Art & Learing

and is open Tuesday through Saturday from

12 - 4:00 P.M. For more information go to

www.twwoodgallery.org or send an inquiry to

info @twwoodgallery.org

Renee Badeau Graduates from Snelling Center for

Government’s Vermont School Leadership Project

The Snelling Center

for Government is

pleased to announce

that Renee Badeau of

East Barre has graduated

from the Vermont

School Leadership

Project. The final celebration

for the Class of

2018 was held on

November 10, 2018 at Lake Morey Resort in

Fairlee. Social entrepreneur and educator, Hal

Colston, served as the keynote speaker, inspiring

the group to remember to bring love into

their work with students. Colston’s message

highlighted the importance of their role and

their work in not only the lives of students but

also the needs of society.

Badeau is currently a Co-Principal at

Williamstown Schools in Williamstown. As a

participant in the Vermont School Leadership

Project, Badeau joined 24 other educators

from across the state in a unique program that

offers intensive professional development for

superintendents, principals, curriculum and

special education directors, as well as other

education professionals who have proven

leadership abilities and seriously aspire to

leadership roles. The Class of 2018 embarked

on their leadership journey in July 2017 and

met for seven overnight sessions with a total

of 18 seminar days.

Through theoretical discussions, experiential

activities and personal reflection, associates

considered and applied concepts related

to leadership, education systems, organizational

change and community. The Class of

2018 is the 13th graduating class of the

Vermont Leadership School Project, and

Badeau joins more than 250 other graduates

who are making a difference in Vermont’s

schools.

Recruitment for the Vermont School

Leadership Project Class of 2020 is now

underway. The Class of 2020 will begin its

program in July 2019 and meet through

November 2020. To learn more and submit an

application, please visit www.snellingcenter.

org or call 802-859-3090.

Photo courtesy of Paul Rogers Photography - Stowe, VT.

The Vermont Supreme Court Gallery Begins

New Year with Ann Young’s Fellow Travelers

Artist, Ann Young has been selected as the

first Vermont Supreme Court Gallery artist

for 2019! Her solo exhibition titled: Fellow

Travelers on view from January 3–March 28,

2018, with an Opening Reception on

Thursday, January 3 from 4:00 – 7:00 pm is

not to be missed. This talented multidisciplinary

Northeast Kingdom artist has a strong

background in ceramic sculpture, illustration,

site specific instillation, and painting.

Fellow Travelers showcases powerful

large-scale oil paintings with narratives that

reach deep into the human condition and their

environments. Young is a great observer of

relationships between people, places, and

spaces. The artist, through observation, and

social integration puts forth allegorical imagery

that makes you think and question what

REALLY is going on here?

Mostly self-taught, in 2001 Young began

her journey into oil painting, influenced by

her extraordinary teachers Max Ginsburg and

Dominique Medici and inspired by the works

of Dutch masters and impressionists artists.

Truly, you can see how she discovered her

creative direction.

Young states “We are fellow travelers. We

move about in space. We journey through a

lifetime of emotion, only to find in the end,

that it is not the goal that matters, it is the

striving.”

• • •

About: Ann Young was born in Chicago

and raised in Illinois and Nebraska but has

lived all of her adult life in Vermont’s

Northeast Kingdom. She dabbled in the “back

to the land” movement and raised a family

and has always been interested in representational

art. From her first paying job illustrating

the varmints of the Nebraska plains

through her stint as an illustrator for The

Center For Northern Studies in Wolcott, VT,

to her pseudo abstract closeups of pond vegetation

and of sea life found on beaches, she

has looked to nature for inspiration. She

received a BFA from Rhode Island School of

Design which sidetracked her into ceramics

and sculpture. She spent years in a fruitful

career making miniature porcelain animal and

human figures for the wholesale craft market.

She taught ceramics at Lyndon State college

and in the public schools. An interest in large

wooden sculpture occupied several years culminating

in large scale gallery installations.

In 2001 she began to devote herself to the

exquisite hues and textures which oil painting

on canvas allows. It was with studies of people

in portraiture and in social interaction that

she chose to explore these possibilities and

has since devoted almost all of her efforts to

painting her fellow travelers.

This event is free and open to the public.

New Spiritual Care & Counseling Concentration

in Goddard College Psychology Program

Goddard College is pleased to announce as those between body and mind or tradition

the new Spiritual Care & Counseling and progress can benefit from a spiritual component

to their psychological care.

Concentration within the Psychology &

Counseling Program.

Students pursuing the concentration in

“In this new concentration, we are working Spiritual Care and Counseling will also learn

to encourage and prepare future counselors to ways to assist and support people impelled by

guide individuals, no matter their condition or human longings such as those for meaning,

experience in life. A unique benefit for students

beauty, fulfillment, and transcendence. This

in this concentration is the possibility of program recognizes, as spiritual traditions

pursuing licensing as a counselor, while having

always have, the teaching and healing poten-

the special qualification to be supportive tial of nature, of the varied forms of beauty,

of those on a spiritual path,” said faculty and of all avenues of connection with the

member William Charles Freeman.

larger whole.

Students in this concentration will benefit Institutions such as hospitals, prisons, community

from the broad, core base of standard psychological

mental health centers, and communi-

theories and methods, as well as ty- based organizations have long tapped, and

explore additional resources for providing will continue to make use of, lay-led programs

compassionate support to people undergoing

and a variety of professional practitio-

crisis or change. Individuals grappling with ners to serve them.

difficult experiences such as marginalization Goddard College will begin enrolling students

or loss and grief, those troubled by difficult

for the spring 2019 semester and is now

questions such as free will versus fate, and accepting applications. To learn more, visit

others dealing with existential tensions such goddard.edu/academics.

December 19, 2018 The WORLD page 11


Anita Merle Whitehill Plummer

Anita Merle Whitehill Plummer passed

away 12/04/18 at C.V.H in Berlin, Vt.

She was born 02/09/23 in Morgan Center,

Vt, daughter of Lucian & Grace (Brown)

Whitehill. She attended schools in

Morgan, Derby & Lyndon, where she

graduated from Lyndon State College.

Anita taught at schools in Brookfield and

Williamstown, Vt for several years, she

also worked for a time at the Sprague

Electric plant in Barre, Vt. Anita married Reginald Plummer

on 06/15/47,and lived most of her life in Williamstown, Vt.

Anita and Reginald had two sons, Michael 01/11/50 ( D

10/05/12)and Daniel 01/22/55. Anita loved the outdoors, and

was an avid gardener and bird watcher. She also loved going

fishing, attending flea markets and antiquing. Anita is survived

by her son Daniel and his wife Elizabeth of Chelsea, Vt,

sisters Norma Lemieux, Barbara Whitehill, brothers, Kennth

Whitehill & David Whitehill. She was predeceased by another

sister Phyllis Whitehill Burroughs. She was also predeceased

by her husband Reginald on 04/20/87. Anita leaves many

nieces and nephews, as well as cousins. Due to her wishes,

there will be no calling hours or service. In lieu of flowers,

donations can be made to the American Heart Association.

Donald M. Wallace

June 24, 1934- November 18, 2018

Donald MacPherson Wallace Jr. of

Northfield, Vermont passed away on

Sunday, November 18, after a short illness.

His daughters Beth and Meg and his

long-time companion Mary Bellinzier

were with him until the end. He was an

extraordinarily dedicated professor, a

committed mountaineer, a staunch environmentalist

and an avid gardener; he had

a strong belief in giving back to his community,

and firm opinions on most subjects.

Don Wallace was born on June 24, 1934, in Glen Ridge, NJ

to Donald MacPherson Wallace I and Edwina (Pomeroy)

Wallace. He was the elder of two brothers and was predeceased

by his brother Edwin (1936- 2009).

Don enlisted as a medic in the army in 1954 during the

Korean conflict. Discharged in 1956, he enrolled in the

University of Vermont and graduated with a B.S.M.E. in 1960.

Don completed his M.S. at the University of Illinois Urbana-

Champaign (1962). From 1962, he taught at Norwich

University in Northfield Vermont, beginning a 55-year career

interrupted only by his doctoral studies (EngScD, Columbia

University, 1968). With his signature pipe, moustache, and

glasses, he was a familiar and formidable figure to generations

of students until his retirement in 2017 at age 83.

Don’s lifelong passion for mountaineering began on hiking

trips with his aunt and uncle Lillian and Russell Lodge, members

of the NJ section of the Green Mountain Club. With his

aunt Gladys Anderson, he climbed his first of the Northeast

111, Big Slide Mountain in the Catskills in 1946. Always a

completist, he was the 4th person to hike all 115 mountains on

the list (including 67 New England peaks over 4000 feet, the

46 Adirondack High Peaks, and 2 other NY mountains), finishing

in 1964. Don also climbed all the Colorado 14ers from

1972 to 1988 and hiked Vermont’s Long Trail end-to-end. In

1980, he became the 4th person to climb the high points of all

50 U.S. states, including Denali.

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page 12 The WORLD December 19, 2018

Don supported the Northfield community in many ways

over his 55+ years in town. He was an EMT on the Northfield

Ambulance Squad from 1975-2001, and represented

Northfield to the Central Vermont Solid Waste Management

District from 1986-2001, during which time he helped to start

Northfield’s waste reduction effort, got Northfield’s Transfer

Station built, and headed up Northfield’s Green-Up Day

efforts. He was on the selectboard from 1999 to 2008.

In the UVM Outing Club, Don met Marlene Bryant and

was married in June 1960. They had two daughters, Elizabeth

(1961) and Margaret (1963). The young family spent most

weekends camping in their VW bus in order to hike and

climb, often at the Shawangunks in NY’s Mohonk Trust. The

couple divorced in 1973. In 1987, he met Mary Bellinzier at a

Norwich dinner-dance. They shared a life and a home for 31

years, hiking and climbing in New England and around the

country and listening to many Bluegrass Gospel Project concerts.

Don and Mary skiied Vermont’s Catamount Trail

together, finishing in 1995. Don was a beloved father and a

cherished partner. He is sorely missed.

Don is survived by his daughters Beth Wallace (Colleen

Boyce) and Meg Wallace; his nieces Eileen Wallace Bradley

(Bruce) and Karen Wallace-Pisano; his long-time companion

Mary Bellinzier; and countless students, colleagues, friends,

and neighbors.

A memorial service will be held at Norwich University’s

White Chapel on Saturday, February 2nd, 2019 at 11:00 am,

with reception to follow in the Milano Ballroom. In lieu of

flowers, contributions may be made to the Catamount Trail

Association, the Green Mountain Club, the Mohonk Trust, or

the Northfield Ambulance Volunteers Inc.

JOYCE FULLER BEAN, 92, passed away on

Dec. 6, 2018. She was born on May 7, 1926, the

daughter of Floyd and Gertrude (Neal) Fuller.

She attended the Chandler Secretarial School in

Boston. On Sept. 27, 1947, Joyce married

Harold Bean in Randolph Center. Mr. Bean predeceased

her in 2001. Joyce was a secretary for

a few years, choosing to stay home once her children were

born. For 38 years, Joyce used her craftsmanship to create

custom slipcovers and draperies. She was very civic-minded,

serving on the East Montpelier School Board. Later, she

served on the Planning Commission, which she chaired. Joyce

enjoyed sewing and was an avid Scrabble player. She also

enjoyed reading and attending the local theater shows. She

loved meeting people and getting to know them. Survivors

include her children Jeff Bean and wife Cheryl, of Middlesex,

and Lesley Bean, of Calais; and many granddaughters and

nieces.

AMANDA F. BRADLEY (FELIX ARDEN), 27, died unexpectedly

on Dec. 3, 2018. She was born Feb. 6, 1991, in

Burlington, the daughter of John E. Kish Jr. and Deborah M.

Bradley. She attended Burlington and Spaulding high schools

and later, studied computer science at CCV. Ms. Bradley was

employed as a security inscription specialist and enjoyed traveling.

Survivors include her father. Services will be at a later

date.

LYNNE GLADYS (PATRICK) REID

CARPENTER, 76, passed away on Dec. 10,

2018. Lynne was born on June 29, 1942, to

Doris (Williams) Patrick and Kenneth L. Patrick,

of Lisbon Falls, ME. Lynne graduated valedictorian

of Lisbon High School in 1960, where she

was a cheerleader and class president. After high

school, she worked for Prudential Life Insurance until she

married John C. Reid in 1962 and moved to Barre. Together,

they raised three children and although they later divorced,

they remained lifelong friends. Lynne was incredibly active in

the Barre community; she coached cheerleading at Barre

Town Elementary School, was a Girl Scout Troop leader and

led the Youth Group at the Barre Congregational Church.

Lynne fulfilled her lifelong goal of becoming a Registered

Nurse in 1993 and became a Nurse Educator. She worked for

the Central Vermont Medical Center for 30 years. On July 17,

1998, Lynne married Don Carpenter at the Barre

Congregational Church and combined her three children and

Don’s three children, forming a “Brady Bunch” of their own.

They made their home in Barre and Joe’s Pond and North Fort

Myers, FL. Lynne enjoyed cooking, entertaining, decorating,

reading, golfing and painting with her great friend, Kate

Duffy. She especially relished spending time with her family

and friends. Lynne is survived by her husband, Don Carpenter,

of West Danville; her children Jonica Reid and Amy Jenkins

(Tommy), both of Maui, HI, and Patrick Reid (Aya), of Tokyo,

Japan; along with her siblings from ME, Joan Patrick, of

Lisbon, Justin Patrick, of Lisbon Falls, Justine Patrick, of

Lisbon, Loretta Patrick, of Brunswick, and Susan Patrick, of

Durham. She also leaves behind her beloved grandchildren;

her stepchildren Jeff Carpenter (Melanie), of Hyde Park,

Jeremy Carpenter, of Montpelier, and Janna Clar, of

Montpelier; and step-grandchildren; as well as nieces and

nephews and in-laws.

MERTIE A. CLARK, 90, died Dec. 10, 2018, at Evergreen

Housecare Center in Stafford, CT. Arrangements are pending

at Boardway and Cilley Funeral Home, Chelsea.

CAPTAIN DOUGLAS JAMES

FINLAY (U.S. Navy, Retired), 96,

passed away on Dec. 7, 2018. Born in Pawtucket,

RI, on Sept. 30, 1922, he was the son of the late

James R. and Sarah “Sadie” (Murray) Finlay.

Over the years, he had been an electrician, Navy

Captain and Aviator, town manager, town selectman,

ambulance driver, church volunteer, and served in many

leadership positions in various organizations. He was perhaps

most proud of his years of service to his country. He married

his longtime sweetheart, the former Elizabeth “Betty” Alburn,

on Oct. 11, 1944, in Pawtucket. Doug is survived by his wife

of 74 years, Betty Finlay, of Moretown; his son, Douglas

Albert Finlay and wife Patty, of Aptos, CA; his daughter,

Bonnie Rae Bossier, of Moretown; and several granddaughters,

grandsons, and great-granddaughters.

HELEN CHRISTINE RIEGELS MACKEY died on Dec.

5, 2018. Helen was born in Sacramento, CA, on Nov. 6, 1936.

After graduating from UVM, Helen moved to Philadelphia to

work as a sales representative for the Corning Glassworks Co.

She fell in love with a customer service manager at the John

Wanamaker center city store. Helen and Allan Mackey married

in 1962 and had two sons. In 1972, the family moved to

East Calais village. She would go on to live in her beloved VT

for the rest of her life. She hosted elaborate dinners and parties

for family and friends but, above all, she loved Christmas.

Helen spent countless hours cooking, making gifts and decorations

(even wrapping paper) all to ensure that the holidays

were special for her family and friends. Helen is survived by

her husband, Allan, of Montpelier; son Scott and wife Kathy,

of Waterbury; son Blake and wife Iratxe, of CO; a niece; six

grandchildren and one grandniece; and two brothers Dave and

Dick.

LEIGH E. TABOR JR., 74, passed

away on Dec. 4, 2018. He was born

Dec. 5, 1943, in Stowe, the son of Leigh E.

Tabor Sr. and Madeline Mandigo Tabor. Leigh

grew up in Stowe. He served stateside in the

U.S. Army during the Vietnam War era. Leigh

was employed as a truck driver for many years.

He was a volunteer firefighter, a drummer in a band for many

years and enjoyed canoeing and camping. Leigh was a longtime

member of American Legion Post #10 in Barre. Leigh is

survived by his children Darron Tabor and wife Lisa, of

Elmore, Michele Facini, of Indio, CA, and Kelly Hammond

and husband Kevin, of Keene, NH; several grandchildren and

great-grandchildren; and a step-granddaughter.

HWF_World2colx5.indd 7

11/20/10 10:03:13 AM


WORLD SPORTS & OUTDOORS

Wildlife in Winter: How Vermont’s Wild Animals Survive Our Harsh Winter Weather

By Tom Rogers

Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department

The calendar may say December, but with the cold winds

blowing and the snowdrifts piling up, it feels like we’re much

later into winter. Vermonters typically take one of three different

approaches to winter. Some (usually retired) Vermonters

go the ‘snowbird’ approach, spending the winter in a warmer

southern climate. Others ‘hibernate,’ staking out a warm spot

next to the woodstove with a cup of cocoa, going outside only

when absolutely necessary. But hardier Vermonters embrace

winter, breaking out the skis or snowshoes, dusting off the

sled, and generally reveling in the snow.

Wildlife follow the same three basic strategies to make it

through the tough winter months. From birds that migrate

south, to bears that cozy up and snooze the winter away, to

moose that stick it out in the cold, wildlife approach winter

using familiar tactics.

Birds, like people, don’t employ just a single strategy to get

through winter. Many species migrate, but in different directions

and at different times. The warblers generally start heading

south to the Gulf Coast by August, whereas some ducks

and geese may not head south until December, particularly in

years where ponds and lakes remain open late. Loons head

east--not south--to spend the winter in the ocean along coastal

New England.

Other birds, from up north such as snowy owls, redpolls,

rough-legged hawks, or snow buntings, migrate into Vermont.

Additionally, not every member of a bird species will arrive at

a single strategy - some individual bald eagles or blue jays

stay in Vermont for the winter while others head out of town.

And many of our resident bird species stay close to home,

including chickadees, waxwings, nuthatches, juncos, ravens,

and woodpeckers. With more elbow room at the feeder or fruit

tree, these year-round residents face less competition for food.

One winged migrator stands out from the rest of the pack:

the monarch butterfly. Monarchs are one of only a small group

of butterflies known to engage in, as birds do, a north-south

migration, with most eastern monarchs overwintering at a

single site in the mountains of central Mexico. But on their

return, a monarch that leaves its wintering grounds in Mexico

will never make it to Vermont.

According to Mark Ferguson, zoologist for Vermont Fish &

Wildlife, “Instead, several generations are born and die along

the way, meaning that the grandchildren or great-grandchildren

of the monarch leaving Mexico at the end of winter

eventually arrives in Vermont each summer.”

Reptiles and amphibians simply lay low (aka, go dormant)

through Vermont’s winter months. Most frogs and salamanders

hibernate under rotting leaves and logs on the forest floor.

Turtles while away the winter on the bottoms of ponds and

rivers. And snakes generally spend the winter in mammal burrows

or rock crevices below the frost line, sometimes with

multiple species of snake curled up together in the same den.

Conversely, bears don’t “hibernate” in the traditional sense.

Unlike other hibernating mammals such as woodchucks or

bats, bears’ body temperature and heart rate stay close to nor-

Public Hearings on Fishing Regulation Changes

The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Board will

hold five public hearings in January on proposed

changes to fishing regulations.

Proposed changes in the baitfish regulation

would simplify some parts of it and establish

it as separate from the general regulation on

fishing.

Jobs Pond in Westmore and Martins Pond

in Peacham would be added to the list of

waters with a two-trout daily limit. A section

of the Lamoille River downstream of Johnson

with a two-trout daily limit and 16-inch minimum

length would be returned to the general

fishing regulations.Public hearings begin at

U.S. Forest Service Encourages Snowmobile

Travelers to Exercise Caution

With additional snow expected in the coming

weeks, the U.S. Forest Service is looking

forward to a successful snowmobile season

and wants to encourage all riders to put safety

first. Green Mountain National Forest (GMNF)

officials are recommending that snowmobilers

exercise caution when operating on the

National Forest, and all lands, in Vermont this

winter. GMNF officials remind snowmobile

enthusiasts to heed to all gates and signs and to

stay off roads and trails that are closed. Due to

heavy snow in November, Forest Service

employees and several snowmobile clubs

throughout Vermont have been working to

clear trees and other debris from trails.

Officials want to remind trail users to use extra

caution early in the season as some trees may

be weak due to snow accumulation and

downed tree hazards are likely.

Weather permitting, snowmobile use is

allowed on designated trails within the GMNF

for four months beginning on Sunday,

December 16, 2018 and ending on Monday,

April 15, 2019. “We are concerned about user

safety. Patrols which are aimed at enforcing

rules and regulations, monitoring trail conditions

and providing visitor information will

occur throughout the Forest,” said John

Sinclair, Forest Supervisor for the Green

Mountain and Finger Lakes National Forests.

The GMNF will continue to work closely with

state and local law enforcement agencies, as

well as the Vermont Association of Snow

• • •

Photo By Tom Rogers

mal during the winter, which they spend in more of a deep

sleep than a true state of hibernation. They do this not to avoid

the snow and cold (bears have thick fur and are well-adapted

to cold temperatures) but to conserve energy while they wait

out the winter months until food again becomes available.

“Bears are triggered to enter their den when food becomes

scarce in fall or early winter, usually following a heavy snowfall,”

said Forrest Hammond, Vermont Fish & Wildlife’s lead

bear biologist. “In spring, the rains and warm temperatures

cause bears to leave their dens in search of uncovered nuts and

green shoots that start to emerge from the melting snowpack.”

Hammond says that winter rains can make bears uncomfortable

and restless and may force many bears from their dens

to seek drier accommodations. “Bears sleep soundly in winters

when deep snow covers the entrances to their dens but during

years with little snow, bears are exposed and awaken easily.”

Deer, moose, beavers, otters, and many other mammals are

active throughout the winter. White-tailed deer are at the

northern edge of their range in Vermont and winter is the

limiting factor that defines how many deer can survive here.

When snows get deep and temperatures plummet, deer seek

out patches of forest with thick evergreen trees that protect

them from biting winds and deep snow, making the conservation

of these deer wintering areas vitally important.

Deer don’t eat much throughout the winter and deplete their

fats stores as the winter months drag on. Late March through

April is a critical time of year; if winter lingers too long and

they don’t have opportunities to feed on emerging plants, the

Travelers (VAST) to make sure that users of

the trail system are respectful, responsible, law

abiding, and safe.

The GMNF and VAST cooperate to maintain

more than 470 miles of National Forest

System trails that are part of the larger statewide

snowmobile network. VAST is one of a

few snowmobile associations in the United

States that has a cooperative partnership agreement

with the U.S. Forest Service. “All of

these trails allow mixed uses, so people are

snowshoeing, hiking, and cross-country skiing,

as well as using snowmobiles.

Snowmobilers should travel responsibly and

yield to other users,” said Sinclair. The maximum

speed is 35 miles per hour on state and

federal land and Vermont has a tough

Snowmobiling While Intoxicated Law that

covers alcohol, as well as drugs.

The U.S. Forest Service is also warning the

public of the dangers associated with riding,

hiking and skiing on frozen water bodies. Trail

users are encouraged to be mindful of fallen

trees and other hazards they may encounter.

Operators must maintain control of their snowmobile

while riding; keep to the right at all

times, wear helmets, and stay on designated

trails only. All snowmobiles must be legally

registered, have liability insurance, and operators

must purchase a VAST Trails Maintenance

Assessment decal. Trail users should pack a

flashlight, cell phone, food, and extra warm

clothing in case of an emergency.

• • •

6:00 p.m. as follows:

January 7: St. Albans Education Center

January 9: Brattleboro Union High School

January 14: Rutland High School

January 15: Lake Region Union High

School

January 16: Montpelier High School

The proposed changes may be seen on the

Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department website

with this link: https://vtfishandwildlife.com/

about-us/fish-and-wildlife-board/board-rules,

and comments may be emailed by January 24,

to ANR.FWPublicComment@vermont.gov.

Public Hearing on Proposed Furbearer

Regulation Changes

The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Board will

hold a public hearing about proposed changes

mandated by legislature to the existing regulation

on hunting and trapping of furbearers

on Tuesday, January 8, 2019 at 6:30 p.m. in

Whitcomb JR-SR High School, 273 Pleasant

Street, Bethel, VT.

The proposed changes would apply to persons

who trap nuisance furbearers or rabbits

for compensation. The changes would require

these people to visit traps within a timely

manner, label their traps, use approved traps,

and submit the carcasses of certain species, as

well as a biological trapping survey report to

the Fish & Wildlife Department. These trappers

are prohibited from using poison to take

statewide deer herd usually declines.

Conversely, moose are well adapted to winter and--when

healthy--are unfazed by the cold. They can traverse deep

snows atop their long, spindly legs. In fact, a harsh winter by

human standards benefits moose, as late season snows can

take a welcome toll on the moose’s main parasite, the winter

tick. Moose are so well adapted to cold temperatures that they

often find summer more of a challenge, developing heat stress

at 57 degrees or more. When temperatures get hot, moose may

stop feeding to seek out cool waters to wade in. As climate

change continues to drive up summer temperatures, this heat

sensitivity worries some biologists who are pessimistic about

the moose’s future Vermont.

Surviving winter can difficult in Vermont. Wildlife need to

have thick cover for shelter, an appropriate den site, open

water to drink, wild food to eat, and the ability to move from

place to place easily. These resources are all found in healthy

and connected habitats.

To ensure wildlife thrive all year round, Vermonters can

make a difference and protect connected habitats throughout

the state. Landowners can work with a wildlife biologist or

forester to improve habitat on their property to give wildlife a

helping hand. Other Vermonters can help wildlife by purchasing

a Vermont Habitat Stamp at www.vtfishandwildlife.com.

The stamp costs $15 with donations going to the conservation

of important fish and wildlife statewide habitat--everything

from streambanks and vernal pools to denning and wintering

areas for all the species in Vermont.

• • •

furbearers.

The proposed rule changes would increase

accountability for those individuals or commercial

entities trapping furbearers or rabbits

in defense of property for compensation. The

proposed rule changes maintain enough flexibility

for individuals, landowners and municipalities

to successfully address nuisance

problems, while prohibiting unsuitable or

inappropriate actions.

The proposed regulation changes can be

viewed on the Vermont Fish & Wildlife

Department website (www.vtfishandwildlife.

com). Comments may be emailed to ANR.

FWPublicComment@vermont.gov The public

comment period ends January 15, 2019.

2019 Watershed Grant Application

Deadline, Feb. 15

The Vermont Watershed Grants Program is Department and the Department of

now accepting applications for projects that Environmental Conservation. It was established

protect, restore and enhance the state’s lakes,

by legislature and funded by sales of

streams, rivers and ponds, including the Vermont Conservation License Plate.

Vermonters’ ability to understand and enjoy “When Vermonters purchase a Conservation

these treasures. Applications are due no later License Plate they’re helping protect healthy

than Friday February 15, 2019.

streams and lakes as well as conserving wildlife

Program grants are available to municipalities,

and important habitats for future genera-

local and regional government agencies, tions,” said Fish & Wildlife Commissioner

sporting clubs, non-profit organizations, and Louis Porter. “Proceeds from the sale of

water-related citizen groups. The range of Conservation License Plates fund the

past projects is just as diverse and has included

Watershed Grants program and help support

invasive species education, shoreline veg-

the Fish & Wildlife Department’s Nongame

etation restoration and the removal of old Wildlife Fund.”

dams and replacement of culverts to improve The Watershed Grants application guide

fish movement.

and application forms are available on the

For 2019, $85,000 is available to fund web at: http://dec.vermont.gov/watershed/

three categories of projects. The three categories

cwi/grants/watershed-grants. Please note that

and the maximum amount for each proj-

the application process has changed from past

ect type are: education and outreach ($5,000), years.

planning, assessment, inventory, monitoring Applications for the Vermont Conservation

($3,500) and on-the-ground implementation License Plate are available on the Department

($10,000).

of Motor Vehicles website: http://dmv.vermont.gov/sites/dmv/files/documents/

The Vermont Watershed Grants Program is

a joint project of the Fish & Wildlife VD-154-Conservation_Plate_App_0.pdf

December 19, 2018 The WORLD page 13


PUBLIC NOTICE

BULLETIN BOARD

St. John Catholic Church in

Northfield is soliciting bids

for the mowing and trimming

of its two cemeteries for

2019. Please contact

Kathy Ducharme at the

rectory office at 485-8313

by January 11, 2019

for further details.

Christmas

Early Deadlines

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Thank You!

To The Editor,

The Vermont Association of Insurance Professionals would

like to thank Noyle W Johnson Group for sponsoring the

VTAIP Holiday Dinner meeting to benefit both CVHHH and

Circle.

The December dinner meeting has been a long-standing

tradition of supporting the community. Each year VTAIP

• • •

members receive wish lists from both CVHHH and Circle and

come together to fulfill the needs of those requiring their services

during the holiday season.

VTAIP meets monthly and encourages outside community

members to join us at our dinner meetings to connect and

network with insurance related professionals.

For information about the VTAIP please contact President

Tammy Lawrey at 802-229-5660 ext 110.

Editorial by the Valley News, West Lebanon, NH

Young Journalists — Again — School the Adults

It is profoundly discouraging to witness adults failing in

their obligations to the young people in their charge. Examples

abound, from the thoughtless to the tawdry to the traumatic,

and in each case they represent a betrayal. But what a glorious

thing it is when young people, with right on their side, stand

their ground and teach the adults a thing or two.

A few months ago, we learned of four student journalists at

Burlington High School who broke the news about a school

employee who was facing a state investigation on charges of

unprofessional conduct. As VtDigger reported in September,

the school’s principal ordered the story removed from the

website of the BHS Register, the student newspaper, which

was an apparent violation of Vermont’s “New Voices” law.

That law, signed by Gov. Phil Scott in 2017, was designed

specifically to protect student journalists. Burlington School

District officials began backtracking almost immediately. The

students’ journalism was sound, the adults’ interpretation of

the law was flawed, and the end result was the scrapping of

“all previously practiced or adopted guidelines” regarding

student publications and a revamping of the school’s media

policy — in a process that this time included students.

“I think ... we’ve just learned how important and how vital

the First Amendment is to just our country, and our society

and our government,” senior Nataleigh Noble, 17, one of the

student journalists who wrote the story, told The Associated

Press.

In October, a similar situation unfolded about 1,500 miles

to the south and west, in Springdale, Ark., where student journalists

at Har-Ber High School, after a nearly yearlong investigation,

uncovered a scandal that involved one of the South’s

sacred cows — the varsity football team.

Six players, the Har-Ber Herald reported, were allowed to

transfer to Springdale High School, which is in the same

school district as Har-Ber High. Such transfers are permitted

for academic reasons only, and that is what the parents of the

players said in their letters requesting the transfers. The student

journalists obtained those letters through a freedom-of-

• • •

In this Sept. 20, 2018 photo, BHS Register editors, from left, Julia

Shannon-Grillo, Halle Newman, Nataleigh Noble and Jenna

Peterson stand outside the Burlington High School in Burlington,

VT. The students stood up to censorship in their student newspaper

and won. AP Photo/Lisa Rathke.

information request — and they also interviewed several of

the players, who told them that the real reason they wanted to

transfer to Springdale was to increase their chances of being

offered a major college football scholarship. Transfers for that

reason are not allowed under the school district’s policy, and

that was the focus of the Har-Ber Herald report.

We would like to be able to say that Springdale School

District officials applauded the students’ diligence and enterprise

and immediately began a review of the district’s policies

on transfers. We cannot. Instead, they suspended publication

of the newspaper, ordered the story and accompanying editorial

removed from its website, demanded that all future stories

be reviewed in advance by administrators and threatened to

fire the teacher who advises the student journalists.

It’s almost like they had something to hide — something,

that is, beyond their ignorance of the 1995 Arkansas Student

Publication Act, which, like Vermont’s “New Voices” law, is

intended to protect the First Amendment rights of student

journalists.

“If something is in the wrong, then I think people need to

continued on next page


It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia,

Make America Apolitical Again

The saddest thing about our era isn’t the contentious state

of politics. It’s the upsetting fact that politics has bled over

into every other aspect of American life.

The NFL, late night comedy, natural disasters, Kanye West:

everything is politicized. Everything is polarized. As a society,

we desperately need something that doesn’t make us

choose sides; something that brings us all together. That

something is “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia.”

If the comedians who make “It’s Always Sunny” are passionately

pro or anti-Trump, they hide it incredibly well. The

characters talk frankly about politics, social issues, and race in

every episode, but the show never takes sides. It’s an incredible

achievement in inclusiveness and restraint.

They have been making fun of overly political ignoramuses

for years. Back in season 9 - in the episode “Gun Control Too:

Still Hot” - the gang tackled the extremely polarizing gun

control issue without taking sides.

The episode begins with amoral businessman Frank

Reynolds (Danny DeVito) going on local news to tell the story

of how his two guns purchased at Gunther’s Gun Shop saved

him from a violent robbery. Mac and Charlie are convinced.

Dennis and Dee are disgusted.

Mac and Charlie arm themselves and go to an elementary

school to try to protect the children. Meanwhile, Dennis and

Dee try to prove their point by showing how easy it is to get

an assault rifle. Slowly, each pair realizes the flaw in their

argument and switch sides in the gun debate.

In the end, Frank admits that he doesn’t care about the issue

at all; he just bought a stake in Gunther’s Gun Shop and

stoked the city’s fear to make more money. Frank compares

himself to Al Gore, who spread panic about Global Warming

and got rich in the process. “In America,” Frank concludes,

“you are either the duper or the dupee.”

This cynical view of politics is more relevant than ever. If

you are fired up about something political, consider who profits

from your rage. And, above all, consider laughing at yourself

for being duped into caring so much.

In season 13’s amazing premier episode, “Make Paddy’s

Great Again,” new cast-member Mindy Kaling gives a heartwarming

speech about how the formerly crass and bigoted

crew at Paddy’s Pub have become woke. Behind closed doors,

the gang laughs at the left-wing customers and counts the

money they made selling cheap Cabernet labeled as

“Conservative Whine.”

Then, Kaling reveals her grand scheme, which is to switch

sides, pretend to be conservative, and steal customers from the

Right-Wing bar around the corner. Mac and Charlie begin

relabeling the cheap wine as “Liberal Tears.”

The characters on “It’s Always Sunny” are terrible people.

But the people who make the show are not. In another episode

last season – “The Gang Solves the Bathroom Problem” – the

show successfully depoliticized another issue that was dividing

our country.

I can’t imagine anything less important than the toilet that

transgender people use. But every conservative father in

America has had an impassioned argument with his liberal

daughter about that very issue.

With zero partisanship and zero cultural sensitivity, the “It’s

Always Sunny” gang broke down the debate for a half hour.

Ultimately, they concluded that the most sane option was for

us to toss the Men and Women signs in the trash and label

every bathroom in America with a sign that reads “Animal

Poop.” Problem solved – and everybody was offended equally.

“It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” used to be the best

comedy on television. Now it is something even more valuable:

it’s the last inclusive political show left in our fractured

culture.

A populist guy and a raging feminist gal can sit on the

couch – hand in hand – and enjoy this show as loving equals.

“It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” makes us laugh at the

nitwits on the screen, and at ourselves.

Op-Ed by the Department of Vermont Health Accesss

An Open Letter to Everyone Who Has Helped

Vermonters Get into the Right Health Coverage

As we entered the final week of Open Enrollment, the

Department of Vermont Health Access wants to thank you for

all you’ve done to help spread the word about this year’s

changes. We also want to ask your help with a final push to

get Vermonters into the ‘right plans.’

Due to a complex set of policy changes, the federal government

is providing a lot more financial help in 2019. This

means:

A family of four earning $100,000 will receive over $3,000

more in financial help than they received in 2018;

Most uninsured Vermonters have a household income that

would now qualify for a zero-premium plan, meaning their

financial help would cover their whole monthly premium;

Many Vermont Health Connect members can save more

than a thousand dollars by changing to a different ‘metal

level’ insurance plan, per the 2019 Plan Comparison Tool.

With your help over the last few years, Vermont has

achieved one of the lowest uninsured rates in the nation. With

your help this past week, we drove it even lower.

Many of our members have referenced communication

from their state legislators, employers, doctors, community

media outlets, neighbors and family members when they

apply for coverage or ask to change plans. Many others have

worked with one of 300 trained In-person Assisters who live

and work in communities across the state. In an age where

folks are buried in information and properly wary that an

unsolicited call could be a scam, words of encouragement

• • •

from a trusted source can really cut through the clutter.

Those personal words -- as much as any invoice insert, letter,

email, or phone call from Vermont Health Connect, Blue

Cross Blue Shield of Vermont, or MVP Health Care – can

help Vermonters take the necessary steps to enroll in the right

health insurance plan for 2019.

What is the right plan? In theory, it’s the plan that will have

the lowest total costs over the course of the year. In other

words, the net premium (what the member pays after receiving

financial help) plus out-of-pocket costs (what they pay

when they receive services) is lower than any other plan. In

practice, it’s easier to define the wrong plan.

It can be confusing, but help was available.

VermontHealthConnect.gov’s 2019 Plan Comparison Tool

has been used nearly 30,000 times this season, up more than

50 percent over last year. Vermonters logged on and chose

their 2019 plan online. For those who prefered phones, the

Customer Support Center was open extended hours this past

week and on the last day of Open Enrollment. Yes, call volumes

were always high near the deadline but people stayed on

the line and someone helped. If the wait times were long, the

team offered a call back. And rest assured, the health insurance

marketplace continued to work until each member and

applicant is in the plan of their choice.

In this time of giving, please give others motivation and

information. Thank you.

PUBLIC NOTICE

BULLETIN BOARD

Lung Cancer?

Asbestos exposure in industrial,

construction, manufacturing jobs, or the

military may be the cause. Family in

the home were also exposed.

Call 1-866-795-3684 or email

cancer@breakinginjurynews.com.

$30 billion is set aside for asbestos

victims with cancer. Valuable settlement

monies may not require filing a lawsuit.

HAVE YOU LEFT YOUR JOB? RETIRED? RETIRING?

If so, you may have a variety of options available

to you. We can educate you on your options

so you can make an informed decision.

We have the experience to help you make

the most of your retirement assets.

Give us a call today.

PLAN • INVEST • PROTECT

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CARPET REMNANTS

FROM $ 49

Young Journalists continued from previous page

know about it,” Halle Roberts, 17, the Herald’s editor-inchief,

told a local TV station. “And as journalists, I feel that it

is our duty to do that. And I don’t think we were in the wrong

for that,” she said.

On Tuesday, after the Student Press Law Center had published

the censored story on its website and the faculty of the

University of Arkansas School of Journalism and Strategic

Media and members of the Northwest Arkansas chapter of the

Society of Professional Journalists weighed in with harsh

critiques of the administration’s actions, Springdale School

District officials relented and allowed the articles to be

reposted. In a statement, they called the matter “complex” and

“challenging” and said it merited a “thorough” review. “The

social and emotional well-being of all students has been and

• • •

continues to be a priority of the district,” they said.

“This statement may or may not answer all of your questions

but this is all we have to say,” they concluded. “The

district will not make anyone available for interviews.”

Not exactly a profile in courage. Further, such petulant

stonewalling sets a terrible example for the unfortunate students

whose schools these officials purport to lead.

We applaud the courageous student journalists at the Har-

Ber Herald, the BHS Register and elsewhere and urge them to

continue to investigate their school districts’ policies and how

they are being implemented. Perhaps their efforts will help

teach district officials a little something about the importance

of the First Amendment, the evils of censorship and the folly

of trying to bury the truth.

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• • •

December 19, 2018 The WORLD page 15


GARY E. PLANTE

10/19/49 - 12/24/15

I Know This Much Is True

I loved you from the very start.

I know this much is true. But

God took you home with Him.

It was sudden, out of the blue.

I will be with you again when

my time has come to be.

Together with you once more.

I will again be with the man I

love and truly adore.

I know this much is true.

I love you, Gary.

The Benefit Shop

15 Cottage St., Barre 479-4309

Love,

Linda

Closed for Renovations

The CVMC Auxiliary Bene-Fit Shop will be closed

October 29th through November 6th.

Jodi's

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We will reopen Wednesday,

(802)793-7417

November

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Wednesday through Friday 10am-4pm

Saturday 9am-2pm.

Come check out our new look and shop for the holidays!

We look forward to seeing you soon, and thank you for

your patronage.

NEW ITEMS

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Thank You To All Our Volunteers & Customers!

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Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts and The WORLD would like to help you wish

a special couple a Happy Anniversary. Just send their name, address & wedding

anniversary date. Each week we publish the names, plus we’ll have a

monthly winner for a 1/2 dozen wrapped red roses at Forget Me Not Flowers

& Gifts, 171 N. Main Street, Barre. No obligation, nothing to buy. Just send

anniversary names two (2) weeks prior to anniversary date, to: The WORLD,

c/o HAPPY ANNIVERSARY, 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please

provide name, address & phone number for prize notification.

Forget Me Not

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171 N. Main St., Barre • 476-6700

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Please Send Us Your December Anniversaries

And Be Automatically Registered To Win A 1/2 Dozen Wrapped,

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DECEMBER 19

KEVN & LEAH SARE, CABOT, 4 YEARS

DECEMBER 20

NORMAN & LOUISE CORLISS, BRAINTREE, 57 YEARS

ERNEST & BEULAH LANPHER, BARRE, 50 YEARS

DECEMBER 25

SKIP & CARMEN THYGENSEN, BROOKFIELD, 60 YEARS

FORGET ME NOT FLOWERS & GIFTS

“HAPPY ANNIVERSARY”

Mail this coupon to: The WORLD

c/o Happy Anniversary

403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641

Just send in the entry blank below, and we will publish it in this space each week.

Plus, we will draw one (1) couple each month for a 1/2 dozen wrapped red roses

from Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts, 171 N. Main St., Barre. No obligation, nothing

to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks prior to anniversary date. Telephone

calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.

ANNIVERSARY

DATE_______________________# YEARS______

NAMES___________________________________

ADDRESS_________________________________

_________________________________________

PHONE___________________________________

page 16 The WORLD December 19, 2018

Glider Rocker Chairs

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Hello

Everyone!

Happy

Holidays!

I would like to say

thanks to all that

came into my life and

gave me a chance

to be family, friends,

lovers and partners

that has touched my

life and brought joy,

laughter and love.

You’re all very special.

I’m gratefully blessed

and think about you

all everyday.

Thanks, lots of

love always,

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See You 7:30AM to 1PM!

MICHAEL DERIENZO

May 29, 1986 ~ December 22, 2007


The love, laughter and pleasure you

brought into the lives of all who

knew you cannot be expressed in

words. Our lives will never be the

same without you. The emptiness

in our hearts will remain forever.

You are sadly missed by all

who knew you ~ especially Mom,

Steve, Dillon, Jacki & Grampy

Happy Birthday!

BARRE-MONTPELIER RD.

Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The WORLD would like to help you wish someone

special a Happy Birthday. Just send their name, address & birthdate. We’ll publish the

names in this space each week. Plus, we’ll draw one (1) winner each week for a FREE

BIRTHDAY CAKE from Price Chopper (Berlin, VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Just

send birthday names two (2) weeks prior to birthdate, to: The WORLD, c/o BIRTHDAY

CAKE, 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please provide your name, address

& phone number for prize notification.

DECEMBER 10

Taylor Quintin, 22, Whitefield, NH

Bonnie Holt, 67, Williamstown

DECEMBER 14

Scott E. Benoir, 56, Northfield

DECEMBER 16

Alicia Royer, 30, Berlin

DECEMBER 18

Beverly Bradbury, 92, Plainfield

Louise Grout, 73, Williamstown

DECEMBER 19

Nathan Bradbury, 33, Pittsford

DECEMBER 20

Maverick Isabelle, 23, Barre

DECEMBER 21

Arriahanna Corliss, 2, East Barre

Sophia Woodard, 3, Barre

DECEMBER 22

Janet Chase, Barre Town

DECEMBER 23

Katrina Bergeron, 11, Plainfield

Liette Wood, Barre

Irene Weston, 79, Middlesex

DECEMBER 24

Becky Bradbury, 55, Orange

Collin King, 18, Barre

DECEMBER 25

Jenna Companion, 20, Waterbury Ctr.

Robert Byam, 70, Plainfield

Bryanna Giacherio, 17

This Week’s Cake Winner:

On DECEMBER 25, ROBERT BYAM of PLAINFIELD

will be 70 YEARS OLD!!

CAKE WINNER: Please call Price Chopper (Berlin, VT)

at 479-9078 and ask for the Bakery Department

by Thursday, December 20th to arrange for cake pick-up.

PRICE CHOPPER

“BIRTHDAY DRAWING”

Mail this coupon to: The WORLD c/o Birthday Cake

403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin

Barre, VT 05641

Open to people of all ages. Just send in the entry blank below, and we will

publish it in this space each week. Plus, we will draw one (1) name each week

for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from the Price Chopper Super Center (Berlin,

VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks prior

to birthdate. Telephone calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.

BIRTHDATE______________________________

NAME___________________________________

AGE (this birthday)_________________________

ADDRESS________________________________

________________________________________

PHONE__________________________________

(Wood) Gonyaw/ Earle Engagement

Michael Earle Jr., along with his father, Michael Earle Sr,

mother Linda Willey, step father Jeff Willey & step mother

Judy Earle, are pleased to announce his engagement to Angela

(Wood) Gonyaw daughter of Delbert Wood Jr & Hattie Wood.

The couple are planning an April 2019 wedding.

Gifford Medical Center

BIRTH

ANNOUNCEMENTS

The following birth announcements were submitted by Gifford Medical Center

on December 9, 2018. Any questions or concerns should be addressed directly to Gifford.

A girl, Peyton Rose-Mae Lacillade, was born November 19

to Ashley (Hull) Lacillade and Kevin Lacillade of Cabot.

A girl, Ruby Mae Harvey, was born December 2 to

Stacy (Cutting) Harvey and Bryant Harvey of Rochester.

ARIES (March 21 to April 19)

The arts are a strong part of the

Arian aspect, with music becoming

more dominant. An important

decision looms as a longtime relationship

takes an unexpected turn.

TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Surrounding yourself with

beautiful things helps restore the Taurean soul. Enjoy an

art exhibit, for example. Or redecorate your personal space

with something truly splendid.

GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Some colleagues might try

to talk you out of what they insist is a risk, but which you

consider an opportunity. As usual, follow your own good

sense when making your decision.

CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A workplace change you

might have worried about soon proves to be highly favorable

for the clever Crab who is ready to take advantage of

new opportunities opening up.

LEO (July 23 to August 22) Congratulations. Your

Leonine pride is polished to a dazzling new brilliance

thanks to your success in winning support for your new

project from even the most doubtful of detractors.

VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) An unsettling rumor

about a colleague’s apparently regrettable behavior is soon

proved groundless, allowing you to enjoy the upcoming

end-of-year festivities in a happy mood.

LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Your success in

helping to create a harmonious environment out of a chaotic

situation earns you the admiration of someone who

could become an important new presence in your life.

SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Your Scorpion’s

sense of loyalty could find you leading a passionate

defense of a loved one you feel is being unfairly treated.

The week’s end brings long-awaited family news.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Your

keen instincts are once more on high alert as you find

yourself being pressured to make a quick decision about a

certain matter. More facts come to light by week’s end.

CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) An unexpected

workplace development could disrupt some family

plans. A full explanation, however, averts domestic discord.

A financial matter continues to need attention.

AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Spend time

away from distractions to reassess some recent moves that

might not have worked out as you had hoped. What you

learn could be invaluable for future decision-making.

PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A recent act of kindness

is a reminder of how important your friends are to

you. You might want to show your appreciation by hosting

a special pre-New Year’s party just for them.

BORN THIS WEEK: You always try to do your best, which

sometimes causes you to be critical of those who don’t live

up to your standards.

(c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc.


Season’s Greetings and

Safe New Year

(Sung to the tune of “The First Noel”)

“As the holidays approach,

Please keep safety in mind

So no accidents occur and

No injuries you’ll find.”

Yes, it’s holiday season

once again. The perfect time

to remind everyone of some

simple things you can do to

keep your family safe and

sound.

1. First, if you have a tree,

secure it well to keep it from

tipping over. If it is a live

tree, make sure it’s kept

watered so it doesn’t dry out.

Keep it away from floor heaters, fireplaces, or other heat

sources. If it is artificial, make sure it is fire resistant. Keep no

more than three strands of lights linked together on an extension

cord. And never use electric lights on a metal tree, unless

you’d enjoy a shocking experience.

2. If you have children, tinsel, small decorations and bulbs

should not be at the bottom of the tree. That’s where small

children can reach for them, put into their mouths and be at

risk for choking. In addition, some tree lights can have lead

content in the wires. Don’t ask children to hang lights, and

keep those wires out of reach. Even for parents, wear gloves

to hang the lights and wash your hands afterward to avoid lead

exposure.

3. Avoid candles on trees and please keep any lit candles out

of reach of small children. Turn off all lights and blow out all

candles when you sleep or leave the house to avoid a potential

fire hazard. And, much as you would any day of the year,

make sure your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors are

working.

4. Most holiday plants are safe, but remember that mistletoe

and holly berries eaten in excess can be dangerous. If your

child does snack on a holiday plant, you can call the Northern

New England Poison Center at 1-800-222-1222.

5. Finally, if you are hosting a party in your home, don’t forget

to clean up the night of the party. That way, your child won’t

discover alcohol or small snack foods that can be choking

hazards the morning after.

To wrap up, just remember…

(Sung to the tune of “Jingle Bells”)

“So find some ways at holidays

So injuries don’t abound

Then you can really celebrate

With your kids safe and sound

So heed these rules and safety tools

So no one flips their lids

This is pediatrician Dr. Lewis First

Hoping you’ll be First with Kids!”

Lewis First, MD, is chief of Pediatrics at The University of Vermont

Children’s Hospital and chair of the Department of Pediatrics at the

University of Vermont College of Medicine. You can also catch “First

with Kids” weekly on WOKO 98.9FM and WPTZ Channel 5, or visit

the First with Kids video archives at www.UVMHealth.org/

MedCenterFirstWithKids.

Maverick Fordyce

Bigelow-Gilman

12-06-18

Alli Gilman & CJ Bigelow

Passumpsic, VT

Wyatt Michael Brown

4-23-18

James & Magan Brown

Orange, VT

Gracie Marie Smith-Farnham

11-17-18

Carl & Coar Smith-Farnham

Franklin, VT

LETTERS TO SANTA

• • •

Holiday Cookies Santa Will Love

Many people enjoy baking come the holiday season, and

perhaps no dish is more synonymous with holiday baking than

cookies. Children leave cookies out for Santa Claus on

Christmas Eve, while adults may indulge and enjoy an extra

cookie or two at family gatherings or holiday office parties.

Cookies come in all shapes and sizes, so bakers have an

array of options at their disposal when planning their holiday

menus. Chocolate chip cookies may be among the most popular

types of cookies, and bakers who want to capitalize on that

popularity while giving loved ones something a little different

may want to try the following recipe for “Double Chocolate

Chip Cookies” from Maxine Clark’s “Chocolate: Deliciously

Indulgent Recipes for Chocolate Lovers” (Ryland, Peters &

Small).

Double Chocolate Chip Cookies

Makes about 12 large cookies

5 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened

5 tablespoons granulated sugar

5 tablespoons light brown sugar, sifted

1 large egg, beaten

1⁄2 teaspoon pure vanilla essence or chocolate extract (see

note)

1 cup plus 2 tablespoons self-rising flour

3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa

1⁄4 teaspoon salt

2⁄3 cup (or more) dark and white (or milk) chocolate chips

(or roughly chopped chocolate)

A heavy, nonstick baking sheet

Preheat the oven to 350 F.

Using an electric mixer, cream the butter and sugars together

until pale and fluffy. Beat in the egg and vanilla essence.

Sift the flour with the cocoa and salt in a small bowl. Fold

into the egg mixture with the chocolate chips.

Place 4 heaping tablespoonsfuls of the mixture on the prepared

baking sheet, spacing them well apart. Press down and

spread out to about 1⁄4-inch thick with the back of a wet spoon

or with dampened fingers (you may like to scatter some more

chocolate chips over the top). Bake for 10 to 12 minutes. Let

cool on the baking sheet for 1 minute, then transfer to a wire

rack. When cool, store in an airtight container. Repeat with the

remaining mixture.

Note: Chocolate extract is a fat-free flavoring ingredient

made from a blend of roasted cacao beans, water and alcohol.

Sara Martin, Barre

Aurora Zurowski, 7

Emma Pulsifer, 11

Andrew Zurowski, 4

December 19, 2018 The WORLD page 17


The History Behind Some Beloved Christmas Songs

Holiday traditions vary from

family to family, but one

component of the holidays

that seems to be universally

enjoyed is a good Christmas song. Music

is piped throughout malls and stores to

entertain shoppers, and favorite tunes

may be on the radio or streamed through

a digital music service as families decorate

their homes.

Many people may love Christmas songs and carols, but

not everyone shares the same favorites. Thankfully, there’s

no shortage of material when it comes to Christmas songs,

ensuring there’s something for everyone.

In 2014, Time magazine researched records at the U.S.

opyright fce to determine the most popular and most

recorded Christmas songs since 1978. when copyright registrations

were digitized. The following are some of the more

beloved holiday tunes and a bit of history about each song.

• “Silent Night”: One of the most rerecorded songs in history

(733 versions since 1978), “Silent Night,” was composed

in 1818 by Franz Xaver Gruber and put to lyrics by Joseph

Mohr. t was rst performed on hristmas ve at t. icho-

las parish church in Oberndorf, a village in Austria. Today’s

version is a slow lullaby, but it’s believed the original was a

dance-like tune in 6/8 time.

• “O Holy Night”: This popular song was composed by Adolphe

Adam in 1847 to a French poem titled, “Minuit, chrétiens

(Midnight, Christians).” Many notable performers, including

Perry Como, Céline Dion, Josh Groban, Michael Crawford,

and Lea Michele, have performed “O Holy Night.”

• “Silver Bells”: Now a Christmas classic, “Silver Bells”

originally was written for the ob ope lm, he emon

Drop Kid.” Songwriter Jay Livingston wanted to title the

song “Tinkle Bell,” but his wife dissuaded him from using

the word “tinkle.”

• “White Christmas”: Irving Berlin believed his song “White

Christmas” would be an instant hit. His prediction was correct,

especially after singer Bing Crosby recorded it.

• “Jingle Bells”: Although it has become one of the more

popular Christmas songs, “Jingle Bells” really was written

for Thanksgiving. It’s also one of the oldest holiday songs

of American origin. James Lord Pierpont, the song’s author,

was inspired by the famous sleigh races of Medford, Massachusetts.

• “Do You Hear What I Hear”: Noel Regney wrote this song

as a call to peace during the Cuban Missile Crisis. The original

context has long been forgotten, and “Do You Hear What

I Hear” is now a staple of holiday celebrations.

• “Santa Claus is Coming to Town”: James Gillespie wrote

this tune while riding a subway and reminiscing about his

childhood with his brother. It became a hit after being performed

at the famed Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.

• “The Christmas Song”: This classic Christmas song was

written in 1944 by Bob Wells and Mel Tormé. It’s usually

subtitled “Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire.” The

song was written during a heat wave as a way to think cool

thoughts. It only took 40 minutes to write the music and

some of the lyrics. Nat King Cole’s rendition of the song is

among the more popular versions.

Christmas songs are enjoyed and performed year after

year. Popular songs continue to endure and attract new fans.

Holiday Worship Directory

THE OLD MEETING HOUSE

We are are a a welcoming congregation ~ - please join us:

Blue Children’s Christmas, Pageant, December December 16, 7:00pm 17, 9:30am

A musical Outdoor longest Service night with service live animals

Children’s Blue Christmas, Pageant, December 23, 17, 9:30am 7:00pm

A Outdoor musical Service longest with night live service animals

Christmas Eve Eve Candlelight Morning Worship Service, 9:30am

Christmas 4:30pm Eve Candlelight Family Service Worship

7:00pm 5:00pm Traditional Family Service with full choir

9:00pm 7:00pm Intimate Traditional Service Service of Lessons with & full Carols choir

www.oldmeetinghouse.org

1620 CENTER

ROAD

EAST MONTPELIER

CENTER

229-9593

Shepherd of the Hills

Lutheran Church

115 Northfield Street, Montpelier • 229-5440

ChristmasWorship Service

Monday, December 24, 5:00 p.m.

Our traditional Christmas Eve service of

lessons, carols, candlelight and Communion.

Please join us to celebrate the joy

of the birth of Jesus Christ, our Savior!

Monday, December 24th Services

7:00 PM... Come and hear the familiar story, sing the beloved

carols, including “Silent Night” by candlelight.

Don’t forget your sleigh bells!

9:00 PM... An intimate service of lessons

and carols with holy communion.

Tuesday, December 25th

Free Community Christmas Meal

from Noon until 2:00 PM downstairs at the church

Every Sunday: worship at 10:00 AM

40 Washington St., Barre, VT 05641

802.476.8156 heddingumc@hotmail.com

www.heddingumc.org

Worcester United Methodist Church

PO Box 125 • Worcester Village Road

Worcester, Vermont 05682

www.worcesterumc.com

Christmas Eve Service

at 7:30PM



C E S AM

Pastor: David Adams

802-888-1764 psatordavid3@comcast.net

The Wise Still

Seek Him

St. Monica Church

79 Summer Street, Barre 479-3253

Christmas Eve Masses:

4:00PM Mass

6:30PM Mass

11:30PM Christmas Concert

(45 Voice Choir, Flutes,

Trumpets, Bells & Drums)

12:00AM Midnight Mass

Christmas Day Masses:

8:00AM Mass

10:00AM Mass

St. Sylvester

Church

223 Church Hill Rd.

Graniteville

476-3913

December 24:

5:00PM

December 25:

9:30AM

Old Brick Church

East Montpelier, VT

Located near Dudley’s Store at the junction of Routes 2 & 14

Candlelight Christmas Eve Service

6:30 PM

Come experience the Hope, Peace,

Joy and Love of the Christmas Birth!

Questions call Pastor Herb Hatch 223-1232

email: brickchurchvt@gmail.com

www.facebook.com/vtworld.news

A LIGHT IN THE DARKNESS

The world can be a dark place. We see it in the news. We see it in our

lives. But on the first Christmas, a brilliant light pierced the darkness.

The child born in a Bethlehem stable had come to bring the light of

forgiveness and peace to a darkened world. Join us to celebrate the

birth of Jesus Christ! Our Christmas worship will feature an inspiring

message, favorite Christmas carols, and a place to bask in the light of

the Christ-child.

A Savor has been born to you; he is Christ the Lord.

Christmas Eve Worship: Dec. 24, 6:30 pm

Christmas Day Worship: Dec. 25, 10:00 am

46 Warner Road (off Airport Road)

www.CTRLutheranVT.com

page 18 The WORLD December 19, 2018


Spiritual Christmas Traditions to Embrace

The holiday season is a special

and spiritual time of year. It can

sometimes be easy to get lost in

the more commercial aspects of

the holiday season, and there’s certainly

nothing wrong with shopping for gifts that

will show your loved ones how much you

love and appreciate them.

For those who want to focus back on the spiritual side of

this special time of year, the following suggestions can help

in those efforts.

SHARE THE STORY OF CHRISTMAS

The Gospels of Mark and Luke offer differing accounts of

the birth of Jesus Christ. Both indicate that Jesus was born to

Mary, who was engaged to Joseph, a carpenter. Mary became

pregnant through immaculate conception, as she was a virgin

when visited by an angel who informed her that she was

to carry God’s son. At the time of Christ’s birth, all Jewish

people had to be counted by Roman soldiers for tax purposes.

That required people to return to their places of birth.

As a result, Mary and Joseph set out on an arduous journey

to Bethlehem. Upon arriving in Bethlehem, inns had no

vacancies, but Mary and Joseph were given shelter in a stable

where Jesus was ultimately born.

ATTEND MASS

Churches traditionally hold religious services on Christmas

Eve and Christmas. These services are joyful expressions

of faith, music and community spirit. But Christmas mass

is not the only time to head to church. During Advent, the

four-week period preceding Christmas, Catholics prepare

and repent. Advent calendars help count down the days until

Christmas.

SET OUT A NATIVITY SCENE

Make a nativity scene the primary focus of Christmas

decorations and encourage children to play with the gures

and act out the Christmas story.

FOCUS ON GIFTS FOR GOOD

Families can focus their energies on faithful endeavors

and the spirit of giving that’s synonymous with the season.

Do good deeds for others, embrace peace and love and share

special time with others.

SING CAROLS

Spread the holiday spirit through song. Get together with

a group of friends or neighbors and go door-to-door, or hold

a caroling performance at a centralized location. Select religious

hymns, but also include some secular favorites.

The holiday season is a great time of year to reconnect

with one’s faith and spirituality.

Holiday Worship Directory

Resurrection

Baptist

Church

144 Elm Street

Montpelier

at 6:30 pm

(Park in our parking lot

adjacent to our church)

Sunday Service

December 23 at 10PM

Candlelight Service

Monday, December 24 at 6:00 PM

Graniteville Presbyterian Church

Light Refreshments & Fellowship

after the service

Join Us in

Celebrating the Birth

of Our Lord Jesus Christ

Christmas Eve Service

Monday - Dec. 24

6:00 to 7:00PM

First Baptist Church of Barre

24 Washington Street, Barre

For more info: 479-2872

"To redeem those under the law."

~Galatians 4:5

The First Congregational Church of Berlin

1808 Scott Hill Road, Berlin

Invites you

to join us

at 7 p.m. December 24th

for our

Candlelight Christmas

Eve Service

You are also encouraged to join us

Sundays at 9:30 a.m. for our

regular church services.

St. John the Evangelist, Northfield

& St. Edward, Williamstown Catholic Churches

(802) 485-8313

Welcome Everyone to Our Christmas Masses

St. John the Evangelist ~ 206 Vine St., Northfield

Monday, Dec. 24: Tuesday, Dec. 25:

4PM - Christmas 12AM - Midnight Mass

Eve Mass

9AM - Christmas

Morning Mass

St. Edward ~ 76 Beckett St., Williamstown

Monday, Dec. 24:

7PM - Christmas Eve Mass

St. Augustine Church

16 Barre Street, Montpelier 223-5285

Christmas Eve Masses:

4:00PM with Christmas Pageant

7:00PM

Christmas Day Mass: 10:00AM

New Year’s Eve Mass: 4:00PM

New Year’s Day Mass: 8:00AM, 10:00AM

North American

Martyrs Church Marshfield

Christmas Day Mass: 8:00AM

New Year’s Eve Mass: 8:00PM

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST

Welcomes Everyone to our

Christmas Worship Service

Sunday, December 23, 2018

10:30 AM

Bible Reading, Music,

Light Refreshments to follow.

Corner of Bailey & State Street

Montpelier, VT

802-223-2477

Christ Episcopal Church

64 State Street, Montpelier (802) 223-3631 www.christchurchvt.org

Schedule of Christmas Services

Christmas Eve Eucharist & Carols

Children & Family Friendly

5:00PM, Monday, December 24, 2018.

Christmas Eve Eucharist & Carols

Choir with Festive Music

9:00PM, Monday, December 24, 2018.

Christmas Day Eucharist with Carols

10:00AM, Tuesday, December 25, 2018.

Barre Universalist

Church

The Church with the Clock

CHRISTMAS EVE

CANDLELIGHT

SERVICE

6:00 PM

Jesus is the reason for the season!

Church of God of Prophecy

241 Quarry Hill Rd Barre

Pastor Jeff Kelley (814-428-2696)

Christmas Program:

Sunday, Dec. 23 at 10:30am

Christmas Eve:

Candlelight Service at 7pm

Enjoy Christmas carols and celebrate the birth of Christ with us!

Christmas & Christmas Eve Services


December 23, 2018

10:30 AM

December 24, 2018

6:00 PM

Covenant Orthodox

Presbyterian Church

249 Airport Road

Barre, VT 05641

Directions: Turn towards Airport on Airport Rd. at the hospital intersection

of Route 62. Go 2.2 miles and look for the church on your left.

www.copcvt.org

Oh Come, Let Us Adore Him

December 19, 2018 The WORLD page 19


Just in the “Nick” of Time

SHOP LOCALLY FOR LAST MINUTE GIFTS

Last-Minute Holiday Shopping Tips

How to Make Gift Wrapping Easier

Magical Harry Potter

Chocolate Wands ($11.99 ea.)

Bridgeside Books

29 Stowe St, Waterbury

244-1441 bridgesidebooks.com

aleoo’s

V T’ S

Centers

Located off Exit 7 of I-89

Berlin, VT So. Barre, Waterbury and

other locations in Central Vermont

Holiday shopping season typically begins the day after

Thanksgiving and etends all the way to hristmas ve.

While that’s a considerable amount of time for shoppers

to find gifts for everyone on their shopping list

many people will still fi nd themselves putting holiday shopping off

until the last minute.

In certain ways, last-minute holiday shopping is easier than ever. Thanks

to online retailers who can ship products overnight, men and women who

delay their holiday shopping have more options at their disposal than they

did before the arrival of the Internet. And unlike the days of yore when the

best deals were largely exclusive to lack riday, some shoppers nd that

competition between online retailers and traditional brick-and-mortar stores

is so great that deals can be found regardless of when they begin shopping.

But while waiting until the last minute to begin holiday shopping may not

be as risky as it used to be, shoppers may still benet by sticking to certain

strategies so they can nd the perfect gifts without breaking the bank.

• Stay within your budget. Even last-minute shoppers have holiday

shopping budgets. But it can be harder for last-minute shoppers to stick to

their budgets because they have less time to comparison shop and hunt for

deals. As the holiday shopping season winds down, resist the temptation

to go over budget. If a gift you had in mind is available but more than you

can spend, look for something else. Overspending on holiday shopping in

December is a recipe for debt in January, and no shopper wants to begin the

new year weighed down by consumer debt.

• Shop local. National chains and big box retailers are renowned for

rolling out great deals during the holiday season, but such stores may have

very limited or unimpressive inventory left by the time last-minute shoppers

begin shopping. Local retailers are often incapable of slashing prices as

signicantly as their larger competitors, and that may mean they have more

extensive inventories available throughout the holiday shopping season. In

addition, shoppers who stick with local retailers won’t have to pay shipping

costs to ensure items arrive on time.

• Shop during off-peak hours. Shopping during off-peak hours can help

last-minute shoppers make efcient use of the limited time they have to buy

gifts for their loved ones. Visit stores early in the morning or late at night,

or schedule a midweek afternoon shopping trip so you aren’t spending what

little time you have left waiting on lines or hunting for parking.

• Give something less traditional. Holiday gifts need not come from

stores. Rather than spending their time shopping for gifts for loved ones

who seemingly have it all, last-minute shoppers can give the gift of a donation

in their loved one’s name. Last-minute shoppers who want to give

something more tangible can create a homemade gift that’s both unique and

heartfelt. If your DIY skills are lacking, give a loved one the gift of a night

out on the town at your expense.

Shoppers who wait until the end of the holiday shopping season to begin

their

While holiday shoppers are often enthusiastic

about finding great gifts

for their loved ones, many are decidedly

less ecited about wrapping

those gifts. any holiday shoppers spend hours

wrapping gifts each year and as gift lists grow

so does the amount of time needed to get all of

those presents wrapped hidden packaged and

or shipped. hoppers can employ the following

strategies to make the process go much more

smoothly and to reduce gift wraprelated aniety.

• Relearn the basics. Some people may think they know how to wrap

gifts, only to realize it’s harder than it looks once the paper, scissors and

Scotch tape comes out. Relearn the basics by viewing online tutorials

prior to wrapping gifts so the lessons learned remain fresh in your mind.

Learn how to wrap standard clothing gift boxes and recognize that such

boxes can often be used to house oddly-shaped items.

• Wrap as you buy. Instead of getting bogged down with wrapping all in

one evening, wrap presents as you purchase them. This ensures that you

don’t leave everything for the last minute and reduces the likelihood that

curious kids or inquisitive spouses discover gifts before the big day.

• Work on a hard surface. It may be tempting to lay everything out on

your bed and wrap gifts while youre binge-watching the latest etix

series. But hard surfaces make the best places to wrap gifts. This ensures

there won’t be any wrinkles in the paper and that you won’t lose supplies

in the bedspread.

• Rely on double-sided tape. For that professional look, invest in some

double-sized tape so you will not have any unsightly tape lines.

• Keep all of your supplies together. Store wrapping paper, scissors,

tags, tape, ribbons, and whatever else you may need to wrap gifts in one

convenient location. This cuts down on time wasted hunting for supplies

around the house.

• Draw on plain gift boxes. Make your own “wrapped gifts” by drawing

or stenciling on plain gift boxes if you’re short on time.

• Identify recipients by gift wrap. Designate one gift wrap for each

person on your shopping list. This way you can easily distinguish one

person’s gifts from another’s. This can keep things more organized when

sorting and visiting with friends and relatives later on.

• Keep gift bags on hand. Gift bags work in a pinch and make it easy to

conceal gifts that are hard to wrap. Curious loved ones can easily peak

inside gift bags, so be sure to wrap gifts in tissue paper before placing

them in the bags.

• Less is usually more. Do not use too much paper when wrapping;

otherwise, you will be left with bulky, sloppy folds. Before trimming

the gift

Great Gifts For Pets!

• Toys • Treats • Beds

• Coats • Boots & More!

Plus many gifts for the people

in their lives!

uy’s arm ar

19 Barre St. • Montpelier

229-0567 • Open Every Day!

For the Musician In Your Life

• Guitars • Banjos • Ukuleles

• Mandolins • Percussion

• Keyboards and Accessories

GuitarSam

71 Main Street

Montpelier (802) 229-0295

Open Every Day

Gift Certificate

MONTPELIER

Farm Toys

CHAMPLAIN VALLEY

EQUIPMENT

72 Kubota Drive, Berlin

802-223-0021

Whimsy Vermont

124 No. Main St., Suite 2

Barre

622-0680

Bury

The

Needle

136 North

Main

(Suite 2)

Barre

(802)

622-0204

Charming Gifts

Richard J. Wobby Jewelers

124 N. Main St., Barre, Vt 05641

(802) 476-4031

Christmas Special:

Purchase a $25 Certifi cate

and Get Another $5 ($30 total!)

AGWAY OF MONTPELIER

190 E Montpelier Rd, Route 2

Montpelier, VT 05602

802-229-9187

montpelieragway.com

1,000a of Cool Items Upstairs at

Beavin & Sons

All Reasonably Priced!

River Street, Montpelier • 229-6745

Customized Shirts, Jackets,

Sweatshirts & Hats

River Street, Montpelier • 229-6745

Bragg Farm Sugarhouse

& Gift Shop

1005 VT 14N, East Montpelier

802-223-5757

www.braggfarm.com

Keep It Local

Give The Gift of Vermont Made

Capitol Stationers

Downtown Montpelier

Now Offering WeatherTech ®

Floor Mats For most cars & trucks!

Midstate Service

Barre-Montpelier Rd.

802-476-4724

www.midstatedodge.com

Great Stocking

Stuffers

3

lbs. $ 19 99

for

+ appl. taxes

For All Occasions

FORGET ME NOT

FLOWERS & GIFTS

171 No. Main Street, Barre, VT

802-476-6700

Morse Farms

Sugarworks

1168 County Rd, Montpelier

223-2740

www.morsefarm.com

Serious Tools for the Everyday Cook

Capital Kitchen

18 State Street, Montpelier

802.229.2305

www.capitalkitchenvt.com

Give the gift of sketching!

THE DRAWING BOARD

22 Main Street, Montpelier

802-223-2902

www.drawingboardvt.com

ONLY $35.00

$75 value

While Kits Last!

Gifts Sets Like This

Dr. Hauschka Morning

Greeting Face Care Set

Splash Naturals

67 Main Street, Montpelier

(802) 223-7752

2

boxes $

15 99

for

+ appl. taxes

Recliners

starting at $299

Mattress Land

97 US Route 302

Barre-Montpelier Rd.

802-479-0671

page 20 The WORLD December 19, 2018

We also have Travel Mugs,

Apparel, DD Cards

Barre • Montpelier • Berlin

622-0259 223-0928 622-0250

COMPANY NAME

MESSAGE GOES HERE

Richard J.

Wobby

Jewelers

124 N. Main St.

Barre, Vt 05641

(802) 476-4031

Our Prices Will Simply Floor You

DELAIR’S CARPET & FLOORING

Route 2, East Montpelier

802-223-7171

flooringvt.com

Fashions From Around The World

and Dr. Hauschka, Jane Iredale,

Bare Minerals

Splash Naturals

67 Main Street, Montpelier

(802) 223-7752

Buy 1 Ornament, Get 1 of Equal or

Lesser Value for 1/2 Price

NORTHFIELD PHARMACY

Deot Suare Northel T

802-485-4771

Great selection of table top frames

THE DRAWING BOARD

22 Main Street, Montpelier

802-223-2902

www.drawingboardvt.com

Serious Tools for the Everyday Cook

Capital Kitchen

18 State Street, Montpelier

802.229.2305

www.capitalkitchenvt.com

Morse Farms

Sugarworks

1168 County Rd, Montpelier

223-2740

www.morsefarm.com

December 19, 2018 The WORLD page 21

Address | Phone | Website


Barre Merry HOLIDAY

EVENTS

Lots of people turned out for the horse drawn carriage rides in downtown this holiday. Merry

Christmas from the Barre Merchants. Thank you to Samantha Walsh and her team of horses.

Silent Auction for Barre

Meals on Wheels

Maisie Lajeunesse worked tirelessly since May soliciting

and gathering donations for the auction to benefit the Barre

Meals on Wheels program where she has volunteered for the

past two years. She never once let her disability hold her back

as she hugged her way through the Barre area with her coach,

Elizabeth Perreault. Together they put in well over 300 hours

working to benefit a cause that they believe in so passionately.

The donations that they gathered amounted to over 110 bid

items, raising over $2100 through dinner tickets, auction bidding

and donations. They will be presenting a check to Bob

Woodard, who manages the program, on Thursday, December

13 between 12:30 and 1:00 pm at the Meals on Wheels Café.

Thank you very much for your interest in this event that we

feel so strongly about. We hope that our effort will help many

local residents through the holiday season and beyond.

The wrapping of 160 boxes of new coats, hats, mittens and teddy bears for the 36th annual World Santa Project for area children was a

huge success last Saturday at the Vermont Granite Museum. The event, organized by World staffers Kay Roberts Santamore, Gary Hass,

Ruth Weeks and Barre Rotarians Caroline Earle and Leeann Marchinelli, got lots of help from the Barre Rotary Club and friends, including

the Central Vermont Young Professionals. “Scott McLaughlin of the Vermont Granite Museum could not have been a better host,”

reported Gary Hass, “The whole event was made into a real holiday party with even some Christmas carols sung by the Barre Rotary Club

Rotobarians.’ unraising continues to cover the greater amount of resents this year.

Christmas Music Origins

Scores of artists have released Christmas albums or

holiday-infused singles during their careers. Christmas music

can be broken down into two distinct categories: traditional

hymns and carols and popular secular songs.

Some believe that the religious standards have been

passed down since the earliest days of Christianity. However,

that is not so. Before the 12th century, music wasn’t typically

included in religious services, and even then music was

included only sporadically. In present day, religious tunes

identied as hristmas music typically are not sung until

Christmas Eve and thereafter until the Epiphany.

Many of the oldest Christmas songs are not old at all.

Many popular carols sung today are less than 200 years old.

The world’s most popular Christmas carol was originally

a poem penned in 1816 by Austrian Catholic priest Josef

Mohr. Two years later, Mohr asked Franz Xaver Gruber, an

organist and local schoolteacher, to put his words to music.

The resulting song, “Silent Night,” was not translated into

English for 40 years.

“Hark the Herald Angels Sing” also originated from a

poem and had the original opening line of, “Hark how all

the welkin rings.” The subsequent version was more catchy,

and the faster-paced accompaniment was courtesy of Felix

Mendelssohn, added 100 years after the poem was written.

“Jingle Bells,” a nonreligious tune that has become

synonymous with Christmas, was not originally written as a

Christmas tune. In fact, the song was intended to celebrate

Thanksgiving.

SPEAKING OUT | The WORLD

What’s your favorite Christmas carol?

Carol - Barre

Rockin’ Around the

Christmas Tree

Barb - Barre

Jingle Bells

Marilyn - Montpelier

I’ll Be Home For Christmas

Priscilla - Berlin

It’s The Most Wonderful Time

Of The Year

Chrissy - East Montpelier

Drummer Boy

Mark - Barre

Baby It’s Cold Outside

Sandy - South Barre

Happy Xmas by John Lennon

Mary Jane - Barre

The River by Barry Manilow

page 22 The WORLD December 19, 2018


Barre Merry HOLIDAY

EVENTS

Our 46th Annual

Merry Christmas

Special

SAVE 20% *

Now thru Dec. 24th

A group of kids were enjoying the reindeer

food buffet making jars of food for the

reindeer at Whimsy Vermont.

All

In-Stock Rings

Diamond Earrings

Watches by Citizen -

Bulova - Caravelle

J

QUALITY

GIFTS FOR EVERY OCCASION

Brenden making an ornament with Joanne at

Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts

124 N. MAIN ST. | BARRE, VT 05641 | (802) 476-4031

Quin and Keating collected their prizes from

the Mary and Barre Holiday Elves Contest

sponsored by the Barre Partnership. This

annual event is always fun for the children.

COZY UP WITH VERMONT FLANNEL

give the gift of handcrafted usa

128 MILL ST. EAST BARRE • M-F 8:30 - 5:30 • SAT 9 - 4 • CLOSED SUN

Owen visits with Santa at

Next Chapter BookStore

HOLIDAY HOURS

CHRISTMAS EVE

STORE 6AM to 6PM

BOTTLE REDEMPTION 8AM to 2PM

CHRISTMAS DAY

CLOSED

BOTTLE REDEMPTION CLOSED

NEW YEAR'S EVE

STORE 6AM to 7PM

BOTTLE REDEMPTION 8AM to 2PM

NEW YEAR'S DAY

STORE 8AM to 8PM

BOTTLE REDEMPTION CLOSED

VT. CRAFT BEERS

•Upper

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~ Case Lots Available ~

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5 BAGS OR MORE $ 5 99 EACH

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411 North Main St., Barre

479-9227 • 476-4962 • Fax 479-9348

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1.25 Liters ...99 ¢**

Monster Energy

16-oz. cans

2/ $ 4 **

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* = +Tax ** = +Tax+Dep.

Specials Good Thru 1/1/2019

We Sell Hunting & Fishing Licenses

Checks By Courtesy Card Only!

LP Gas Grill

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Bottle Drives Welcome

Advance notice appreciated

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Yellow Tail

Ass't Flavors, 1.5 liter $ 10 99*

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Hurry, Limited Supply On All Specials!

Open Everyday!

Monday-Friday 6AM-9PM

Saturday & Sunday 7AM-9PM

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Fast, Courteous 8AM TO 6PM DAILY!

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December 19, 2018 The WORLD page 23

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page 24 The WORLD December 19, 2018

All calendar submissions should be sent to editor@vt-world.

com or mailed to The WORLD, Attn: Calendar, 403 U.S. Route

302, Barre, Vt. 05641. The deadline is 5:00 p.m., Thursday preceding

publication. The Ongoing section is for free/low cost

community events, which should be verified monthly. We are no

longer able to include ongoing classes.

Ongoing Events

BARRE- Weekly Business Networking in Central Vermont at

Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce, 33 Stewart Ln.

8AM-9:30AM. Thurs. Free. Info: mike@eternitymarketing.com.

Granite Center Garden Club, the Barre Congregational Church.

Runs Apr.-July & Sept.-Nov., 2nd Mon., 6:30PM. Info: www.

facebook.com/@granitecentergardenclub.

Church of God of Prophecy, 241 Quarry Hill Rd. Sunday School:

9:30AM; Service: 10:30AM; free potluck dinner: 12PM on 2nd

Sun. Info: (814) 428-2696.

Sons of the American Legion Squadron #10 Meetings. Barre

Legion Post #10, 320 N. Main St. 3rd Wed. of each month. 6PM.

Women & Children 1st: Senior Day Every Wed. Seniors 55 &

older receive 10% off their purchases. 114 N. Main St.,

Central VT Adult Basic Education. Free classes. Pre-GED and

high school diploma prep classes at Barre Learning Center, 46

Washington St. Info./pre-register 476-4588.

PAWS. Support for those grieving the loss of a pet. Universalist

Church. 1st Thurs. of month. 7 p.m. Info. beyondthedog97@

gmail.com.

Rainbow Umbrella of Central Vermont, an adult LGBTQ group,

bowls at Twin City Lanes on Sunday afternoons twice a month.

For dates and times: RUCVTAdmin@PrideCenterVT.org

Central Vermont Woodcarving Group. Free instruction projects

for all abilities. Barre Congregational Church, Mon. 1-4pm. 479-

9563.

Heart of Vermont Quilt Guild meets 3rd Tues. of the month at

First Presbyterian Church, Seminary St. 5:30-7:30PM.

Step ‘n’ Time Line Dancers of Central Vermont. Thurs. at The

Old Labor Hall, 46 Granite St. 6:30-8:30PM.

Playgroup. Aldrich Children’s Library, Every Wed. 9:30-11AM

(*Only during school year.). Sponsored by The Family Center of

Washington County. www.fcwcvt.org

Additional Recyclables Collection Center. Open for collection

Mon., Wed., Fri. 12-6PM, 3rd Sat. 9AM-1PM. 540 N. Main St.,

Barre. Visit www.cvswmd.org for list of acceptable items.

Jabbok Christian Center Prayer Meeting. 8 Daniel Dr. 6:30-

8PM. 1st & 3rd Thurs. Info: 479-0302.

Medicare and You. Have questions? We have answers. Central

Vermont Council on Aging, 59 N. Main St., Suite 200, 2nd and 4th

Tues. of the month. Call 479-0531 to register.

Wheelchair Basketball. Barre Evangelical Free Church, 17 S. Main

St., Every other Tues., 5:30-7PM. Info: 498-3030 (David) or 249-

7931 (Sandy).

Aldrich Public Library Activities. 6 Washington St., 476-7550.

Story Hour: Mon. & Tues.,10:30AM. Reading Circle Book Club:

3rd Wed., 6:30PM. Living & Learning Series: 1st Sun., 1PM.

Senior Day: 1st Wed. 1PM.

Central Vermont Business Builders. Community National Bank,

1st & 3rd Tues., 8-9AM. Info: 777-5419.

Weekly Storytime. Next Chapter Bookstore, 158 North Main St.,

Sat., 10:30AM. Info. 476-3114.

Play Group. St. Monica’s Church, lower level, Thurs. during

school year, 9:30-11AM

Vermont Modelers Club. Building & flying model airplanes yearround.

Info: 485-7144.

Community Breakfast. First Presbyterian Church, 78 Summer

St., 3rd Sun. FREE, 7:30-9AM. 476-3966.

Friends of Aldrich Public Library. Aldrich Library, 2nd floor

boardroom, 4th Tues. 6:30PM. Info: 476-7550.

Circle of Parents. Confidential support group for parents and caregivers.

Tues. evenings. Info: 229-5724.

Mothers of Preschoolers. Monthly get-togethers for crafts,

refreshments, etc. Christian Alliance Church, 476-3221.

Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings in Barre, daily; call 802-229-

5100 for latest times & locations; www.aavt.org.

Hedding United Methodist Activities & Meetings. 40

Washington St., 476-8156. Choir: Thurs. 7PM; Free Community

Supper: Fri. 5:30-6:30PM; Community Service & Food Shelf

Hours: Weds & Thurs. 3-5PM.

Make a Visit to Bragg Farm a

Holiday Tradition!

Enjoy Product

Sampling!

CHRISTMAS

TREES & WREATHS

on Rt. 14 N East Montpelier

1 mile north of E. Montpelier Village on Rt. 14N (follow signs)

223-5757 • Open Every Day 8:30am-6:00pm

Turning Point Recovery Center. 489 N. Main St., Barre. Safe &

supportive place for individuals/families in or seeking substance

abuse recovery. Open Mon/Tue/Thur: 10AM-5PM; Wed/Fri:

10AM-9PM; Sat: 6PM-9PM. For info & programs, call 479-7373.

Green Mountain Spirit Chapter. National women bikers club.

2nd Wed. Info: grnmtnspirit@hotmail.com.

Grief & Bereavement Support Group at the Central Vermont

Home Health & Hospice office, 600 Granger Road. This group is

open to anyone who has experienced the death of a loved one.

Group 1 Meets every 3rd Wed. 10AM-11:30AM, Group 2 meets

every 2nd Mon. 6PM-7:30PM. Free. Info: 223-1878.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs. Barre City Police, 15

Fourth St., 476-6613. Get rid of old or unused meds at these local

permanent safe disposal sites.

BERLIN- Drop-in Meditation Sitting Group. W/Sherry Rhynard.

CVMC, conf. room #2, Thurs., 6-7PM. sherry@easeofflow.com or

272-2736.

Barre Tones Women’s A Capella Chorus. Capital City Grange

6612 Rt 12. Mon., 6:30-9PM. www.barretonesvt.com 223-2039.

NAMI-VT Connection Recovery Support Group. Central

Vermont Medical Center Boardroom, 130 Fisher Rd. 2nd Thurs.,

4PM. Free. 90-minute recovery support groups for people living

with mental illness. Also at CVTMC, NAMI Vermont Family

Support Group, Room 3, . 4th Mon., 7PM. For families and

friends of individuals living with a mental illness.

Cancer Support Group w/ potluck. 2nd Wed., 6PM. Info: 229-

5931.

Living w/ Advanced or Metastatic Cancer: Lunch provided, 2nd

Tues. 12-1PM & Writing to Enrich Your Life: For anyone

touched by cancer, 3rd Tues., 12-1PM. Both held at CVMC Cancer

Center resource room. Info. 225-5449.

Central Vermont Rotary Club. Visitors & potential members

welcome. Steakhouse Restaurant, Mon., 6:15PM. 229-0235.

Parkinsons Support Group. Woodbridge Nursing Home, 142

Woodridge Rd, 3rd Thurs., 10AM. Info: 439-5554.

Diabetes Support Program. CVMC, conf. rooms, 1st Thurs.,

7-8PM. Free. Info: 371-4152.

Civil Air Patrol. At the airport (blue hangar), Tues., 6-8:30PM.

Info: 229-5193.

Pregnancy & Newborn Loss Support Group. CVMC conference

room #3, 4th Mon., 6:30-8:30PM. 371-4304.

Partners for Prevention-Alcohol & Drug Abuse Coalition.

CVH, 2nd Weds., 11:30AM.-1:30PM. Info: 479-4250.

Savvy Speakers Toastmasters Club. BC/BS conf. room,

Industrial Ln., 1st & 3rd Tues., 5:30-7PM. Info: (802) 476-0908 or

mlferguson2002@yahoo.com.

Birthing Center Open House. For parents, sibs, grandparents,

etc. CVMC, 1st Wed., 5:30-7PM. RSVP/Info. 371-4613.

Total Joint Replacement Class. CVMC. Conference Rms 1 & 2.

Free. 1st & 3rd Thurs., 2-3PM. Info: 371-4357.

Breastfeeding Support Group. CVMC Garden Path Birthing

Center, 1st Mon., 5:30-7PM. Info: 371-4415.

Infant & Child Car Seat Inspections. Berlin Fire Station. Free.

1st Fri., 12-4PM. Appointments required: 371-4198.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs. Berlin Police, 108 Shed

Rd., 223-4401. Get rid of old or unused meds at these local permanent

safe disposal sites.

BETHEL- YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program. United

Church of Bethel, Church St. Thurs., 11AM-12PM. Free. Info:

728-7714.

BRADFORD- Rockinghorse Support Circle. Grace Methodist

Church. For young women w/ or w/o kids, childcare & transportation

available. Wed., 1-2:30PM. Info: 479-1086.

New Hope II Support Group. Grace United Methodist, Mon.,

7-9PM. Info: 1-800-564-2106.

BROOKFIELD - Mothers of Preschoolers. Meal & childcare

provided. New Covenant Church, 2252 Ridge Rd., 3rd Fri., 6PM.

Info: 276-3022.

Health-focused Group. Learn to cope w/ life’s passages. Wed.,

7-8PM. Info: 276-3142.

CABOT- Fiddle Lessons with Katie Trautz: Mon., Info: 279-

2236; Dungeons & Dragons, Fri., 3-5:30PM. All at Cabot

Library, 563-2721.

CALAIS- Men’s & Women’s Bible Study Groups. County

Road, Wed., 7PM. Info: 485-7577.

CHELSEA- Story Time. For ages 0- 5. Chelsea Public Library,

Wed., 1:15PM. Info: 685-2188.

Take Off Pounds Sensibly. Nonprofit support grp. United Church of

Chelsea, North Common, Wed., 5:45PM. Info: 685-2271.

Chronic Conditions Support Group. Chelsea Senior Center, in

the United Church of Chelsea, 13 North Common. Free. Fri. 8:30-

11AM. Info:728-7714.

Chelsea Historical Society House/Museum. Open 3rd Sat. May-

Oct., FREE, 10AM.-12PM. Info: 685-4447.

EAST BARRE- Story Hour. Aldrich Library York Branch, Tues.,

ages 0-3. 10AM., ages 3-5 10:30AM. Info: 476-5118.

E. HARDWICK- Touch of Grace Assembly of God Church,

corner Rts. 15 &16.Sun. worship 10AM; Tues. Bible study (call

for info). Wed. youth group: 5PM dinner, 6PM activity. Info: 472-

5550.

E. MONTPELIER- Men’s Ministry. Crossroads Christian

Church. Mon. 7-9PM. Men’s Breakfast: 2nd Sat., 8AM. Sun.

Service: 9:30-11AM. Info: 476-8536.

Twin Valley Senior Center. 4583 U.S. Rte 2. Open Mon., Weds.,

Fri., 9AM-2PM. For class listing and info: 223-3322.

GROTON - YA Book Club: 3rd Mon., 6:30PM; Book Discussion

Group: 4th Mon., 7PM; Crafts & Conversation, Wed., 1-3PM.

Round Robin Storytime for kids age 0-5: Tues., 10AM. All at

Groton Public Library. Info: 584-3358.

HARDWICK - Caregiver Support Group. Agency on Aging,

rear entrance Merchants Bank, 2nd Thurs. 229-0308 x306.

Peace and Justice Coalition. G.R.A.C.E. Arts bldg (old firehouse),

Tues., 7PM. Info: 533-2296.

Nurturing Fathers Program. Light supper included. Thurs.,

6-8:30PM. Registration/info: 472-5229.

MARSHFIELD- Playgroup. Twinfield Preschool, Mon.,

8:15AM-9:45AM (except when school not in session).

Story Time & Playgroup. Jaquith Public Library. Wed.,

10-11:30AM. For kids age 0-6. Program not held days Twinfield

Union is closed.

continued on page 26


We have the

Cure for your

Holiday Headaches

HAPPY HOLIDAYS!

The Northfield Pharmacy

MON.-FRI. 9-6; SAT. 9-2; SUN. 8-NOON

DEPOT SQUARE • NORTHFIELD

485-4771

Do you remember this Santa e’s a former elivery erson for the ORLD

Thanks and

best wishes to our

friends and customers

at the holidays!

Dick

Blake’s

Southern Cars

Serving Central Vermont

for 57 Years

Rt. 14, East Montpelier

223-7191

May the spirit

of the season fill your heart

and home with joy!

Bragg Farm

Sugar House &

Gift Shop

1005 VT Route 14N

East Montpelier, VT

376-5757 | 223-5757

Thanks and

Best Wishes from

our family to yours!

Country

Pampered Paws

Pet Grooming

45 Old Farm Road

East Montpelier, VT 05651

802-229-0114

Merry and

bright wishes

to you and yours

at Christmastime!

Central Vermont

Rotary Club

Thanks and

Best Wishes from

our family to yours!

Hutchins Roofing

& Sheet Metal Co.

www.HutchinsRoofing.com

17 West Second Street, Barre

802-476-5591

1-800-649-8932

Wishing all of our

friends and neighbors

all the best!

Morse Farm

Maple Sugarworks

1168 County Rd., Montpelier

802-223-2740

Merry Christmas,

Happy New Year

& God Bless!

Bill Doyle &

Olene Doyle

& Family

Merry Christmas

&

Happy New Year

The WORLD

403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin

802-479-2582

800-639-9753

Good Tidings

to You & Yours

at Christmas!

Yankee

Clipper

at The Master’s Edge

100 State St., Montpelier

223-7361

Merry Christmas

& Many Thanks for

Your Business!

Midstate

Chrysler•Jeep•Dodge

Ram•Hyundai

1365 US Rte. 302

Barre, VT 05641

800-340-0101

Happy Holidays

To All! Thank You

For Your Business!!

Subway Berlin

1284 US Rt. 302, Suite 4

Barre, VT 05641

476-3737

Merry Christmas

from Dr. Michael Adler

& His Fabulous Staff

at

Central Vermont

Dental Center

417 US Route 302-Berlin

(next to the WORLD)

802-622-0801

December 19, 2018 The WORLD page 25


HOT OR ICED

Cappiccino

or Latte

4 pm - 6 pm only

Medium size only

Now through Dec. 31

Barre

622-0730

Midsummer Night’s

Dream

LNT, 2011

francis moran

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DRIVE

UP

B-M Road-Berlin

622-0250

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UP

page 26 The WORLD December 19, 2018

$

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Jaquith Public Library Activities. Old

Schoolhouse Common, Story & Play Group:

Wed. 10-11:30AM. Book Group for Adults: stop

by for copy of the book, 4th Mon., 7PM. Info:

426-3581.

MIDDLESEX - Food Shelf. United Methodist

Church, Sat., 9-10:30AM.

MONTPELIER- Vermont College of Fine

Arts Friday Night Reading Series at the Cafe

Anna, 1st floor of College Hall, 36 College St.

5:30-7:30PM. Free snacks.

Overeaters Anonymous: 12-step program for

people who identify as overeaters, compulsive

eaters, food addicts, anorexics, bulimics, etc. All

welcome; no dues or fees. Info re: place & time:

863-2655.

LGBTQ Veterans Group, Christ Episcopal

Church. 6PM-8:30PM. 2nd & 4th Wed. Info:

825-2045.

1st Friday Folk Dancing. Montpelier Senior

Activity Center. 1st Friday of the month.

Donation: $3-5. Info: 223-2518.

Irish Session. Sat.,2PM-5PM & Southern Old

Time Music Jam. 2nd and 4th Sun.,

10AM-12:30PM. Both take place at Bagitos, 28

Main St.

Sunday School. Christian Science Church, 145

State St., Sun., 10:30AM.

Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup. North Branch

Nature Center. Mon. 9:30-11:30AM. Info: 229-

6206.

Montpelier Kiwanis Club. Tues., 6PM. at The

Steak House. All are welcome. Info: 229-6973.

Onion River Exchange Tool Library. 46 Barre

St. Over 85 tools. Wed., 10AM-2PM, Thurs.,

10AM-2PM.

Rainbow Umbrella of Central Vermont, 58

Barre St. An LGBTQ group. 3rd Tues., 5:45PM

for a casual dinner at a local restaurant. Info:

RUCVTAdmin@PrideCenterVT.org.

Friday Night Group. Open to all LGBTQ youth

ages 13-22. Pizza & social time, facilitated by

adults from Outright VT. Unitarian Church, 2nd

& 4th Fri., 6:30-8PM. Info: 223-7035.

Meditation. Mon.,1PM.; Intro to Yoga, Tues.

4PM; Consults, Fri. 11AM. Free classes, limits

apply. Fusion Studio, 56 East State St. Info: 272-

8923.

Open Library. Resurrection Baptist Church.

Sun. 12:30-2PM.

Central VT Roller Derby’s Wrecking Doll

Society. Intro to roller derby, gear supplied,

bring mouth guard. Montpelier Rec. Center,

Barre St., Sat. 5-6:30PM. Info: www.twincityriot.com.

Celiac Support Group. Tulsi Tea Room, 34 Elm

St., 2nd Wed., 4-5PM. Info: 598-9206.

MSAC Public Activities. Montpelier Senior

Activity Center, 58 Barre St. FEAST Together:

Tues. & Fri.,12-1PM (EXCEPT July 24, July 27,

July 31, August 3). RSVP 262-6288. Living

Strong: Mon. 2:30-3:30PM. & Fri. 2-3PM;

Crafters Group: Wed., 12-2PM. Photography

Club: Thurs., 12-1PM; Ukulele Group: Thurs.,

6-8PM; Walks with Joan: Tues., 10-11AM; Italian

Group: Tues., 1:15-2:45PM; Trash Tramps: Tues.,

2-3PM.For info on a listing: 223-2518.

A Course in Miracles at Christ Episcopal

Church, 64 State St., each Tues., 7-8PM. Info:

622-4516.

Parent’s Group & Meet-Up. Connect with local

parents to share advice & info. Kellogg-Hubbard

Library, Hayes Rm, 1st Mon., 10-11:30AM. Info:

mamasayszine@gmail.com.

Families Anonymous. For families or friends

who have issues with addiction, alcohol and/or

mental illness. Bethany Church, 2nd floor youth

room, Mon., 7-8PM. Info: 229-6219.

Freeride Montpelier Open Shop Nights. Need

help w/a bike repair? Come to the volunteer-run

community bike shop. 89 Barre St., Wed. 4-6PM.

Info: freeridemontpelier.org.

Free Community Meals. Mon: Unitarian

Church, 11AM-1PM; Tues: Bethany Church,

11:30AM-1PM; Wed: Christ Church,

11AM-12:30PM; Thurs: Trinity Church,

11:30AM-1PM; Fri: St. Augustine Church,

11AM-12:30PM; Last Sun., Bethany Church,

4:30-6:30PM.

Grandparents Raising Their Children’s

Children. Support group, childcare provided.

Resurrection Baptist Church, 144 Elm St., 2nd

Thurs., 6-8PM. Info: 476-1480.

Calico County Quilters. All skill levels welcome.

2nd Sat. Sept. through June, 1-3PM.

Location info: 244-7001.

Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA). Bethany

Church basement, Tues., 6:30PM. Info: 229-

9036.

Kellogg-Hubbard Library Activities. 135

Main St., Story Time: Tues/Fri, 10:30AM.

Info:223-3338.

CHADD ADHD Parent Support Group.

Childcare not available. Woodbury College, 2nd

Tues., 5:30-7:30PM. Info: 498-5928.

Resurrection Baptist Church Weekly Events.

144 Elm St. Sun., 9:45AM. Bible Study; 11AM.

Worship Service; Wed., 7PM. Prayer Meeting.

Good Beginnings of Central VT. 174 River St.

Drop-In Hours at the Nest. 1st floor Weds/Thurs/

Fri., 9AM-3PM. Babywearers of Central

Vermont meet upstairs, 4th Mon., 5:45-7:45PM

& 2nd Thurs., 9:30-11:30AM. Info: 595-7953.

Breastfeeding support: 3rd Thurs., 9:30-

11:30AM; Nursing Beyond a Year: 3rd Fri.,

9:30-11:30AM (802-879-3000).

Al-Anon. Trinity Methodist Church, Main St.,

Sun., 6:15-7:30PM. Info:1-866-972-5266.

Al-Anon. Bethany Church basement, 115 Main

St., Tues. & Thurs. 12-1PM., Wed. 7-8PM. Info:

1-866-972-5266.

SL AA. 12-step recovery group for sex/relationship

problems. Bethany Church, Wed., 5PM.

Info: 249-6825.

Survivors of Incest Anonymous. Bethany

Church parlor, 115 Main St., Mon., 5PM. Please

call first: 229-9036 or 454-8402.

Brain Injury Support Group. Unitarian

Church, 3rd Thurs., 1:30-2:30PM. Info: 1-877-

856-1772.

Playgroups: Dads & Kids, Thurs., 6-7:30PM.

and Sat., 9:30-11AM, at Family Center of

Washington County. Held during school year

only.

Kindred Connections Peer to Peer Cancer

Support for patients & caregivers. Info: 1-800-

652-5064.

Christian Meditation. Christ Church, Mon.,

12-1PM.

Mood Disorders Support Group. 149 State St.,

Last Entryway, First Floor. Peer & professionally

led support for people coping with mental illness.

Wed. 4-5PM. Free. Info: 917-1959.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs.

Montpelier Police, 1 Pitkin Court, 223-3445 &

Washington County Sheriff, 10 Elm St., 223-

3001. Get rid of old or unused meds at these

local permanent safe disposal sites.

MEMORY CAFE. is no longer at the Montpelier

Senior Activity Center, 58 Barre St. It is now

called MEMORABLE TIMES CAFE hosted

Central Vermont Council on Aging and the State

of Vermont ABLE Library and will be held the

3rd Wednesday of each month October through

March at the Vermont History Center, 60

Washington St., Barre, VT. Contact Barb Asen,

CVCOA Family Caregiver Support Director,

at basen@cvcoa.org or 802-476-2681

Community Song Circle. Center for Arts &

Learning, 46 Barre St. 1st Sun. except July/Aug.,

6-8PM. Info: vtcommunitysing@gmail.com.

MORETOWN- Mad River Chorale.

Rehearsals at Harwood Union H.S., Mon.,

7-9PM. Info: 496-2048.

MORRISVILLE - “The Role of Power,

Authority and Control in Groups” Monthly

Meeting at the Morristown Centennial Library,

20 Lower Main St. 1st Tues. 5:30PM-7PM.

Info: gerette@dreamhavenvt.com.

Overeaters Anonymous: 12-step program for

people who identify as overeaters, compulsive

eaters, food addicts, anorexics, bulimics, etc. All

welcome; no dues or fees. Info re: place & time:

863-2655.

River Arts Events. Photo Co-op Drop-in 3rd

Thurs., 6PM-8PM. $5 suggested donation.

Poetry Clinic Drop-in 1st & 3rd Tues., 6PM-8PM.

$5 suggested donation.

NORTHFIELD- Bingo. Northfield Senior

Center. Mon., 4PM.

Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program. Ages 12-18.

Readiness & Regional Technology Center,

Norwich campus, Tues., 6-8:30PM. Info: capitalcomposite@yahoo.com.

Clogging & Irish Step Lessons. W/Green

Mountain Cloggers, ages 8-78. Sun., 5-8PM.

Info: 522-2935.

Playgroup. United Church of Northfield. Wed.,

9:30-11AM. Held only when school in session.

Info: 262-3292 x113.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs. Northfield

Police, 110 Wall St., 485-9181. Get rid of old or

unused meds at these local permanent safe disposal

sites.

PLAINFIELD- Farmers Market. Fri., 4-7

P.M., Mill Street. Local produce, plants,

crafts, maple syrup, teas and tea service, and

more.

Community Supper Support Group, Grace

United Methodist Church. 4th Tues., 6PM-7PM.

Info: michaelbix@gmail.com.

Cardio Funk Class. the Community Center.

Fri., 5-6PM. Info: email shannonkellymovement@gmail.com.

Cutler Memorial Library Activities. Classic

Book Club: 1st Mon., 6PM; Tuesday Night

Knitters (except 1st Tues.). Info: 454-8504.

Diabetes Discussion & Support Group.

Everyone welcome. The Health Center conf.

room, 3rd Thurs., 1:30PM. Info:322-6600.

RANDOLPH- Health Support Groups. Maple

Leaf Room at Gifford Medical Center. Tobacco

Cessation Program regularly offers four-week

“Quit in Person” group sessions. Info: 728-7714.

Caregiver Support Group at the Gifford

Medical Center. 2PM-3PM. Meets 2nd Wed. of

the month. Info: 728-7781.

Diabetes Management Program. Kingwood

Health Center (lower level conf. room), 1422 VT

Route 66. Thurs., 10AM-12:30PM. Six week

program for people diagnosed with type-2 diabetes.

Info/register: 728-7714.

New Business Forum. Vermont Tech Enterprise

Center, 1540 VT Rte 66, 2nd Wed.s,

11:30AM-1PM. Info: 728-9101.

continued on next page


Yoga Classes. All ages & levels. Donations benefit Safeline. VTC

Campus Center, last Sun. of month, 2-3:30PM.

Randolph Senior Ctr. Activites, 6 Hale St., Lift for Life Exercises:

8:30AM,Tu/Th & Weds/Fri; Cribbage: Mon., 10AM; Bingo: Mon.,

10:30AM; Bridge: Mon., at the Joslyn House, 2:15PM;Mahjongg:

Tues., 10AM; Crafts: Wed., 10:30AM; Knit-Wits: Thurs., 10AM;

Foot Clinics: 1st Wed., call to sign up; Book Club: 1st Wed.,

12:45PM. Info: 728-9324.

Cancer Support Group. Gifford Conference Ctr, 2nd Tues., 9:30-

11AM. Info:728-2270.

Storytime. Kimball Library. Wed., 11AM, ages 2-5; Toddler-time,

Fri., 10:30AM; Gathering for handwork, 2nd & 4th Mon., 6PM.

WAITSFIELD - Community Acupuncture Night. Free assessment

& treatment. Donations welcome. Three Moons Wellness,

859 Old County Rd., 2nd fl., last Weds., 4-7PM. RSVP: 272-3690.

WARREN- Knit and Play. Warren Public Library. Bring your

kids & your projects. All levels. Thurs., 9:30-11:30AM.

WASHINGTON- Central VT ATV Club. Washington Fire

Station, 3rd Tues., 6:30PM. Info: 224-6889.

Calef Mem. Library Activities. Art & Adventure w/ April: 3rd

Sat., 1AM; Storytime: Mon., 11AM; Tech Help Drop-In: Sat.,

10AM-2PM. Info: 883-2343.

WATERBURY - Waterbury Public Library Activities.

Preschool Story Time: Thurs., 10AM. Baby & Toddler Story Time:

Mon., 10AM. Crafts: Tues., 3-4PM. Info: 244-7036.

WATERBURY CTR- Bible Study Group. Waterbury Ctn

Grange. Sun., 5-6PM. Bring bible, coffee provided. Info: 498-

4565.

WEBSTERVILLE- Fire District #3, Prudential Committee.

Monthly meeting, 105 Main St., 2nd Tues., 6PM.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs. Barretown Police, 149

Websterville Rd., 479-0508. Get rid of old or unused meds at these

local permanent safe disposal sites.

Weekly Guided Nature Walks, Barre Town Forest. 9AM. Meet

at 44 Brook St. Websterville. All ages & dogs on leashes welcome.

Easy to moderate. Tues. (unless it’s raining enough for an umbrella)

through September. Info: 476-4185.

WEST TOPSHAM- Bible Study. New Hope Methodist Church,

2 Gendron Rd. Wed., 6:30PM.

WILLIAMSTOWN- Bible Study. Christian Alliance Church,

Sun., 6PM. Info: 476-3221.

WOODBURY- Woodbury Community Library Winter Hours:

Mon/Wed., 1-5PM, Sat., 10AM-12PM. Knitting/Handworkers’

Circle: Sat., 10AM-12PM. All ages & abilities.Valley Lake Road.

Info: 472-5710.

WORCESTER- Knitting Night. The Wool Shed, Tues., 6:30-

8:30PM.

Wednesday, December 19

GREENSBORO- Mid-Week Movie: Murder on the Orient

Express at the Highland Center for the Arts, 2875 Hardwick St.

6PM-8PM. $5. Info: www.highlandartsvt.org.

MONTPELIER- Lost Nation Theater Presents Stories for the

Season – a Special Holiday-Inspired Event at Montpelier City

Hall Arts Center. 7PM. Join favorite LNT artists and fans for dramatic

readings of stories from around the world that celebrate the

return of the light. Info: www.lostnationtheater.org.

OLLI Presents the film, “The Unknown Girl,” Savoy Theater,

26 Main St. 12:30PM. A young doctor is determined to discover

the identity of an African woman found dead near her office.

Discussion following the film. Info: gracewgreene@comcast.net.

Ring, Christmas Tower Bells! United Methodist Church.

11:58AM. Michael Loris will play the unrestored 1908 McShane

chime of ten bells.

STOWE- Increase the Light: A Singing Experience at the

Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, 122 Hourglass Dr.

5PM-6:30PM. A multi-faith, multi-sensory experience for all-ages.

Donations accepted for the Helen Day Art Center and Stowe Free

Library, as well as Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society. Info: 253-1800

or jcogs@jcogs.org.

WARREN- VSO Brass Quintet/Counterpoint at the Warren

United Church, 339 Main St. 7:30PM. The ensemble is pleased to

present the VT premiere Nancy Tillman’s beloved children’s book,

“On the Night You Were Born.” Info: Visit www.vso.org.

Thursday, December 20

BARRE- Jason Baker Acoustic at Gusto’s, 28 Prospect St. 5PM.

Free. Also at Gusto’s: DJ Rome 802, Dance Hits. 8PM. Free. 21+

CALAIS- Open Mic at the Whammy Bar, 31 W. County Rd.

7PM. Info: 229-4329.

GREENSBORO- Music @ The Café: Sam Bulpin at the

Highland Center for the Arts, 2875 Hardwick St. 6PM-8PM. No

cover, please tip performers and servers. Sam Bulpin is local student,

musician, and aspiring actor. Info: www.highlandartsvt.org.

MONTPELIER- Harpist Judi Byron Free Concert at the Christ

Church Episcopal, 64 State St. 12PM. all are welcome to bring a

bag lunch. Coffee, tea, (and sometimes cookies) are provided.

Info: 223-3631.

Ring, Christmas Tower Bells! United Methodist Church.

11:58AM. Michael Loris will play the unrestored 1908 McShane

chime of ten bells.

RANDOLPH- Chandler’s 17th Annual Holiday Artisans

Market at the Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 Main St. Hours

& info: www.chandler-arts.org.

Friday, December 21

BARRE- Elizabeth Renaud Acoustic at Gusto’s, 28 Prospect St.

5PM. Free. Also at Gusto’s: Heartless Tribute to Heart & Led

Zeppelin.9PM. $10. 21+

CALAIS- Papa’s Porch (Bluegrass) at the Whammy Bar, 31 W.

County Rd. 7:30PM. Info: 229-4329.

MONTPELIER- Ring, Christmas Tower Bells! United

Methodist Church. 11:58AM. Michael Loris will play the unrestored

1908 McShane chime of ten bells.

RANDOLPH- Chandler’s 17th Annual Holiday Artisans

Market at the Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 Main St. Hours

& info: www.chandler-arts.org.

Saturday, December 22

BARRE- Moving Light Dance Company Presents The 12th

Annual Green Mountain Nutcracker, Barre Opera House. 7PM.

Experience the joy of a cherished holiday traditions with a local

twist. Tickets & Info: barreoperahouse.org, 476-8188.

DJ LaFountaine Dance Hits at Gusto’s. 9:30PM. Free. 21+

CALAIS-Liz Beatty and the Alternates (Electric Blues, Soul) at

the Whammy Bar, 31 W. County Rd. 7:30PM. Info: 229-4329.

MONTPELIER- Onion River Choral Concert at the Unitarian

Church, 130 Main St. 7:30PM. $20. Followed by reception. Info:

www.onionriverchorus.org.

Ring, Christmas Tower Bells! United Methodist Church.

11:58AM. Michael Loris will play the unrestored 1908 McShane

chime of ten bells.

RANDOLPH- Chandler’s 17th Annual Holiday Artisans

Market at the Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 Main St. Hours

& info: www.chandler-arts.org.

Sunday, December 23

BARRE- Moving Light Dance Company Presents The 12th

Annual Green Mountain Nutcracker, Barre Opera House. 2PM.

Experience the joy of a cherished holiday traditions, a classic story

with a local twist. Tickets & Info: barreoperahouse.org, 476-8188.

MONTPELIER- Onion River Choral Concert at the Unitarian

Church, 130 Main St. 4PM. $20. Followed by reception. Info:

www.onionriverchorus.org.

RANDOLPH- Chandler’s 17th Annual Holiday Artisans

Market at the Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 Main St. Hours

& info: www.chandler-arts.org.

Monday, December 24

MONTPELIER- Ring, Christmas Tower Bells! United

Methodist Church. 11:58AM. Michael Loris will play the unrestored

1908 McShane chime of ten bells.

NORTHFIELD- Holy Supper of the Nativity (Meal Will Be

Served) at the St. Jacob Orthodox Christian Church, 376 Rt 12.

4PM-5PM. Vespers of Christmas. Info: 673-4042.

Tuesday, December 25

MONTPELIER- Ring, Christmas Tower Bells! United

Methodist Church. 11:58AM. Michael Loris will play the unrestored

1908 McShane chime of ten bells.

NORTHFIELD- Divine Liturgy of Christmas at the St. Jacob

Orthodox Christian Church, 376 Rt 12. 9:30AM. Info: 673-4042.

Thursday, December 27

BARRE- Stefani Capizzi Acoustic, Gusto’s, 28 Prospect St.

5PM. Free. Also:DJ Rome 802 Dance Hits. 8PM. Free. 21+

CALAIS- Open Mic, Whammy Bar, 31 W. County Rd. 7PM.

Info: 229-4329.

Friday, December 28

BARRE- Cooie DeFrancesco Acoustic at Gusto’s, 28 Prospect

St. 5PM. Free. All ages, Also at Gusto’s:.Lyons Disiple Raggae.

9PM. $5. 21+

CALAIS- Kelly Ravin and Halle Jade at the Whammy Bar, 31

W. County Rd. 7:30PM. Info: 229-4329.

MONTPELIER- General Auditions for 2019 Plays at Lost

Nation Theater, 39 Main St. By appointment: 3PM-8PM. Age 15+.

Prepare 2 contrasting monologues and 16 bars of a song (optional)

no longer than two total minutes. Bring headshot and resume.

Sign-up: Sign-up: info@lostnationtheater.org.

Saturday, December 29

BARRE- DJ KAOS Dance Hits at Gusto’s, 28 Prospect St.

9:30PM. Free. 21+

BERLIN- Kevin McEnerney & Jas White DUO Acoustic at

Dog River Brewery, 1400 US-302. 6PM. Free. 21+

CALAIS- Praxis (Jazz/Prog)

at the Whammy Bar, 31 W.

County Rd. 7:30PM. Info: 229-

4329.

Monday,

December 31

BARRE- New Years Even

Family Glow Party at the

Barre Elks Lodge.

8:30PM-12:15AM. DJ ELMT.

Bring your own snacks & nonalcoholic

beverages. Members

lounge for 21+. $10/$30 for the

family. Tickets at Nelson’s Ace

Hardware & NYEFamilyGlow.

EVENTBRITE.com.

MONTPELIER- VT Blues

Artist Dave Keller Performs

Special Evening Concert w/

Bandmate Ira Friedman at

the Unitarian Church, 130 Main

St. 5:30PM. $15/$20. Info:

info@davekeller.com.

RICHMOND- Folknight

Richmond at the

Congregational Church, 20

Church St. 7PM. Performers

from Young Tradition Vermont,

Emerald Rae, Old Sky, and

Pete’ Posse will be sharing their

music in a concert to benefit the

Richmond Historical Society.

Suggested donation $20/person.

Info: 434-3654.

Wednesday,

January 2

GREENSBORO- Mid-Week

Movie: The Help at the

Highland Center for the Arts,

2875 Hardwick St.

6PM-8:30PM. $5. Info: www.

highlandartsvt.org.

THE AMERICAN

LEGION

BARRE POST 10

320 NORTH MAIN ST.

BARRE, VT

Fri., Dec. 21 • 7-11 pm

SHERRI’S

JUBILEE

$4 COVER

Sat., Dec. 22 • 7-11 pm

KRAZY

KOUNTRY

$6 COVER

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

21 & OVER

For information, call the Post at

479-9058

Gregoire’s Violin Shop

Making & Restoring Fine Violins

Rentals • Service • Sales

Violin • Viola • Cello • Bass

LESSONS FOR ALL AGES

FREE VIOLIN RENTAL

WITH WEEKLY LESSONS

up to 6 months

Monthly

Rentals: Violin $ 15 Cello $ 28

10 Hutchins Circle, Barre 476-7798

www.vermontviolinmaker.com

THURSDAY - SATURDAY

11AM-8PM

Serving Breakfast SUNDAYS ONLY 8am-2pm

2678 River Street, Bethel (2.6 mi. on VT Rt. 107)

802-234-9400 www.toziersrestaurant.com

CANADIAN CLUB

BINGO

•Flash Ball 1: $500.

•Flash Ball 2: $200.

•MEGA Jackpot: $3,600.

•Jackpot: $1,300.

Thursday Night

•Doors Open at 4:00 PM

•Premies at 6:00 PM

•Regular Games at 7:00 PM

CANADIAN CLUB

ROUTE 14 • 479-9090

Just outside of Barre

Ring in

the

New

Year!

at the

Barre American Legion!

Share the Gift of Music! ♫ Come Play With Us!

Three Orchestras ~ All instruments & ages

Intro to Strings, Group Class

Beginners ages 8-12 ♪ Tuesdays, 3:45-4:45pm, Jan. 15—Mar. 19

Downtown Montpelier ♫ Discounted Rentals Available

REGISTER NOW!!

info@gmys-vt.org ♫ www.gmys-vt.org ♫ (802) 888-4470

ANNUAL

APPRECIATION NIGHT

TURKEY

DINNER &

FIXINGS

WITH DESERT

featuring the band

CONTAGIOUS

$35 PER PERSON

includes dinner, dancing,

midnight buffet and a

champagne toast

to ring in the new year!

Dinner 7:00pm

Band 8:30-12:30

Call (802) 479-9058 for more info

and to make your reservation

320 N. Main St., Barre

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

21 AND OVER

December 19, 2018 The WORLD page 27


Rodney Marsalis Philadelphia Big Brass @ Fuller

Hall

December 21 @ 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

Into The Mystic: A Tribute to Van Morrison @

Higher Ground

December 21 @ 8:00 pm - 11:00 pm

Kat Wright @ Higher Ground

December 30 @ 9:00 pm - 11:30 pm

Kat Wright @ Higher Ground

December 31 @ 9:00 pm - 11:30 pm

Pink Talking Fish @ Strand Theatre

January 18, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 11:00 pm

Havana Cuba All-Stars & Dancers @ Fuller Hall

January 29, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

Young the Giant @ Flynn Center

January 29, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 11:00 pm

The Logger and the Fiddler @ Fuller Hall

February 2, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

A Beatles Tribute @ Higher Ground

February 2, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 10:30 pm

California Guitar Trio and Montreal Guitar Trio @

UVM Recital Hall

February 8, 2019 @ 7:30 pm - 10:30 pm

oncert

Connections

Shanghai Opera Symphony Orchestra @ Lyndon

Institute Auditorium

February 13, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

Kurt Vile & The Violators @ Higher Ground

February 14, 2019 @ 8:30 pm - 11:00 pm

Matt Nathanson @ Higher Ground

February 28, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 11:00 pm

Ranky Tanky @ UVM Recital Hall

March 8, 2019 @ 7:30 pm - 10:30 pm

Storm Large @ Flynn Center

March 9, 2019 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Québecfest @ Flynn Center

March 15, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 11:00 pm

Dervish @ Barre Opera House

March 16, 2019 @ 7:30 pm - 11:00 pm

The Secret Sisters @ Barre Opera House

March 23, 2019 @ 7:30 pm - 11:00 pm

Frankenstein @ Fuller Hall

March 27, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

For venue phone numbers, call

The Point at 223-2396 9:00 to 5:00

Mon.-Fri., or visit our web site at

www.pointfm.com

ART EXHIBITS

BARRE- Studio Place Arts Presents: Rock Solid XVIII. This

annual stone sculpture exhibit, since 2000, showcases stone

sculptures and assemblages by area artists and other work

that depicts the beautiful qualities of stone. Second Floor

Gallery:Finding the Quiet by Linda Finkelstein - works in

rust, eucalyptus and indigo. CELEBRATE! Enjoy this 3-floor

fine art and craft extravaganza with work created by more than

80 Studio Place Arts (SPA) member artists, and CELEBRATE

3X: (1) Find one-of-a-kind handmade gifts & treasures; (2)

Support local artists and crafts people and fortify our local

economy; & (3) Boost the programs for all ages and abilities at

SPA, your nonprofit art center. Runs 11/13-12/27. Studio Place

Arts (SPA) 201 N. Main St. Info: www.studioplacearts.com.

Studio Place Arts presents: Scrap Yard: Drawings by Mark

Heitzman. An exhibit of 10 large-scale graphite or charcoal

drawings of tools and other objects, including a tire iron, the

bottom of an ancient oil can, and a drill bit. On display through

March 2, 2019, at The Morse Block Deli, located 260 N. Main

Street, Barre. Info: www.studioplacearts.com.

CHELSEA- Julia M. Pavone: “Mixing it Up... Encaustic,

Cold Wax and Found Object Paintings.” On exhibit 11/1-

12/31 at the Chelsea Public Library. Info: 685-2188.

JEFFERSONVILLE- GEMS and GIANTS: An Exhibition

of Small Paintings and Large Paintings at the Bryan Memorial

Gallery, 180 Main St. An exhibition of 150 artworks by its gallery

members in a small format and in a large format. New this

year is the addition of “Giants” to the mix, with works by gallery

members juried into this aspect of the show. Both exhibits open

11/8. Runs 11/8-12/23. Info: www.bryangallery.org.

Bryan Memorial Gallery Presents Heartbeet Felts, an

Exhibition of Wall Hangings Created by the Members of

the Heartbeet Lifesharing Community. Heartbeet is a

vibrant lifesharing- community and licensed therapeutic residence

that includes adults with developmental disabilities and

interweaves the social and agricultural realms for the healing

and renewing of our society and the earth. Bryan Memorial

Gallery is honored to present this exhibition of felted wall

hangings as an expression of the gallery’s commitment to the

community. Runs 11/8 – 12/23. Bryan Memorial Gallery is

located at 180 Main St. Info: www.bryangallery.org.

MARSHFIELD- Digital Photography Exhibition Work By

Twinfield Digital Photography Students at the Jaquith Library,

122 School St. Runs 11/3-1/2/2019. Info: 426-3581.

MONTPELIER- Current Paintings by Mary McKay Lower

and Elizabeth Nelson Holiday Pop-Up of Vermont Artists

and Silent Auction at the T.W. Wood Gallery, 46 Barre St. The

in Montpelier, VT announces an upcoming exhibit of two

Vermont artists, Mary McKay Lower and Elizabeth Nelson.

Nelson will feature works from her travels to Iceland. Lower

will exhibit landscapes and still life paintings. Runs 10/30-

1/4/19. Info: www.twwoodgallery.org & 262-6035.

Dee Christie & Robin Leone at the Cheshire Cat, 28 Elm St.

Dee Christie repurposes old books into visual works of art ~

painting, collaging and drawing within the pages to create art

infused with positivity and whimsy. Robin Leone of Robin’s

Hoods handcrafts felted wool hats that are one of a kind. Runs

through Dec. Info: www.cheshirecatclothing.com.

Thomas Waterman Wood – The Master Copies at the T.W.

Wood Gallery, 46 Barre St. Wood created commissioned portraits

across the United States and Canada which lead to a trip to

Europe in 1858 with his wife. While Wood was in Europe he fell

in love with the paintings of the European Masters, including

Rembrandt and Turner. Info: info@twwoodgallery.org, 262-

6035. Runs 10/30– 6/1/2019.

Interior/Exterior: Paintings and Drawings by Diane Fitch at

the Vermont Supreme Court Gallery. Explores a disciplined

lifetime of painting and drawing. With strong influences from

paintings of 18th and 19th century domestic interiors, Fitch

moves her subject matter into modern motifs and meaning. Runs

10/1-12/21.

The Vermont Arts Council Presents 7Women 7Walls, an

exhibit featuring work by seven Vermont artists whose techniques

range from fiber art and collage to encaustic and frottage.

Their work is deeply personal, expressing explorations into their

life experiences, spirituality, and responses to both the natural

and digital world. The exhibit runs through 12/28.

WATERBURY- Worcester Pastel Artist Marcia Hill’s

Display “Through the Seasons” at the Waterbury Public

Library, Hill’s exhibit depicts pastel paintings through the

seasons and is aptly titled. Info: www.marciahillart.com, 244-

7036. Marcia’s paintings will be on display until the end of

December.

page 28 The WORLD December 19, 2018

VCRD Invites Community Applications for 2019

Climate Economy Model Communities Program

The Vermont Council on Rural Development (VCRD)

invites communities interested in developing local solutions

that reduce carbon emissions and increase economic vitality

to participate in the 2019 Climate Economy Model

Communities Program. A collaboration of VCRD, Efficiency

Vermont, Vermont’s utilities and other partners, the Program

works with two communities annually to help build and

implement locally developed projects that increase economic

opportunity, affordability, and resilience in the face of climate

change. The Program kicked off in 2017 and is working or has

completed work in Pownal, Middlebury, Randolph and

Swanton. An overview of the efforts can be found here

-https://www.vtrural.org/sites/default/files/Overview%20

and%20ProfilesFinal.pdf.

“Many Vermont towns are grappling simultaneously with

two big questions – how can they strengthen their local

economy and how can they do their part as a community to

tackle climate change? The Climate Economy Model

Communities Program binds these two questions together and

helps towns identify and push forward projects that achieve

both goals. The Model Communities Program also provides

an important opportunity to address the needs of low and

middle-income Vermonters who face significant financial

burdens as they try to pay for electricity, heating, and transportation

fuels,” noted Paul Costello, Executive Director of

VCRD. “Participating towns and partners have rallied together

to develop a strong portfolio of local projects. New communities

selected for the program for 2019 will be able to

build upon this great platform of work as they chart their own

path.”

“At Efficiency Vermont we believe that town-level action

is key in Vermont’s efforts to reduce energy usage and energy

costs,” noted Rebecca Foster, Director of Efficiency Vermont.

CVTV Channel 192 • BARRE, VT

Wednesday

6:00AM - News

8:00AM - Science &

Technology

10:00AM - Education

12:00PM - Entertainment

2:00PM - The Cinemaniacs

4:00PM - Health

6:00PM - News

8:00PM - Science &

Technology

10:00PM - The Folklorist

Thursday

6:00AM - News

8:00AM - Grace & Truth

Ministries

10:00AM - The Folklorist

12:00PM - Entertainment

2:00PM - Sports

4:00PM - History

6:00PM - News

8:00PM - Grace & Truth

Ministries

10:00PM - The Folklorist

Friday

6:00AM - News

8:00AM - Grace & Truth

Ministries

10:00AM - Cooking Show

12:00PM - Entertainment

2:00PM - Middlesex

Historical Society - Allen

Church

4:00PM - Vermont State

House

6:00PM - News

8:00PM - History

10:00PM - Energy Week

Saturday

6:00AM - Barre

Congregational Church

8:00AM - Science &

Technology

10:00AM - First Presbyterian

Church

12:00PM - Cooking Show

2:00PM - Barre

Congregational Church

4:00PM - History

6:00PM - Cooking Show

8:00PM - New England Uncut

- Episode

10:00PM - Christmas In The

Village Chester 2018

Sunday

6:00AM - Washington Baptist

Church

8:00AM - First Presbyterian

Church

10:00AM - Cooking Show

12:00PM - Barre

Congregational Church

2:00PM - Cooking Show

3:00PM - First Presbyterian

Church

5:00PM - Christ Community

Church

6:00PM - Christmas In The

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also be viewed online at cvtv723.org

“All schedules are subject to

change, please call us

with questions - 479-1075.”

Village Chester 2018

10:00PM - Barre

Congregational Church

Monday

6:00AM - The Folklorist

8:00AM - Inspiring Careers -

Apostle Victor A Bessong

10:00AM - Science &

Technology

12:00PM - Entertainment

2:00PM - New England Uncut

- Episode

4:00PM- History

6:00PM - The Folklorist

8:00PM - Health

10:00PM - Middlesex

Historical Society - Allen

Church

Tuesday

6:00AM - News

8:00AM - History

10:00AM - Inspiring Careers -

Apostle Victor A Bessong

12:00PM - Entertainment

2:00PM - Sports

4:00PM - Yoga

6:00PM - News

8:00PM - Grace & Truth

Ministries

10:00PM - The Curious

Giraffe Show Season 1

CVTV CHANNEL 194

Wednesday

6:00AM - Community Bulletin Board

7:00AM - News

9:00AM - Barre City Council

12:00PM - Barre City Council

3:00PM - Barre City Council

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Williamstown

10:00PM - Williamstown

Thursday

6:00AM - Williamstown

9:00AM - Williamstown

12:00PM - Williamstown

2:00PM - Community Bulletin Board

3:00PM - Barre Supervisory Union

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Barre Supervisory Union

10:00PM - Barre Supervisory Union

Friday

6:00AM - Barre Supervisory Union

9:00AM - Barre Supervisory Union

12:00PM - Barre Supervisory Union

3:00PM - Barre Town Select

5:30PM - Community Bulletin Board

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Barre Town Select

10:00PM - Barre Town Select

Saturday

6:00AM - Barre Town Select

9:00AM - Barre Town Select

12:00PM - Barre Town Select

3:00PM - Community Bulletin Board

4:00PM - Washington Baplist

Church

5:00PM - Barre Congregational

Church

7:00PM - News

09:30PM - First Presbyterian Church

11:30PM - Barre Town Select

Sunday

6:00AM - Barre Congregational

Church

9:00AM - Washington Baplist

Church

10:00AM - First Presbyterian Church

12:30PM - Barre Congregational

Church

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also

be viewed online at cvtv723.org

2:30PM - Washington Baplist

Church

3:30PM - Christ Community Church

6:00PM - First Presbyterian Church

9:30PM - Barre Congregational

Church

10:50PM - First Presbyterian Church

Monday

6:00AM - Statehouse programming

9:00AM - Statehouse programming

12:00PM - Statehouse programming

3:00PM - Barre Act 46

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Barre Act 46

10:00PM - Barre Act 46

Tuesday

6:00AM - Barre Act 46

9:00AM - Barre Act 46

12:00PM - Barre Act 46

3:00PM to 5:00PM - Statehouse

programming

6:00PM - News

7:00PM - Barre City Council “Live”

CHARTER COMMUNICATIONS OF BARRE

ALL PROGRAMING SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE

ONION RIVER COMMUNITY ACCESS MEDIA CHANNELS 15, 16, 17

• Bethel • Braintree • Montpelier • Randolph • Rochester • U-32 District Towns • Waterbury Schedules subject to change without notice.

ORCA Media Channel 15 2:00p Energy Week

Christmas Carol Sing

Public Access

3:00p Democracy Now!

8:00a Democracy Now!

Weekly Program Schedule 4:00p Bill Doyle on VT Issues

9:00a Vote for Vermont

5:00p A Conversation with the Ski Industry 10:00a Crazy Chase Performance

Wednesday, December 19

7:00p Understanding Vermont's Opioid

6:00a Understanding Vermont's Opioid

Crisis

Crisis

8:30p Gay USA

7:30a Eckankar

9:30p Greater Burlington Women's Forum

8:00a Democracy Now!

11:00p House at Pooh Corner

9:00a Celluloid Mirror

10:00a Moccasin Tracks

Saturday, December 22

11:00a Bill Doyle on VT Issues

6:00a Wednesday Night Live

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program 7:30a Abled to Cook

1:00p Bread and Puppets

8:00a Greater Burlington Women's Forum

3:00p Democracy Now!

9:30a Ecosocialist Seminar

4:00p Christ Church Concert Series 10:30a Improbable Theater

5:00p Your Spark of Humanity

11:30a Your Spark of Humanity

5:30p Greater Burlington Women's Forum 12:30p House at Pooh Corner

7:00p A Conversation with the Ski Industry

9:00p Silver Maple Community Housing

Project

10:30p Wednesday Night Live

Thursday, December 20

6:00a Words On Film

7:00a Major Jackson

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Extempo

10:30a Silver Maple Community Housing

Project

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p Ecosocialist Seminar

6:30p Eckankar

3:00p Democracy Now!

4:00p Understanding Vermont's Opioid

Crisis

5:30p Improbable Theater

7:00p Bread and Puppets

9:00p Senior Moments

11:00p Celluloid Mirror

Friday, December 21

6:00a Bread and Puppets

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Abled and on Air

10:00a All Things LGBTQ

11:00a Talking About Movies

12:00p Brunch With Bernie

1:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:30p Extempo

3:00p Bear Pond Books Events

4:30p Roman Catholic Mass

5:00p Washington Baptist Church

6:00p Words On Film

7:00p A Christmas Carol

8:00p All Things LGBTQ

9:00p Vote for Vermont

10:00p Octagon St. Laveau

10:30p Betty St. Laveau's House of Horror

Sunday, December 23

6:00a A Christmas Carol

7:00a Bear Pond Books Events

8:30a Energy Week

9:30a Washington Baptist Church

10:30a Roman Catholic Mass

11:00a House at Pooh Corner

12:00p The Telling Project

3:00p Senior Moments

5:00p Vote for Vermont

6:30p Yoga For You

7:00p Ecosocialist Seminar

8:00p Abled to Cook

8:30p Abled and on Air

9:30p Improbable Theater

10:30p Your Spark of Humanity

11:00p Words On Film

Monday, December 24

6:00a The 48th Annual Community

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p Celluloid Mirror

2:00p A Christmas Carol

3:00p Democracy Now!

4:00p Moccasin Tracks

5:00p Middlebury Community Wind

Ensemble

6:30p Yoga for You

7:00p Major Jackson

8:00p Christ Church Concert Series

9:00p The 48th Annual Community

Christmas Carol Sing

Tuesday, December 25

6:00a Christ Church Concert Series

7:00a A Christmas Carol

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a The Telling Project

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p All Things LGBTQ

2:00p Major Jackson

3:00p Democracy Now!

4:00p The 48th Annual Community

Christmas Carol Sing

5:30p Abled and on Air

6:30p Abled to Cook

7:00p A Christmas Carol

8:00p Bill Doyle on VT Issues

9:00p Bear Pond Books Events

10:30p Extempo

ORCA Media Channel 16

Education Access

Weekly Program Schedule

Wednesday, December 19

12:00p East Montpelier School Board

3:00p First Wednesdays

5:00p Yestermorrow Speaker Series

6:30p Montpelier/Roxbury School Board

LIVE

Thursday, December 20

12:00p Harwood Unified

“The Model Communities Program capitalizes on this potential

by bringing citizens together to develop and implement

local solutions. The unified and organized local teams that

emerge from this program are strong partners as we work to

unleash greater energy savings for homes, businesses, schools

and municipalities across Vermont.”

“Randolph had a strong record of accomplishments related

to renewable energy development and home weatherization

before we applied for this program,” noted Gary Dir who

coordinated Randolph’s application for the Model

Communities Program. “The Model Communities Program

has taken our work to the next level. At a time when we are

grappling with some major threats to our downtown, the program

has helped to unify us and to get things moving in a

positive direction. We are achieving immediate results, but

also long-lasting change that is so important for the long-term

economic and social health of the region.”

Project Director Jon Copans of VCRD released a Request-

For-Proposals soliciting applications from communities that

are interested in participating in the Model Communities

Program for 2019. Communities will have until January 18 to

apply. A copy of the RFP and more details about the program

can be found here - https://www.vtrural.org/programs/modelcommunities/apply-now.

The Climate Economy Model Communities Program is

made possible by support from VLITE, Jane’s Trust

Foundation, the Sustainable Futures Fund of the Vermont

Community Foundation, the Bay and Paul Foundations, the

Oakland Foundation, the High Meadows Fund, and VCRD’s

generous supporters. The Vermont Council on Rural

Development is a non-profit organization charged by the federal

farm bill to act as a neutral convener at both the local and

policy level supporting the progress of Vermont communities.

DON’T PUT OFF ‘TIL TOMORROW

WHAT YOU CAN SELL TODAY!

479-2582

Or Toll Free 1-800-639-9753 ~ Central Vermont’s Newspaper

403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, VT 05641

4:00p Berlin School Board

8:00p Washington Central Supervisory

Union

Friday, December 21

12:00p Washington Central Supervisory

Union

3:00p Berlin School Board

6:00p U-32 School Board

10:00p Game of the Week

Saturday, December 22

12:00p Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

3:00p Yestermorrow Speaker Series

5:30p Rochester-Stockbridge Unified

District

8:00p U-32 School Board

Sunday, December 23

12:00p Orange Southwest Supervisory

Union

3:30p East Montpelier School Board

6:00p Higher Education

7:00p Montpelier/Roxbury School Board

Monday, December 24

12:00p Middlesex Town School District

Board

3:30p Higher Education

4:00p VT State Board of Education

Tuesday, December 25

12:00p Rochester-Stockbridge Unified

District

2:30p Osher Lecture Series

5:00p Orange Southwest Supervisory

Union

8:00p Middlesex Town School District

Board

ORCA Media Channel 17

Government Access

Weekly Program Schedule

Wed, December 19

7:00a Bethel Selectboardp11:00a

Green Mountain Care Boardp3:00p

Berlin Development Review Boardp4:00p

Berlin Selectboardp6:30p Montpelier City

Council LIVE

Community Media (802) 224-9901 Check out our Web page at www.orcamedia.net

Thu, December 20

7:00a Randolph Selectboardp12:00p Vermont

State Housep4:00p Central Vermont

Internetp8:00p Waterbury Selectboard

Fri, December 21

7:00a Bethel Selectboardp11:00a

Moretown Selectboardp2:00p Central

Vermont Internetp6:00p Rochester

Selectboardp8:00p Montpelier Planning

Commission

Sat, December 22

6:00a Central Vermont Regional

Planning Commissionp8:30a

Vermont State Housep12:00p

Randolph Selectboardp5:00p Calais

Selectboardp8:00p Green Mountain

Care Board

Sun, December 23

7:00a Waterbury Selectboardp10:00a

Rochester Selectboardp12:00p Vermont

State Housep3:00p Montpelier Development

Review Boardp6:30p Montpelier

Design Review Committeep9:00p Montpelier

City Council

Mon, December 24

7:00a Moretown Selectboard

10:00a Racial Disparities Advisory Panel

12:00p Bethel Selectboard

4:00p Middlesex Selectboard

5:30p Montpelier Design Review

Committee

7:00p Montpelier Development Review

Board

Tue, December 25

7:00a Calais Selectboard

11:00a Central Vermont Regional Planning

Commission

1:30p Vermont State House

5:30p Montpelier Planning Commission

10:00p Racial Disparities Advisory Panel


The History of Holiday Lights

Holiday celebrants employ holiday

lights in various ways. Certain

individuals may be content to hang

lights on their Christmas trees

and call their decorating complete. Others

may get their holiday jollies by making sure

each square inch of their home is covered in

twinkling lights. Still, other people prefer the

more subdued effect of lights framing one

picture window of the house.

The tradition of Christmas lights stretches back to early

modern Germany when people used candles to decorate

Christmas trees in Christian homes. Those candles were

harbingers of what would come when electric lights replaced

gas and other open ame illuminating devices that were

commonplace prior to the 20th century.

homas dison, the inventor of the rst successful practical

light bulb, also created the rst strand of electric lights

that would be used in holiday decorating. By 1880, Edison

had standard incandescent light bulbs well sorted out and desired

a way to better advertise his invention, so he decided to

make the most of the holiday season and put his light bulbs

on display. According to a 2003 article in American Heritage

magaine titled he iard of our hristmas ree, dison

strung incandescent bulbs all around the compound of

his Menlo Park, , laboratory. dison constructed an eightmile

underground wiring system in order to power this grand

light display. Because the laboratory was situated along the

railroad that passed between Manhattan and Philadelphia,

thousands of people were able to see the display.

The concept of electric holiday lights took a bit of time

to catch on. Edison’s friend and associate Edward Johnson

was tasked with stringing together colored lights in 1882 and

placing them on an evergreen tree. ohnson hand-wired

red, white and blue light bulbs. n 1, President rover

leveland reuested the hite ouse family hristmas tree

be illuminated by multi-colored electric light bulbs.

n 13, when eneral lectric began to offer pre-assembled

kits of holiday lights, stringed lights were reserved for

the wealthy and electrically savvy. or example, in 13

a single string of electric lights cost $12, or around $300

today.

t would take several more years before holiday lights became

a national tradition. n hristmas ve 123, President

alvin oolidge began the countrys celebration of hristmas

by lighting the National Christmas Tree on the Ellipse

located south of the White House with 3,000 electric lights.

oday, illuminated strands of lights have become a large

part of holiday celebrations and have even been adopted for

use during various year-round events. uch lights can be a

beautiful and festive addition to many celebrations.

• • •

Stay Safe When Stringing Holiday Lights

Lighting displays are one of the many things

that help make the holiday season a special

time of year. Often awe-inspiring, holiday

lighting displays present a perfect opportunity for

communities and individuals to showcase their

festive sides.

afety should always be a priority when stringing holiday

lights both inside and outside a home. he ational ire

Protection Association notes that, between 2009 and 2014,

re departments in the nited tates responded to an average

of 21 home res that started with hristmas trees per year.

ighting displays strung on home exteriors also can pose

safety risks if homeowners do not exercise caution. ortunately,

various strategies can help homeowners safely decorate

their homes interiors and exteriors this holiday season.

hoose a fresh tree. he P recommends celebrants

who prefer natural Christmas trees choose ones with fresh,

green needles that do not fall off when touched. Dry trees

are more likely to catch re than freshly cut trees. dding

water to the tree stand each day will keep trees fresher

longer. hen placing the tree, avoid placing it too close to

heat sources, making sure it is at least three feet away from

replaces, radiators, candles, heat vents, or lights.

• Check all lights before stringing them. All lights, including

those going on trees inside a home and those being strung

outside, should be inspected prior to being strung. Look for

any worn or broken cords and replace any defected lights.

• Employ the buddy system. When stringing lights, always

work with at least one other person. This makes it safe for

homeowners who must climb ladders to string lights on

especially tall trees andor on their home exteriors.

void working in inclement weather. he weather during

the holiday season can sometimes be unpleasant or unpredictable.

heck the forecast before stringing exterior lights

to ensure Mother ature wont pose a threat. void hanging

lights if the forecast predicts wet, icy or windy conditions

that can make ladders unstable.

urn lights off when going to bed andor leaving the house.

nterior and exterior holiday lights should not be left on

when no one is home or everyone inside is sleeping. f left

on overnight or when no one is home, lights may contribute

to res that damage homes and may even prove fatal.

MATINEES SAT., SUN. & MON. Dec. 22 - 24 & Wed. Dec. 26 - Jan. 1

BOTH THEATRES CLOSE CHRISTMAS EVE AT 4:00 and REOPEN CHRISTMAS NIGHT AT 5:15

CAPITOL MONTPELIER

For Showtimes 229-0343 or www.fgbtheaters.com

Audio Descriptive Available on certain movies...

WED. - THURS. DEC. 21 - 28

MATINEES SAT. & SUN. , MON. & WED.

BUMBLEBEE --PG-13--

Advance Showing On Thurs. Dec. 20 at 7:00

MARY POPPINS RETURNS --PG--

Wed. Dec. 19 at 4:00 & 7:00

Thurs. Dec. 20 at 6:30

Fri. thru Thurs. Dec. 21 - 28

PLEASE CHECK CALL OR CHECK

WEBSITE FOR TIMES

FOR CAPITOL....

MARY POPPINS --PG--

THE GRINCH --PG--

RALPH BREAKS THE INTERNET --PG--

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY --PG-13--

BUMBLEBEE --PG-13--

WELCOME TO MARWEN --PG-13--

HOLMES & WATSON --PG-13--

MATINEE EVERY

WEDNESDAY 4:00 PM

AT THE CAPITOL AND THE PARAMOUNT.

Wednesday Bargain Matinees.

Free small popcorn with admission.

Exclusively for FGB Theaters Movie

Card Owners....

Because of movie lovers like you we

are proud to announce

$5 TICKET TUESDAY!

All year long, tickets are just five dollars

every Tuesday with FGB THEATERS

MOVIE CARD.

Replenish with $25 or more and receive

a FREE MEDIUM POPCORN to go along

with that $5 Tuesday ticket.

Our FGB Theater MOVIE Card is for the

movie lover. Tuesday is your $5 ticket to

savings to see the hottest releases.

PARAMOUNT BARRE

For Showtimes 479-0078 or www.fgbtheaters.com

WED. - THURS. DEC. 21 - 28

MATINEES SAT. & SUN. , MON. & WED.

AQUAMAN --PG-13--

Fri. at 5:45 & 8:45

Sat. at 11:45 (2D) 2:45 (3D), 5:45 & 8:45

Sun. at 11:45 (2D), 2:45 (3D) 5:45 & 8:45

Mon. Matinee at 1:45

Tues. at 5:45 & 8:45

Wed. at 2:45, 5:45 & 8:45

Thurs. at 2:45, 5:45 & 8:45

SPIDER-MAN INTO THE

SPIDER-VERSE --PG--

Fri. at 6;00 & 8:35

Sat. at 12:00 3:00 ,6:00 & 8:35

Sun. at 12:00, 3:00, 6:00 & 8:35

Mon. at 2:05 Tues. at 6:00 & 8:35

Wed. & Thurs. at 3:00, 6:00 & 8:35

24 Hour Movie Line 229-0343 BUY TICKETS ONLINE: www.fgbtheaters.com

www.facebook.com/vtworld.news

SAMBEL’S! SAMBEL’S!

Book Your Holiday Parties

and Other Special Occasions

Sambel’s Catering 249-7758

Power CALENDAR brunch. OF Blues EVENTS: brunch.

Tues., Every Sept. 25 Sunday • 6PM - 2AM

Tequila 10:00am-2:00pm

Tuesday ~ $5 Margaritas

Wed., Sept. 26 • 6PM - 7PM

Ham eggs Zumba toast ~ coffee public • $8.99 invited • Sundays

Wed., Sept. 26 • 7PM

Open

Bloody

Mic

Marys,

~ anyone

Mimosas

come

and Red

play/dance/sing

Eyes!! Raise

your celery to blues brunch at Mingle Night Club.

Friday, Sept. 28 • 6PM to 11PM

214 NORTH Hot MAIN Rod STREET, & Rock DOWNTOWN & Roll BARRE

car 802-249-4550 show & dance, • 802-793-8819 $5 cover

Friday, OPEN Sept. TUES-SAT 28 •11PM 6PM-CLOSE - 2AM

Today’sSUN Hits

10AM-2PM

with DJ• CLOSED

Stevie B,

MON

$5 cover

CHRISTMAS

TREES &

WREATHS

Nov. 23

till Christmas

In The Berlin Mall

Parking Lot

Mon.-Thurs. 11AM-6PM

Fri. & Sat. 9AM-6PM

Sun. 11AM-5PM

MIKE MOLLEUR TREE FARM

FRESH CUT • VERMONT GROWN • CHRISTMAS TREES • WREATHS • ETC.

MolleurChristmasTrees.com

GILBERT

TREE FARM

Balsam • Fraser Firs

Mon.-Thurs. 11-4

Fri.-Sun. 9-4

Choose & Cut $40

CASH ONLY

802-433-5855

1941 Weir Road • Williamstown

December 19, 2018 The WORLD page 29


You Call The Shots

Hand-Crafted Espresso Drinks

Just Ow You Like

Barre

622-0730

DRIVE

UP

B-M Road-Berlin

622-0250

DRIVE

UP

Montpelier

223-0928

DRIVE

UP

www.facebook.com/vtworld.news

POETRY CORNER | THE WORLD

The Damn Cold

Todd Washburne

Today, Tuesday, Gail and I walked

The streets of Montpelier.

It was so cold

That my breathe froze in my mouth.

It is a good thing I don’t speak

Very much to communicate.

I type on a keyboard and all my

Conversations are to be read.

So, not speaking a lot is not too

Noticeable in cold weather.

A few people were walking

And so bundled up that

Eyeballs staring straight ahead were all you saw.

A few homeless people

Sitting, freezing, and shaking

asking for help with money.

So, cold frigid weather

Be gone

And I am ready for spring.

With All My Love

By Old George

As I walk that last mile.

From you I must go.

Oh my darling.

At my grave, as you are kneeling.

Kiss a flower, to let me know.

From your heart.

Your love for me, will never go.

I will miss you, oh my darling.

Til we meet again in heaven.

With all my love you know.

sky-scrape

By Wayne F. Burke

a fish with its head

buried in the murk,

a poodle behind it

and Rocky the Squirrel

of “Bullwinkle” fame

above;

a burro the sun

burns through

and Rocky

now a camel

as the fish comes out

a dark channel

sucker-mouth lips

open to swallow

the poodle and

camel both

who join and

become a horse’s head

with great blue eye

in place.

Post Card

By Wayne F. Burke

early morning light in the

east

blue patch behind Misty Mountain

mauve underbelly of steel cloud bank

turning rosy

smoke drifting lazily from chimney

of house

steeple roof jutting into

cauldron of

red sky.

Meditation

By Wayne F. Burke

End of my meditation.

I rise,

bow nine times to the

Buddha within

and to past Buddhas through

golden kalpas of time

and to the monks and bhikkunis

of Sangha-mine.

The Sliding Hill

By Dottye Ricks

Silent it stands in the falling snow

Waiting for those who will come no more.

Who have grown and flown

where the wild winds blow,

never again its thrills to taste -

the ice and the cold on the downhill race.

Fly, Child, Fly – on the Sliding Hill.

Who sang and laughed and leapt and rolled

down that hill on sleds of old.

Who froze their hands, and cheeks and nose

seeking the ride, where the cold wind blows.

Swerving and turning and flipping around

Into the snow on the long run down.

Laugh, Child, Laugh – on the Sliding Hill.

And we the old, with calm and grace

Look back with love on that downhill race.

And remember with joy those days of yore

The children, the cold, and the blowing snow.

And in our minds, we see you still,

Seeking the drifts, the bumps, and the thrill,

Forever, in Joy – on the Sliding Hill.

gods

By Wayne F. Burke

a gull

dull gray

like the sky

under which I sit

to pray

at the fountain

the new Kaaba

in the mini-park beside

the Chinese restaurant,

the living waters ripple

over the stone

like clock work,

a metronome,

moo goo guy pan

my prayer

to Allah

and all other gods

known and

unknown.

GO FIGURE

The idea of Go Figure is to arrive at the figure given at

the bottom and right-hand columns of the diagram by

following the arithmetic signs in the order they are given

(that is, from left to right and top to bottom). Use only the

numbers below the diagram to complete its blank

squares and use each of the nine numbers only once.

page 30 The WORLD December 19, 2018


POETRY CORNER | THE WORLD

The Electric Scooter

By Todd Washburne

The Storm

By Corinne Davis

What a sight to see

A little boy on his electric scooter.

He laughed and smiled as he scooted

Down the bike path.

Did he think he was going 199 miles an hour.

If so, what a brave little boy.

I never ha a scooter, why I don’t know.

I can only imagine what the little boy felt.

Like the wind rushing by his face and blowing

His hair into a messy unkempt look.

His shirt blowing in the wind and his body

Relaxed and enjoying the adrenaline rush.

I never have had an adrenaline rush.

I have not ever had the freedom of

My body feeling free and going into the wind

With my hair blowing in the wind.

Letters on my board are magical, they appear and then

disappear.

The scooter is also magical.

Because I can close my eyes and pretend that it is me on

the scooter and that

My body is finally free of my awkward jerk movements

which

I think is one of the side effects of my jerk jerk autism.

My Heart Is True

By Old George

To you I give my soul to keep.

My love for you is deep.

Like the first rays of the morn sun.

To my heart, you are my only one.

From the meadow, a flower I well bring.

For you make my heart sing.

Love for you is my everything.

To ream of you, joy to my heart will bring.

For you are my hopes, my dreams.

At times, you are like a bee sting.

But then I look into your brown eyes.

Once again I forgive everything.

For how could I naught want you near.

I love only you my dear.

So as I dream of you.

My heart is true.

Rolling thunder soothes me like a lullaby

while branches of white light up the sky.

Heavy torrential rain quenches the

ground’s thirst.

Later on the horizon a rainbow has burst

Begrudgingly, in the distance a retreating

rumbling is heard.

Contented in nature I search for

unfound words.

As the trees let go of the heaviness

of rain.

Birds loudly squawk for their perches to regain.

The sun teeters back and forth, whether

to stay in or come out

Knowing that mother nature is never

Mister Squirrel

By Corinne Davis

Mr. Squirrel is beckoning to me,

Swinging through the trees like a chimpanzee

He sways and reaches and jumps around

Toying with my attention like a mime or clown

So furry and fat as he sits huddled on the fence,

Dutifully ready to avail his defense

Incessantly he cracks open each peanut or seed

While enemies embark out of their own greed

It is odd how his eyes are on each side of his head

Rather than like us, we look straight ahead

He doesn’t have a care and is back each day

He softens me like a child in mindless play.

First Snow

By Corinne Davis

This morning as I looked out the bay window in awe My kitten grasped

at snowflakes with her anticipating paw She is thinking if only I could

catch just one Or maybe she is in the act of just having fun I greeted my

neighbors as I walked down the drive Mesmerized by the beauty and

grateful to be alive

As I looked up at the white branches of the towering trees

I am locked in a trance and prompted to freeze

Hypnotized as I watch the flakes fall

I am consciously listening to hear his call

Mysteriously the snowflakes will disappear without a trace

Reminding me that I am always surrounded by God’s Grace

1. The Wichita Mountains can be found in

which U.S. state? Missouri, Oklahoma,

Kansas, Arkansas.

2. True or False: Pennsylvania is misspelled

on the Liberty Bell.

3. What is the most visited attraction in the

U.K? Big Ben, The British Museum,

Stonehenge, Buckingham Palace.

Answers included with other puzzle answers

DON’T PUT OFF ‘TIL

TOMORROW WHAT YOU

CAN SELL TODAY!

479-2582

Or Toll Free 1-800-639-9753

Central Vermont’s Newspaper

CLASSIFIEDS

403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, Vermont 05641

Concepts Kakuro

Best described as a number

crossword, the task in

Kakuro is to fill all of the

empty square, using numbers

1 to 9, so the sum of

each horizontal lock equals

the number to its left, and

the sum of each vertical

block equals the number

on its top. No number may

be used in the same block

more than once.

December 19, 2018 The WORLD page 31


INTERESTED

IN CDL?

Classes

ongoing in Barre

Information:

476-4679

Visit Our Website:

www.cdlschoolinvt.com

E-mail

us!

Now Placing

Your Classified

Or Display Ad Is

Even Easier!

sales@vt-world.com

Please include contact

person

& payment info

Only

Coaching VACANCY

Spaulding High School is seeking a:

VARSITY BOYS’

LACROSSE COACH

Interested candidates are invited to submit a letter

of interest, resume, and three references to:

Patrick D. Merriam, Athletic Director

Spaulding High School

155 Ayers Street; SUITE #1

Barre, VT 05641

or e-mail your application materials to:

pmerrshs@u61.net

Submission deadline: Monday, January 14, 2019.

FULL Barre Supervisory Union Varsity Coach

Job Description:

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EOE

Vermont Department of Taxes

Seeks Seasonal Employees

Looking to develop skills that will help prepare you for a career?

The Department of Taxes seeks temporary employees to assist with

the busy tax season.

•Tax Examiners & Clerks: These positions will vary

depending uponthe experience and skill set but the main duties

of these positions willbe answering taxpayer phone calls,

reviewing led returns oncomputers referring complex

returns to senior level examiners.

•Data Entry: several people are needed to enter/verify forms

data onPCs. Alpha/numeric speed required – 6,000 keystrokes/

hour

•Scanning work: assist in returns processing by operating

largescanner.

•Batching forms: processing mail into batches to be scanned.

All positions run tentatively, Jan.-June 2019, day shift only, Mon.-

Fri. in Montpelier with the possibility of some Saturday overtime.

Organization and attention to detail is required The State of

Vermont offers an excellent total compensation package. To apply,

use our online job site at https://humanresources.vermont.gov/

careers For additional information you may contact

corrinna.colson@vermont.gov or call 802-828-6843.

The State of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

At Vermont Creamery, we pride ourselves in producing

the highest quality cheeses, butter and crème fraiche

while supporting and developing family farms. We aim to

exemplify sustainability by being profitable, engaging our

staff in the business, and living our mission every day at

the Creamery. Vermont Creamery is hiring for the following

positions:

PRODUCTION TEAM MEMBERS

(1ST & 2ND SHIFT)

Competitive wage plus a shift differential, as well as a

comprehensive benefits package.

To apply, please call 802-479-9371

or visit www.vermontcreamery.com

EOE

page 32 The WORLD December 19, 2018

CLASSIFIEDS

HOLIDAY DEADLINE: THURSDAY 5:00PM

DISPLAY ADS WEDNESDAY AT 5:00PM

802-479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • Fax 802-479-791

Email: sales@vt-world.com

JOB

OPPORTUNITIES

25 TRUCK DRIVERS TRAIN-

EES NEEDED! Earn $1000

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Stevens Transport covers

all cost! 1-877-209-1309

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ELECTRICIANS LICENSES

& APPRENTICES SOUGHT -

Commercial Electrical

Contractor seeking Licensed

Electricians to join team.

Competitive wages and

growth potentials. Call

(802) 223-3221 or

email resume to

plizzari@selectricvt.com

IMMEDIATE OPENING Full

Time 35 hour week position

for a cook. Consists of cooking

for Senior Center & Meals

on Wheels For more information

call 223-3322 or email,

twinvalleyseniors@myfairpoint.net

PART TIME CARPENTER /

SERVICE MANAGER Fecteau

Homes has an opening for

an experienced carpenter to

monitor and perform service

work on new and sold homes.

Duties include but not limited

to, taking service orders,

ordering and tracking parts,

ordering and tracking factory

service, scheduling and performing

service work. Experience

in all facets of carpentrya

plus. Candidate must be

self motivated and organized.

Anticipated to be 20 +/- hours

per ee. Hours eile and

can be discussed at the interview

phase. Email resumes to

Jim@fecteauhomes.com or

mail to PO BOX 703, Barre,

VT 05641

WORK AT HOME AND EARN

BIG BUCKS!

Earn up to $1,000 a week

at your leisure in your own

home? The probability of gainin

i pro ts rom tis and

many similar at home jobs is

slim. Promoters of these jobs

usually require a fee to teach

you useless, and unpro t

able trades, or to provide you

with futile information. TIP:

If a work-at-home program

is legitimate, your sponsor

should tell you, for free and

in writing, what is involved. If

you uestion a proram’s le

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FAX US!

Now Placing Your

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Our Fax Number Is

802479-7916

Please Include Contact Person

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Vermont Foodbank is hiring an

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Clinical Care Associates

Needed

We’re looking for full-time Clinical Care Associates (CCAs) to

join our primary and specialty care practices. A CCA position

is a unique opportunity to connect with our communities

and serve our patients. Qualified candidates must possess

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December 19, 2018 The WORLD page 33


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85 SOUTH MAIN ST. • BARRE, VT

802-476-5400

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page 34 The WORLD December 19, 2018

LINE RATE 1-3 Words Per Line $1.75/LINE

CAPITALIZATION:

Capitalizing more than the first 2 words, etc. 70¢/WORD

DEADLINE: For The WORLD is MONDAY by 10:00

AM

CANCELLATIONS: A classified ad cancelled before 10:00 AM

on Monday will receive credit for the remaining paid weeks.

The WORLD asks that you check your ad on its first publication. If you find an error

please notify us immediately so that corrections can be made. The WORLD will not be

responsible for more than one incorrect publication of the ad.

PHONE NUMBER ___________________________________________________________________________

LAST NAME _______________________________________________________________________________

FIRST NAME ______________________________________________________________________________

ADDRESS _________________________________________________________________________________

CITY _______________________________________________ STATE ____________ ZIP _______________

START DATE: ___________ NUMBER OF ISSUES: __________

EXACTLY HOW YOU WANT THE AD TO READ

Please print, we cannot be responsible for words we can't read.

________________________________________________________________

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THE COST OF YOUR AD IN THE WORLD

Each separate word, each phone number counts as one word

Number of words ____________ times 35¢($3.50 min.) _________________ (cost for one week)

times number of weeks __________ 4 for 3 Special

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING FORM

403 U.S. RT. 302 - BERLIN • BARRE, VT 05641-2274

479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • FAX 479-7916

TOTAL COST __________________

$ FULL PAYMENT MUST ACCOMPANY THIS FORM

MasterCard

Visa

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Signature __________________________________________Exp. Date ___________________

CLASSIFIEDS

You +

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average number of people reading this issue

WE GET RESULTS

Accoring to the nationally non auit rm

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The WORLD has an average readership of 30,000 per issue

Audited numbers are numbers you can trust.

Use your VISA/MC/DISCOVER

and call 479-2582 or

1-800-639-9753

CHECK HEADING:

Animals-Farm ......................500

Animals-Pet .........................430

Antiques/Restorations .........144

Baby/Children Items ............140

Bicycles ...............................220

Boating/Fishing ...................210

Building Materials ................300

Business Items ....................080

Business Opportunities .......060

Camping ..............................205

Childcare Service ................030

Christmas Trees ..................370

Class & Workshops .............103

Clothing & Accessories .......130

Computers/Electronics ........100

Farm/Garden/Lawn .............410

Free Ads ..............................108

Furniture ..............................180

Garage Sales/Flea Mkt. ......145

Health ..................................113

Home Appliances ................160

Hunting/Guns/Archery .........305

Insurance/Investments ........090

Job Opportunities ................020

Lost and Found ...................110

Miscellaneous .....................150

Musical ................................200

Personals ............................105

Professional Services .........540

Rideshare ............................125

Snow Removal Equip. .........355

Snowmobiles/Access. .........360

Sporting Equipment ............250

Storage................................235

Support Groups ..................107

Tools ....................................330

Wanted ................................120

Wood/Heating Equip. ...........350

Work Wanted .......................040

AUTOMOTIVE

Campers/Motor Homes .......845

Cars & Accessories ............875

Motorcycles/ATV’s ...............850

Trucks/Vans/Jeeps Access. .870

Vintage/Classic Vehicles .....873

Work Vehicles/Heavy Equip. ....855

REAL ESTATE

Apts./House for Rent ...........630

Camps for Sale ...................650

Comm. Rentals/Sales .........605

Condominiums ....................680

Apt. Blds. for Sale ................685

Homes .................................690

Land for Sale .......................670

Mobile Homes .....................600

Vacation Rentals/Sales .......645

Wanted to Rent/Buy ............610

FARM/GARDEN/

LAWN

2019 UVM Extension Master

Gardener Course, Learn to

create a healthy, sustainable

home landscape & grow your

own food! Become a volunteer

and teach others environmentally

friendly, research-based

practices. Course offered

online, statewide, non-credit.

Course Details: The 16-week

online course starts January

18 and runs through the week

of May 10 Each module is

taught by university faculty or

industry experts Topics cover

a diverse range of horticultural

topics Students have access

to course materials until July

31, 2019 Choose to become

a certi ed Master Gardnerol

unteer (Track 1) or take the

course only and earn a Certi

cate o Home Horticulture

(Track 2), or simply access

the materials to learn at your

own pace. The course uses

a combination of videos, live

Q&A webinars, discussion forums,

and weekly activities to

guide your learning No driving

in bad weather! Complete the

course in the comfort of your

own home $425 for Track 1

($30 per module) or $475 for

Track 2 ($33.00 per module).

Scholarships are available.

Learn more and register @

go.uvm.edu / emg Questions?

master.gardener@uvm.edu

or 802-656-9562 To request a

disability-related accommodation

to participate, please contact

Beret Halverson eret.

halverson@uvm.edu or 802-

656-1777 by December 21

FARM/GARDEN/

LAWN

FOOD GRADE Barrels totes,

We have over 700 in stock

from 2 1/2Gal — 275 Gal totes.

Call for Info; Bicknell Barrels

The Barrel Man. 802-439-

5149/802-439-5519.

ANIMALS/PETS

Country

Pampered

Paws

Pet Grooming &

Boarding

East Montpelier

802-229-0114

Radiant Heated Floors For Winter,

Air Conditioning In Summer

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

FOR SALE:

MALE Umbrella Cockatoo,

Lare Cae. He’s a man’s

bird. Must live in a Single

Dwelling required. $750.00.

802-533-7458

LABRADOODLE PUPPIES

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Checked. Puppy shots. Ready

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802-222-1834;

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LOOKING FOR A DOG

WALKER, 2-3 times a week,

can e eile on times. Call

802-279-6237

continued on next page

CHAD

Chad is 28lbs of adorable beagle! Unlike

some of his hound pals here, he is a quiet

guy who likes to use his nose whenever he

can. Looking for a canine companion to

keep you company in the car or around

the house? Chad is your pal! He is new

to CVHS as he was found as a unclaimed

stray so we are still getting to know him.

He's shown us he has good leash manners,

knows to sit, and is motivated by tasty

treats. We are not sure if he would like a

canine friend in his new home, so we would

do a dog-to-dog introduction before adoption. As you can see in his photo, he isn't

shy of a camera and loves to take a close up!

1589 VT Rte 14S, East Montpelier

476-3811 • centralvermonthumane.org

Tues.-Fri. 1pm-5pm,

Sat. 10am-4pm

Should Shelters Lower the Cost of

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DEAR PAW’S: My local

shelter has started holding

“free” adoption days twice

a year. It drops the $100

fee to adopt a pet (although

people still need to pay a

$10 processing fee, and

they get a collar and ID tag

with that). Taking care of

pets can be expensive, and I think these kinds of promotions

attract owners who aren’t going to invest in their new

pet and keep them healthy. What do you think about lowcost

shelter adoptions?

-- Colin H., via email

DEAR COLIN: If a lower adoption fee helps shelters find

homes for pets, and reduces shelter populations, I’m in

favor of it. However, I understand your reservations. In

some ways, it’s a gamble that the shelter takes on each new

person to come through its door. Will this person be the

forever family for a traumatized dog? Can a family with

kids care for a cat with special needs?

Some shelters vet potential owners before allowing

them to adopt, while others follow the more familiar “open

adoption” practice, where the criteria are not so strict.

Pet adoption fees are not about gatekeeping. These fees

cover the cost of caring for animals at the shelter: their

food and health care, as well as administration. In return,

new owners often receive a voucher or coupon for a free

vet visit and steeply discounted services like vaccination

and deworming. And the fee is far lower than the cost of

buying a pet through a breeder or at a pet store.

Whether a lower-cost promotion is in place or not,

potential new owners should always visit their nearest

shelter first as they search for their new pet.

Send your questions, comments or tips to

ask@pawscorner.com.

(c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc.


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How to recognize skin and food allergies in dogs

Allergies can affect anyone, even the

family dog.

According to the American Kennel Club, various types of

allergies can affect dogs. Skin allergies and food allergies can

be very unpleasant. And just like their owners, dogs may be

vulnerable to environmental allergens like dust, pollen and

mold.

Learning about allergies and how to recognize them in

dogs can help pet owners ensure their four-legged friends

live as happily and as comfortably as possible.

SKIN ALLERGIES

The most common type of allergic reactions in dogs, skin

allergies, also referred to as “allergic dermatitis,” are caused

by ea allergy dermatitis, food allergies or environmental

allergies. lea allergy dermatitis is an allergic reaction to ea

bites. ogs may be allergic to ea saliva, which can make

them very itchy, particularly at the base of their tails. As dogs

scratch their itches, their skin can become red and inamed

and may scab over.

The AKC notes that itchy skin may also be a byproduct

of food allergies or sensitivities to certain foods. In such instances,

the most common places dogs will itch are their ears

and paws. Itchiness also may be accompanied by gastrointestinal

issues.

Dogs that only seem to itch their skin during certain times

of the year may be dealing with skin allergies resulting from

environmental allergens like dust, pollen and mold. The ears

and paws are the most commonly affected areas in these

instances, though dogs also may feel itchiness in other areas,

such as their wrists, ankles, muzzle, underarms, groin, around

their eyes, and in between their toes.

FOOD ALLERGIES AND SENSITIVITIES

The AKC notes that food allergies may not be as common

as people think. In many instances, food sensitivities are to

blame for many symptoms dogs exhibit. If the veterinarian

suspects a dog has a food sensitivity, he or she will work

with dog owners to identify the ingredient that is causing a

reaction. Both food allergies and food sensitivities can trigger

gastrointestinal problems like diarrhea and/or vomiting. Skin

conditions like hives and facial swelling may be indicative of

an allergy. Itchiness, poor skin and coat, and chronic ear or

foot infections are among the symptoms of food sensitivities

noted by the AKC.

Diagnosing allergies in dogs can be complicated. Veterinarians

may rst try to rule out other conditions that may be

causing symptoms in your dog. If the vet suspects an allergy,

he or she may try to conrm this by utiliing an elimination

diet that restricts what the dog eats for 12 weeks. Learn more

about dogs and allergies at www.akc.org.

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Mon.-Fri. 7:30am-4:30pm • Closed Saturday

Happy to Help You with your Special Projects!

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December 19, 2018 The WORLD page 35


For

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Call 479-2582

or

1-800-639-9753

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AUTOMOTIVE

Deadline Is

Monday

Before 10AM













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page 36 The WORLD December 19, 2018

CAMPERS &

MOTORHOMES

1990 Class A

“Bounder”

Good Shape.

We’re Upgrading.

$5500

238-1015

TRUCKS/VANS/

JEEPS/ACCESS.

2006 DODGE RAM 1500

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Sales 802-476-5370 or 866-

928-9370 For more Details

Text 78YR TO 27414

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installation, shipping, wheel weights, tax & shop charges

Most Cars &

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MONTPELIER, VT

Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 7-5

Wed. 7-7 SAT. 8-2

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Call toll free: 833-759-2738

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TRUCKS/VANS/

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2007 DODGE DAKOTA

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Asking $8500 obro.

can be seen at 7053 County

Rd, Calais. 802-223-5780

2010 CHEVROLET EQUI-

NOX $6,995 East Barre Auto

Sales 802-476-5370 or (866)

928-9370. For more details

text 1AMM to 27414

CARS / TRUCKS WANTED!!!

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2010 CHEVY MALIBU LTZ

auto., PW, PL, sunroof, 4 cyl.

$5,495

CARS &

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money before they provide

their service. TIP: If you have

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credit report call the ATTOR-

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at . Don’t

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NEW & USED TIRES ALL

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action. Local professionals

that respond immediately.

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2-door, auto., low miles 2016 HONDA CRV EX-L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,795 ($399/MONTH)

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Home for the Holidays:

Is Your Car Up for the Journey?

AUTOMOTIVE

Pre Trip Inspection- Is Your Car Ready for the Holiday JourneyBefore you pack up the

car to head home for the holidays, the Car Care Council reminds you to make sure

your vehicle is ready for the journey. Conducting a thorough vehicle inspection will

help you avoid the inconvenience and potential safety hazards of breaking down miles

away from home.

“It’s easy to remember to get your family ready for the

holiday festivities, but what about preparing the car that’s

going to get you there?” said Rich White, executive director,

Car Care Council. “Having a pre-inspection performed on

your car will give you peace of mind as you travel and help

make your journey safer.”

Before leaving home, the Car Care Council recommends a

check of the following, often overlooked, items: tires and tire

pressure, brakes, hoses and belts, air lters, wipers, exterior

and interior lighting, and uid levels, including engine oil,

windshield washer solvent and antifreeze/coolant.

“A pre-trip inspection provides the opportunity to have

service repairs made at home by your own trusted technician

who knows the vehicle, and helps reduce the chance of

costly and dangerous trouble on the road,” said Rich While.

9 Steps For a Winter Ready Car

Steps to Winterize You VehicleThe last thing any driver needs is to break down in cold,

harsh winter weather. A vehicle check now before winter arrives is a sensible way to

be car care aware and avoid the inconvenience of being stranded out in the cold and

with the unexpected expense of emergency repairs, says the Car Care Council.

“Winterizing your vehicle before the temperatures drop is

a wise idea,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care

Council. “An investment of an hour or two to have your

vehicle checked is all it takes to have peace of mind and

help avoid the cost and hassle of car trouble during severe

weather.”

The Car Care Council recommends the following steps

for winterizing your vehicle:

If you’re due for a tune-up, have it done before winter

sets in. inter magnies existing problems such as pings,

hard starts, sluggish performance or rough idling.

Have the battery and charging system checked for optimum

performance. Cold weather is hard on batteries.

lean, ush and put new antifreee in the cooling system.

As a general rule of thumb, this should be done every two

years.

Make sure heaters, defrosters and wipers work properly.

Consider winter wiper blades and use cold weather washer

uid. s a general rule, wiper blades should be replaced

every six months.

Check the tire tread depth and tire pressure. If snow

and ice are a problem in your area, consider special tires

designed to grip slick roads. During winter, tire pressure

should be checked weekly.

Have the brakes checked. The braking system is the

vehicle’s most important safety item.

Have the exhaust system checked for carbon monoxide

leaks, which can be especially dangerous during cold

weather driving when windows are closed.

• • •

The Car Care Council also recommends that drivers keep

important telephone numbers in their cell phone or glove

box in case of a breakdown or travel emergency. Vehicles

should have a roadside emergency kit that includes items

such as a rst aid kit, a tire-changing ack, a tire pressure

gauge, umper cables, a ashlight and a blanket. copy of

the recently-updated 80-page Car Care Guide should be kept

in the glove box and can be ordered free of charge at www.

carcare.org/car-care-guide.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for

the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign

promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance

and repair to consumers. For a free copy of the council’s

popular Car Care Guide or for more information, visit www.

carcare.org.

Check to see that exterior and interior lights work and

headlights are properly aimed.

e diligent about changing the oil and lter at recommended

intervals. Dirty oil can spell trouble in winter.

Consider changing to “winter weight” oil if you live in a

cold climate. Have your technician check the fuel, air and

transmission lters at the same time.

Motorists should also keep the gas tank at least half full

at all times to decrease the chances of moisture forming in

the gas lines and possibly freezing. Drivers should check the

tire pressure of the spare in the trunk and stock an emergency

kit with an ice scraper and snowbrush, jumper cables,

ashlight, ares, blanket, extra clothes, candlesmatches,

bottled water, dry food snacks and needed medication.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the

“Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting

the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and

repair to consumers. For a copy of the council’s Car Care

Guide or for more information, visit www.carcare.org.

Classifi ed

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

If you are looking at this space so are

29,999* other people

Robert Dudley

Jerry Dudley

CARS

We Repair All

Snowplow

Brands

JUST EAST OF MONTPELIER ON RTE 2 • BERLIN, VT

TIRES

Jerry Dudley's Auto Connection

395 Washington Street

Barre, VT 05641

Phone: 802.476.8114

30+ Years In Satisfying Customers

Find Us Online at dudleyauto.com

TRUCKS, SUVs & VANS

★ Warranties Available ★

Snowplows

SALES & SERVICE

For Superior Snowplowing Performance

McLEODS

SPRING & CHASSIS

“Your Truck Chassis Specialists”

32 BLACKWELL ST., BARRE, VT 05641 • 1-802-476-4971

STOP

NEVER GIVE YOUR:

•SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER

•CREDIT CARD NUMBER

•BANK ACCOUNT NUMBER

Or any other

personal information

To someone you don’t no

en anserin an advertisement.

A public service announcement

presented to you by The WORLD

We Sell TIRES

• We Service All

Makes & Models

• Fleet & Commercial

Accounts Welcome

• We Honor All

Extended Warranties

PRICES

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Accoring to the nationally non auit rm

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The WORLD has an average readership of 30,000 per issue

Audited numbers are numbers you can trust.

OFFERS VALID AT THIS DEALERSHIP ONLY. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH OTHER OFFERS. TAX & SUPPLIES EXTRA.

Call Toll Free 866-764-7509

MONDAY - FRIDAY 7 - 5 • SATURDAY 7 - 12. OFFERS GOOD WITH AD UNTIL 12-29-18.

December 19, 2018 The WORLD page 37


REAL ESTATE

Montpelier Traditional Residence - $195,000

3BR, 1.5 bath 2-Story home with full walk-out basement, has a woodland setting, an over-sized fenced yard

for the dog, a wide covered porch, and a most convenient location! Spacious rooms, several with hardwood

fl ooring under carpets, Anderson windows, recent plumbing updates and standing seam metal roof. Kitchen

with walk-in pantry redone about 10 years ago. Please take a look!

Ernie’s Listing

Jack Associates

www.C21Jack.com

317 River Street, Montpelier

Each Office is Independently Owned & Operated

VALUE FOR YOUR HARD-EARNED DOLLAR

Waterford: Look no further than this property located 5 minutes from downtown St. J. &

St. J. Academy. The exterior is maintenance-free with hardie board siding & a metal roof.

The interior is in excellent condition with spacious rooms that include 3 or 4 bedrooms

depending on your needs, 3 baths, eat-in kitchen, office, living room w/fireplace, formal

dining room, sunroom, detached 2 car garage, a workshop with room for 3 more vehicles, a

small barn & 12.9 surveyed acres with extensive river frontage, open fields.

$219,900--ML4689760

ST. JOHNSBURY

309 Portland St, Suite 101; 802-748-2045

DANVILLE

10 Route 2 West, P.O. Box 68; 802-684-1127

beginrealty.com

Jack

Associates

REALTOR ®

Lori Holt

223-6302 Ext. 1

REALTY ASSOCIATES

PUBLISHER’S

NOTICE

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this

newspaper is subject to the fair housing

act which makes it illegal to advertise

“any preference, limitation or discrimination

based on race, color, religion,

sex, handicap, familial status or

national origin, or an intention, to make

any such preference, limitation or discrimination.”

Additionally, Vermont’s Fair Housing

and Public Accomodations Act prohibits

advertising that indicates any preference,

limitation or discrimination based

on age, marital status, sexual orientation

or receipt of public assistance.

This newspaper will not knowingly

accept any advertising for real estate

which is in violation of the law. Our

readers are hereby informed that all

dwellings advertised in this newspaper

are available on an equal opportunity

basis.

To file a complaint of discrimination,

call the Vermont Human Rights

Commisson toll-free at 1-800-416-2010

(voice & TTY) or call HUD toll

free at 1-800-669-9777 (voice)

or 1-800-927-9275 (TTY).

APARTMENTS

ROOMS/HOUSES

FOR RENT

3 BEDROOM HOUSE for

Rent in Barre. 1 and 3/4

baths. 1800 sq. ft. in Residential

Neighborhood near Camp

St. Newly Renovated Kitchen,

with all New Appliances.

Washer / Dryer, Garage, Finished

Basement, Lots of

Storage, Woodsy Backyard.

$1350 Monthly plus Utilities.

Six month to one Year Lease,

you choose. Possibility for

additional year lease. Non-

Smoking. Will Accept Small

Breed Dog or Cat. Credit

Check Contact: apdbarre@

gmail.com

THANK YOU FOR SAYING

I SAW IT IN

APARTMENTS

ROOMS/HOUSES

FOR RENT

4 BEDROOM, 2 BATHROOM

HOUSE with 2-car garage.

$1850 / mo. + plus utilities.

Near Montpelier. Contact 603-

291-0433

APT for RENT No. Montpelier

illae Unurn drm nd

$820 includes heat hot water

electricity no pets non smokers

Call p.m. 454-7364

Barre City 2 BEDROOM, 2

new baths, newly renovated

house. washer & dryer. $1200

per mont lus Utilities, rst

and last. 802-793-5858

BARRE. 3bdrm, $900. heat

and utilities not included, no

pets, non-smoking.

802-476-2092.

BARRE. GROUND oor,

$850. 3bdrm, heat and utilities

not included, no pets, nonsmoking.

802-476-2092.

FOR RENT. Roommate to

share 2 bedrooms. Graniteville.

802-249-9214.

MONTPELIER. 2bdrm, 1 bath,

kitchen, living room, coin-op in

basement. All utilities included.

Free parking. $1,150.

Call 802-917-8505.

RULE OF THUMB......

Describe your property,

not the “appropriate” buyer or

renter, not the landlord,

not the neighbors.

Just describe the property and

you’ll almost alays oey te

law.

SOUTH BARRE 3 bedroom

dulex Apartment quiet dead

end street, parking, back yard,

sun porch, washer and dryer.

Some furnishings. Barre Town

School. Convient to Hannafords

and McDonalds. No

smoking or pets. $950 plus

utilities. 802-476-4814

VACATION

RENTALS/SALES

WARM WEATHER is Year

Round in Aruba. The water

is safe, and the dining is fantastic.

Walk out to the beach.

3-Bedroom weeks available.

Sleeps 8. email: carolaction@

aol.com for more information.

HOMES

HOUSE & 10 WOODED Acres

Calais, VT. Spring, Septic, off

grid. $85,000.00. 802-272-

1653

WILLIAMSTOWN.

BRAND NEW HOME

3bdrm, 2ba, beautiful lot, good

access to I-89 and recreational

activities, great neighbor-

ood. ,. Won’t last

802-272-7422

WORRIED ABOUT FORE-

CLOSURE?

Having trouble paying your

mortgage? The Federal Trade

Commission says don’t pay

any fees in advance to people

who promise to protect

your home from foreclosure.

Report them to the FTC, the

nation’s consumer protection

agency. For more information,

call 1-877-FTC-HELP or click

on ftc.gov. A message from

The World and the FTC.

FREE SCRAP METAL

REMOAL IN CENTRAL T

No oil tanks. Will also take

furnaces, boilers, and do

mobile home demolition for a

fee. Call Chad. 802-793-0885

Create a sale-worthy

showplace

The sentiment “don’t judge a book by its cover” can be applied

to many situations. When it comes to selling their

homes, homeowners should remember this adage as they

prepare their homes for prospective buyers.

tatista indicates that

there were , houses

sold in the nited tates in

21. he anadian eal

state ssociation said a

record 3,11 residential

properties changed hands in

21, marking a .3 percent

increase from 21.

omeowners who want

to make their properties

stand out can take the following

steps.

• • •

1474 Waterbury Stowe Rd, Waterbury

onvenient setting on 1- acres in aterbury features an efcient four bedroom1 bath home

that has many energy upgrades in recent years including 21 heat pump and spray foamed

basement. rilled well and private septic. Many fruit plantings, a chicken coop and big yard.

lose to all aterbury has to offer and minutes to urlington.

MLS#4704540

New Reduced Price: $389,000.

Visit Our Website For Details On These And Other Listings

HARRINGTON REALTY

www.harringtonvt.com

802-563-6000 or 802-595-1156

Cabot, Vermont

page 38 The WORLD December 19, 2018

DE-PERSONALIZE THE

HOME.

omeowners ll their

spaces with family photos,

heirlooms, personal interests,

and other conversation

pieces. Prospective buyers

may not be able to see past

personal belongings and

may even be distracted by them. or example,

buyers who have strong beliefs about

animal welfare may not buy a home displaying

hunting trophies. emove personalied

items where possible, replacing them with

generic items.

IMPROVE THE EXTERIOR.

says that curb appeal is crucial to

making a strong rst impression. messy or

lackluster landscape can turn buyers away

even before they reach the front door. Mow

continued on next page


REAL ESTATE

Bird Feeding Basics

AFFORDABLE

APARTMENTS

WITH HEAT

INCLUDED

Highgate

Apartments

located in Barre, is currently accepting applications

for 2 & 3 bedroom apartments

Hardwood floors, fresh paint, modern kitchen & baths, yard space,

ample closets, & washer/dryer hook-ups. Laundry room on site.

Rent includes heat/hot water, 24-hour emergency maintenance,

parking, snow removal, & trash removal. Income limits apply.

To request an application, call 476-8645 or stop by the on-site

rental office at 73 Highgate Drive, #121, Barre, VT.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

Updated Weekly

Home Mortgage Rates

Rate APR Term Points

Downpayment

LAST

DOWN

LENDER UPDATE RATE APR TERM PTS PAYMENT

Community Natl 5.000% 5.008% 30 YR Fixed 0 5% Community National 11/30/17 5.000% 5.008% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

4.625% 4.639% 15 YR Fixed 0 5%

Bank 1-800-340-3460 4.625% 4.639% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

NE Fed CR UN 4.750% 4.775% 30 YR Fixed 0 5% New England Federal 11/30/17 4.750% 4.775% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

4.250% 4.294% 15 YR Fixed 0 5%

ermont leas the nation in resients ho articiate in bir atching. eeing birs in inter is a great ay to enoy seeing illife Credit Union 866-805-6267 4.250% 4.294% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

from your home. Photo by Tom Rogers.

Northfield Savings 4.875% 4.916% 30 YR Fixed 0 5%

With

Northfield Savings 11/30/17 4.875% 4.916% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

winter weather now taking ease with which they can nd 4.125% it at 4.194% a feeder. 15 YR ome Fixed common 0 5%

Bank (NSB) 4.125% 4.194% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

hold, Vermonters are readying

seed types that attract birds are sunower, thistle, and millet.

802-485-5871

These VSECU are sold separately and 4.875% in 4.917% combination 30 YR Fixed at most 0 general 5%

their bird feeders.

4.375% 4.446% 15 YR Fixed 0 5%

hardware stores as are a host of feeder types and styles.

VT State Employees 11/30/17 4.875% 4.917% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

“Birds of all species have very interesting behaviors, Suet from your local meat cutter is a favorite of many birds. Credit Union (VSECU) 4.375% 4.446% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

shapes, and plumage and have captured the human imagination

for millennia. Winter feeding is an opportunity to ower gardens uncut to allow the birds to pick at seed heads Rates can change without notice.

1-800-371-5162 X5345

Another means to feed birds is to leave your late-blooming

witness rst-hand the fascinating array of bird life, often of owers like lack-eyed usans and other cone owers. f ***APRs are based on 20% down payment. Some products are available with as little as

near our homes,” said John Buck, Vermont Fish & Wildlife’s

you have the space, growing your own sunowers and letting 5% down, with purchase of Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI). The cost of PMI is not

migratory bird biologist.

them stand is another great source of ‘natural’ food.

included in the APR calculations.

Make sure your feeders are free of potentially harmful

Vermonters who feed birds will have plenty of company.

germs by cleaning them with a very dilute (10%) chlorine

According to a 2011 report by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife

solution and rinsing with water. This will greatly reduce

ervice, 3 of ermont residents identied themselves as

the possibility of bacteria and viruses being harbored at the

feeder. Finally, position feeders far enough from windows

bird watchers around their respective homes and nearly half

and other glass structures to reduce the likelihood of birds

of all households in Vermont feed birds. The state also leads

colliding into them. Collisions are a major source of bird the nation with 39 percent of residents participating in bird

mortality each year and feeders 4 to 10 feet away from watching away from home. Bird feeding and watching can be

windows cause the most problems as birds ush off a feeder a boon to local businesses too, with an estimated $12.4 million

and hit windows with a lot of speed. Additionally, keep cats

in annual bird seed sales, and a total of $65 million in all

inside, as domestic cats kill billions of birds worldwide each bird watching supplies sold in Vermont each year.

year and birdfeeders can make birds particularly easy prey Vermonters wishing to do more for birds can make a taxdeductible

for them.

donation to the Nongame Wildlife Fund on line 29

ccording to uck, birds are uite capable of nding food of the state tax returns, or by donating to the fund directly at

in the wild but are attracted to feeders because of the relative www.vtshandwildlife.com.

Showplace continued from previous page

the lawn and make sure shrubbery has been trimmed. Seasonal

potted owers and plants can help make the house look

polished. Repair cracks or damaged walkways, and consider

a fresh coat of paint on trim around windows and doors.

Pressure-wash siding if necessary.

• • •

FOR THE MOST CURRENT CLASSIFIED ADS, VISIT OUR WEB PAGE:

www.vt-world.com

Gerry Tallman, Esq.

Serving Central Vermont

for over 20 years

Blanchard Block, 5th Floor, Barre | 26 N. Main St. Randolph

802.461.4444 or 802.728.9103

ofceTallmanLaT.com

PUT THINGS IN STORAGE.

Rent a storage unit to house items that can make a home

appear cluttered. Clean out closets and cabinets, so that when

buyers “snoop” during appointments or open houses they see

orderly storage areas. If closets are brimming with stuff, buyers

may assume the house doesn’t have enough storage space

and move on.

MAKE IT LIGHT AND BRIGHT.

Open up all of the drapes and blinds, and turn on overhead

lights so the house is well-lit. Add table lamps or other

xtures to especially dim rooms.

CREATE A HOTEL EXPERIENCE.

Forbes suggests making bathrooms look like a spa. Stack

a few pretty washcloths tied with ribbon, add some scented

candles and faux plants and buy bathmats and towels in

coordinating tones.

Remove extraneous items from kitchen counters and

replace them with vases of owers. n addition, set up dining

spaces as if one were sitting down to a meal, and ensure appliances

are sparkling clean.

USE COMMON ‘SCENTS’.

kip the sh, bacon or other aromatic meals for a few

days, as such foods can leave lingering aromas. Baked goods,

vanilla and cinnamon might make for more appealing scents.

Making a home sell fast involves preparation and the

knowledge that buyers are often greatly inuenced by their

rst impressions.

Wanda French

Senior Loan Officer—NMLS #101185

Office: (802) 479-1154

Cell: (802) 224-6151

Wanda.French@academymortgage.com

Www.AcademyMortgage.com/WandaFrench

Wishing You and Your

Family a Happy

py

Holiday Season!

Kim Somaini

Senior Loan Officer—NMLS #207001

Office: (802) 622-8339

Cell: (802) 249-2458

Kim.Somaini@academymortgage.com

Www.AcademyMortgage.com/KimberlySomaini

MAC1218-1460628

December 19, 2018 The WORLD page 39


Plenty of free parking

Tax Free footwear and clothing

Furniture and Gifts

Footwear

and

and

clothing 20% off

Plenty of free parking

Clothing 20% off

the regular price . Some brands excluded due to vendor restrictions

Footwear and

clothing 20% off

the regular price . Some brands excluded due to vendor restrictions

Vermont Maple Syrup

Pint $8.95

Quart $12.95

1/2 Gallon $ 23.95

Gallon $39.95

Cabot cheddar 3lb $11.99

GMC k-cup 24 ct $11.99

Sunflower

40lb

$13.95

Pint $8.95

Sunflower

40lb

$13.95

Darn Tough

Smartwool

socks 20% off

buy 12 save

the regular price . Some brands excluded due to vendor restrictions

Tax Free footwear and clothing

Vermont Maple Syrup

Quart $12.95

1/2 Gallon $ 23.95

Gallon $39.95

Cabot cheddar 3lb $11.99

GMC k-cup 24 ct $11.99

30% off

Darn Tough

Smartwool

socks 20% Wicker off

buy 12 Furniture save

sale

30% off

60% off

sale

Recliners and sofas 60% off

25% off

Please check our prices

you wont be disappointed

Waterbottles ,Headlamps ,

Hydration packs 20% off

Snow shoes 20% off plus a

free pair of Smartwool

socks with adult styles

Waterbottles ,Headlamps ,

Waterbottles, Hydration packs Headlamps 20% off

Snow Hydration shoes packs 20% off 20% plus offa

Snow free shoes pair of 20% Smartwool off plus a

free socks pair with of adult Smartwool styles

socks with adult styles

Next door at our

Gift House

20% off

Some brands excluded due to

vendor restrictions

286 Waits River Road Bradford, VT 800-222-9316 Mon- Sat 8:30-5:30 Friday nights till 8 PM closed Sundays

Extended Holiday Hours Dec 17- Dec 22 Recliners Monday- Saturday and 8:30AM sofas - 8 PM closed Sundays Christmas Eve till 4PM

25% off

Please check our prices

you wont be disappointed

Wicker

Furniture

Furniture and Gifts

Next door at our

Gift House

20% off

Some brands excluded due to

vendor restrictions

286 Waits River Road Bradford, VT 800-222-9316 Mon- Sat 8:30-5:30 Friday nights till 8 PM closed Sundays

Extended Holiday Hours Dec 17- Dec 22 Monday- Saturday 8:30AM - 8 PM closed Sundays Christmas Eve till 4PM

page 40 The WORLD December 19, 2018

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