NZPhotographer Issue 4, February 2018

nzphotographer

Whether you’re an enthusiastic weekend snapper or a beginner who wants to learn more about photography, New Zealand Photographer is the fun e-magazine for all Kiwi camera owners – and it’s free!

ISSUE 4, February 2018

INTERVIEW

WITH ROXANNE CRAWFORD

A Mummy Photographer Who Captures Moments and Details

FINDING INSPIRATION IN THE CITY:

Wandering Around Wellington

HOW TO:

CAPTURE WATERFALLS

Waterfall photography tips

with Richard Young

JOURNEYING THROUGH

JURASSIC PARK?

February 2018

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From the Editor

Join the conversation!

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nzp@excio.io

Get in touch!

Taya Iv, Editor

Dear reader,

We’re so happy to bring you Issue

4. This month, our team wrote eyeopening

articles, submitted gorgeous

photos, and worked very hard to make

this magazine as inspiring as possible.

In this issue, you’ll find a rich variety

of content: Rod Lowe talks about his

work in Behind the Shot, Emily gives

inspiration for shooting in the city,

and Brendon shares his Jurassic Park

adventures! You’ll also get to find out

more about our talented cover artist,

Roxanne Crawford, in an exclusive

interview, along with many more

interesting pieces.

As you read our articles and look

through the photos, we hope you find

the encouragement you need to take

more photographs. Whether you live

in New Zealand or on the opposite

side of the world, you’re bound to find

something inspiring to shoot. So go out

there, capture precious moments, and

share them with us. We look forward to

featuring you in future issues!

General Info:

NZPhotographer Issue 4

February 2018

Cover Photo

by Roxanne Crawford

Publisher:

Excio Group

Website:

www.excio.io/nzphotographer

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Group Director:

Ana Lyubich ana@excio.io

Editor:

Taya Iv

Graphic Design:

Maksim Topyrkin

Editorial Assistant:

Emily Goodwin

Contributing Writers/Photographers:

Ray Harness, Brendon Gilchrist,

Richard Young

Advertising Enquiries:

Phone us on 04 889 29 25 or send

us an enquiry hello@excio.io

© 2018 NZPhotographer Magazine

All rights reserved. Reproduction

of any material appearing in this

magazine in any form is forbidden

without prior consent of the

publisher.

About NZPhotographer

Whether you’re an enthusiastic

weekend snapper or a beginner

who wants to learn more, NZ

Photographer is the fun e-magazine

for all Kiwi camera owners – and it’s

free!

Disclaimer: Opinions of contributing authors do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the magazine.


TABLE OF

CONTENTS

4

6

10

14

15

16

20

25

BEHIND THE SHOT WITH ROD LOWE

INTERVIEW WITH ROXANNE CRAWFORD

FINDING INSPIRATION IN THE CITY: WANDERING AROUND WELLINGTON

Emily Goodwin

HOW TO: CAPTURE WATERFALLS

RIchard Young

EXPERT CRITIQUE

JOURNEYING THROUGH JURASSIC PARK?

Brendon Gilchrist

BACK TO BASICS PART 2 AN INTRODUCTION TO APERTURE

Ray Harness

READERS SUBMISSIONS

February 2018

Paola Musumeci

OCEANOMARE

F/5.6, 1/200s

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BEHIND THE SHOT

WITH ROD LOWE

CAN YOU TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT YOURSELF?

I was born in New Zealand but moved to Australia

some years ago. While I’m an engineer by

profession, photography is becoming my passion.

I started photography by accident in 2014 when

I bought a mirrorless camera as a gift for my wife

who had been asking for a “proper camera” for

many years. However, she wasn’t interested in

learning all of the controls and features of the new

camera so I started learning about the camera and

photography by myself and haven’t looked back!

DID YOU PLAN THIS SHOT OR WAS IT MORE

OF A LUCKY MOMENT?

There was a bit of both involved. I was deliberately

looking for interesting photo opportunities at a local

Chinese Lantern Festival and I noticed the big pots

with steam rising out of them and the chef busy

preparing food. The lucky moment occurred when

the chef happened to look up at me just as I took

the photo.

WHAT WAS HAPPENING BEHIND THE CAMERA

THAT WE CAN’T SEE?

There were literally hundreds of people walking

around and queuing at the many food stalls which

made it even more difficult to take photos. The smell

of the food, the buzz of the crowd and the street

vendors loudly advertising their wares made it a fun

and exciting night out.

WHAT EQUIPMENT/SETTINGS DID YOU USE TO

TAKE THIS?

I have an Olympus OMD EM1 mirrorless camera and

was using a 45mm f/1.8 prime lens, both of which

are quite small and ideal for street photography.

Normally I would have used my 25mm lens but for

this evening I wanted to get some photos with a

shallower depth of field.

Due to the low light at dusk, I had to bump the ISO

up to 1000 to allow a shutter speed of 1/250s to

avoid any motion blur. The Olympus has a great

electronic viewfinder where I can see the exposure

change in real time while making adjustments

which lets me concentrate on the subject instead of

thinking about the settings too much.

WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO TAKE THIS, AND WHY

DO YOU PERSONALLY LIKE IT?

I enjoy looking for different and interesting scenes of

people in their surroundings when I’m out and about

with my camera. When I started learning about

photography, I came across a short instructional

video from Thomas Leuthard, a Swiss photographer,

whose black and white images inspired me to try

street photography myself.

What I like about my Street Chef photo is that I

managed to capture a moment that will always

remind me of the food and fun I had on that

evening at the Chinese Lantern Festival. I took just

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the one photo of this particular chef and I’m glad it

turned out OK.

HOW WAS THE IMAGE EDITED?

The only editing was some cropping, converting to

black and white and a few minor adjustments in

Lightroom. Other than that, it’s pretty much out of

the camera.

IF YOU COULD RE-TAKE THE PHOTO, IS THERE

ANYTHING YOU WOULD CHANGE?

I took this photo in 2015 when I’d only been learning

about photography for about a year and back then

I was shooting in JPG. If I could re-take this photo, I

would shoot it in RAW and would move closer to the

subject to avoid the need for cropping. Apart from

that, I wouldn’t change anything else.

ANYTHING ELSE YOU WOULD LIKE TO TELL US?

I also like setting up and taking still photos of small

objects where I can control all of the lighting, you

can see these on my 500px account linked below.

It’s almost the opposite of street photography where

everything is much more spontaneous. It allows me

to keep taking photos at home when I don’t have

the chance to go out.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

http://www.500px.com/rod_lowe

February 2018

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Interview with Roxanne Crawford

A Mummy Photographer Who Captures Moments and Details.

ROXANNE, CAN YOU TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT

YOURSELF?

I grew up and still live in a small town called Paeroa

in Northern Waikato. I worked as a dental assistant

for several years before getting married and starting

a family. I have two kids aged 8 and 4. I’ve been a

stay at home mum since which has given me the

opportunity to explore photography more, in-between

busy family life!

WHAT’S YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY BACKGROUND?

Photography is something I’ve always been interested

in. But it all started with wanting to capture and

document my children growing up.

When I got my first DSLR, all I wanted to do was shoot

in manual mode, and learn everything there is to learn

about photography. So I enrolled in the photography

institutes course in 2015, which for me was the best

start.

A lot has been self taught via researching the

internet and Youtube videos as well as a few good

photographer friends that have helped me along the

way.

The learning process is always ongoing and I love

trying new things and different genres. Portraits, Macro

and my newest venture of landscape photography.

WHAT EQUIPMENT DO YOU SHOOT WITH?

I use a canon 6D. I have a variety of lenses...

For my portraits I use a Canon 50mm f/1.4, Canon

135mm f/2L or a Sigma art 35mm F/1.4.

For my macro images I use a Canon 100mm F/2.8L

and for landscapes a Canon 17-40mm F/4L with a Nisi

filter kit.

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WHAT INSPIRES YOU?

The simple act of capturing a moment or an emotion

that you can have forever. That can’t be replicated

and is pretty precious to me. To be able to share that

with others is an amazing feeling.

The little details in nature really help you to truly

appreciate the beauty in everyday that may not

have otherwise been seen without looking a little

closer.

The unpredictability and challenge of getting a great

image excites me. To me, photography is so much

more than just taking pictures. I love the technical

aspects, the whole creative process is like therapy.

HOW DO YOU LIKE TO SPEND YOUR FREE TIME?

I spend a lot of my free time with my children, my

family and friends. The beach is a favourite place we

spend a lot of time at and obviously my photography

obsession is a big part of my free time also.

February 2018

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WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MOST CHALLENGING

PHOTO TO SHOOT, AND WHY?

Ever since I saw images of refractions in

drops I knew this was something I had to try.

Refractions involve shooting a water drop with a

background image behind it, the image is then

reflected inside the water drop. It’s harder than it

looks with positioning and focusing the reflections

in the drop. With a lot of perseverance I got it

right and was happy to get something out of

the process, definitely a skill that I would love to

perfect more.

WHAT’S YOUR BIGGEST ACHIEVEMENT IN

PHOTOGRAPHY?

Just learning photography in general has been a

big achievement. I feel as though I’ve come so

far from where I began. That in itself is rewarding.

But I’ve also had a couple of images win

places in competitions... In my first year entering

D-photos amateur photographer of the year

award in 2016 I came third in the macro

category with the little spider. In my second year

of entering, so 2017, my refraction shot with the

yellow flower came third place also.

WHAT’S YOUR POST-PROCESSING

PROCEDURE?

I love the creative process from shooting right

through to editing. I like to try new things,

new styles. Edits can take me anywhere from

10 minutes to a couple of hours. I’m a big

perfectionist so I’m forever going back over

images and perfecting them. I always shoot in

RAW format, I use Photoshop and Google Nik

software for editing.

ANY PHOTO-SPECIFIC PLANS OR

RESOLUTIONS FOR 2018?

Shoot more, share more!

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.facebook.com/photographybyRoxann

www.instagram.com/photography.by.roxanne

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February 2018

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FINDING INSPIRATION IN THE CITY:

Wandering Around Wellington.

by Emily Goodwin

New Zealand is renowned for its

landscapes and nature, providing

photographers with numerous

opportunities to capture stunning scenes

of the natural world. But cityscapes and urban

photography should not be overlooked. Whether

you’ve lived in Wellington most of your life, or

are just visiting for a few days, take some time

to shoot the city and notice its finer details whilst

also challenging yourself.

Shooting in the city, assuming it’s not your usual

genre, is perfect for expanding your photography

skills as you push out of your comfort zone to see

things in a new light. Do the opposite of what

you’re comfortable with... and don’t worry too

much about the results, just experiment and have

fun.

SHOOT STREET SCENES

For landscape and nature lovers it can be a

real challenge to want to shoot street scenes

since a shopping street is hardly likely to

take your breath away. Even more reason to

do it! Go out and find some urban beauty in a

corner you would never have usually noticed!

If you’re nervous about people seeing

you taking candid photos of them and the

surroundings, shoot from the hip.

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REVEL IN REFLECTIONS

Have fun with this and look for reflections

everywhere... If you normally avoid shooting in

the rain then get out there and see what you can

capture in puddles! The modern buildings are a

perfect challenge with all the shiny chrome and

glass, and of course, there’s the sea – Shoot the

colourful reflections of CBD lit up at night, or get

up close and shoot the reflections of the boats in

day time.

SELECT A SUBJECT

Churches, Sculptures, Cafes, Windows, Signs,

Flags... Narrow down the subject matter and focus

on capturing just 1 of these for the day. You’ll be

forced to slow down as you see things with fresh

eyes. How can you capture them differently?

CAPTURE COLOUR

Make it your mission to go out one day and

shoot the brightest of colours that catch your

eye, you could even just focus on one colour.

Get down to Courtenay Place and Cuba Street to

get started, making sure to take in the colourful

bucket sculpture, Queen’s Wharf is also alive

with blasts of colour that would normally be

missed. Choose red and you’ll be drawn to the

cable car, the Westport Chambers building,

the old telephone booth, the door of the old

fire station, shop signs and pavement cafes.

Focus on yellow and the trolley buses, kayaks,

and bollards on the waterfront will grab your

attention.

February 2018

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SEEK SHAPES

Again, it’s all about seeing things with new

eyes. Capture the sleek curves and sharp

angles on the Te Papa building and then find

the best position for capturing triangles at

the pedestrian bridge entrance. The Beehive

among many other architectural delights

should keep you busy for a while! Take it one

step further and play around with shadows

and repeat patterns. For a real challenge,

pick 1 ‘shape’ such as squares, lines or

arches, the possibilities are endless!

SHOOT ONLY IN B&W

This really makes you think about what

you’re shooting as you’re forced to think

about composition and texture. You need

sharp contrasts to come up with a striking

image with a true white and a true black,

not 100 shades of grey. Switch your

camera settings so you’re shooting in B&W

and you’ll soon be seeing the city in a

different light... Pun intended!

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DELIGHT IN THE DETAILS

Stop shooting the bigger picture and delight in

documenting the details. Did you ever really stop

to admire the spirals of the posts in front of the

city hall? Or the detailing on the columns at the

parliament building? The mundane can actually

be quite marvellous as seen in this rooftop photo

if you just slow down enough to notice.

LOOK UP

How often do we actually look up when we’re

walking around, going about daily life? We

might look up when viewing a church but the

rest of the time, not so much. Now is the time

to get that camera looking up whether you’re

in the middle of CBD looking at skyscrapers

or actually noticing the glass roof in the train

station for the first time. Never mind the funny

looks from passers by, get down on the ground

and shoot up for a whole new perspective.

Don't like shooting alone?

Check out the Wellington Photography Meetup Group

for hosted photo walks.

https://www.meetup.com/

WellingtonPhotographyMeetupGroup/

February 2018

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How to: Capture Waterfalls

Waterfall photography tips with Richard Young

MCLEAN FALLS, THE CATLINS

EMBRACE THE CLOUDS

Photographing a waterfall on a sunny day can be

hard, direct sunlight on the water can result in an

uneven exposure; cloudy days offer better conditions

and use of longer shutter speeds. When waterfalls

are in the bush, they can also often be in complete

shade in the early morning and late afternoon on

bright days.

F/11, 1s, ISO100,18mm lens

CAPTURE THE MOVEMENT

The effect of flowing water in a photograph really

changes with different shutter speeds. To freeze the

water and capture its dramatic power; use a fast

shutter speed (1/500 or shorter). To achieve lovely

flowing, silky looking water; use a slow shutter speed

(1/4th second or longer).

FRAME THE WATERFALL

Make sure you include some still subjects like rocks

in your composition, so that the whole shot is not

just moving water. A strong foreground of rocks

and flowing water can also help add depth in the

photograph, leading the viewer's eye to the waterfall

behind.

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ONLY BLUR THE WATER

If you are using a slow shutter speed to blur the water

with a long exposure, you will need to use a tripod.

When using longer shutter speeds on a tripod you

also need to use a cable release/remote (or set the

2-second timer) on your camera to get a sharp shot.

PHOTOGRAPH MCLEAN FALLS IN THE CATLINS ON A 7 DAY WILD SOUTH ISLAND PHOTOGRAPHY

TOUR: 1ST MAY - 7TH MAY 2018 WITH NEW ZEALAND PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOPS


Expert Critique

MAUREEN PIERRE

EARLY LIGHT

F/10, 2/5s, ISO200

This shot was taken from the shore of Lake Heron, looking towards the Southern Alps on a field trip with

the Nature Photography Society NZ. As a group of enthusiastic photographers of all levels of ability and

experience, we enjoy field trips to places around the local area, the South Island and further afield.

TAYA IV

‘Early Light’ is a gorgeous photograph with eyecatching

subjects and a tranquil atmosphere.

What I like most about it are its colours: pleasant

shades of browns, purples, and yellows that work

so well together. The only thing I’d change is the

lighting; if a little more exposure were added, the

colours would stand out beautifully. Other than

that, ‘Early Light’ is a gorgeous work of art that

perfectly highlights the beauty of New Zealand.

Well done!

EMILY GOODWIN

The range of purple colours in Maureen’s ‘Early Light’

photo immediately caught my eye, and that hint

of yellow in the sunrise really ‘makes it’ in my mind

though others might say the sky looks too unnatural

and that more blue is needed. Viewed at 100% the

photo isn’t as sharp as I would like and there’s a lot of

noise – I’m not sure if a tripod was used when taking

this but if so, better settings would have been to shoot

at a smaller aperture and ISO 100. Getting the camera

lower to the ground would also have taken this to the

next level, allowing for more sky above the mountain

and an overall better composition by reducing much

of the ‘dead space’ between the nearby rocks and

distant mountain. Saying that, this is still a wonderful

shot and a stunning scene that I would have been

proud to shoot myself. I would very happily hang this

on my wall!

February 2018

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Journeying Through Jurassic Park?

by Brendon Gilchrist

F/7.1, 1/200 s, ISO250, 24mm

Jurassic Park? No! It’s Punakaki located in

Paparoa National Park.

The reason I called it Jurassic Park was

when I was hanging out on the bridge of

the Pororari River a tourist came running up to me

with his camera in hand and said ‘I had to stop,

this looks like Jurassic Park!’ He really was not

wrong, to stand on the main highway and to see

something so unique to this area, that you can

associate to a movie is pretty amazing.

In my opinion, this very small part of the west

coast has some of the best coastal photography

locations found in one small area.

The main attraction are the famous pancake

rocks. The best time to capture these are at

high tide or during a big storm. A short 20 min

walk takes you out and around the peninsular

where the blowholes are. These were formed 30

million years ago from fragments of dead marine

creatures and plants of what was the former

seabed which slowly rose up out of the ocean

due to seismic activity.

You see when you go there the meaning of the

pancake rocks as they look like pancakes, just

without the bacon or banana on them, and no

yummy caramel sauce running over the edges!

Jordale Rocks is located 20 minutes south of

Punakaki. Let me tell you, the waves on these

beaches on the west coast will knock you off

your feet – Literally! I find it best to study the

waves, watch where they are breaking, where

the water is flowing, that increases your chance

of a really good picture. If you are going be

standing in the water, make sure your footing is

solid and you move your camera when you need

to, or you’ll loose it to the ocean. The ocean

looks calm but watch for 5 minutes and you’ll see

the waves coming in so fast, 3 or 4 sets on top

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F/8, 1/4 s, ISO64, 24mm

December 2017

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of each other... That’s a lot of water coming

towards you, don’t run!

Although I captured some great shots, for me,

camping out in nature was the best part of this

trip.

We had an incredible drive down Bullock

Creek Road, huge cliffs of limestone with flat

tops on either side of us. We took our time and

admired the view before setting up camp

near where the Cave Stream walk starts.

But the best was still to come... During the

night listening to Moreporks talking to each

other, Kiwi screeching out in the valleys it

was so peaceful, way better then staying

somewhere where all you can hear is the

ocean crashing.

5am comes around, no alarm clock was

needed as the forest was alive. It was just so

stunning to hear Bellbirds, Tuis, Robins, and

Fantails, it really blew me away.

To just listen to the wildlife was the best. The

photos and sunset I got at Jordale rock was

awesome but this was one of those moments

where you really take a step back and say

“yes nature is just so beautiful”. It was like

silence, no words needed to be spoken. If

humans can just stop and listen, this sound can

only tell you that nature is what we should all

love, for it is so kind and looks after itself.

To sum up Paparoa National Park, I have

to say if you want to get away, go there!

There’s plenty of accommodation nearby,

lots of walking tracks, and lots of ocean rock

outcrops to visit and photograph. You’ll be

pleasantly surprised at how much there is

to see if you think past what everyone else

photographs... Look a little deeper and you

will find secret spots.

I’m always looking for places less

photographed, but everyone else keeps going

to the same spot so let’s put this challenge

out there - Go and find something unique,

something new... Nothing is impossible to

achieve if you are willing to try.

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F/16, 4s, ISO64, 24mm


February 2018

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Back to Basics Part 2

An Introduction to Aperture

by Ray Harness

In this issue we explore how the different aperture settings affect the picture you are taking and

how to utilise it. These are basic guidelines since all images are subjective and all photographers

have their own style and ideas.

SHOOTING IN APERTURE PRIORITY MODE

The camera is your tool, and will perform any task you ask, provided you have given it the instructions

it needs to do this. To be able to tell your camera what you want it to do means you need to

understand yourself, what any given subject requires. This comes with experience, and digital

cameras give you the facility to take a shot, review the shot and then adjust the settings to make

corrections immediately.

In Aperture Priority mode you set the aperture whilst the camera decides the best shutter speed to

suit your selected aperture in the current lighting conditions. Mastering aperture priority mode is a

great stepping stone as you come off of Auto and make your journey into fully manual.

As to the subjects, Aperture Priority is usually associated with portraiture, architecture, landscapes

and pretty much anything that does not move. The critical thing here is the focus, and so the shutter

speed is not necessarily important, depending on available light.

The f stop numbers can be a bit difficult to grasp at first because the smaller the number, the larger

the aperture, i.e. f2 is a wide aperture, where as f16 is much smaller. It can be confusing to the

uninitiated reader as it seems the wrong way around!

Use smaller apertures (i.e. f16) to give all round focus for landscapes and architecture.

Use larger apertures (i.e. f4.5) to accentuate the subject and blur the background for portraiture and

close up objects such as flowers.

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F4

F8

F16

UNDERSTANDING DEPTH OF FIELD ( DOF )

To put this simply, DoF is how much of the

picture is in focus from the foreground to the

background. You control this with the aperture.

The smaller the aperture, the greater the depth

of field, the larger the aperture the less depth of

field. For example, in landscape photography

if you have objects close in the foreground and

want the whole scene in focus you would use an

aperture of f16 or greater to render everything

you see in focus. In close up photography, (not

macro) a smaller aperture of say, f2.8 to f5.6

would only give sharp focus to the main subject,

throwing the background into soft focus.

For example purposes, I have taken 3

photographs of a bougainvillea in bloom and

have cropped them. They are taken at f4, f8,

and f16. In the picture at f4, the blooms are in

sharp focus while even the close foliage is cast

into soft focus. At f8, the blooms are sharp, as is a

lot of the surrounding foliage. At f16, the blooms

and the surrounding foliage are all in focus.

This example is to illustrate the effect the

aperture has on the picture. This is not macro

photography, rather a pseudo, the lens set at

maximum focal length, (in this case 300mm) and

taken at the lens closest focus distance, in this

instance that is 1.5 metres.

So, if you apply this to medium focal lengths

for say portraits, you can have the subject in

absolute focus, while the extraneous, often

distracting, background is rendered blurred and

indistinct.

In landscape photography you can exploit the

DoF. Auto focus cameras focus at infinity for

landscapes, unless you tell them to do otherwise.

When using small apertures, they have latitude

for incorrect focusing, especially over shorter

distances. Photographs are inherently sharper

at smaller apertures, but that compromises

exposure control. Because of the small apertures

normally associated with landscapes, it is

thought that you have as much DoF as possible.

To a certain extent, that is true. But when using

such small apertures, you can extend the

sharpness of the foreground by focusing on a

point midway to your object and the rest of the

photograph will still be succinct.

This is a fairly simple explanation of Depth of Field,

but the more you experiment, the better your

chance of achieving the picture you want.

February 2018

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TESTING YOUR LENS

As I developed my photography, pardon the pun, I relied

heavily on gaining knowledge from articles in magazines

and books. (The internet not existing back in my day!)

One article in particular always stayed in my mind. Whilst

talking about aperture priority, it stated that although you

would choose the aperture you wished to make the shot,

you should consider at which aperture your particular lens

will render the sharpest results.

The rule of thumb is that F8 is regarded as fairly optimal,

but this test should reveal some interesting results

nonetheless.

Take the same shot 3 times changing only the aperture

each time i.e. one at F7.1, one at F8 and one at F9. You’ll

then compare to see which is sharpest. Do this for each

lens you have.

View the 3 photos on your computer, making sure you’re

zoomed in at 100% and you should be able to see a

marked difference. Move the photo so you can see all

the key elements. Which photo looks the sharpest to you?

Make a note of the aperture you used and you now

have a good starting point. Apply this ‘3 picture’ method

to any shots requiring critical focus and you’re sure to nail

the shot!

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT!

No matter where you are or what you’re shooting, be it a

landscape or your pet, take the time to play around with

your aperture settings.

On that note, I wish you all very good luck, and very

many successes.

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December 2017 23


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PORTFOLIO

Best readers' submissions this month

February 2018

25


MERCURY MERGING

F/1.8, 1/250s, ISO250

In this image I wanted to portray isolation and buoyancy in a place far removed. Slowly being drawn

from one liquid into another - merging with the liquid metal of mercury creating a warped vision.

Gail Stent

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February 2018

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ANGEL

F/1.8, 1/200s, ISO 800

This is an underwater shot merged with other images. I wanted to create an ethereal image of an

angel floating in heaven, a place where the world is forgotten.

Gail Stent

February 2018 29


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THE WEB

F/8, 1/250s, ISO80

In life we are bound to the reality of our world. This image shows an entangled web confining us

to the commitments of one's life, while searching for imagination and creativity.

Gail Stent


February 2018

OCEANOMARE

F/5.6, 1/4000, ISO200

In “Oceanomare”, I tried to search the borders of the sea, borders which do not exist, or even

better, are always moving and changing. The contrast between the rigid and precise square

format and and the blurred area, which leaves a very small section on focus, highlights that

unique moment which is already over. The work is dedicated to that kind of amazing feeling that

I, who was born in an island, Sicily, feel anytime I face the sea.

Paola Musumeci

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GODLEY HEAD WALKWAY

F/11, 1/160s, ISO200

Images taken on the walkway at Godley Head on the north side of Lyttelton Harbour

Maureen Pierre

February 2018 33


34 NZPhotographer


BLUE LAKE IN SNOW

F/11, 1/100s, ISO200

A clear crisp morning and a beautiful view of the Blue Lake St Bathans, the old

historic goldmining town. The lake was formed by miners sluicing away a hill looking

for gold in earlier times.

Maureen Pierre

February 2018 35


36 NZPhotographer


A SOULFUL RETREAT

F/5.6, 1/50s, ISO200

One man practicing kindness in the wilderness is worth all the temples this world pulls.

Jack Kerouac

Peter Kurdulija

February 2018 37


NOW IT FEELS LIKE … I THINK I WAS THERE

F/4.8, 1/50s, ISO500

Peter Kurdulija

38 NZPhotographer


February 2018

39


40 NZPhotographer


BLACK CAT ON STONE STEPS

F/5.6, 1/125s, ISO200

Peter Kurdulija

February 2018 41


42 NZPhotographer


DOUBLE RAINBOW

F/16, 1/80s, ISO200

Ray Salisbury

February 2018 43


44 NZPhotographer


ROSES

F/6.4. 1/1700s, ISO400

Parnell Rose Gardens. Happened to capture this bee heading towards the flowers.

Ruth Boere

February 2018 45


46 NZPhotographer


SHARING A MOMENT

F/5.2, 1/3200s, ISO800

Capturing an intimate moment. Went to shoot the sunset but caught the last of the

sun on these two.

Ruth Boere

February 2018 47


48 NZPhotographer


SUNRISE AT LAKE MANGAMAHOE

Early start in Taranaki, the sky was clear so I headed for the lake. Great spot for

reflection on a still day.

Sandy Abbot

February 2018 49


50 NZPhotographer


CORNWALLIS WHARF

F/16, 1/2 s

Grey day at Cornwallis suited a monochrome rendering to an image of the water

and the wharf.

Steve Harper

February 2018 51


52 NZPhotographer

GUY NOIR

F/10, 1/320s

A daily visitor we've named Guy Noir as his tones are much darker than the

normal pheasants.

Steve Harper


JAMA MASJID

This is an image of the largest mosque in India, the Jama Masjid.

Susan Blick

February 2018 53


54 NZPhotographer


KAYAKING IN MILFORD SOUND

Sea kayaking in Milford Sound. A magnificent waterfall drops straight into the ocean.

Victor Kang

February 2018 55


56 NZPhotographer


A SWOLLEN RIVER

River swollen after recent rainfall in Kahurangi National Park.

Victor Kang

February 2018 57


58 NZPhotographer


IZAKAYA

F/1.8, 1/40s, ISO640

Izakaya or drinking beer with the locals in a traditional Japanese equivalent of

a pub. These places cater for small community of people who are regular there

and know each other. They have earned each others trust and are close enough

to share their stories of everyday life, listen to daily shenanigans, and discuss

politics, but keep their personal life in private. The flag means that the Izakaya is

working. If they remove the flag it means that the pub is rented for the night.

Yasen Georgiev

February 2018 59


60 NZPhotographer


NO PLAN B

F/16, 6/1s, ISO100

The Paris UN Climate Conference represents an historic opportunity to put the world

on course to meet the climate change challenge. The world needs a new model

of growth that is safe, durable and beneficial to all. COP21 seeks to deliver a clear

pathway with short and long term milestones, and a system to help us measure and

increase progress over time until we get the job done. The Paris Agreement is not only

possible, it is necessary and urgent. Thats why there is "No Plan B"

Yasen Georgiev

February 2018

61


62 NZPhotographer


WINTER DREAM

F/4, 1/60s, ISO1000

My award winning photo in Sony World Photography Awards in Open Travel Category in 2015 .

This image was taken at the ski resort of Borovets in March. As I started my photographic journey

I decided to go somewhere I haven't been before and my University gave me this opportunity to

travel with them for the Winter University games. I was amazed by the nature and atmosphere.

The last day of our trip I decided to make a final picture before we leave.The view from my hotel

room was the right place. I was lucky with the weather too - a silent cold night, with mist and snow.

Because of the late hour the tracks were almost empty. I used the flash to capture the snow.

Yasen Georgiev

February 2018

63


64 NZPhotographer


LOOK AND THINK

BEFORE OPENING

THE SHUTTER.

THE HEART AND MIND

ARE THE TRUE LENS

OF THE CAMERA.

Yousuf Kairsh

February 2018

65

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