Runway S/S19

alfolltd

The best hair and fashion trends from backstage and the catwalk in Spring/Summer 2019

YOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE TO THE NEW SEASON

UNWAY

SPRING

S U M M E R

CREATIVEHEADMAG.COM

2019


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HAIR: LUISA ALDRIDGE, HARI’S

FASHION: FEBEN VEMMENBY

HAIR: MARIO FAILLA, THE GALLERY

FASHION: MARTIN HANLY

HAIR: BEN HARDS, THE SQUARE

FASHION: PAOLO CARZANA

HAIR: ELETTRA GUGGERI, RICHARD WARD HAIR & METRO SPA

FASHION: EKATERINA ZELENTSOVA

HAIR: DARREN FOWLER, FOWLER35

FASHION: MATTHEW NEEDHAM

HAIR: SHELLEY SUMNER, RUSH

FASHION: PAOLINA RUSSO

HAIR: MARK WOOLLEY, ELECTRIC HAIRDRESSING

FASHION: SARAH KAUFFMAN

HAIR: ADAM REED, PERCY & REED

FASHION: GUI ROSA

HAIR: SAM ASHCROFT, BROOKS & BROOKS

FASHION: DINGYUN ZHANG

HAIR: JORDAN GARRETT, HERSHESONS

FASHION: ALEKSANDAR MITROVIC

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0% RETOUCHED

100% TECNI.ART

@LOREALPRO

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HAIR: PAUL HESSION, HESSION HAIRDRESSING

FASHION: JIE WU.

HAIR: BEN GARRY

FASHION: GUI ROSA

HAIR: RICHARD PHILLIPART, THE BOUTIQUE ATELIER

FASHION: CAMERON WILLIAMS

HAIR: LEE NASH-JONES, NASHWHITE

FASHION: ALEKSANDAR MITROVIC

HAIR: FERGAL O’CONNOR, ORIGIN

FASHION: MASHA POPOVA

HAIR: JONATHAN SOONS, HEADMASTERS

FASHION: JORDAN CHARLES

HAIR: DALE HOLLINSHEAD, HAZEL & HAYDN

FASHION: JIE WU

HAIR: DARREN FOWLER, FOWLER 35

FASHION: CECILE TULKENS

HAIR: MATTHEW CURTIS

FASHION: EKATERINA ZELENTSOVA

HAIR: JASON HALL, JASON HALL HAIRDRESSING

FASHION: DINGYUN ZHANG

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HAIR: KY WILSON, THE SOCIAL

FASHION: JIE WU

HAIR: JOHN GILLESPIE, JOHN GILLESPIE HAIRDRESSING

FASHION: JOHANNA PARV

HAIR: JACK MERRICK THIRLWAY, NEVILLE HAIR & BEAUTY

FASHION: TALIA LIPKIN-CONNOR

HAIR: CHERYL MUNOZ, DANIEL GALVIN

FASHION: SARAH MCCORMACK

HAIR: MARC TRINDER, TRINDER HAIR STUDIOS

FASHION: CECILE TULKENS

HAIR: PAUL DAVEY, DAVEY DAVEY

FASHION: JOSHUA CRABTREE

HAIR: JASON HALL, JASON HALL HAIRDRESSING

FASHION: PAOLINA RUSSO

HAIR: ANGEL MONTAGUE SAYERS, SALLY MONTAGUE

FASHION: MATTHEW NEEDHAM

HAIR: KATHRYN DARTNELL, HARINGTONS

FASHION: MASHA POPOVA

HAIR: PAUL DAVEY, DAVEY DAVEY

FASHION: ALEKSANDAR MITROVIC

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DISCOVER INSIDE THE STORY BEHIND THE RE-LAUNCH * OF TECNI.ART

AND THE 2019 COLLECTION

IMAGES CO-DEVELOPED BY

*The Tecni.Art range is being relaunched with new packaging, some products being discontinued and 3 new products.

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HAIR: JOSH WOODMAN, ANDREW HILL

FASHION: JAWARA ALLEYNE

HAIR: EILEEN MCGRATH, THE EDGE

FASHION: GUI ROSA

HAIR: FERGUS DALY, ZEBA

FASHION: JOSHUA CRABTREE

HAIR: ANDREW MULVENNA

FASHION: SARAH MCCORMACK

HAIR: JAMES COLEMAN, BROWN SUGAR

FASHION: GUI ROSA

HAIR: LUKE PLUCKROSE, SAKS

FASHION: JAWARA ALLEYNE

HAIR: DANIELLE DIGNAM, DYLAN BRADSHAW

FASHION: PAOLINA RUSSO

HAIR: STEPHEN CHAPMAN, CONTEMPORARY

FASHION: TALIA LIPKIN-CONNOR

HAIR: MARCELLO MOCCIA, ROOM 97

FASHION: JOHANNA PARV

HAIR: ANDREA DALEY, BARBARA DALEY

FASHION: JORDAN CHARLES

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CONTENTS

SPRING/SUMMER 2019

06

TOP FIVE MOMENTS

The best that the S/S19 runways had to offer

16

THE TRENDS

The season’s most sought-after hair looks

22

HOW HAIR HAPPENS

We break down the looks from three key shows

30

RE:CREATE

Bite-sized trends to whet your fashion appetite

34

JOSH WOOD

The iconic colourist talks about the incredible feats involved at Marc Jacobs

36

TINA OUTEN

How to enjoy backstage and make great hair happen

38

GUIDO PALAU

Why the styling legend came back to London this season

44

FASHION IN MOTION

Johanna Cree Brown braids big with Carla Fernández

46

BRUSH UP

We talk to the big-hitters about a styling skills shortage

Cover image: Roksanda, hair by James Pecis for L’Oréal Professionnel

04 SPRING/SUMMER 2019

RUNWAY


EDITOR’S LETTER

EDITOR’S LETTER

…And S/S19 is officially a wrap, dear Runway readers!

Quite literally in fact, from Korean rappers storming the catwalk at Chocolab

(turn to That Was The Season on page 14 to find out more) to the beautiful silk

scarf wraps at Dolce & Gabbana (see The Trends from page 16). So now to

reflect on what a season it’s been – when it comes to seriously chic fashion

credentials, London is often dismissed as the kooky little sister to fashion

week’s heavyweights (Paris, we’re looking at you). So it was rather satisfying to

see it take centre stage. Showcasing debut collections from Alexa Chung as well

as welcoming Riccardo Tisci to the Burberry fold (see Top Five Moments from

page 6) our capital city did us proud – no coincidence then that Guido Palau

decided to make a lengthy return to London (see page 38). We’ve also caught

up with the King of Colour, Josh Wood (page 34) and runway ray of light,

Tina Outen (page 36) for more backstage action from the leads. But Runway

is as much about you guys as it is our Fashion Week favourites, so we also

explore the way that lead hair stylists and designers are coupled up for

collaborations at On|Off (page 40), as well as looking at how session styling

and working backstage can help boost skills back in the salon (see page 46).

Feeling inspired? We’ve only just begun…

Cassie Steer

Runway guest editor

Beauty editor

Editor in chief: Amanda Nottage Art: Graeme White Chief sub editor: Adam Wood

Contributors: Deborah Murtha, Anna Samson Publisher: Catherine Handcock

RUNWAY, 21 THE TIMBERYARD, DRYSDALE STREET, LONDON N1 6ND

T: 020 7324 7540 E: enquiries@alfol.co.uk

Runway is published twice a year by Alfol Ltd. CreativeHEAD is a registered trademark. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher. All information correct at the time of going to press

RUNWAY

SPRING/SUMMER 2019

05


TOP FIVE

MOMENTS

IN HAIR &

FASHION

We work (the Frows) hard, so you don’t have to…

06 SPRING/SUMMER 2019

RUNWAY


COOL RUNNINGS

ALEXACHUNG

Image courtesy of L’Oréal Professionnel

THEY SAY you can’t buy class, but thanks to

Alexa Chung’s eponymous debut LFW collection,

you can now buy a little piece of cool. Because,

let’s face it, Chung is irksomely cool. “I’m here to

show that I’m taking this seriously,” she said

backstage. “I wanted to prove that this brand has

longevity.” So, what awaited us? Why, the Alexa

uniform of course; all-cream dungarees, boiler

suits and utility denims. The collection also took a

trip back to the ’70s via her fictitious travel agent

‘AC World Travel Inc’ – a logo which was

emblazoned on slogan T-shirts and sweaters. The

results were floaty boho dresses, tan suede trench

coats and pinafore dresses. “It’s Alexa Chung

meets ’70s Jane Birkin,” said lead stylist for

L’Oréal Professionnel, Bleach London’s Alex

Brownsell, of the air travel-inspired hairdo. “It’s as

if her hair has gone a little bit static on the flight.”

RUNWAY

SPRING/SUMMER 2019

07


SHE WORE LEMON

ROKSANDA

Orange is not the only fruit (colour) but it was one

of the more popular (alongside lemon yellows and

pink grapefruits) judging by the procession of

citrus brights at Roksanda. But these zesty

offerings weren’t the only pieces to get us

salivating. Citing her inspiration as “beautiful,

round female bodies”, as well as a series of

tapestries by architect Le Corbusier, the result was

a refreshingly female take on power dressing and

all without a macho shoulder pad in sight. Much

like the artfully effortless hair. “She’s the

sophisticated Roksanda woman who’s into arts

and culture,” explained James Pecis, lead stylist for

L’Oréal Professionnel backstage. But like anything

described as ‘effortless’, there’s a fair bit of work

involved. “We’re accentuating the natural waves,

but if they don’t have waves, then we cheat.”

When life gives you lemons...

Image courtesy of L’Oréal Professionnel

08 RUNWAY

SPRING/SUMMER 2019


CHECK MATE

BURBERRY

Image courtesy of James Cochrane

‘Hotly anticipated’ is a term that’s levied around

rather freely during Fashion Week, but in the case

of Riccardo Tisci’s debut collection for Burberry,

‘hot’ didn’t even come close. Tisci declared he

wanted to “own beige” and so he did, opening

with a procession of models swathed in every

imaginable incarnation of the colour. Then this

chic, sophisticated Mary Jane-shod section made

way for its sneaker-clad younger, punkier sister

(and brother – there was menswear, too). “It’s a

celebration of cultures, the traditions and codes of

this historic fashion house and of the eclecticism

that makes up the beautifully diverse UK,”

explained Tisci, and his bid to make the brand

work for everyone certainly paid off. It was also

reflected in the hair, as Guido for Redken devised

two separate looks for the girls and boys; one

messy and punky and the other ‘clean and chic’.

RUNWAY SPRING/SUMMER 2019

09


HEIR EXTENSIONS

NATASHA ZINKO

We’d rather like Natasha Zinko to adopt us. There,

we’ve said it. Sure, it’s partly because we’d have

access to her amazing wardrobe, but also because

we’d probably be on our way to being a fashion

mogul ourselves. This is all judging by her son

Ivan, who collaborated with his designer mother

on a capsule of men’s looks for her S/S19 line. Oh,

and did we mention that he is 11 years old? The

playfully proportioned collection showcased acid

yellows, bubblegum pinks and holographic mauves

stomping down the catwalk to a soundtrack Ivan

had recorded with producer Scott Storch. But the

main inspiration behind the reworked denim and

paint-splashed dresses was sustainability and

working with pre-used materials, something that

carried through to the hair. “The look is very

lived-in, slept-in and worn-in,” said lead hairstylist

for L’Oréal Professionnel, Tina Outen.

Image courtesy of L’Oréal Professionnel

10 RUNWAY

SPRING/SUMMER 2019


DANCING QUEEN

DIOR

Image courtesy of James Cochrane

Dior can always be counted on to provide a visual

feast, but Maria Grazia Chiuri’s S/S19 ode to tulle

was a sensorial extravaganza as showgoers were

treated to a mesmerising performance by a troupe

of dancers led by choreographer Sharon Eyal. The

collection featured dance-inspired garbs, from fluid

black column dresses, fishnet body stockings and

the pièce de résistance – a dress made from 90

metres of nude tulle. There was even – gasp – jersey

in the show. “It’s the first time in my life I’ve used

silk jersey! It’s very good for the modern woman to

put in her luggage,” joked Chiuri. Even Guido for

Redken was tripping the light fantastic backstage:

“The look is dancer-like in a more contemporary

or experimental way while still being feminine,”

he explained, wrapping the hair around the head

to create an almost folded design for a beautifully

simple silhouette, accesorised with a headband.

RUNWAY

SPRING/SUMMER 2019

11


HIGH AND DRY

With interest in the natural look riding high, the new Redken Dry Texture collection

contains the perfect products for next-level natural…

12 SPRING/SUMMER 2019

RUNWAY


ADVERTORIAL

THE DONE/UNDONE aesthetic is still ruling the

runway, with naturally glamorous looks being seen

show after show. Filtering down to the salon floor,

clients are seeking easy, effortless styles created with

multi-use styling products that let them switch up

their look seamlessly. Step forward Redken’s new Dry

Texture collection, perfect for embracing your client’s

individuality and natural texture.

Like no-make-up make-up, the right products are

essential to celebrate and elevate a client’s hair type,

movement and character. This is not the messy

bedheads we’ve seen in the past, nor is it a prim and

proper ‘set’ look. Never before have we seen such

interest in embracing unique features, a trend seen all

over the runways for S/S19. Redken’s clever new

styling products, Dry Shampoo Powder 02 and Dry

Shampoo Paste 05, have been created specifically to

help create these artfully undone styles without

weight. The pair offer modern texture, volume and

grip without crunch or residue. Redken’s global

creative director, Guido Palau, premiered these new

season stylers during NYFW at the Coach S/S19

show, creating a natural look with an edge for guys

and girls at ease with their beauty.

THE STYLERS THAT THINK THEY’RE DRY SHAMPOOS

DRY SHAMPOO POWDER 02 DRY SHAMPOO PASTE 05

Love the lift and texture of dry shampoos but hate the

residue and lack of control? This loose powder uses

trending beauty ingredient charcoal to absorb excess oil,

creating relaxed matte styling without dullness. A

sprinkle of this fairy dust and hair is effortlessly fresh.

Shake gently at the roots and massage into hair and scalp.

Need a touch more hold? This innovative paste combines

the freshness of a dry shampoo with a mild, workable

hold shape paste that’s great for shorter styles. Style until

satisfied, with the bonus of root lift and absorbed

impurities. Work a small amount onto the roots and

through the mid-lengths. Can be used on dry or damp hair.

“The Redken Dry Texture collection was my go-to this season. We are seeing beautifully luxe

and healthy hair again – inspired by people adopting a healthier lifestyle – and the Dry Texture

collection helped give hair a good base and fresh structure”

GUIDO PALAU, REDKEN GLOBAL CREATIVE DIRECTOR

For more information about the Redken Dry Texture collection and to become a stockist, email redken@loreal.com or visit redken.co.uk

RUNWAY

SPRING/SUMMER 2019

13


THAT WAS

THE SEASON…

S/S19 will be remembered for rappers on runways, major logos and blinged-up kicks

SNEAKER PIMPS

WE DON’T THINK we’ve ever been quite as

grateful for a trend that allows us to wear

comfortable footwear in the name of fashion.

No, it’s not Crocs, but it is the next best thing –

trainers – and they were spotted across every

fashion capital from Tory Burch in NYC to

Burberry in London. But it was Longshaw

Ward’s deliciously embellished pumps that

had us hotfooting it down to VV Rouleaux.

PORTRAIT OF A LADY

Colin Horgan at On|Off

AMID THE STEELY gazes of Victorian nobility

and under the nose of Queen Victoria herself,

Erdem flaunted his collection of floaty floral dresses

inspired by Fanny and Stella (AKA Frederick Park

and Thomas Boulton), Victorian cross-dressers and

gay lovers. It was the label’s second time showing at

the National Portrait Gallery and it couldn’t have

been more fitting.

L O G O S

A GO-GO

FUELLED BY ’90s nostalgia and

brandished at shows such as

ALEXACHUNG, logos are a

not-so-subtle statement in

authenticity. But it was at Colin

Horgan at On|Off where the

trend really went to town, as

logos were tied around the

models’ necks, ankles and wrists

and even made up part of the

outfits themselves, as was the

case with this stunning black

leather ‘Nightwalker’ dress.

Longshaw Ward at On|Off

TRUMP CARD

COUTURE MILLINERY

it was not – but the ‘Make

Hair Great Again’ caps

donned by the production

crew at Bora Aksu were a

bit of light relief among

the backstage bustle.

And great hair it was too,

thanks to Tina Outen’s

braiding skills.

14 SPRING/SUMMER 2019

RUNWAY


THAT WAS THE SEASON

ART EXHIBITION(IST)

ONE COULD ARGUE that many of the garbs shown at

fashion week are works of art in their own right, but then

designers such as Roksanda and IA London at On|Off ramp

things up by putting actual art on the clothes. At IA London

hand-drawn, digital images of classic Roman statues made way

for resplendent floral prints which looked as though they had

been left out in the rain. Poetry in motion.

Carla Fernández

palmer//harding

Roberta Einer

THIGH’S THE LIMIT

FORGET THE cold shoulder, the thigh has taken over

as fashion’s latest body part du jour. Flashing the flesh

everywhere from ALEXACHUNG to Natasha Zinko,

it’s time to up your hair removal game.

FLICKS AND CHILL

THE AWARD for the most chilled-out show had to

go to Markus Lupfer. The whimsical presentation

had recreated a balmy beachscape complete with

alabaster white sand and tufts of scenic marram

grass; the kind of place you could pitch up a

windbreaker and happily settle down for the week.

Maybe it was the wispy dresses that had a calming

effect backstage, or maybe it was the fact that the

Dyson hairdryers were as quiet as a sea breeze –

either way we didn’t want to leave.

IA London at On|Off

IT’S A RAP

“LET’S MAKE some noise for fashion, aiiight?” Not exactly

what showgoers at Chocolab at On|Off experienced but they

were treated to a group of Korean rappers (you’ve heard of

K-Rap, right?) opening the show which was a masterful

homage to street culture. Keep it 100…

Image courtesy of L’Oréal Professionnel

RUNWAY

SPRING/SUMMER 2019

15


THE TRENDS

From S&M Alice bands to static strands, this season’s unlikely hair heroes

gave us the trends you’ll want to rock all season long…

ALEXACHUNG

16 SPRING/SUMMER 2019

RUNWAY


TRENDS

ALEXACHUNG

THE SHOW Roksanda

HAIR: James Pecis for L’Oréal

Professionnel

THE LOOK: Natural, textured waves

with density

HOW: After saturating the hair with

TECNI.ART Pli, it was dried into

the hair as a base before TECNI.

ART Liss Control was layered on

from mid-lengths to ends to add

separation and weight. Three low

Colin Horgan at On|Off

Natasha Zinko

Roksanda

BRUSH WITH FATE

CARELESS COIFFS and inadvertent ’dos informed this season’s

take on ‘natural’ and there was a distinctly accidental feel to the

looks as stylists recreated hair left to its own devices. At Natasha

Zinko and Colin Horgan at On|Off the theme was ‘slept-in’ hair,

with Horgan’s backstage brief specifically referring to girls who

had been out clubbing all night. The result was sweaty hair with

one side left as it would have looked at the start of the evening,

while the other was dishevelled with a slept-in feel, thanks to

Tina Farey at Rush Hair’s genius technique using with mesh

and a diffuser for L’Oréal Professionnel. But alongside these

#wokeuplikethis textures was hair that had been shaped by the

elements. At Calvin Klein, Guido for Redken’s half wet-look was

inspired by a girl walking into water so that only the bottom gets

wet; “I don’t want it to look drenched, more spritzed,” he

explained. Meanwhile at ALEXACHUNG, the pressurised air of

plane travel was Alex Brownsell for L’Oréal Professionnel’s

rationale behind the slightly static-looking texture (due to a nylon

bristle brush) which even sported a faux cow’s lick. The key is

careful product layering using a diffuser, not to mention a ban on

tools: “We’re doing everything with hands to maximise textures,”

added Adam Reed at Roberta Einer for L’Oréal Professionnel.

GET THE LOOK

braids – one at the back, one each

side – were made into a soft,

rounded shape to avoid obvious

zig-zag effects. To finish, irons were

gently clamped down each braid,

which were left to cool and set

before being released. Subtle

S-bends were added for a natural

look, then lightly spritzed with

Infinium soft hold hairspray.

Daniel Pascal Turner at On|Off

Calvin Klein

Escada Natasha Zinko

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SPRING/SUMMER 2019

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TRENDS

I’M WITH THE BAND

WARNING: S/S19 is strictly a headgear-only zone; headbands

must be worn on site to gain access(ories) all areas. Luckily there

were plenty to choose from as every fashion capital had their own

take on the trend. At Dior, the utilitarian nude bands were

reminiscent of dancers’ accessories – those taut bands that give

you a mini facelift – and which informed the hairstyle. “Every

model at the show this season has some kind of headband, so the

hair is designed to support this, but it’s actually very beautiful in

itself, it creates an elegantly simple silhouette,” explained Redken

global creative director Guido, backstage. Over at Prada the Alice

band was being given a Miuccia-style makeover with leather and

studs – also serving as the perfect device to disguise a cheeky

winge. “It’s funny how a short fringe immediately offers a more

boyish, rebellious feel which, coupled with the headband, gives a

really strong silhouette,” Guido added. Leather and studs aside,

the rest of the looks were a little more in-keeping with the season,

thanks to floral bouquets at Dolce & Gabbana and Bora Aksu.

The key to avoiding twee when wearing a flowery crown? “Make

everything else messy,” said Tina Outen for L’Oréal Professionnel

of the looped twin braids she fashioned over at Bora Aksu.

Dolce & Gabbana

Prada

Guido backstage at Prada

Versace

Bora Aksu

THE SHOW Dior

HAIR: Guido for Redken

THE LOOK: A little dancer-like,

in a more contemporary way

HOW: Hair was washed with

Redken Color Extend Magnetics

Shampoo and Conditioner and left

to air-dry. A 3” triangle was

sectioned off at the crown using a

comb, then twisted into a knot with

elastic. Starting from the left side of

GET THE LOOK

the head, the rest of the hair was

roughly sectioned into four and

wrapped in a swirl, kept in place

with Redken Forceful 23. Redken

Fashion Work 12 was sprayed

before being clipped into place to

hold its shape as they worked

around. The final section was

smoothed down with Redken

Forceful 23 to hold it in place.

18 SPRING/SUMMER 2019

RUNWAY


TRENDS

Colin Horgan

Images courtesy of L’Oréal

Professionnel and Redken

Longshaw Ward at On|Off

THE SHOW Markus Lupfer

HAIR: Tina Outen for

L’Oréal Professionnel

THE LOOK: A strict head shape

with hair that has dried after a

swim in the ocean

HOW: Starting with a strict

centre-parting hair was saturated

with TECNI.ART Siren Waves,

clapped through the mid-lengths

and ends with the crown

David Koma

palmer//harding

WET SPELL

Ah, wet look hair – friend to the time-poor and canny

camouflage to the shampoo shirker – and this season’s

drenched ’dos didn’t disappoint. At Markus Lupfer, Tina Outen

for L’Oréal Professionnel created gentle movement on the ends

for a beachy texture that looks like it’s wet but is dry. In Tina’s

inspired words: “It’s business on top and party at the ends.”

Dual texture was also evident at David Koma, again with

Tina Outen for L’Oréal Professionnel and Christopher Kane,

where the tops of Guido’s boyish ponytails were drenched with

Redken Glow Dry Style Enhancing Blow-Dry Hair Oil and

combed back using a wide-toothed comb to leave clear grooves

in the hair. Over at Longshaw Ward at On|Off, Cristiano

Basciu of Richard Ward Hair & Metrospa went a little more

formal for L’Oréal Professionnel, with slick ’20s-inspired Marcel

waves, while Cristian Pignatta from Neville Hair & Beauty for

L’Oréal Professionnel also cracked open the gel at palmer//

harding. “She’s strong and fearless, so it’s a wet-to-dry fade as if

she’s embracing taking a walk in the rain,” he said of the

slicked-back look. Brace yourselves, this season is about to get

wet ‘n’ wild.

GET THE LOOK

moulded through the top of

the ears for a clean, tight

head shape. TECNI.ART

Pli was layered over the

top to mattify, before

creating a beachy texture

through the lengths with

TECNI.ART Bouncy

and Tender squashed

in and diffused dry.

Markus Lupfer

Christopher Kane

Tory Burch palmer//harding

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@LOREALPRO

#TECNIARTIST

20 SPRING/SUMMER 2019

RUNWAY


ADVERTORIAL

THE WORLD IS CHANGING.

STYLE IS CHANGING.

T E C N I . A R T

IS CHANGING

At Central Saint Martins 38 stylists gathered at the L’Oréal Professionnel

Design Lab to celebrate the relaunch* of the TECNI.ART range

*The TECNI.ART range is being relaunched with new packaging,

some products being discontinued and three new products

IT’S A CHILLY SUNDAY in London’s Kings

Cross and UK and Irish hairstylists are at

Central Saint Martins, the talent hothouse

responsible for some of the biggest careers in

fashion. The goal is to celebrate the legendary

backstage styling range TECNI.ART in its new

form – streamlined, simpler, but more effective

under pressure than ever…

The new TECNI.ART range has been

co-developed with hair stylists to ensure that the

end result is what stylists really need. Busy

backstage or in the salon, you can tell at a glance

what you need thanks to the new streamlined

packaging. Your core essentials are in classic

white. Need a texturiser? Reach for silver. Want a

total transformer? Then bet on black. In fact the

Transformers are among a host of innovative new

stylers that will give you the perfect tools for a

brilliant final look every time. New shine top

coat Ring Light is an instant classic that gives you

a high-shine, non-greasy finish.

Adam Reed of Percy & Reed spoke about his

experience of the International Design Lab he

attended in Paris. Fabio Piras, director of MA

Fashion at Central Saint Martins discussed the

rise of ‘no trend’ in the fashion industry and

how his students create and challenge trends.

Inspired and ready to go – and wearing

customised TECNI.ART styling belts by Reid

Galbraith of Backyard Denim – the stylists

worked with a moodboard and enjoyed total

creative freedom to produce a finished

look on their model. Models were styled in

clothing created by Central Saint Martins MA

students and curated by course tutor and

fashion designer Louise Gray. The looks were

shot by Jack Eames and the models were then

also captured in high street, everyday wear.

The contrast between the high-fashion shoot

and the street style shoot highlights just how

versatile TECNI.ART can be. The new-look

range will be arriving in salons in February and

already serious excitement is building. Go big,

go sleek, go wavy… go all TECNI.ART.

To discover the new-look TECNI.ART, call L’Oréal Professionnel on 0800 0304034 or

visit lorealprofessionnel.co.uk.Follow backstage @lorealpro #lorealprouk #tecniartist

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21


HOW HAIR HAPPENS

HOW HAIR HAPPENS

Head backstage with three of the globe’s premier stylists to see them fashion the future trends for the S/S19 season

THE SHOW – ROBERTA EINER

THE LEAD – ADAM REED FOR L’ORÉAL PROFESSIONNEL

TECNI.ART

Beach Waves was dried

into the hair, before it

was twisted into a loose

bun and secured

discreetly with pins

behind the ears.

For a worn in, dry

texture, Adam Reed

used his fingers to layer

L’Oréal Professionnel

TECNI.ART Beach

Waves and TECNI.

ART Savage Panache.

Hair was pulled

back into a midheight

ponytail and

secured tightly with

a 3mm elastic.

22 SPRING/SUMMER 2019

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HOW HAIR HAPPENS

For an undone,

understated vibe, baby

hairs were pulled out

and a final spray of

TECNI.ART Pli was

applied. Adam used a

boar bristle brush to

break up the hair and

add some detail.

Rather than forcing hair

into unnatural shapes,

those with afro textures

were left with bouncy

curls, showing off each

model’s individual look.

Make-up was also

minimal, giving models

a subtle glow.

Hair nets were worn to

allow the hair to set

while make-up was

perfected and models

rehearsed the walk.

The bright colours and

abstract shapes of

Roberta Einer’s

collection were perfectly

complemented by this

anti-statement hair,

with its lived-in texture

and simple knot.

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HOW HAIR HAPPENS

THE SHOW – ERDEM

THE LEAD – ANTHONY TURNER FOR L’ORÉAL PROFESSIONNEL

Hair was braided from

behind the ears to the

nape of the neck, then

linked into one central

plait and secured using

elastic to give a

‘pinched’ look.

The Dyson Supersonic

hair dryer Professional

edition was used to

smooth the hair and a

mist of L’Oréal

Professionnel Infinium

Pure hairspray gave a

luxurious texture to the

‘modern Victorian’ hair.

The look started with

cocktails – L’Oréal

Professionnel TECNI.

ART Full Volume Extra

Mousse was mixed with

TECNI.ART Pli and

applied throughout

the hair to build a

strong foundation.

24 RUNWAY

SPRING/SUMMER 2019


HOW HAIR HAPPENS

The look was set using

more Infinium Pure

strong hold hairspray,

so as to remain perfectly

neat when models took

to the runway.

Accessories played an

important part in this

show – glittering

earrings hung like

chandeliers and

wide-brimmed hats

added an air of mystery.

For some extra shine,

L’Oréal Professionnel

Mythic Oil was

smoothed onto the

hair, especially over

the crown where the

lights hit the head.

Erdem’s collection was

inspired by the true

story of famed Victorian

cross-dressers and gay

lovers, Fanny and Stella.

Romantic silhouettes

with billowing sleeves

were wrapped in

floral prints.

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25


HOW HAIR HAPPENS

THE SHOW – PALMER//HARDING

THE LEAD – CHRISTIAN PIGNATTA FOR L’ORÉAL PROFESSIONNEL

The shape was then

created by pulling the

top of the hair back

and tucking it behind

the ears.

To prep this

dual-texture look,

Christian Pignatta

spritzed the hair with

L’Oréal Professionnel

TECNI.ART Pli and

smoothed the hair down

with a brush.

L’Oréal Professionnel

TECNI.ART Liss

Control and TECNI.

ART Extreme Splash

were applied to the head

using a tint brush, to

create a slicked-back

wet look that left the

ends dry.

26 SPRING/SUMMER 2019

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HOW HAIR HAPPENS

To exaggerate the

contrasting wet and dry

textures, TECNI.ART

Super Dust was rubbed

into the ends to dull

the hair.

A diffuser was used to

enhance natural

movement in the lengths

of the hair, and extra

bends were added with

a curling tong.

The look was set with a

final spray of TECNI.

ART Ring Light over

the head, and a bold red

lip was added as a

final touch.

Texture was also

important in the clothes,

with models wearing

different fabrics in

similar jewel tones

for a luxurious,

decadent collection.

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27


Teddy Quinlivan (right),

Leomie Anderson Teddy Quinlivan and Leigh (right), Lezark

Leomie Anderson (left) and for Leigh Redken Lezark 5th Avenue (left)

for Redken 5th Avenue

All rights reserved. 2018

LACQUER YOUR HAIR WITH LIQUID COLOR

NEW COLOR GELS LACQUERS

LOW AMMONIA. LOCKED-IN SATURATION. LACQUER SHINE.

Permanent liquid color reinvented. Get rich, saturated results with

high impact shine. Now with Color Gels Lacquers and Shades EQ

you have the perfect liquid color pair for up to 100% coverage

and an easy refresh on Zones 2-3. #ColorGelsLacquers


RE:CREATE

The bite-sized trends to whet your Fashion Week appetite

TWO OF A KIND

IT WAS A 2-FOR-1 kind of deal over at Paul Costelloe,

where Toni&Guy international artistic director Indira

Schauwecker created “power hair with a romantic touch”.

This translated into a wispy, messy roll on top and a

half-down ’do at the back, with mousse diffused into

the ends to give the waves a youthful, effortless feel.

RATE OF KNOTS

WAS IT THE ADVENT of athleisure or just a general

laissez-faire morning attitude that saw the growth of the

top knot in fashion circles? Well, the challenge is now on to

deliver it to clients a little differently, and you could take a

leaf out of Guy Kremer’s book of chic buns and knots.

Styling for L’Oréal Professionnel, he presented a couple of

stunning examples at a celebration of Graduate Fashion

Week talent at the Houses of Parliament – eternal loops

with no beginning or end. Now it’s your turn…

30 SPRING/SUMMER 2019

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RE:CREATE

Christopher Kane

Calvin Klein

Victoria Beckham

OH BOY!

S/S19 WAS A GAMINE dream with damp ’dos that had a distinctly masculine edge. Leading this troop of tomboys was Redken’s

Guido, whose wet-look waves at Calvin Klein had more than a whiff of surfer dude about them, while at Victoria Beckham

and Christopher Kane it was the comb marks in the front, and the slightly square head-shape that gave an androgynous feel.

“There’s a boyishness to this look which is becoming a bit of a trend,” Guido mused backstage at Christopher Kane.

KEEP CALM

AND CARRY ON…

…SHOULD BE THE battle

cry when entering backstage,

but ‘calm’ is not a word often

associated with Fashion Week.

Hurrah then for Adam Reed

and his #calmdownknot at

Roberta Einer, which he

created in a bid to bring a little

of his signature serenity to the

game. The textured knot kept

a windswept, ethereal feel,

thanks to revamped L’Oréal

Professionnel TECNI.ART.

SCULPTURE CLUB

HAIL CAESAR HAIR! Roman emperor-inspired style is set to

take over. International artistic director for Toni&Guy Cos

Sakkas set about recreating the curls seen on those marble busts.

He separated the front from ear to ear, gathering the rest into a

ponytail which was twisted and looped up into a knot. Then he

lightly diffused the hair with a wand before using fingers and a

spritz of hairspray to define the curls and keep them in place.

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31


RE:CREATE

Erdem

PURE JOY

WHO WAS THE UNSUNG HERO of London Fashion Week? That would be L’Oréal Professionnel’s Infinium Pure hairspray,

which went to work backstage with super-stylists such as James Pecis and Anthony Turner (pictured above). Its hypoallergenic,

unscented qualities may be unassuming, but it’s influence on the catwalks is undeniable. High fixation+low stiffness = pure love.

Images courtesy of L’Oréal Professionnel, Redken and Toni&Guy

EGG HEADS

MARC JACOBS proved to be

a masterclass in old-school

hairdressing techniques, with

Redken global creative

director Guido’s exaggerated

‘egg shape’ chignons. “It’s

loosely based on the ’60s with

a nod to iconic women like

Barbra Streisand and Lee

Radziwill, who were always

‘done’,” explained Guido

backstage. “It’s the kind of

hair you have to go to a salon

for as it’s an example of

dressing hair up to the

extreme.” Well if it’s good

enough for Barbra...

32 SPRING/SUMMER 2019

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RE:CREATE

PEEK-A-BOO

RUNWAY READERS, lend us your

ears… mainly because they can add

a quirky detail to an otherwise

classic hairstyle. Take the slick,

Josephine Baker-inspired marcel

waves at Longshaw Ward at On|Off,

where Cristiano Basciu of Richard

Ward Hair & Metrospa sculpted the

hair around one ear before securing

it into a low chignon at the back.

Cristiano, we hear you.

C O M E

UNDONE

DISHEVELLED ’DOS

are

one thing, half-decimated ones

are an entirely different

undertaking. It might sound

counterintuitive to the rules of

hairdressing, but the hair by

Tina Farey from Rush Hair at

Colin Horgan for On|Off was

carefully designed to resemble

morning-after manes, where one

side bore the remnants of the

start of the evening while the

other had a decidedly sweaty,

slept-in vibe. The hero product?

L’Oréal Professionnel’s Mythic

Oil. #WokeUpLikeThis

STICK AND TWIST

“IT’S A PRETTY, young, fresh style inspired by street fashion,”

Darren Fowler of Fowler35 said of the twisted chignons at

Chocolab for On|Off. Fowler blow-dried hair straight using

L’Oréal Professionnel TECNI.ART Full Volume Extra mixed

with water, before brushing back into two low ponytails that

were twisted in opposite directions to form two coils. These coils

were then wrapped around each other to form a rope, while the

spiky ends were fixed in place with strong-hold hairspray.

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TOP FIVE JOSH WOOD

Images courtesy of Redken

34 SPRING/SUMMER 2019

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JOSH WOOD

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW

The sheer scale of Josh Wood’s colour work for the Marc Jacobs S/S19 show was unprecedented.

Here, he shines a light on this stunning shade operation and getting the vintage hues the designer craves…

IN THE RUN-UP to the Marc Jacobs S/S19 show, every second

counted for Redken’s global color creative director, Josh Wood.

“When designers see something they really like, which really

connects with their vision of the collection, they want more and

more of it,” says Josh. That goes some way to explaining just how

Josh and his five-strong team found themselves colouring the hair

of 37 models.

Yes, that’s 37. And many of them arrived with waist length,

virgin hair that needed bleaching, toning with an ‘undercoat’ of

grey or violet, roots added back in, then coloured again – all over

four days... it’s exhausting just to contemplate such an operation.

Back at the A/W18 show, it was big news when nine models walked

with strong hair colours inspired by ’80s nightclubs. Now, Josh and

the team were looking at more than four-times that number…

“We were doing shift work,” Josh explains. “We’re in Marc’s

studio with no backwash – it was

literally over the office sink. We

simply couldn’t afford the time for

the model to leave the fitting to get

in a cab and find us in a salon. We

didn’t stop.” The process was so

time-consuming that every model

needed to be tracked and accounted

for – a job entrusted to Josh’s super-organised first assistant.

“Mads was the one dealing with multiple teams, figuring out

who was who. Thank God for Mads,” he says.

Looking back, even It List Fashionista winner Mads-Sune

Lund Christensen can’t quite articulate how they made it through

in one piece – although the rapturous response made it all

worthwhile. “I have absolutely no idea how we did it,” he laughs,

but admits that he has developed an almost sixth sense when

working with Mr Wood.

“I’ve spent a lot of time trying to get into Josh’s mindset, to

prepare myself for what’s to come. I had a lot of spreadsheets and

notebooks. It’s just about keeping calm and organised,” he adds.

“My approach is slowly-slowly,

gently-gently, take your time

and preserve the hair”

JOSH WOOD

It was the shades, as much as the sheer scale, which caught

everyone’s imagination. The “anti-unicorn tones”, as Josh

describes them, evoked an unusual sense of history and depth for

pastels. To get this different transparency, Josh layered Redken

Color Gels Lacquers, Shades EQ Pastels, City Beats and new

Shades EQ Reds to get the variety of hues.

“It was that combination of a different undercoat that gave us

this idea of an antique pastel, a heritage pastel. Much softer, it

was almost ageless; they weren’t garish. They had an element of

sophistication about them, which is exactly what Marc wanted.”

It hasn’t always been the case that designers’ models have been

so welcoming to colour: “Five years ago nobody wanted it;

everybody fought it, cried, and then we’d colour it back again

after,” Josh recalls. “Now it’s ‘make it as bright as you can, we’re

going to relaunch this model with this colour’. It’s really been an

overnight change in attitude.”

To have such a drastic attitude

adjustment from both model

management and the models

themselves is challenging, Josh

admits, “because if there’s going to

be that demand then my business is

going to have to change”. In this

new dawn of catwalk colouring, what is the biggest challenge?

“The stamina,” he says. “It’s six weeks of non-stop work. I do like

to celebrate with the designers but my priorities are A) making sure

my team’s okay and B) delivering on what I’m there to do.”

Josh’s measured approach to colour is exactly what sets him

apart from others and puts him in such high demand. He manages

to coax and tease out hues which are as-yet unseen, while also

managing to keep hair looking healthy. “My approach is

slowly-slowly, gently-gently, take your time and preserve the hair.

I’ve worked on catwalk hair for a long time, and for my own

reputation I want positive feedback – it resonates back to salon

clients. The tone of voice is equally as important to me as creativity.”

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TINA TELLS IT

Natasha Zinko

You can spot session stylist Tina Outen backstage in a heartbeat, thanks to the unicorn-friendly candy pink hair,

and she’s here to have a good time and do great hair, as she tells Runway...

“I’VE GOT A TURQUOISE scarf on today, that’s me pushing the

boat out!” says Tina Outen, her voice crackling across the line

from New York, where she’s in transit to a shoot. Known for her

sunny, funny personality and wearing a lot of pink, Tina has been

doing the rounds backstage since she started on Luke Hersheson’s

team after meeting at the Harvey Nichols Hershesons salon in

London near the turn of the century. “I found that having a

strong identity helped me. As a hairdresser, it starts with my hair

– and now look, everything is getting colourful,” she giggles.

Back then, in 2002, Tina was a recently crowned

L’Oréal Colour Trophy winner happily working with salon

clients, until she was bitten by the backstage bug when she started

working for the Hershesons brand. Even after moving to the US

for a pop-up salon opportunity (called Tina Did It – now her

Instagram handle and printed on all her backstage capes) she

continued to keep one foot in the fashion world, being steadily

drawn in by the creativity of other artists. “Doing those cuts and

colours enabled me to move from the salon and into fashion. I just

like to listen, look at the clothes, look at the models, look at the

Natasha Zinko

36 SPRING/SUMMER 2019

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TINA OUTEN

Bora Aksu

Bora Aksu

Bora Aksu

Markus Lupfer

Rejina Pyo

David Koma

hair, and then see what you can make that ties everything

together,” she explains.

That collaborative spirit and bright personality is as

indomitable as ever, even as Tina raced between several different

shows in London during the S/S19 season. From the nomadic

braids at Bora Aksu (“He’s always about his muse. He’s always

about women who are fighting, struggling, achieving

something”), to Natasha Zinko’s repurposed collection with

Wrangler (“We were repurposing and layering our products too,

which was the texture, the lived-in feel”), Tina’s all about telling a

story with her work. Even Markus Lupfer’s pseudo-simple wet

look hair had a story. “Markus loves Spring/Summer. The look is

a summer girl at the beach – but in the dunes, not the tropics.

She’s young, modern, cool.” Rather than relying on salt sprays

to mimic the sea-wet texture, Tina loaded the hair with the

unusual gel-cream texture L’Oréal Professionnel TECNI.ART

Siren Waves.

With Fashion Week’s tight time pressures and notoriously

high stress levels, Tina’s approach to shows is markedly different.

“It’s important to me to keep the energy and fun levels up

backstage. I’m an energy person, a vibe person,” Tina asserts.

Natasha Zinko

“Seeing your hair on 20 models

all lined up is incredible – you don’t

get that on shoots”

TINA OUTEN

Bora Aksu

David Koma

She likes to finish all of the hair looks, especially when she’s

zipping across the world and working with different teams. How

to catch her eye? Turns out it’s easier than you think. “I’ll work

with anyone! I’ve met people off Instagram, people DM me and I

get them to come and meet me,” she says. “It’s just about feeling,

energy-wise, like we get on, having that good vibe next to you.”

Even after all this time, the rush that Fashion Week gives her

is incomparable: “Seeing your hair on 20 models all lined up is

incredible – you don’t get that on shoots,” she says. Tina’s

positivity shines all the brighter. Wouldn’t the world be an

altogether nicer place if we were all just a little bit more Tina?

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37


GUIDO

LONDON

CALLING

Runway sits down with British session legend Guido Palau to talk trends, team dynamics

and the unmistakeable London vibe, as he returns for a season in the capital

38 SPRING/WINTER 2019

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GUIDO

Victoria Beckham, image courtesy of James Cochrane

IT’S BEEN YEARS since Guido led so many shows in London,

but with occasions such as Riccardo Tisci’s first show for

Burberry and Victoria Beckham’s 10-year anniversary and LFW

debut, Guido and his team set up camp in the capital for a very

special London Fashion Week.

“It’s funny because I always feel like I belong here,” says the

Redken global creative director, making himself comfortable on

the plush Covent Garden Hotel sofa. “For a while I really severed

ties with London, but something’s shifted a little bit. Just being

here feels… it’s what I know, it’s where I grew up.”

The hotel is opposite one of the first salons Guido worked in,

more than 30 years ago. “It’s funny how life is. It was nice

coming back, nice to do Victoria Beckham’s show here again after

New York,” he smiles. “I went to the party for a bit afterwards,

and you couldn’t have been anywhere else but London in that

space – London people have a distinctness about them. People

here really know how to enjoy themselves, they let go.”

Guido has known Victoria since her Spice Girls days, and has

been with her over the past decade when she weathered initial

scepticism as she moved into fashion. “You’ve gone on this

journey with a designer, someone who was up against the odds in

a way, and she’s proved herself,” he explains. “Going from being

in a successful girl group to running a successful business, having

a family and children… it’s pretty powerful. It’s not easy.”

Victoria’s signature understated glamour took on a boyish,

minimalist edge for S/S19, standing apart from many of the shows

that saw a real return to more noticeable styling, after years of

undone looks. “There’s still the natural hair around, but there

seems to be an interest in more glamorous looks. For a good three

years we’ve talked about natural textures, but now there’s an

interest. People want to see a

fashion moment, a look,” he says,

referencing the responses to the

oversized silhouettes at Marc

Jacobs and extravagant Valentino

Couture blowouts. For Guido, the

‘reboot’ of focusing on natural

textures and diversity was much needed, a new type of beauty

statement for the world: “We’re going to keep that positive

message, but for a while we let that fashion edge go.”

For Riccardo Tisci’s first Burberry show he utilised a chignon

to keep the look simple and clean. Being able to help to establish a

brand’s voice is something that Guido takes great responsibility

in: “Even though Riccardo’s an established designer, you’re at the

beginning, you’re creating a new voice for the brand.

“There was a lot of pressure on that show but at the same

time it was exciting to be around that kind of expectation,” he

adds. “I’d worked with Riccardo at Givenchy so I know him, but

the Burberry woman is completely different to the Givenchy

woman. That’s the exciting thing about working with a new

designer, or one who is new to a house; you get to develop a style.”

“London people have a distinctness about

them. People here really know how to

enjoy themselves, they let go”

GUIDO

With such a history in Fashion Week styling, the changes to

the shows over the years are all too clear. “When I first started

we would do 18 models, a big show was 22 models. Not

anymore!” he laughs. “You still only get four hours and now can

have 120 at Burberry, 175 at Dolce & Gabbana… the numbers

are huge, the team you need is huge.”

And what’s hard with having a big team is that you don’t

know each individual’s skillsets. “You walk in and there are all

these new faces you don’t know,” he admits.

The dynamic backstage –

coupled with a language barrier

in some cases – of eager young

stylists, frayed nerves and huge

time pressures means that it can

be a baptism of fire.

“It’s one thing I always say

– you have to remember the speed,” he says. “170 people, three

hours, you have to work it out. It’s not 45 minutes per person,

like you would in the salon. It’s a different language. I try to get

it as perfect as possible, but I just need it done.”

He likes to keep an eye out for fresh talent backstage,

knowing that the atmosphere certainly isn’t for everyone. “But if

you want to work backstage… as long as you’re helpful, you’re

good,” he smiles. “It’s all about thinking and using your time

wisely for the lead person: ‘how can I be helpful? What can I do,

if I’m not technically putting the hair up?’

“It might not be your skillset for that show. We all have

strengths but when it’s not yours, what can you do to relieve the

team of the stress and help the situation? You would be a shining

star to me if you have that attitude.”

Guido backstage at S/S19

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Daniel Pascal Turner at On|Off

40 SPRING/WINTER 2019

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ON|OFF

MATCHY-MATCHY

Pairing creatives together can be a tricky business. Here’s how it’s done

at the On|Off showcase at London Fashion Week…

ON|OFF HAS BEEN instrumental in launching the careers of international

fashion designers for years. For 26 seasons across 15 years, the showcase at

London Fashion Week has given labels such as Gareth Pugh, Peter Pilotto and

JW Anderson a platform to promote their visions on a global stage. Looking to

highlight new visionaries and bright-minded businesses, the On|Off initiative is

as nurturing as it is creative.

Part of this support involves connecting designers with experienced hair

and make-up teams to help complete their vision. L’Oréal Professionnel steps

up to the plate for hair, hitting home runs season after season with its carefully

considered partnerships. Each designer has their own story and appeal, and the

L’Oréal Professionnel team works with its associated artists to find the perfect

pairing, every time. How? Let’s find out…

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41


ON|OFF

IA LONDON LONGSHAW WARD DANIEL PASCAL TANNER

THE DESIGNER: Ira Avezov

THE STYLIST: Mark Woolley,

Electric Hairdressing

THE LOOK: Textured, lengths tucked into

collars and hoods to create a pear shape

THE DESIGNERS: David Longshaw

and Kirsty Ward

THE STYLIST: Cristiano Basciu,

Richard Ward Hair & Metrospa

THE LOOK: Clean and sculpted

THE DESIGNER: Daniel Pascal Tanner

THE STYLIST: Richard Phillipart,

The Boutique Atelier

THE LOOK: Low ponytail with

Pre-Raphaelite texture

RUNWAY: How did you find On|Off?

IRA AVEZOV: It was our debut show and

having an opportunity to work with

top-end professionals from L’Oréal

Professionnel felt like a precious gift.

When the people you work with are very

talented – as Mark Woolley and his team

are – it makes the results extraordinary,

and the process inspiring and enjoyable.

RUNWAY: What makes the On|Off

showcase different to other shows?

MARK WOOLLEY: On|Off has an

international reputation for launching new

visions and collections from emerging

designers. How it supports new talent is

amazing; it offers what new designers need

to start their career in fashion and grow.

Electric is an independent, British brand

born from pure passion, with the goal to

make a difference in our industry – and

young designers have the same intent – so

working together to create something

different and inspirational is ideal.

RUNWAY: How did the show’s low

side-parting with a hint of Marcel wave

and chignon look come into being?

DAVID LONGSHAW: Cristiano

instantly connected with our research

images and collection fittings photos we

showed him, and suggested ways to adapt

the hair styling to create the sculpted look.

It felt like a more polished progression

from our previous season’s catwalk

hair (which was a messy wet look).

It really suited our S/S19 garments,

which have more of an emphasis on

tailoring, they’re a bit more grown up.

RUNWAY: How has the pairing evolved?

CRISTIANO BASCIU: This is the second

time we have worked with the Longshaw

Ward designers and we absolutely love

creating hair for them! We have developed

a brilliant relationship which is really

important – they trust our team to create

something special for them that really

works for their vision.

RUNWAY: How did you find the

experience of an On|Off collaboration?

DANIEL PASCAL TANNER: It was a real

pleasure to work with a hair stylist as

creative as Richard, he interpreted the

aesthetic and feeling of the collection

beautifully. The textured fringe added

intrigue and romance, but the hair was

still clean and off the sides of the face,

so we could see the models features.

RUNWAY: What was the process like?

RICHARD PHILLIPART: Daniel and I

chatted over the phone a couple of times,

we exchanged moodboards and emails

back and forth long before we did the

fitting and test day. Because of the big

black velvet hats worn by half of the

models, we needed something to tie all

the looks together. So on the test day

I suggested black ribbons in ponytails and

it became a key part of the style. We’ve

worked together since, collaborating on

a hair show that he styled.

42 SPRING/SUMMER 2019

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ON|OFF

COLIN HORGAN

CHOCOLAB

THE DESIGNER: Colin Horgan

THE STYLIST: Tina Farey, Rush Hair

THE LOOK: Sweaty, post-clubbing, with

one side left as it would have been at the

start of the night

RUNWAY: How did you find On|Off?

COLIN HORGAN: It was an incredible

experience. It was experimental, but the

level of professionalism was so strong I

couldn’t have asked for more.

TINA FAREY: I really loved working with

Colin and we’ve already collaborated

again as he kindly lent us two of his outfits

for the Rush Live charity hair show!

RUNWAY: How did you settle on the

‘post-clubbing’ look?

COLIN HORGAN: My concept for the

hair was supposed to be a ‘out all night,

just come home’ look where the hair is

coming undone but still has a sleek,

sophisticated element to it. When Tina

was doing a few different tests there was a

point where the hair was half complete,

and I loved how effortless it looked. It gave

this sense the woman had done it herself

but was at a stage in the morning where

she felt great enough to know it didn’t

need adjustment.

ON|OFF

THE DESIGNER: Qing

THE STYLIST: Darren Fowler,

Fowler35

THE LOOK: Clean and simple with a

low, twisted chignon

RUNWAY: How did you find On|Off?

QING: It was a great working with

On|Off and L’Oréal Professionnel, Darren

and his team were excellent. All of us were

extremely happy with the result and

experience Darren provided. I can’t thank

L’Oréal Professionnel enough for

providing such an exquisite team for us!

DARREN FOWLER: On|Off is always

exciting. Creating characters is very much

my ethos and something I carry through

to the catwalk. I always work with the

designers to consider the story of the

models, presenting an image that will

convey that story to the viewer.

RUNWAY: How did you devise the look?

DARREN FOWLER: It was decided that

the model was chic but street. Almost East

London meets Couture. I used a double

ponytail tied in at the nape to keep the

parting through the top, then flipped this

up and tied it again so that we had this

sculptured shape working back up the head.

RUNWAY

SPRING/SUMMER 2019

43


“It was a mix of editorial hair but

with a surreal quality. The show

was performance art”

JOHANNA CREE BROWN

REVOLUTIONARY SPIRIT

Love the looks created by Johanna Cree Brown

and the Trevor Sorbie Art Team

t

PROTEST BRAIDS

Three low braids

using figure of eight

weaving are finished

with L’Oréal

Professionnel

TECNI.ART

Ring Light

t

SURREALIST

BRAIDS

An extended braided

tail wrapped and

draped around neck

and clothes, with

TECNI.ART Web

used for braiding.

44 SPRING/SUMMER 2019

RUNWAY


CARLA FERNÁNDEZ

JOIN THE

RESISTANCE

Designer Carla Fernández fights the good fight at the latest V&A Fashion in Motion,

with extra muscle from Johanna Cree Brown and the Trevor Sorbie Art Team

Images courtesy of L’Oréal Professionnel

THE SPOTLIGHT SHONE on designer

Carla Fernández at the latest Fashion in Motion

event at the V&A, which showcased her

Manifesto of Fashion as Resistance and featured

a live chorus and a catwalk presentation with

work from five collections. Centred around the

designer’s commitment to decolonisation,

intersectionality and social justice, Carla’s

designs also reflect the rich history of textiles

and design of her native Mexico.

After studying art history, fashion design and

Mexican apparel, in 2000 she launched her

ready-to-wear brand inspired by traditional

Mexican textiles. By 2008, she had been named

Fashion Entrepreneur of the Year by the British

Fashion Council, and in December 2018 she was

honoured with the Design Miami/Visionary

Award alongside her husband, artist Pedro Reyes.

L’Oréal Professionnel, which has provided

hair teams for the Fashion in Motion event since

its inception, tasked leading stylist Johanna Cree

Brown and the Trevor Sorbie team to create

editorial looks with an out of this world element

that befitted the work. Johanna explains that

each look “was a mix of editorial hair but with a

surreal quality. The show was performance

art”. For Carla, she says working with Johanna

to create the looks “demonstrated the hair was

also an art piece, a crafted hairstyle”.

The Trevor Sorbie artistic director worked

closely with style consultant and designer Sam

Lambert to create the initial concept for the hair,

which featured centre-partings and a mix of

long and woven braids. Using references from

the textiles of Mexico’s indigenous communities

that influence Carla’s work, Sam explained that

they “wanted to pick inspiration from the

culture and make it contemporary”. From this,

Sam and Johanna developed the idea of making

the hair part of the clothing, to make it an

accessory coming out from the cloth or using

long single braids as necklaces.

t

FEMINIST

A luxe shape with

disconnected

lengths, using

TECNI.ART

Web to slick down

the sides.

t

ANDROGYNOUS

Hair as nature

intended, with a

little TECNI.ART

Web to slick hair

back from face.

RUNWAY

SPRING/SUMMER 2019

45


BRUSH UP

Are your staff up-to-scratch on styling? We spoke to some of the backstage big-hitters

about the skillset they claim is missing from the next generation of hairdressers…

Holly Fulton


SKILLS

Richard Phillipart

TRADING IN THE SALON floor for an

adrenaline-filled season backstage at

fashion week is a dream come true for

many. With lucky stylists cherry-picked for

the best teams led by some of the biggest

names in the business, expectations are

high – both for the hairdresser and for the

salons that are losing staff for days at a

time. But what happens when the new cog

doesn’t fit in the finely-oiled machine?

“One of the issues we’re

finding is a shortage of ‘classic’

skills,” says Adam Reed,

co-founder of Percy & Reed

and L’Oréal Professionnel UK

editorial ambassador. He feels

that the need for speed in

under-pressure salons has

resulted in a chasm between expectations

and experience, with artists hoping to pick

up key techniques on the job. “We don’t

want rushed work, we need an incredible

level of skill,” he continues. “Even the

most basic skills they seem to have no

idea how to do, or how to make it

look beautiful.”

When your work is under this much

scrutiny – forming the basis of trends to

come for the season ahead – there’s no

room for winging it. “People want to assist

and come backstage, as I did,” Adam

explains. “But I learnt those classic skills

before I even went to assist. They should

be practising on block heads. Even now, if

I’m going to do a show and I’ve been sent

a reference, I still practise and make sure

that I’ve got the right tools.”

“Even the most basic skills they seem

to have no idea how to do, or how to

make it look beautiful”

ADAM REED

So what can be done? To start, Adam

has filmed a series of video tutorials for

L’Oréal Professionnel’s Access platform to

offer insight and education to all salon

stylists that’s completely accessible – no

“access all areas” pass needed.

Richard Phillipart, owner of The

Boutique Atelier in Cheshire, leads his

own team at London Fashion Week and he

Adam Reed

RUNWAY

SPRING/SUMMER 2019

47


SKILLS

Jonathan Soons

“When I started assisting, my ponytail

work was weak. I picked up on it

immediately and practised for a long time”

JONATHAN SOONS

suggests doubling down on the core skills

that are so essential when working

backstage. “Often we will be working a

classic technique into

a modern texture, so

a wide skillset and

understanding of

how things work

will help you be

ready for anything,”

he explains.

Even simple up-dos can be the

downfall of a Fashion Week newbie.

“Ponytail work is sometimes the skill that

needs to be improved,” agrees Jonathan

Soons, artistic ambassador for

Headmasters. “When I started assisting,

my ponytail work was weak. I picked up

on it immediately and practised for a long

time to have the confidence to do a high

show pony.”

Technique isn’t the only element these

fashion week seniors find lacking in their

assistants – having a broad product

knowledge is essential, especially as

extreme looks sent down the catwalk are

rarely created with the usual instructions.

It’s a lesson that Kathryn Dartnell, art

director at Harringtons, learnt very

quickly. “When I first started working

backstage, I remember noticing the

amount of product used,” she recalls.

“Seeing someone use a whole bottle of

TECNI.ART Full Volume Extra mousse

on one head of hair… I’d never seen

anyone do that in the salon before! I found

I had to learn to use and understand

products in a whole new way backstage.”

That understanding of products and

building a base of expertise around what’s

in your kitbag is an key element of the

revamped TECNI.ART range from

L’Oréal Professionnel. Reformulated after

intense workshopping with stylists from

around the globe including Adam Reed,

TECNI.ART’s raison d’etre to is to

provide the tools that will allow a stylist to

achieve what they’ve been briefed to do as

brilliantly as possible.

But for Kathryn, her time backstage

has greatly helped to shape her work back

in the salon. “There are lots of skills that

cross over, but session artists have such

an in-depth knowledge and skill set when

it comes to styling hair. There is so much

to learn in simply styling; there isn’t a

salon hairdresser alive who won’t benefit

from being exposed to the skill set

48 SPRING/SUMMER 2019

RUNWAY


SKILLS

“There isn’t a salon hairdresser alive who

won’t benefit from being exposed to the

skill set required to work backstage”

KATHRYN DARTNELL

Kathryn Dartnell

required to work backstage at a show.”

Gaining an awareness of your own

strengths and weaknesses is no easy feat

but can quickly help to set you apart in the

best way possible. As concerned as Adam

is about a “cheat mentality, of winging it”,

he knows that this is by no means a

universal problem. He adds: “Some people

are so on the ball. What’s interesting is

how they then really stand out.”

It’s something that Jonathan agrees

with, advocating fast thinking and being

aware of other teams in cramped quarters.

“Backstage is not a salon environment,

and being chatty or slow is not good,”

Jonathan warns. “You need to be alert

and ready to help more than one stylist

at a time.”

So how best to make a (positive)

impression? “Ask to come

and assist at the prep,”

Adam suggests. “It’s a

small thing, but you’ll see

all of the process of the

prep and be able to go

home and practise it –

and knock it out of the

park. You’re getting a free education.”

Filming the test or guide means that

you can be in the moment, paying

attention to what’s being shown – but it

also gives you concrete material to return

back to the salon with and learn from.

“Make sure you bring a good kit and ask

lots of questions,” Adam concludes.

“I never mind if people ask me questions,

I’d rather someone ask than try and wing

it. I’ll always make sure my assistant can

be a point of contact if you’re a little

nervous about talking to me. It’s a job

where you have to be able to communicate

or you’re never going to learn – and you’ll

be annoyed at yourself for not asking.”

SESSION

SKILLS FOR

THE SALON

TIPS & TRICKS

Update your backstage skills with the

Tips & Tricks styling course from

L’Oréal Professionnel. Taught by

Kayleigh Twigg from Brooks &

Brooks, it gives you the ammunition

you need to keep styling from

becoming your Achilles heel. Improve

your confidence with braiding and

hair-up styling through step-by-step,

interactive demonstrations and

hands-on training.

27 March, London Academy

lorealaccess.com/uk

MASTERCLASS

Redken’s next-level Masterclass

sessions are perfect for making sure

your skills are freshly sharpened

for backstage work. Learn some of

S/S19’s hottest trends with Jonathan

Long’s S/S Cut/Color/Style

masterclass, or learn from the king

of cool himself, Mr Larry King, in

his expert Styling class. Under his

expert guidance you’ll be ready to

create his signature styles and

polished looks with an undone twist.

18 March and 29 April,

Redken Exchange, London

lorealaccess.com/uk

RUNWAY

SPRING/SUMMER 2019

49


S/S19 HAIR IS…

“ABOUT FRINGES,

BANGS AND MINI

FRINGES. WE SAW

THEM AT PRADA,

MIU MIU, ALL

OVER THE PLACE.

THERE’S A

BOYISHNESS

THIS SEASON

THAT’S

EMPOWERING,

TOO”

Guido, Redken

global creative

director

“LOW

MAINTENANCE.

SMOOCHED-

DOWN, WEARABLE

WET LOOKS ARE A

MUST THIS

SEASON. IT’S

EVERYTHING THAT

IS NATURAL, EASY

TO WEAR BUT STILL

POLISHED WITH

SHINE”

Mark Woolley,

Electric

Hairdressing

“FREE-FLOWING.

THERE’S LOTS OF

MOVEMENT, LOTS

OF TEXTURE – BE IT

STRAIGHT, WAVY

OR CURLY – BUT

THERE’S ALSO

LOTS OF HAIR

DOWN LOOKS

WITH AIR

CATCHING IT AS

MODELS WALK”

Richard Phillipart,

The Boutique

Atelier

“COLOURFUL!

EXPRESSIVE,

EXPERIMENTAL

AND FUN HAIR

THAT LOOKS LESS

FLOWY AND

EDITORIAL – MORE

LIKE THE WAY HAIR

WAS WORN AS

AN ACCESSORY IN

THE ’80S”

Josh Wood,

Redken global

color creative

director

“TOO COOL FOR

SCHOOL.

EFFORTLESS

SHAPE, COLOUR

AND FINISH ARE

KEY TO KEEPING IT

REAL. THINK

DEBBIE HARRY,

SOFIA COPPOLA

AND CAROLINE DE

MAIGRET AND

YOU’RE ON THE

RIGHT TRACK!”

Adam Reed,

Percy & Reed

A summary of the season, in the words of the professionals

S/S19 HAIR IS…

“BRINGING

TEXTURE BACK!

THINK

SLICKED-BACK

POWER BRAIDS,

FROM ELABORATE

UP-DOS AND

FLUFFY, FLYAWAY

WAVES TO

WET-LOOK

PONYTAILS

– TEXTURE IS KEY”

Cristiano Basciu,

Richard Ward Hair

& Metrospa

“ACCESSORIES!

THINK BACK TO

‘80S SCHOOL

STYLE. I LOVED

THE LEATHER

HEADBAND

AT PRADA,

THE ENCRUSTED

DIAMOND CLIPS

AT MAXMARA…

CHANEL BOWS

MADE A

STATEMENT, TOO!

Tina Farey,

Rush Hair

“ALL ABOUT

DUALITY. WE’RE

MODERNISING

AUTHENTIC,

NATURAL HAIR BY

CREATING DUAL

TEXTURE . BE IT

SHINY WET

PRODUCTS USED

FOR HOLD AND

CLEAN ENDS THAT

FLY, OR CLEAN

ROOTS AND DRY

TEXTURED ENDS”

Tina Outen

“IS STILL ABOUT

INDIVIDUALITY.

GONE ARE

COOKIE-CUTTER

HAIRCUTS, THERE’S

NEVER BEEN A

BETTER TIME TO BE

BOLD AND USE

YOUR HAIR TO

EXPRESS WHO YOU

REALLY ARE. IT CAN

BE TAILORED WITH

A UNIQUE TWIST”

Darren Fowler,

Fowler35

“ABOUT THE

RETURN OF THE

STATEMENT

HAIRCUT. THE

NEED FOR

STRUCTURED

SHAPES IS AT THE

FOREFRONT. WE

ARE SEEING THE

REBIRTH OF THE

EMPOWERING

HAIRCUT”

Cristian Pignatta,

Neville Hair &

Beauty

50 SPRING/SUMMER 2019

RUNWAY

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