The Good Life Men's Magazine - January/February 2019

TheGoodLife

Featuring entrepreneurs Bert, Lisa and Klaus. Local Hero - Youthworks, Having a Beer with Nick Broadway, Ice Fishing and more in Fargo Moorhead's only men's magazine.

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2019

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FATHERS | MR. FULL-TIME DAD

WRITTEN BY: BEN HANSON

PHOTOS BY: URBAN TOAD MEDIA

Ahh, New Year’s. What a wonderfully two-faced time of year. Sure, we

get one more chance to party (if you can find a sitter) with friends and

family, but it’s also the end. Literally. Not just the end of the year, but the

end of the most joyous, merry-filled time of the year. And to celebrate, we

embark on a ruthless examination of our personal failings and character

flaws. Cheers!

I’m of course talking about the yearly self-hazing ritual known as the

New Year’s resolution. Lose weight, stop smoking, eat a little healthier,

transcend time and space, finally write that children’s book you’ve been

talking about for the past two years… we all know the obvious ones.

This year, I’m giving up before I start, not even bothering to pick up the

towel before throwing it in. But I’m a sucker for tradition and couldn’t

stop myself from still making a list. Not for me, however, but for Macklin,

my above average three-year-old son. I put together a pretty universal

toddler resolutions list I’d like to believe he might choose to tackle in

2019.

I won’t lose my mind every morning when the

cartoons get turned off.

Routines are routines because they’re routine, right? My morning routine

goes off with atomic clock precision. Mack crawls into “the big bed,” we

watch cartoons, I destroy his life by turning the TV off in order to get him

dressed for school. I’d like to think he learns to anticipate the inevitable

and at some point in 2019 we make it to school without a fight.

2 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com

I’ll stop referring to the people I love as “poopy.”

My wife, Emily, is a therapist. A damn good one, too. But it took a

psychiatrist coworker of hers to help us put this one into perspective.


“Poop is his favorite word,” she said. “It’s therefore a sign

of affection.” Sure, but it’s still poop, and the rest of the

literate world isn’t going to understand that when he calls

me poopy in front of the poor server who’s just trying to

take our order at B-dubs that he’s really just saying “I love

you, Daddy, I’d like some white milk, please.”

I won’t sprint into the middle of the

parking lot.

You only get so many chances to get this one right, so

please don’t give me any looks if I happen to lose my cool

while strongly supporting my son in achieving this very

important resolution.

I’ll remember it’s winter and my wagon’s

in the shed.

Time is a tough concept to grasp. I get it. I still get confused

about what day it is after a hard night’s sleep. I also get

that his favorite thing to do is walk to the park and drag

along his wagon in case he’s too tired to make the walk

home. But it’s been months since we last took a wagon

walk to the park. Months since he’s seen any hint of green

grass. Let’s connect the dots in our heads, eh son?

I’ll look down when I pee.

Whether standing up or sitting down. Walking, running or

riding. Driving, chipping or putting… watching your aim is

a valuable, versatile life skill. He’s pretty much mastered

every other aspect of potty training, so here’s hoping he

can dial in that midstream focus and keep it all in the pot.

I’ll make friends with the dog, finally.

Just be nice to the dog already. Please? She’s old and was

here first. And she’s really pretty awesome, even if she’s

got some concerning lumps and blotches of baldness. I’d

hate to one day have to blame you for those, son, so please

don’t put me in that position. I love you both.

I’ll break the world record for volume

of surface area touched in public in a

single outing.

It’s amazing to me how infrequently Mack gets sick. I

think he’s only had to stay home from daycare twice in

his life, which is almost record-breaking by itself. It’s

amazing because of the sheer amount of public-facing

stuff he touches. He’s put his hands on more goods

than a Hornbacher’s stock boy. Considering his strong

constitution, I’m quite curious to see how far he can take

this one. Surprisingly, he’s got my full support.

As for me, I’ve already succeeded with my New Year’s

resolution. Wildly so, in fact. No one has ever given up

faster or more effortlessly than I! But with all this free

time, I suppose I could resolve to be more patient when

morning tantrums delay our departure or when he can’t

keep his grubby little hands inside the shopping cart. We

only have 15 years before he probably moves out… I really

should enjoy them all as much as possible. •

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 3


CONTENTS VOLUME

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2019

6 • ISSUE 4

02

06

FATHERS / MR. FULL-TIME DAD

A TODDLER'S NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTION

ICE FISHING

GRAVEYARD SHIFT WALLEYES

THE RISE OF LIVE EDGE SLABS

12 BUFFALO COULEE WOOD PRODUCTS 24

JEWELRY BUYING TIPS FOR MEN

16 5 TIPS TO FIND THE PERFECT GIFT 28

18

ON THE COVER / THE MEYERS'

BERT, LISA AND KLAUS

4 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com

30

HAVING A BEER WITH / NICK BROADWAY

WEEKEND ANCHOR AND REPORTER

ASK 30 WOMEN / WHAT IS THE BEST/WORST

PICKUP LINE YOU HAVE HEARD?

LOCAL HERO / YOUTHWORKS

YOUR FRIENDLY SUPERHERO SOCIAL WORKER


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urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 5


WRITTEN BY: JASON MITCHELL | JASON MITCHELL OUTDOORS

o many fisheries come

to mind where after dark

patterns offer some of

the best opportunities for

catching fish. After dark strategies

and locations however can vary

dramatically from where we might

find fish during daylight or twilight

hours.

What happens so often to us as

anglers is that we simply figure out

one window or movement of fish and

when that window ends, we assume

that the bite is over. Could be setting

up on a classic point anticipating the

sunset bite. A classic pattern might

start in deeper water and as the day

progresses to where the sun hits the

horizon, we find an intense window

of fish activity on top of the point

that might last half an hour. What

so often happens is that after this

intense flurry, we quit marking fish

and assume that the bite is over. The

bite might indeed be over if we don’t

make any adjustments but the reality

is that we can prolong the bite and

keep catching fish if we move with the

fish. Of course there are also basin

and transition bites as well like what

we often see on Red Lake and Mille

Lacs after dark. Perhaps the toughest

aspect of catching walleye well after

dark is forgetting some of the lessons

we tend to learn during the day.

So often, finding and catching

walleyes is all about reading

structure and focusing on edges.

After dark however, you can throw

that edge mentality out the window.

We often find walleyes roaming away

from structure well after dark. Large

expansive flats in shallow water are a

6 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


Walleye after dark

play by a different set of rules.

MAKE THE RIGHT ADJUSTMENTS TO

CAPITALIZE ON SOME OF THE MOST

INTENSE WALLEYE BITES.

favorite location. That four to six-foot

sand flat that is several acres might

be void of walleye activity during the

day where even sunrise and sunset

patterns seem to revolve around

structure that breaks into deeper

water. In the middle of the night

however, walleyes will often push up

and roam much shallower water than

what some anglers would envision.

On some fisheries, walleye will also

be more apt to eat much higher in

the water column well after dark. We

have seen many scenarios where we

caught more walleye after dark by

fishing halfway down in the water

column, especially for big fish. This is

particularly true for set rods and tip

ups with big bait.

Like any other time of year, full moon

periods can make some after dark

patterns better but there will often

be feeding windows that happen in

intense flurries through the night.

Don’t expect activity all night long,

wait out the windows because ninety

percent of the activity will happen

during ten percent of the time.

My favorite after dark locations and

patterns are not necessarily classic

walleye structure or breaklines that

are close to deeper water. Typically,

large flats or even basins and large

shelves shine after dark. I use the

whitetail deer analogy a lot when

describing walleye patterns and

movements. During the day, deer

might follow an edge but come middle

of the night, they might be more apt

to be standing out in the middle of a

soybean field that is several hundred

acres. Walleyes can also be just as

random after dark.

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 7


Because the exact location of fish can be so

random on large flats and shelves, fishing these

locations takes a certain kind of mentality. You

can spread out tip ups to increase the chances

of contacting these roaming fish or you can fish

out of a shelter but in this situation, you have to

realize that the fish are going to find you. This

isn’t a situation where you can necessarily move

around to find these random fish, set up so that at

some point during the night… these fish find you.

The beauty of fishing well after dark is that these

fish will be looking for you. What makes after dark

patterns for walleye so much fun is that these fish

are typically much more aggressive and these fish

are looking for a meal. The bites are often much

more intense. These fish will peel off much more

line off a tip up for example or hit a lure repeatedly.

WHAT MAKES

PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY: JASON MITCHELL

AFTER DARK PATTERNS

FOR WALLEYE SO FUN

IS THESE FISH ARE

TYPICALLY MUCH

MORE AGGRESSIVE.

8 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


When fishing after dark, I am a big

proponent of using glow finishes on

lures. Not always necessary but I

have seen so many situations where

we almost immediately caught a fish

after charging a lure. When using

live bait on tip ups, don’t hesitate

to use larger baits that are up to

eight inches long. Clip the tails of

rambunctious chubs and suckers

so that they can’t trip flags or pull

the roller around the spool. Strike

indicators are nice to have on tip ups.

Other nice tools for the graveyard

shift include head lamps and LED

lights for inside shelters. LED light

sources have about replaced a lot of

traditional propane lanterns.

What can make the after dark period

so fun is the intensity of the mayhem.

You can have an hour or two of

complete silence interrupted by the

most intense feeding windows. The

bite is often a full on blitz where it

seems like every line has a fish.

Where every tip up is out of the

water and there are fish flopping all

over the ice. Realistically, this after

a dark window is what can make

spending the night in a fish house

so appealing. Tangled rattle reels

and chaos. On so many fisheries, the

period between sunset and sunrise

offers some of ice fishing’s most

exciting walleye fishing. •

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 9


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10 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


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urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 11


THE RISE OF

LIVE EDGE SLABS

BUFFALO COULEE WOOD PRODUCTS

Woodworkers know one of the most important decisions

of any woodworking project is selecting the type and size

of wood necessary to get the job done. Whether building

custom furniture or a designing the perfect bar for your man

cave, each project is unique and deserves the highest quality

material which often can’t always be found at chain stores.

That’s where Buffalo Coulee Wood Products comes in. As a

go-to when gathering wood materials, Buffalo Coulee Wood

Products offers a variety of materials including reclaimed

lumber and beams, wood discs, and live edge slabs.

The men behind Buffalo Coulee Wood Products are Jared

Johnson and Matthew Weaver, who forged a friendship while

working as arborists. While their business partnership began

in the spring of 2016 after purchasing a Howell Model 0

circular sawmill from the early 1900’s, the company didn’t

come to fruition until late the following year when the duo

received their first load of live edge slabs. Shortly after, the

partners purchased a full-blown sawmill operation just a few

miles east of the Buffalo Coulee in Cummings, North Dakota

which provided the inspiration behind their business name.

From there, business took off quickly.

Live edges have

been around

since the dawn of

time...or at least

since humankind’s

first attempt at

creating furniture.

12 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


WRITTEN BY: KATIE JENISON • PHOTOS BY: URBAN TOAD MEDIA

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 13


Within the first few months, Johnson and Weaver noticed

one product in particular seemed to be a hot commodity

among their clientele – live edge slabs. While live edge

slabs aren’t an entirely new concept on the woodworking

scene, they’ve begun to increase in popularity in recent

years. The rise in popularity is more than likely due to

home renovation and design shows such as HGTV’s

beloved Fixer Upper, Pinterest DIYers, and specialty

woodworking shops.

If you’ve missed out on this trend, you’re probably

scratching your head and wondering what a live edge is.

Live edges have been around since the dawn of time...or at

least since humankind’s first attempt at creating furniture.

Most commonly utilized in woodworking projects to create

tables, shelving, and fireplace mantles, a live edge refers to

leaving at least one side of wood slab completely raw.

Rather than paring down the slabs to create uniformed

planks, the natural shape and edge of the slab is displayed

in all its glory. In fact, most woodworkers design their

pieces around the shape of the slab, resulting in a truly

unique finished product. Live edge slabs can come from

a large variety of wood species including walnut and oak,

and woodworkers have the option of leaving the bark as is

or removing it to create a smoother edge while maintaining

the original shape.

14 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


Imperfections in the slab? No problem! Rather

than seeing cracks, knots, and voids in the wood as

problematic, woodworkers choose to showcase them

because they add to the uniqueness of each project. If a

smooth surface is desired or the bark is left on, an epoxy

mixture can be used to fill in the voids while preserving

the characteristics of the wood.

Since the first load of wide edge slabs arrived at the

Buffalo Coulee Wood Products sawmill, customers

can’t seem to get enough, and the slabs continue to be

a bestseller. Recognizing just how in-demand live edge

slabs are, Johnson and Weaver go the extra mile to bring

in different species of wood from all over the United

States to create the ultimate customer experience. If they

don’t have a desired species of slab on hand, customers

can rest easy knowing they’ll do what they can to locate

it and bring it to the sawmill.

The process behind cutting down logs may not be

totally unique, but for the guys at Buffalo Coulee Wood

Products, it’s a labor of love. Once logs are brought to

the sawmill, each one is cut into slabs using either the

bandsaw or chainsaw mill. Johnson says this is one of

their favorite parts of the process because each log is

different. He equates it to Christmas morning because

“you never know what you’re going to get!” After the logs

have been cut into slabs, they’re moved into the mill’s

solar kiln where they’re dried down. When the moisture

content is at about 10%, the slabs are removed from the

kiln and ready for purchase.

While Buffalo Coulee Wood Products celebrated its

one-year anniversary in November, Johnson and Weaver

have seen so much success with their fledgling business.

So much success, in fact, they’re already looking to

the future. First up is expanding their operation to cut

wide width slabs. At the moment, the mill is able to cut

materials up to a 54” width but hopes to accommodate

larger slabs in the future. The duo is also open to

setting up a woodworking shop to sell finished products

like custom wood furniture down the line. Until then,

their number one goal is to be the premier source for

woodworkers in the region. •

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 15


5 TIPS TO FIND THE PERFECT GIFT

WRITTEN BY: KATIE JENISON

Between the holidays and the upcoming Valentine’s Day, it is definitely jewelry buying season!

While jewelry makes a great gift this time of year, it’s perfect for other occasions, too.

From anniversaries to birthdays, a beautiful piece of jewelry is a wonderful way

to show her you care. Here are five tips to help you do just that.

1. BE PREPARED

When buying jewelry for a woman,

it’s important to have an idea of what

she does and does not like. Helpful

things to know include what kind

of stones and metal she prefers, as

well as if there’s a specific shape of

stone she likes. With just a little basic

information, picking out jewelry will

be that much easier.

To avoid ruining the surprise by

asking her questions, there are a

couple options to determine her

preferences. First, take a peek at

the jewelry she already has. What

does she wear the most? Is there an

overall style she seems to like? Next,

ask those close to her what she likes.

If you’re still struggling to figure out

what she likes, go with a classicdiamonds!

16 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com

2. BUY MATCHING ITEMS

Purchasing jewelry from a collection

is a great way to create a theme

and will provide several options

the next time you buy her jewelry.

Most collections include a necklace,

earrings, ring, and bracelets. Or,

if she’s the type to mix and match

consider purchasing a piece that

complements her existing jewelry.

3. PERSONALIZE IT

One way to add a special touch to

your selection is to make it personal.

Choose a piece showcasing her

birthstone or get her a charm bracelet

featuring items significant to your

relationship. Take it one step further

and have a message engraved on it.

Personalized touches to her jewelry

will make the gift even more unique.


4. MAKE IT MEMORABLE

Once you’ve found the right piece of jewelry, it’s time

to go the extra mile. Have it gift-wrapped and make

a special plan to surprise her with it. By making the

first time she sees it a memorable experience, the

gift is even more meaningful, and she’ll have a great

story to share with friends and loved ones. Plan a

romantic dinner out or take her to a place that has a

special meaning to both of you. Do it right and she’ll

be gushing about it for years to come!

5. KNOW THE RETURN POLICY AND

WARRANTY

It’s important to understand what kind of warranty is

included with a jewelry purchase. Jewelry repair and

replacement can be costly, so it may be necessary to

invest in an extended service plan. Regular cleanings

and inspections are usually required to keep up the

warranty, but they often cover things like sizing, repairs

to damaged stones, and replacing missing stones.

While these tips will be a big help when picking out

jewelry for your significant other, there’s no guarantee

she’ll absolutely love it. The best way to be prepared

for that situation is to know the store’s return policy

before making the final purchase. Neither of you

wants to be stuck with an expensive piece of jewelry

she doesn’t like!

Luckily, jewelry store staff are well versed in helping

men find the perfect piece of jewelry for the women

in their lives. So, if you’re still struggling with what

kind of jewelry she’d like, you can count on jewelry

consultants to steer you in the right direction.

Regardless of what kind of jewelry you pick, she’ll love

the care and thought you put into the gift! •

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 17


ON THE COVER | THE MEYERS

18 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


WRITTEN BY: BRITTNEY GOODMAN • PHOTOS BY: URBAN TOAD MEDIA

The Good Life sat down for a cocktail and conversation

with Bert, Lisa, and Klaus Meyers, proprietors of

Dempsey’s, Würst Bier Hall and the upcoming Beerfish

to talk about beginnings and the future.

Bert and Klaus Meyers are twin brothers born on the

north side of Chicago who grew up from the age of six in

Nashwauk in the Minnesota Iron Range. Bert’s wife and

partner of 18 years, Lisa Meyers, spent her childhood in

Verndale, Minnesota on a dairy farm.

Bert and Klaus’s father was an ironworker and their mom

was a cook and restaurant owner. “Our neighborhood in

Nashwauk was pretty fun. We would go cliff diving, ride

our bikes all over and raise hell every day,” described Bert.

Klaus added, “We learned how to party up there.” Lisa

said, “My neighborhood was fields.”

Bert, always social, said, “In Nashwauk, I was one who

had the keg parties. It is a different world now; nobody

does keg parties. But I was, ‘two bucks, or go home.’”

Perhaps this was foreshadowing of his entrepreneurship

and ownership of successful bars.

Klaus moved to Fargo in 1988 for college. Bert came

the following year. Lisa came in 1994. Bert and Klaus

met Lisa in 1995 when they all worked at what was

then the Doublewood Inn.

One of Bert’s first entrepreneurial adventures was

a window washing business, Lenny and Squeegee’s

Window Washing. Klaus owned a landscaping

business.

Lisa and Bert married in 2000 and started the first

location for Bertrosa’s Chicago Café in an old gas

station on South University Drive in Fargo. The name

“confused people,” said Bert, but it is a combination

of Bert with his mother’s name, Rosa. Lisa said,

“Bertlisa’s just didn’t have the same ring to it.” Klaus

explained, “In Chicago, there was a restaurant we liked

called Manjovens which came from the three owners’

names: Manny, Joe and Vinnie. We liked that idea.”

Bert said, “We started with four items on our menu. We

made $600 our first day, and after that, we did $25 a

day for four months.” Lisa added, “It was a long haul.”

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 19


ON THE COVER | THE MEYERS

They continued the idea of Chicagostyle

street food at a location on

45th Street next to J.T. Cigarro’s.

Bert said, “It was successful. We

made money but we could have

made more.”

Most people discovered Bertrosa’s

in its final location in downtown

Fargo in the lower level of The Black

Building opening in July 2002. Bert

asserted, “Downtown was where we

got our footing — where Bertrosa’s

took off. But it did take a while for

people to understand what we were.”

Lisa said, “Because we had Chicago

in the title, people would confuse

us with the chain restaurant, Old

Chicago.”

The Bertrosa’s menu came from the

food Bert and Klaus grew up eating,

such as Italian beef sandwiches and

Chicago-style hot dogs. Klaus added,

“We moved from Chicago when we

were kids but we stayed connected.”

Bert asserted, “It is the greatest city

in the country.” They visit Chicago

at least once a year and have a big

connection to the Windy City.

They then sought something

different, and their chance came

when a new type of liquor license

came out in Fargo – the Z License.

Bert explained, “When the new

Z licenses came out, Klaus and

I, along with my cousin, Ron said

‘let’s do this.’ We put a $200 check

down at the City of Fargo and we

were chosen. We borrowed money

from family, sold Bertrosa’s, sold

20 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


our house and Klaus sold his

landscaping business. We basically

sold everything to do it.”

They bought the building “for a

reasonable amount of money,”

said Bert. As downtown Fargo

has boomed, the building’s value

has increased so much that it has

helped them be able to open their

subsequent businesses.

Dempsey’s has become a downtown

hub for music. Most nights of the

week there is activity on each level,

drawing national and regional acts.

Dempsey’s and The Aquarium are

celebrating their 13th anniversary

in March of 2019. On March 11th,

there will “definitely be a party to

celebrate” according to all three.

If you have been to Dempsey’s

or The Aquarium, you know that

music is an important part of the

atmosphere. Bert’s favorite artists at

the venue have included Langhorne

Slim, The Black Keys, and The Iron

Horse Band. Lisa really has enjoyed

Halestorm, 2 Live Crue, Mark

Mallman and Band of Horses. Klaus

mentioned Two Gallants and Future

Islands.

The Irish-themed bar’s name

originates from the last name of

their great-grandparents in Mudfork,

Logan County, West Virginia. They

recently traveled to a family funeral

in Kentucky and got to sample

some moonshine from family in

West Virginia, staying true to their

roots. The twins definitely have Irish

heritage. According to a DNA test,

their father is 52 percent Irish. Klaus

added, “A lot of our family is Scottish,

Irish and English.”

Klaus has the distinction of being

a Kentucky Colonel, an honorary

commission given by the state to

a person noted for public service.

He explained, “I was in the hotel

business for a long time. There was

a high maintenance customer in the

hotel, but we took care of him well.

The man told me that the Governor

of Kentucky, Paul Patton, was a

friend of his. So he took care of me

and now I am a Kentucky Colonel,”

proudly showing us the official,

framed certificate hanging in the

office at Dempsey’s along with his

updated membership card from his

wallet.

Bert said, “Dempsey’s is fun to have.

We spend a ton of time here. If we

ever go out, we always end up here –

seeing all of these bands that become

somewhat famous. It’s just plain fun.”

Klaus replied, “My favorite part is

all of the music we get here and also

all of the friends that we have made

here. We have met a lot of people

over the years.”

The furniture and interior design

are due to Klaus’s artistry and skill.

He and the general contractor

worked together. Klaus did all of

YUM!

peppers + onions,

sauerkraut,

and báhn mì

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 21


ON THE COVER | THE MEYERS

the tiling, stone and bathrooms.

Bert complimented, “Klaus’s

craftsmanship is amazing.”

Dempsey’s was not enough. In

January 2014 the crew opened Würst

Bier Hall on 1st Avenue. The idea

of sausage and beer hall came after

exploring several concepts. Bert

explained, “We all chose the idea

of a sausage place with communal

seating. We wanted the long benches

and communal feel, but we did not

know how that would fly in Fargo. But

the concept has been gangbusters.

It was initially supposed to be more

European but local media kept

reporting on it as German, and we

went with it. In the end, it has worked

out for the best.” Lisa added, “And

we were taking a chance – being

off-Broadway at the time, we were

unsure.”

Würst is Lisa’s focus. She is the

President and does the accounting,

payroll, and day-to-day operations.

Lisa explained, “I am a firefighter

putting out fires – literally and

figuratively. I have had to learn

general maintenance, plumbing and

electrical. I am a handyman in many

ways.” Bert chimed in, “Not me.

When something needs fixing, I call

someone.”

Klaus, just like with Dempsey’s, is

the artist behind Würst’s look and

feel. He made all of the tables and

benches and much of the artistic

touches are his.

As for the food, Lisa said, “I have

only been cooking since opening

Bertrosa’s downtown. We opened

22 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


Bertrosa’s and I learned as I went.” Bert smiled

and added, “I taught her.” He learned how to cook

from his mother “and a lot of it on my own.” He

gave this advice: “Always become friends with the

chef where you work. They are the most important

persons to know.”

The staff at both Dempsey’s and Würst are very

important to the Meyers and are “family.” Klaus

asserted, “We care about the employees. We’re

pretty easy going.” Bert added, “We don’t try to be

a**holes at all.”

Bert explained, “We have been through deaths,

kids, marriages and divorces. And, heck, we

actually have real, blood-related family members

working with us too.” Lisa added, “We have many

employees who have been with us since day one.”

The most recent venture is the new Würst Bier

Hall in West Fargo. Klaus described it as the

“same concept” as the downtown Würst, but “less

industrial. It is decorated in the Würst look with a

lot of art by Punchgut.” As always, Klaus built the

tables and benches. Lisa explained, “We have 36

taps, wine on tap and an amazing patio.”

And the adventurous three are not done yet.

Another concept, Beerfish, is on the horizon. It will

be a fish and chips restaurant with more, including

an oyster bar and will be located directly behind

Dempsey’s in Roberts’ Alley. Bert emphasized,

“Located across from the greatest bar in the city

of Fargo!”

Beerfish will have a variety of fish and chips with

heavy appetizers, pasta and tiki drinks. Bert said,

“But we don’t want people to think it is going to be

English style fish and chips. It will literally be Iron

Range style fish and chips – a highfalutin fish and

chips place.”

All three described what “the good life” means to

them.

Klaus said, “Good food. Good friends. Good booze.

And family is the most important.”

Lisa is thankful for being fortunate and “being

successful.”

Bert said, “Life is good. It is living comfortably and

helping others who are less fortunate. We work

hard and we are lucky to have a good life.”

Success could not happen to three more fun and

deserving people at the heart of downtown Fargo,

and now West Fargo. Cheers to Klaus, Bert and

Lisa! •

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 23


HAVING A BEER WITH

NICK

BROADWAY

WRITTEN BY: MEGHAN FEIR • PHOTOS BY: URBAN TOAD MEDIA

24 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


PEOPLE DON'T BELIEVE "BROADWAY" IS ANYTHING MORE THAN A STAGE NAME

For WDAY weekend anchor and reporter, Nick Broadway,

interviewing and sharing stories is, of course, his job.

During a chilly weeknight in November, the tables were

turned as I got the lowdown on our youngest beer-featureboy

yet. What came up were details that don’t usually get

mentioned on the nightly news, such as his obsession with

Oreos and how various people don’t believe “Broadway”

is anything more than a stage name (he showed me all his

ID and credit cards, so I think I’m ready to believe it’s his

real surname).

As he sipped a beer without judgment from any beer snobs

at Brewhalla, he told me how his career started a few years

ago with an internship-turned-job at KVRR before stepping

foot in the WDAY studio. Yet, as it goes with news anchors,

he’s already a household name, as proven by my parents

who knew who he was when I mentioned this interview at

our Thanksgiving dinner.

Good Life: Take a sip. Prepare yourself… Are you the type

of person who, in coming to the end of the toothpaste tube,

gets everything out of the tube before you throw it away, or

do you just give up?

Nick Broadway: I thought I was the get-everything-out-ofthe-toothpaste-tube

type, until I met my wife. I never do the

roll-up method. Don’t do it. It’s crap. One time, I was going

to throw it away, and Kate grabbed it and said, “No, you

still have a good 30 days left in that.” Challenge accepted.

She made it happen. I don’t know how she did it. Thirty

days went by and she kept using it.

GL: What song is your most common earworm?

NB: For the longest time it was “Gratitude” by Beastie

Boys. The second is “How Many More Times” by Led

Zeppelin. I’m not particularly fond of either of these songs.

Great bands, great albums, right? But, for some reason,

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 25


OREOS. I'M NOTORIOUS FOR EATING THEM.

those particular songs have a knack for getting stuck in

my head.

GL: Do you know what song always gets stuck in my

head? The Tim McGraw one that goes, “I’m an Indian

outlaw, half Cherokee and Choktaw.” Yeah, that one.

GL: If you could be any video game character, which

character would you be?

NB: That’s a tough one. I’m a big video game guy. If I were

going to go with someone who originated in a video game,

I’d probably go with Captain Falcon. He’s my favorite

Smash Bros. character, and it would mean I’d get to drive

lightning-fast, futuristic cars in space.

GL: What’s the most annoying, cliché thing to say or love

these days? For example: people past the age of 15 who

are still obsessed with unicorns, or people who always

brag about their coffee addiction.

NB: I would say the most annoying thing would be — and

maybe this is bad because we’re in a place of business

that sells it — but something about the beer-snobbery

culture. It’s like, “Ohhhh, this tastes a little too hoppy.” I

enjoy a good craft beer. That being said, the people who

make fun of me for liking a particular beverage or not is

probably the most annoying thing people have taken up

these days.

GL: What’s your favorite movie to watch in the winter

when you’re cold and sad from a lack of vitamin D?

NB: I really like the movie “Black Dynamite.” It’s great.

It makes fun of 1970s action films. It’s a parody of itself.

A lot of people I’ve recommended it to do not like it, but

that’s always a classic for me.

GL: Do you have a special food that you’re known for

loving?

NB: Oreos. I’m notorious for eating them.

GL: So do you split them apart and dunk, dunk the whole

thing, or not dunk at all?

NB: I’m versatile. I switch it up. Either I’ll dunk the whole

thing and let it sit for a minute and enjoy the soft cookie,

or I’ll split it in half, eat the non-frosting half first — to

get that little palette cleanser — and then eat the rest of

it. Double stuff is probably my favorite. There’s a cookie

dough flavor that came out that was pretty good, too. I

don’t understand the Swedish Fish flavor.

26 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


GL: If aliens took over WDAY,

what would their main message

be?

NB: They’d probably say

something along the lines of, “We

picked North Dakota because in

every alien invasion movie where

they show a map of all the places

the aliens are invading, North

Dakota and Minnesota are never

on the map, so surprise! Please

become enslaved by our alien

race and give us all your money.”

GL: I love that they’d say please.

“We’re forcing you, but we’re also

polite.”

NB: They’re in the Midwest! They

have to be kind about it.

GL: What are your thoughts on

Valentine’s Day?

NB: Valentine’s Day is pretty

great because I get to spend time

with my wife. We usually make it

a point to do something special,

and it’s an excuse to get her

presents.

GL: So the societal pressures

don’t burden you?

NB: No, no.

GL: Thank you! I don’t understand

why guys usually hate it so much

and get so stressed about it.

Darren Losee: People that hate it

are bad at it.

GL: Have you ever tripped on live

television?

NB: No, but I did rip my pants. I

was shooting my own footage that

day. I did a little squat to get the

camera down and they ripped.

There was a reporter on the way

to relieve me, regardless of the

condition of my pants, so I got to

run away pretty quickly.

GL: What does living the good life

mean to you?

NB: Living the good life is doing

what you can to be happy and

make others happy. If you're able

to enjoy a fulfilling life without

hurting yourself or others, and

while surrounding yourself with

positive people, you're doing it

right. •

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 27


ASK 30 WOMEN

WHAT IS THE BEST/WORST PICKUP LINE

YOU HAVE HEARD?

As Valentine’s Day approaches, you may find yourself desperately searching for a date. While pickup

lines may grab her attention, we are here to advise you – the information below probably won’t help you

achieve your goal.

Unless her sense of humor is off the charts, then by all means…

go for it! We hope you find your perfect match!

The Good Life Men’s Magazine is not responsible for the results of any

pickup line directed at or in the presence of other humans. Shame on

you for thinking any of these would work. •

1. Is that a real ring, or just

something you wear to keep

guys like me away?

2. I want to drink your

bathwater.

3. If beauty where a sin,

you wouldn’t deserve God’s

forgiveness.

4. Are your parents gardeners?

Because they have raised a

truly beautiful flower in your

household.

5. Do you believe in love at first

sight or should I walk by again?

6. Do you live in an igloo?

Because you’re a pretty cool

person.

7. I should call you Google,

because you have everything

I’m looking for.

8. If I told you you had a nice

body, would you hold it against

me?

9. I got more moves than

U-Haul.

10. Hey, girl. Is your name

Wi-Fi? Because we have a

connection.

28 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


11. Did you have Lucky Charms for

breakfast? Because you look magically

delicious!

12. If you were a Transformer, you’d be

Optimus Fine.

13. Did it hurt when you fell from Heaven?

14. If you were a fruit, you’d be a fineapple.

15. You’re so beautiful that you made me

forget my pickup line.

16. Hello. Cupid called. He says to tell you

that he needs my heart back.

17. If you were words on a page, you’d be

what they call "fine print".

18. I must be a snowflake, because I’ve

fallen for you.

19. Looks at my shirt tag and says, "just

what I thought - made in heaven."

20. Your dad must be a thief. He stole all

the stars from the sky and put them in

your eyes.

21. You look like my future ex-wife.

22. "I can see the moonlight in your eyes.”

(We were in a lower level bar – Inside.)

23. "I have some Jack Daniels at my house.

Want to come over?” It apparently worked,

we are still together after 33 years!

24. There is something wrong with my cell

phone. It doesn't have your number in it.

25. You spend so much time in my mind,

I should charge you rent.

26. We're not socks. But I think we'd make

a great pair.

27. How much does a polar bear weigh?

Enough to break the ice!

28. On a scale from 1 to 10, you're a 9...

And I'm the 1 you need.

29. Are you a camera? Because every time I

look at you, I smile.

30. Did you swallow magnets? Cause

you're attractive.

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 29


LOCAL HERO | YOUTHWORKS

YOUR FRIENDLY

SUPERHERO SOCIAL WORKER

YOUTHWORKS HELPS STRUGGLING TEENS DEFINE THEIR OWN SUCCESS

WRITTEN BY: BEN HANSON • PHOTOS BY: URBAN TOAD MEDIA

Tucked behind towering trees that line South University

Drive near downtown Fargo in a grand 90-year-old home,

a growing nonprofit organization called Youthworks is

helping homeless, runaway, trafficked and struggling teens

and young adults find direction in their lives. The agency

has been providing direct services since 1991 in Fargo,

where they partner with the United Way, as well as several

local, state and federal programs for funding and support.

Leading the way from his cozy third-floor office decorated

with local art, vintage lighting and a round gathering table

set in the middle, Program Director Ethan Hoepfner — not

far removed from his teen years — drives the mission with

unrestrained passion.

“I started at Youthworks when I was just 15 years old

knowing that I wanted to help people,” Hoepfner said with

a conviction in his voice that betrays his young exterior. “I

didn’t want to flip burgers or do dishes. I wanted to help

people.”

At 27, he’s not much older than the young men and women

he’s committed his life to help, and you get the sense that he

sees himself in many of the kids with whom he works.

“My clients changed my life. Every single story of a youth

that sits in that chair,” Hoepfner said, pointing across the

table, “reminds me of how truly lucky I am. I got my degree

from the University of Mary, but my profession was inspired

from my clients.”

30 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


MY CLIENTS

HAVE CHANGED MY LIFE.

EVERY SINGLE STORY OF A YOUTH THAT SITS

IN THAT CHAIR, REMINDS ME OF HOW TRULY

LUCKY I AM.

A Strengths-Based Approach

From anger management programs to street outreach and

traditional family counseling services, the organization meets

kids — and their families when possible and appropriate —

wherever they are in life.

“Most of the youth we serve really just have adverse childhood

experiences,” Hoepfner explained. “They’ve either experienced

abuse or neglect, grown up with parents who are separated or

may be in and out of jail or struggling with substance abuse.

These childhood experiences threaten brain development and

lead to negative long-term health conditions and ultimately

erratic behavior.”

As Hoepfner speaks, rattling off statistics and anecdotal

evidence from the latest research into child and human

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 31


LOCAL HERO | YOUTHWORKS

THESE KIDS I WORK WITH

ARE THE MOST RESILIENT

MENTALLY TOUGH SURVIVORS I KNOW.

development, it’s like listening to a well-rehearsed, yet very

impassioned TED Talk. Once again, it’s easy to forget he’s

three years shy of his thirtieth birthday.

These kids I work with are the most resilient, mentally

tough survivors I know. They just need one person, one

consistent, caring, non-judgemental adult that just doesn’t

give up on them to make the necessary impact on their

lives,” Hoepfner said. “That’s how we approach what we

do… we have this positive, strengths-based model where we

take anything negative and turn it into a positive.”

It sounds easy and simplistic. But the reality is it’s much

easier to label these kids as troublemakers and lost causes

than it is to lend them your ear and give them a chance to

tell their stories. While the rest of us might see a teenager in

handcuffs — arrested for selling a bag of weed to his friend

— and rush to judgement about his character, Hoepfner

sees a kid with untapped potential as a future accountant.

“Think about it…” he started. “That kid has to know his

math in order to survive on the streets selling drugs. He

has to be good with money, almost shrewd. We take that

negative life choice and highlight the skills involved to turn

it into a positive.”

And that right there is the secret superpower of the

Youthworks mission. Part friendly neighborhood

Spiderman, part social activist Superman always seeking

to find the good in others.

“We are experts in youth,” Hoepfner said. “We are experts in

best practices of trauma-informed care and positive youth

development. We believe in young people; we don’t think of

them as delinquent or runaways or addicts. Rather, we help

them discover what their strengths and skill sets are.”

Origin Story

All good superheroes have an origin story — something

that sets them on the virtuous path of helping others, often

at great personal risk. For Hoepfner, yes, he may join the

street outreach crew that seeks runaways under bridges

and in mini-tent cities unseen to most F-M residents, but

the greater risk of working with struggling teens is more

mental than physical. To that end, he speaks carefully and

succinctly.

32 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


TRANSITIONAL LIVING &

PARENTING PATHWAYS

The Transitional Living and Parenting Pathways

programs provide transitional housing and support

services to young adults and young parents

transitioning out of homelessness, with the goal of

increasing core life skills and empowering youth

to reach sustainable independence. The programs

provide housing, education, independent living and

parenting skills, and employment support.

OUTREACH /

DROP-IN PROGRAM

Through its Street Outreach and Drop-In Center

programs, Youthworks provides low to no-barrier

access to survival needs and support to homeless

youth. Youthworks staff are present in the Fargo/

Moorhead community, meeting homeless youth on

their turf and providing information on critical services

and support that can help these youth take the first

steps out of homelessness.

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 33


LOCAL HERO | YOUTHWORKS

“I’ve also struggled with some of those adverse childhood

experiences that I now see on a daily basis with the kids I

work with,” Hoepfner said. “It’s what inspired me to call up

a homeless shelter and ask if I could help in the kitchen.

They said I had to be 18, so call Youthworks instead. And

here I am all those years later.”

Some origin stories are richer because of the secrets they

hold back. For Hoepfner, you get the feeling there’s more

to that initial inspiration that drove him to seek out others

in need of help — others who are perhaps more like him

than he cares to reveal. That air of mystery is also what

may permit others to open up, as they see a glimpse of

themselves in him and find the trust they need to listen

to his guidance. Whatever the truth may be, it is a shared

truth between him and his clients. It’s a truth that not only

brought him to Youthworks as a teen, but is also keeping

him here as a purpose-driven program manager.

“My clients keep me here and this great amazing team

that we have,” Hoepfner said. “Not a day goes by where I

don’t learn from my clients or from this amazing staff that

I supervise and the people above me who’ve mentored me.

It’s all about that relationship… I want to leave a legacy of

relationships, with the people I work with and the clients I

serve.”

What Does Success Look Like?

It’s an easy question for most of us. We measure success

by deadlines met and goals achieved at work or home. We

balance our checkbooks and find satisfaction in a growing

bottom line. For the kids Hoepfner works with on a daily

basis, success isn’t just hard to find, it’s hard to define…

often because no one has ever asked.

MY CLIENTS KEEP ME HERE

AND THIS GREAT AMAZING TEAM

THAT WE HAVE.

34 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


“Most of these kids haven’t had any guidance in their lives,”

Hoepfner explained. “These kids literally have no one. Their

parents are in and out of prison or inconsistent; they’re used

to street life. Youthworks — we are the ones who are there

to make an impact and be with them on the journey. They

will struggle, but it’s not a failure with us. We regroup and

figure it out tomorrow.”

Ultimately, success at Youthworks is whatever the young

people define for themselves — with a little guidance from

the team. Success is also different for all of the different

programs offered, each with their own complex challenges.

“It might be reuniting with their family. It might be getting

youth off the streets and getting their basic needs met that

night. It might be not dropping out of school. Ultimately,”

Hoepfner pauses… “Ultimately, it’s not our life. It's their life

and we try to help them strive for their own goals.”

Focusing on relationships has been a hallmark of Hoepfner’s

short, but highly impactful career. It seems instinctual, but

he also has the science to back it up.

“I think just believing and valuing young people is where we

all need to start,” he said. “A study came out recently that

polled a bunch of North Dakota students and found that

only 1 in 3 young people reported they had someone who

valued them in their life. Hearing young people, listening to

what they need and what they want is so important. If we

can find strengths in them and respond in a new way not

based on labels, it’s so much more effective.”

Listen to kids. Value them and their stories. Focus on their

strengths and avoid rushing to judgement. It sounds so

easy that it makes you wonder how it can feel so hard to do.

Perhaps it’s hard for the same reason it’s successful — longterm

relationships are hard to forge, but harder to break.

“We get so frustrated with our clients who relapse maybe

50 times…” Hoepfner said, trailing off for a moment. “But

what if the 51st time works?” •

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT:

YOUTHWORKSND.ORG

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 35

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