BeatRoute Magazine BC Edition January 2019

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BeatRoute Magazine is a monthly arts and entertainment paper with a predominant focus on music – local, independent or otherwise. The paper started in June 2004 and continues to provide a healthy dose of perversity while exercising rock ‘n’ roll ethics.

Currently BeatRoute’s AB edition is distributed in Calgary, Edmonton (by S*A*R*G*E), Banff and Canmore. The BC edition is distributed in Vancouver, Victoria and Nanaimo. BeatRoute (AB) Mission PO 23045 Calgary, AB T2S 3A8 E. editor@beatroute.ca BeatRoute (BC) #202 – 2405 E Hastings Vancouver, BC V5K 1Y8 P. 778-888-1120

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JANUARY 2019

100 KEYBOARDS

A SYMPHONY OF SOUNDS

+ CANUCKS

DEFENCEMAN MICHAEL DEL ZOTTO TALKS HOUSE MUSIC

SNOWED IN COMEDY TOUR NADA GROCERY SNAIL MAIL WEEDEATER THE CRYSTAL METHOD DEERHUNTER IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK


JOHN FLUEVOG SHOES AD:

TRIM SIZE: 10.25"W x 11.5" H, RIGHT HAND PAGE

LIFE’S TOO SHORT

TO WE AR

BORING SHOES

JOHN FLUEVOG SHOESGRANVILLE ST· · WATER ST· · FLUEVOGCOM


january‘19

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Cautious Clay - Page 30

January 2019 3


WITH MICHAEL DEL ZOTTO OF THE VANCOUVER CANUCKS

Written by Court Overgaauw

When Michael Del Zotto was drafted 20th overall

by the New York Rangers in 2008 he probably

wasn’t looking ahead to the years he’d spend as

a member of the Vancouver Canucks. Maybe

he should have been. Michael’s hometown of

Stouffville, ON has produced three NHL players

in the last three decades, Brad May, Raffi Torres

and Del Zotto. All of them were drafted in the

first round, all of them drafted by New York-based

teams and eventually, all of them found their way

to Vancouver. BeatRoute caught up with Del Zotto

by phone recently to discuss his thoughts on this

weird fact (he agreed, it’s weird) and to chat about a

number of other things, including his moonlighting

gig as a House DJ.

HOW MUCH OF A ROLE DOES MUSIC PLAY IN

YOUR DAY TO DAY LIFE?

I have music on the majority of the day, especially in

the off season. I’m very much a homebody so when

I get back from a workout, I’m laying out by the

pool at my house, I’ll have music on all day; cooking,

you name it, music is playing.

WHEN DID YOU START MESSING AROUND

WITH MAKING YOUR OWN MIXES?

It was when I was in Philly, so I’d say five years ago

now. I was one of the only single guys there and I

was watching Netflix eight or nine hours a day. I got

to the point where I thought I had to do something

more productive with my time. I’ve always loved

music; I play the alto sax as well, so I ended up

buying a saxophone. I also had some buddies. I’m

pretty good friends with Tiesto and a couple other

really big DJs. So I got some equipment and, like

anything now, you can go on YouTube and teach

yourself, so I started that way. I was fortunate

enough to go in the studio with Tiesto and some

other guys in Toronto. Just learning and watching

from them was pretty incredible for me.

IT CAN’T HURT THAT YOU’VE GOT WORLD

CLASS DJS AS TEACHERS AND MENTORS?

Oh for sure, they’ve been such great guys. Tiesto I’ve

become close with, he’s a huge hockey fan. I go way

back with him, I’ve seen him in Vegas numerous

times. I’ve been up on stage with him in Vegas,

which was pretty cool. That was actually one of the

cooler moments of my life, that was awesome.

WHAT’S THE RESPONSE BEEN FROM THE GUYS

ON THE TEAM?

For the most part the guys like it. I more so just play

my stuff before games, just more pump up stuff

cause we have a lot of, ya know, western Canadian

farm guys on our team who enjoy their country

music, and I’m not a huge fan of that so I let them

enjoy their country music on off days and practice

days, but before games I take over with the pump

up stuff.

IF YOU COULD PICK THE CANUCKS THEME

SONG, WHAT WOULD IT BE AND WHY?

If I could pick myself, let me pull it up, I have my

laptop in front of me. It’s a remix of “Seven Nation

Army.” every time I play it in the room the guys love

it.

IF YOU COULD PICK A THEME SONG FOR THE

CALGARY FLAMES WHAT WOULD IT BE?

Laughs. Give me a second, you’re stumping me with

this one. I gotta find it, it’s on the tip of my tongue.

Yeah, the song is called “I’m on Fire” by Vicetone. It’s

one of my favourite beats.

SO EVEN THOUGH THEY’RE A RIVAL YOU’D

PICK A GOOD SONG FOR THEM?

Well, I’d pick one that’s fitting for their name. I think

whether they’re a huge rival or not, I’m all about

growing the NHL and growing the game. You’d

want them to have a song that’s going to help grow

their brand, and grow the game there in Calgary.

That’s the best thing for the game, best thing for the

players, so I’ll let them have that one.

CLASSY ANSWER MICHAEL DEL ZOTTO.

WHAT WAS THE FIRST ALBUM YOU BOUGHT

WITH YOUR OWN MONEY?

I didn’t buy it with my own money, but the first

album was Dr. Dre’s Chronic 2001. My cousin got

it for me and my brother for Christmas. Amazing

album, but I was 11 at the time, my brother was 14.

Probably not the best album for an 11-year-old to

be listening to. Still, to this day some of my favourite

songs, and my favourite hip-hop album to listen to.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVOURITE PLACE TO SEE LIVE

MUSIC IN VANCOUVER?

In Vancouver here? To be honest, I haven’t seen any

shows here in Vancouver.

OK, SO WHAT’S YOUR FAVOURITE PLACE IN

THE WORLD TO SEE A SHOW?

Madison Square Garden. Swedish House Mafia,

their final tour was awesome. Jay Z and Kanye

at MSG as well was incredible. Some big House

festivals in Toronto, like Veldt. There’s another one

called Digital Dreams. I’ve been to Ibiza before, the

music there is pretty incredible. If you’re into House

music you have to go. It’s just music all day every

day until crazy hours of the morning.

LOOKING AHEAD TOWARDS 2019, WHAT IS

YOUR NEW YEARS RESOLUTION?

Keep growing as a person. Nothing specific, just

growing and becoming a better person every single

day.

Off the ice, Canucks defenseman Michael Del Zotto likes to dabble in House Music behind the decks.

If you’re interested in hiring Michael Del Zotto as a DJ,

you can reach out to him on Twitter or Instagram @

MDZofficial. For the full interview with MDZ, visit us

online at www.beatroute.ca

4

January 2019


CITY BRIEFS!

BOWIE BALL MATTHEW GOOD ODD SOCIETY SPIRITS SALT. THROWDOWN 2019

BLACK ART JAZZ COLLECTIVE

January 25-26 at Frankie’s Jazz Club

This group of talented musicians

channels both Miles Davis and Art

Blakey while expressing the history of

jazz and the African American civil

rights movement. Contemporary,

soulful, and modern, the Black Art

Jazz Collective features Jeremy Pelt

on trumpet, Wayne Escoffery on sax,

James Burton III on the trombone,

Xavier Davis on piano, Corcoran Holt

on bass, and Johnathan Blake on

drums.

BOWIE BALL

January 12 at the Rickshaw Theatre

The fourth annual celebration of

David Bowie’s life and music includes

performances by 18 local bands

covering his music, art inspired by the

icon, face painting, and a costume

contest. The musical lineup includes

La Chinga, The Judys, and Fuckguns /

Daddy Issues (Bloody Betty). Proceeds

benefit the Canadian Cancer Society.

BOOBIES AND WIENERS SIX

January 25-26 at The Arts Factory

The annual dirty art show is back for

its sixth year in a row. Presented by

Hot Art Wet City and Arts Factory,

the exhibition features a great

assortment of local artists playing

with subject matter and styles that

touches on everything from crass to

cartoon.

FRAMES OF MIND

January 16 at the Cinematheque

Frames of Mind is an ongoing

monthly film series that supports

education surrounding mental health

and illness. This month’s feature is

the Vancouver premiere of Waiting

for Barcelona – a black and white

documentary about a migrant named

Mou, who has been living on the

streets of Barcelona for 10 years.

MATTHEW GOOD

February 1 at Centennial Theatre

Matthew Good is on his first solo

tour in Canada since 2007, this time

in support of his most recent and

ninth solo album, 2017’s Something

Like a Storm. All proceeds of Good’s

merchandise sold will benefit the

Canadian Mental Health Association.

ODD SOCIETY SPIRITS

1725 Powell Street

The East Vancouver distillery just

launched single malt and rye whiskies

made from 100 per cent local grains.

The highly anticipated Commodore

Canadian Single Malt Whisky and

the Prospector Canadian Rye Whisky

source grains grown and harvested in

BC, which distiller Gordon Glanz uses

to craft his whiskies onsite in small

batches using traditional methods.

SALT.

January 24–26 at Roundhouse

Community Arts and Recreation

Centre

This show, part of the PuSh Festival,

has writer and performer Selina

Thompson telling a powerful story

of courage, change, and healing.

Thompson traces her journey on the

Transatlantic Slave Triangle – which

transported millions of enslaved men,

women, and children from Africa to

Europe and America from the 16th

to the 19th century – through ritual,

ceremony, and spoken word.

SOUNDING THE INFINITE

January 19 at the Museum of

Anthropology

In support of Marking the Infinite

at the Museum of Anthropology,

Sounding the Infinite illuminates the

stories behind the works of art and

the artists that created them. Curator

Carol E. Mayer will lead a guided tour

of the exhibition and seven-piece

ensemble RumSalt will perform an

inspired set in response to the works.

THROWDOWN 2019

January 2-27 at The Improv Centre

Vancouver TheatreSports League rings

in the New Year with laughs at its

annual Throwdown – International

TheatreSports Festival. The festival

welcomes the best TheatreSports

teams from all around the US, who

will go head-to-head in round robin

matches. Don’t miss three-time

returning champs from Orlando. Will

they do it again this year?

VOGUE FEMME WORKSHOP WITH

PACKRAT LANVIN

January 19 at KW Studios

Dancer Packrat Lanvin – who has

worked with the likes of N.E.R.D.

and RuPaul’s Dragcon – is hosting

a Vogue Feminine (also known as

Vogue Femme) workshop that will

focus on understanding and learning

the art form with history, across the

floor, and freestyle. Vogue Feminine

originated in the Black and Latino gay

communities of New York City. The

workshop’s environment, as always

with its presenter Van Vogue Jam, is

totally inclusive.

January 2019 5


STREET/ROUTE

By Chris Dzaka | Photos by Timothy Nguyen

BeatRoute hits the pavement in

Vancouver and asks…

“ What’s your New Year’s

resolution?

Phil Addington, Bone Rattle Music

“To spend more time with my family.

Eric Vernon Ignatius Joseph

Bristow Esquire Jr.,

“Bone Rattle Music

My New Year’s resolution is to continue staying

out of jail. I’ve been out 10 years since I last got

arrested.

Tony Dallas, Mintage

“To probably cut back on the carbs. Do more

travelling. Work out a little bit more. Save up

some money. Nothing crazy.

Polina Eroujenets, LaLa’s on the Drive

“I want to get my driver’s license. Get my L. I’ve put it

off for a long time; it’s about time now.

Nils Von Hahn, Highlife Records

“My New Year’s resolution is to not engage in political discussions on

social media, because I got really sucked into the vortex of that in the

last year. And it feels important to me and I want to make the world a

better place, and I care about what my friends think, and sometimes

it feels important to do that, but I feel like there’s also been times

where it’s sort of put through a ripple of bad vibes into the air. And

I’m way more about trying to figure out the things that people have

in common than the things that they don’t have in common. And I

want to focus more on the things I have in common with my friends

as opposed to [what] I don’t have in common.

Michael Lee, The Drive Coffee Bar

“People who make New Year resolutions really have to stress

about keeping them. I just want to stay alive. That’s my

resolution: just stay alive. Waking up breathing every day is a

real bonus. And to be kind. That’s it. That’s all I care about.

Josie Boyce, Black Dog Video

“My New Year’s resolution is pretty much the same every

year, and my New Year’s resolution is to have a little more

resolve in everything I do. A little more intention, a little

more resolve.

Mark Richardson, Audiopile

“I haven’t really thought about it. I need to do a bit

more to care for my body in general. Exercise, which is

something I don’t really do outside of cycling to and

from work. Pretty typical. Self care, that’s probably the

word for it.

6

January 2019


UPCOMING SHOWS

THE CRYSTAL METHOD JANUARY 12

KONGOS

WITH FITNESS

JANUARY 13

SNAIL MAIL

WITH CHOIR BOY

JANUARY 27

MAD CADDIES

WITH THE BRASS ACTION

JANUARY 31

HIPPO CAMPUS

WITH NOW, NOW

FEBRUARY 8

CHALI 2NA & THE HOUSE OF VIBE

WITH THE GAFF

FEBRUARY 14

GUSTER

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

FEBRUARY 15

RIA MAE

DEAN LEWIS

COLD CAVE

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

WITH ADULT. & SEXTILE

FEBRUARY 18 FEBRUARY 19

FEBRUARY 20

TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT IMPERIALVANCOUVER.COM


Lara Favaretto Tutti giu per terra, (2004) 1 ton of confetti joker lux, talcum powder, 4 hermetic stage ventilators | dimensions variable

Rennie Museum | 51 East Pender St | Vancouver


FEMME SERIES

DISMANTLING THE PATRIARCHY, ONE PLAY AT A TIME

LEAH SIEGEL

CITY

I once had an acting instructor who,

whenever he got frustrated with the

work of my male classmates, would

go off on them about the privileges of

their gender.

“Women have to work 10 times

harder while competing for less work,”

DAKH DAUGHTERS

With the Femme Series, The Cultch aims to honour women in the theatre.

he’d say. “In a typical play, there will

probably be two female roles – and

one of them will be a maid.”

Things have been changing, though.

From Daisy Ridley’s Rey in Star Wars

to the all-female crew of Annihilation,

it’s not uncommon to see a female

action star grace the big screen. The

sexual harassment scandals which

rocked cultural institutions from

Hollywood to Broadway over the past

year have further sparked important

conversations on power and gender in

the entertainment industry.

Enter stage left, the Femme Series at

The Cultch: a month dedicated to the

work of female and female-identifying

artists. Executive Director Heather

Redfern launched the series a couple

years back.

“It’s allowed me to be very forthright

about including work that has some

pretty good, hard-hitting feminist

content,” she says. “I want people to

come away feeling more empathetic,

powerful and strong — like they’re

part of something, like they’re not

alone.”

DAKH DAUGHTERS

January 15 to 19

The series starts with a musical group

from Ukraine with international

influences. “They sing in several

different languages, but they’re really

rooted in very traditional Ukrainian

music, as well,” Redfern says. “It’s like

the accordion meets Pussy Riot. It’s

very political.”

POWER BALLAD

January 22 to 26

Later in January comes a cross between

a karaoke session and what Redfern

describes as “basically a feminist rant.”

Don’t let that intimidate you, though.

“I saw Power Ballad in Edinburgh in

the summer of 2017, and at first I

thought, ‘I’m not going to like this,’”

Redfern says. “But by the end I was in

tears; I was singing along. It’s a perfect

example of why the Femme Series is

important, because it’s short, it’s not

really a full-length piece, but my god is

it ever powerful, and strong, and sexy.”

Before attending, study up on your

Blondie, Redfern advises.

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING

February 5 to 16

The series officially concludes with

a comedy by Shakespeare — with

a twist. Much Ado is pleasant little

romp in the countryside in which most

characters have both the maturity and

the hormone levels of your average

middle schooler. No tragedy à la

Othello or Romeo and Juliet here —

but a classic nonetheless. In a reversal

of what would have been the norm in

Shakespeare’s time, female actors will

be playing all the roles in this take by

Classic Chic (the first local company to

be included in the Femme Series).

OTHER EVENTS

During the span of the series, The

Cultch will host a number of other

related events. Highlights include

feminist karaoke with Julia Croft of

Power Ballad on January 25, and a

performance by Hawaiian singer and

hula dancer Kaumakaiwa Kanaka’ole

on January 27. Details can be found at

thecultch.com

The Femme Series runs from January 15

to February 16 at the Cultch.

The PuSh International

Performing Arts Festival

is proud to present

a suite of Japanese

experimental musicians.

RARE PERFORMANCE!

MARGINAL

CONSORT

For three hours, four musicians come

together with enough instruments

for an orchestra. The improvise

ambient, heavily manipulated

music, neither fully in harmony nor

fully independent of each other.

FIRST TIME IN CANADA!

CANADIAN PREMIERE

100

KEYBOARDS

ASUNA

Sound artist ASUNA takes

battery-powered, analogue

keyboards and uses them to create

waves of overlapping notes: the

Moiré effect of superimposed

patterns, here used musically.

CANADIAN PREMIERE

RINGO

TETSUYA UMEDA

The wildly inventive Tetsuya Umeda

uses tin cans, dry ice, bowls, hot

plates, and more to create an

experience so beguiling and unique

as to redefine those very objects.

THEATRE

DANCE

MULTIMEDIA

MUSIC

FILM

January 2019 9


YORK THEATRE

PRODUCTION

SUPPORT:

Jan 15–

Jan 19, 2019

THEATRE

PLACES, PLEASE

YOUR MONTHLY THEATRE GUIDE

LEAH SIEGEL

Happy 2019, Vancouver! How are those New Year’s

hangovers coming along?

We here at BeatRoute aren’t doctors (just ask our

parents!), but we know how to use a search engine,

and apparently some of the best cures for a hangover

include a full night’s sleep, a good breakfast and a

theatre matinee. Yes, that third one’s made up. Again,

we’re not doctors. But think about it: dark theatre,

no pressure of social interaction, cultural enrichment

– and doesn’t “I caught a matinee” sound better

than “I ate six eggs in one sitting and wore sunglasses

inside?” All light-hearted joking of alcohol abuse

aside, there’s some really neat stuff going on this

month, and you should see it.

THE FULL LIGHT OF DAY

January 7-12 at the Vancouver Playhouse

Mary has lived a full life. She’s tried to be a decent

person. She’s voted liberal. She has a loving family.

They’ve been well-off, having worked in finance

and real estate. Then, life deals her two blows: the

revelation of her husband’s deep-seeded corruption,

and the disappearance of one of her children. The

show brings to the fore the complicated nature

of a family’s love, while scrutinizing upper-middle

class privilege. Is it possible to be privileged, yet not

complicit in systemic injustice?

The Electric Company Theatre has put out some

really cool stuff, and The Full Light of Day seems like

it’ll be no exception. To help bring the story to life,

they’re projecting onto the stage original short films,

as well as feeds from 14 different live video cameras.

Film, finance and real estate: this just screams

Vancouver.

MRS. KRISHNAN’S PARTY

January 15-23 at the Culture Lab

All the way from New Zealand comes an unlikely duo

in this piece of participatory theatre: Mrs. Krishnan

(Kalyani Nagarajan), a 58-year-old Indian matriarch

who runs a corner store, and her boarder, James

(Justin Rogers). The former is anticipating her son’s

return home; the latter is an “overzealous wannabe

DJ” - exactly the type of person who’d jump at any

chance to throw a party. James decides to do just

that for the Hindu harvest festival Onam, and when

a bunch of strangers (us, the audience) show up,

Mrs. K goes along with it. Like all good parties, there’s

music (DJing, of course, by James), dancing, and food.

“Expect to be social,” advises Rogers.

Jacob Rajan and Justin Lewis, the show’s writers

and directors, said that there’s more to this party

than a simple celebration: there’s an underlying

chaos as well. “That moment of not knowing, of

being lost and confused, excited and a little scared is

really what tonight is about,” they write. “Something

has to die in order for something to be renewed. It’s a

tough lesson, but a constant.”

PALMYRA

January 22-24 at Performance Works as part of

the PuSh Festival

What starts as two men and a plate quickly escalates

to brutality and a stage of smashed crockery. (This

might be a piece to avoid if you’re not into inhaling

fine ceramic particulates.) In their piece named after

the ravaged Syrian city, Bertrand Lesca and Nasi

Voutsas explore the violence and cruelty of warfare

through – of all things – clowning.

SUDDENLY SLAUGHTER

January 25-26 at Russian Hall as part of the PuSh

Festival

In a poor part of Tehran, a new tenant moves into

communal housing – and seems to be in possession

of a good deal of money. This wealth sparks jealousy

and tension within the community, and we can

only assume that happiness and good things follow

as a result. Or not. Inspired by the work of Iranian

playwright Abbas Nalbandian.

Dakh

Daughters

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THECULTCH.COM

Photo by Angel Lynne

Mo money, mo problems, Suddenly Slaughter is inspired by the work of playwright Abbas Nalbandian.

10

January 2019


ASUNA proves that not everything is at is appears – or as it sounds.

100 KEYBOARDS

100 KEYBOARDS

100 KEYBOARDS

Expecting the Unexpected

By Mathew Wilkins

Imagine a performance where no spoilers need

alerting. Where the beginning, middle, and end

are fully known to everyone there – and no one

minds at all. 100 Keyboards by Japanese sound

artist ASUNA is just that: a piece that explores

the sonic interaction between a predetermined

amount of toy keyboards playing in unison in

an enclosed space. What results, however, is

something that is incomparable, transient, and

(nearly) indescribable.

“In this site-specific listening experience, I

would like you to listen to the subtle variations

of sound interference and resonance,” ASUNA

describes.

These ‘subtle interferences’ are created using

a formula that’s actually quite simple. The

keyboards – usually more than 100 of them – are

arranged in concentric circles, with the artist

moving from the inside to the edge. A single note

is played on each before moving onto the next,

but a small stick is lodged into the key before

moving on, to ensure that each note continues

playing for the duration of the performance.

What results is an eerie, overlapping cacophony

of sound that shifts and transforms based on

location, space, and movement.

“Complex interference and resonance in the

space can reveal different sound[s]... I hope

listeners will listen carefully to the phenomenon

of those sounds and will discover an experience

of new sounds in each,” ASUNA adds.

The inspiration for this and other projects

arose from a number of important influences in

ASUNA’s life, including several artists inside and

outside Japan like Wrk, Murray Schafer, and The

Nihilist Spasm Band. Before working in sound

installation, ASUNA played computer-based

music in the late ‘90s and had a brief stint in a

lo-fi experimental punk outfit – both of which,

according to him, granted the artist a “distinct

point of view on the conceptual and physical

effects of the phenomenon of sound.”

Yet ASUNA’s interest in sonic sensation

seems to have truly began in his parents’ thread

spinning factory, where he enjoyed listening to

the machines and their motors in his childhood.

“I am aiming to produce works that update

the context of art and music,” ASUNA says of

his current and upcoming body of work, which

seems to frequently utilize mundane musical

phrases or sound-making objects.

Works like 100 Toys, for instance, employs the

same formula as 100 Keyboards, yet with – you

guessed it – children’s toys. ASUNA’s latest record

Tide Ripples takes predictable fingerstyle guitar

that slowly melts into a sea of sonic chaos. These

and many other pieces seem predicated on that

idea of “updating context.” Whether it’s toys,

keyboards, or fingerstyle guitars, ASUNA takes

objects that we think we understand and turns

them on their head. In not so many words: you

may think you know what you’re in for when you

attend a 100 Keyboards performance, but in all

likelihood, you’re wrong. In this case, hearing is

believing.

100 Keyboards takes place on January 19 at the

Russian Hall as part of the PuSh Festival.

January 2019 11


PANCHO

VILLA

Photo by Gema Galiana

Bringing a Mexican legend to life

By Luke Bailey

How do you tell the story of a man who some

consider to be a legendary hero, while others

revile as a murderous bandit? Pancho Villa From

a Safe Distance is an experimental chamber opera

led by composer Graham Reynolds and librettist

Lagartijas Tiradas al Sol that tries to make sense

of the life and legacy of the famous Mexican

revolutionary general.

“Even in his lifetime, the line between truth

and fiction for Pancho Villa was very blurry,” says

Reynolds. “People romanticize him now, and there

are a lot of commendable things that he did. But

it was also a confusing, complicated war. He killed

an awful lot of people and many of them were

innocents. So here we are… spectating from a safe

distance.”

The show blends multiple musical genres,

formats, and languages to tell the story of Pancho

Villa’s influence on the Mexico-United States

border. Reynolds leads the show on keyboards, and

is accompanied by another six musicians and two

singers, as well as pre-recorded and live videos.

These disparate pieces all come together in a

way that feels especially relevant given the current

tensions at the border.

“It’s super topical right now,” says Reynolds.

“But the border has always been a source of both

controversy and cultural enrichment. It’s a place

where ideas and cultures exchange and meet. And

in some ways, you also feel the randomness of

these areas. Why this place? Why this river? Why

does a kid on the north side get a great education

and health care while a kid on the south side does

not?”

And because the United States government has

started to tighten control around their Canadian

borders as well, Reynolds thinks that Vancouver

audiences will be able to appreciate the story on a

whole different level.

“We’ve taken for granted the ease with which

we can travel between Canada, Mexico and the

United States,” says Reynolds. “And we’ve taken

for granted how friendly the countries are. But

[Donald] Trump has thrown all of that away and

turned it into this complex thing. Suddenly, these

random lines between the countries have a lot

more weight and meaning than they ever did

before.”

Pancho Villa From a Safe Distance takes place on

January 31 at the Vogue Theatre as part of the PuSh

Festival.

The show begins with two musicians and eight

dancers on stage. Indonesian metalcore duo

Senyawa incorporates traditional motifs into

an experimental brand of operatic metal in

the hour-long ritual. The dancers oscillate with

more abandon as the instrumentation surges in

magnitude. The climax of the show is marked

by primeval hysteria.

The musical component comprises of Rully

Shabara and Wukir Suryadi, in conjunction

with choreographers Lucy Guerin and Gideon

Obarzanek alongside Dancenorth Australia.

A sonic/kinetic powerhouse, Attractor was a

beast to tame.

“Trying to sync the energy of the music with

the dancers was the most challenging part,

because while they speak with movements,

we speak with music. The communication is

entirely dependent on the sync of energy,” says

Shabara.

Attractor was conceived on a trip that

Obarzanek took to Indonesia in 2014, where

he witnessed a number of traditional rituals.

This transforming experience coincided with

the performer’s own past – ritual dances on a

kibbutz in Israel.

“After two nights of prayers and offerings

to the dead, dancers entered a state of trance

through a series of vigorous performances,”

says Obarzanek. “Now possessed, they were

considered vessels for immortal spirits who

had come to visit the living. To prove this

extraordinary transition from human to

non-human, they performed shocking acts of

pain and strength before being exorcised by

Shamans.”

It was with the immense potency of its

inspirations and unlikely collaborations that

Attractor came to fruition. The show is driven

by an ancient, erratic force that is harvested on

stage and released into the audience. Attractor

is a convergence of cultures and peoples; a gift

of life.

“It is a coming together of energy, a force, a

moment in time – a ritual for non-believers,”

adds Kyle Page, artistic director of Dancenorth

Australia.

Attractor runs from January 18-29 at the

Vancouver Playhouse as part of the PuSh

Festival.

By Maryam Azizli

ATTRACTOR

A Transcendental Purge Through

Organized Chaos

Photo by Gregory Lorenzutti

12

January 2019


PRINCE

HAMLET

Adding a New Poetry to Shakespearean

Classic with Sign Language

By Leah Siegel

If you were to ask 1000 questions about

anything, what would it be? In her art installation

titled Race Cards, multi-disciplinary artist

Selina Thompson asks 1000 questions about

race and racism. What started as performance

art in which Thompson invited strangers to

watch her as she sat in a room writing question

after question has now become a travelling

exhibit showcasing a subject everyone should

be questioning every chance they get. To dive

deep into herself and pull these questions from

her experience wasn’t easy and was, at times,

detrimental to Thompson’s mental and physical

wellbeing. The installation began as a 12-hour

performance, writing 800 questions as people

entered the room one at a time to watch her

write and watch the installation grow.

“[The experience] made me very ill, so I said I

never wanted to do that again,” says Thompson

of the beginnings of her provocative work. “So

we turned it into an installation. I rewrite it

every nine months or so – update questions

that are out of date, or no longer relevant,

put things in that are now essential. We make

edits for different national contexts and when

working with a different language, I translate in

collaboration with a local artist of colour, so a

lot changes there too. But it is one long stream

of consciousness at its heart. It was very, very

hard, emotionally. Part of why the work needs

a boundary around it is to protect me from the

residue of that experience.”

Thompson’s inspirations for Race Cards

lies within the name of the installation itself,

something that’s been under the noses of

those who can’t relate to the experience of the

transgressions – macro and micro – that people

of colour face on a daily basis.

“I have to be upfront and confess immediately

that I am not a particularly subtle person,”

Thompson adds. “I don’t have that kind of

smarts, so the inspiration is literally the term

‘playing the race card.’ I was sick of being told

I was doing it, sick of hearing it used to silence

people, irritated by the fact that this was a

terminology that had been used to disempower

and negate the experiences of people since I was

small, and seemed to be the case.

Initially, I wanted to turn it on its head, find a

way of playing a race card that was empowering.

I was also super interested in internet –

particularly Twitter – discourse around race. The

speed of it, the mix of autobiography and theory

in a very specific way, the competition, the oneupmanship.

I was also sick of being asked about

race by people who were decades older than me.

That’s enough. I’m going to ask the questions

now.

The person asking the questions is the person

that holds the power, because they’re setting

the discourse – and that’s part of why whiteness

situates race as a problem that people of colour

need to solve, to maintain that power dynamic. I

wanted to try to outsmart it.”

By turning the tables on the conversation and

by having those who hold power over the source

of racism through virtue of whiteness and the

privilege that is inherent within it, Thompson

aims to make people think, but what they take

away from it is entirely up to them.

“How people feel as they read them is not

my business, nor my concern,” she says. “I

know that sounds really harsh and standoffish,

but it’s not a theatre work, where I’m kind of

locking an audience into what is essentially a

trigger chamber to stimulate specific feelings.

An installation is much more open ended. You

can walk away when it’s too much. I have less

pressure to entertain. There is a clearer boundary

and I like that boundary and the work it does,

so it can stay in place. Feel what you want, take

away what you want – the work of coming to

terms with race is lifelong, and no one can do it

for you.”

Race Cards runs from January 23-February 2 at

the Roundhouse Community Arts and Recreation

Center as part of the PuSh Festival.

A little over 10 years ago, Ravi Jain was trying

to establish a theatre company in Toronto.

He had just returned from a stint abroad

and was still reacquainting himself with

Canadian audiences. For his first production,

he mounted a perennial favorite: William

Shakespeare’s Hamlet. A decade later, he’s

coming back to the Danish prince – but not

because he’s in need of a crowd-pleaser.

“Part of revisiting an old play like Hamlet

is to show that there is more to be found in

this play than we know,” Jain says. “It’s a great

opportunity to challenge the status quo, and

to show us that another world is possible

when you change who gets to tell the story.”

In Why Not Theatre’s production of Prince

Hamlet, there are a number of changes made,

but perhaps the most significant is who now

relays the story to the audience: Horatio –

Hamlet’s best friend and (spoiler alert!) the

play’s sole survivor – played by deaf actress

Dawn Jani Birley. For this shift in perspective,

Birley and Jain had to translate from scratch

Shakespeare’s poetic English into American

Sign Language (ASL).

“There are three styles of ASL that are

happening throughout the show,” Jain

explains, including a more expressive, imagebased

type of ASL that Birley developed for

the production. “The response to that has

been amazing, because deaf audiences don’t

normally get to experience that same level

of poetry. An interpreter is often giving a

neutral expression of what is happening, so

it’s as if you’re reading the play for yourself.

You just read it. There’s no emotion, there’s

no context. What Dawn does so incredibly

is embody and perform the emotion to

communicate the expression of the text.

There’s a lot of nuance to what she does that

just brings it to life.”

A signing Horatio isn’t just an artistic

choice for Jain: it’s also political. “Dawn speaks

a lot about deaf people being forgotten, being

invisible, and not being given importance in

society. In our version, the deaf person has

the most important role: the storyteller,” he

says. “The story is literally in her hands.”

Prince Hamlet runs from January 23-27 at the

Frederic Wood Theatre as part of the PuSh

Festival.

RACE

CARDS

Flipping the Deck on the

Conversation around Racism

by Joey Lopez

Photo by Manuel Vason

January 2019 13


COMEDY

SNOWED IN COMEDY TOUR

IT’S NOT ALL DOWNHILL FOR THIS SNOWBOARD-INSPIRED COMEDY TOUR

GRAEME WIGGINS

Paul Myrehaug is hitting the slopes and going for big laughs at the Snowed In Comedy Tour.

SMASH COMEDY FESTIVAL

SMASH SOME FEELS, SMASH SOME BARRIERS, SMASH SOME LAUGHS

RANDEE NEUMEYER

For comedian Paul Myrehaug, the Snowed In

Comedy Tour is a homecoming of sorts. Originally

from Camrose, Alberta and having spent some

time in Vancouver, coming back for a few weeks

from his current home base in France is like a

breath of fresh air after working the European

scene for awhile.

“It’s like training with weights on your legs

when I come back to Canada,” he explains. “Right

now I’m in Vancouver running the new Snowed In

set – we write a new 25 minutes every year – and

the comfort of a Canadian audience is like a warm

hug from the Virgin Mary, it’s so good. I appreciate

the crowds so much now.”

Canadian audiences start with an easier frame

of reference from the get go: “I’m wearing a plaid

shirt; I have a bit of a farm accent. They kind of

get your whole package, knowing that you’re from

Alberta. They know what to expect, they know

your character.” In his words, European crowds are

“a little more boisterous, a little more heckly.”

The tour started years ago as an excuse for Dan

Quinn to do some more snowboarding with his

comedian buddies, so he scheduled a comedy

tour around the various ski hills he wanted to

try and figured he could pay for it all by doing

comedy shows at night.

“It’s a really successful comedy tour, especially

in the landscape of Canada,” says Myrehaug.

“Canadians aren’t used to going to see stand-up

comedy in theatres. It’s not in our culture yet –

we’re more [used to] comedy clubs – so it’s really

rare for a comedy tour like this to catch fire.”

The snowboarding aspect of the tour has

remained all these years as well, which can make

finding acts a little difficult: “You need to play

theatres, be a decent snowboarder, and not mind

being in a truck for half of your life. It’s actually

difficult to find acts that fit this tour because

the sporting side is so big as well.” Despite that,

they always manage to find interesting and funny

acts to join them; this year, the tour includes Arj

Barker and Debra DiGiovanni on different legs. If

you’re lucky, you can catch them on the slopes the

day of, and use the show in the evening as a little

après-ski.

Catch the Snowed In Comedy Tour at various

locations around BC in January, and in Vancouver

at the Rio Theatre on February 9.

If you’ve been paying attention to the Vancouver

comedy scene, then you’ve heard of Nasty Women.

The all-female sketch and improv group performs

every month at The Biltmore Cabaret, and will be

performing at Just for Laughs NorthWest in February

as part of Best of the West. Now they’ve announced

Smash Comedy Festival (Yes, “smash” as in “smash

the patriarchy!”), a festival exclusively for female

identifying performers. The festival is three days of

improv, sketch, stand-up and workshops, showcasing

the best performers in the city.

The comedy scene is male dominated and women

still need to carve out room for themselves, and

that is exactly what they are doing. “I’ve heard this

multiple times, but people are like, ‘We need stuff like

this, we need more women running shows. We need

more female identified people doing their thing and

spreading their voices.’ That’s always a cool reaction

to get, and I’m hoping this weekend is going to bring

those people out more,” says Racquel Belmonte, one

of the three members of Nasty Women taking on

organizing the festival, along with Denea Campbell

and Stacey McLachlan.

The festival became a concrete idea when the Nasty

Women members were trying to figure out what to

do with the money from their shows and wanted to

help out future performers. “I think the idea just came

about – let’s put on a festival and put those proceeds

towards sending a kid or maybe even more, depending

on how the weekend goes, to improv camp,” says

Campbell.

The festival includes Vancouver comedy staples like

The Lady Show and Brunch Comedy but also opens

up space for beginners and people who have never

14

performed before. “The first show is a jam show, so

literally anybody who’s ever wanted to try improv that

identifies as WTF (women, trans, femme) can come

do improv for free,” says Belmonte. Along with The

Jam Show, they are running a series of workshops that

anyone (including men) can attend, which will teach

performers techniques like how to cultivate joy while

performing and how to challenge gender concepts

when presented with them on stage.

Creating the lineup was all about representation

of what the comedy scene has to offer audiences. “A

lot of the shows are a sampler pack of some of our

favourite sketch and improv shows,” says Campbell.

“The goal was to get as many performers on the stage

as possible.” The festival will also feature a stacked

stand-up show hosted by Emma Cooper of Rape is

Real and Everywhere, and the festival will close out

with the crowd favourite, Weird Gal Karaoke.

“So far we’re getting really positive reactions which

is awesome, and I think it’s just hitting me now that

this is really exciting and other people are excited

about it too. I’m just excited for people to be a part of

it, for people to see it,” says Campbell.

“I think women are the hardest working people in

the comedy scene right now,” says Belmonte. “To be

able to celebrate these hard working people, it’s really

special. That’s what I’m excited about. We’re going to

celebrate all the fucking hard work we’ve been putting

in for years with the people we want to celebrate

with.”

The festival kicks off at The Biltmore Cabaret on January

24 and then continues January 25 and 26 at Little

Mountain Gallery.

Photo by Nolan Sage

The future is female and the Nasty Women comedy troupe are one smash above the rest.

January 2019


SUSTAINABLE HUTS

INNOVATIVE SHELTERS ENHANCE BACKCOUNTRY EXPERIENCE

JESSIE FOSTER

Backcountry exploration on Vancouver Island just reached a new peak with the unveiling of the Peak 5040 Hut.

Tucked away deep in the depths of the

snowy forest between Tofino and Port

Alberni is an alpine hut unparalleled

anywhere on Vancouver Island. Nothing

but sweet serenity surrounds this brand

new state of the art backcountry cabin

called the 5040 Peak Hut. This is the first

innovative and sustainable structure in

the area that is operated by solar panels

along with a wood pellet burning stove.

This backed by all the other amenities

an adventurer should need, makes for

a much easier trip out into the woods

in the wintertime. With a major lack of

options for backcountry skiers, boarders,

sledders, snowshoers and others looking

for some off-the-map adventure, many

have opted to stay where there’s already

a steady base of backcountry cabins

established on the mainland. The hut

committee is elated to now have a

feasible alternative to taking a ferry to the

mainland for backcountry riding.

Chris Jensen pitched this idea four years

ago to the Alpine Club of Canada (ACC),

which led to a team of people going out

to discover the perfect peak to place the

new cabin. “The Island has really steep

terrain in the mountains so we wanted an

area where the approach didn’t cross any

avalanche terrain, and the site itself wasn’t

going to get blasted away,” said Jensen.

Without huts such as these realized,

outdoors-people would have to carry

around packs filled with pans, pots, toilet

paper and other unnecessary belongings

that weigh down their shoulders, bags

and ultimately eating away energy which

could be used instead for exploring.

“First Nations, lots of them were on

board right away because they thought

it would provide a good safe haven to

be able to have youth group trips and

reconnect them with the alpine areas,”

says Jensen. There was some concern at

first that people would be cutting down

the trees surrounding the dorm, but with

the eco friendly stove, this will not be a

dilemma for the area.

This hut is innovative in many ways,

including the wood pellet stove, the

engineering, and the new solid separating

outhouse according to Jensen. Nearly 400

people came from around the province,

as well as internationally, to lend a hand

wherever they could to help construct

the building. There was “quite a huge

army” that went out for the past couple

years, mainly on weekends, to help out

with the new building. Their efforts have

been recompensed with a beautiful and

sustainable hut for many generations to

come.

“The 5040 Hut, in some inexplicable

way has twisted itself around my heart

and strives to hold me in that place on

that wonderful, pretty little mountain. I

look forward to the next season and hope

for tons of snow,” says Chris Ruttan, the

Peak 5040 Hut construction leader.

With the hut being completed in

late October, it has now begun taking

reservations and will be accepting its first

guests mid-January. Lawrence White is

the ACC national executive director and

spoke in front of the 60 eager adventurers

who showed up to the grand opening

event.

“It was executed with purpose and

vision, with thoughtfulness and speed,

with inclusiveness and transparency. The

hut at Peak 5040 will be celebrated for

decades to come by people of the Island,

and by those of us longing for the Island.

It is your gift to the mountain community

and for that I hope you are eternally

proud,” says White.

MOVING MOUNTAINS

MARK TREMBLAY

IN CONVERSATION WITH ONE OF WHISTLER’S SNOWBOARD ICONS

JESSIE FOSTER

Whistler/Blackcomb’s own

mountain man Mark Tremblay give

us the rundown on snowboarding.

This means everything from filming,

injuries, travelling, sledding, music

and general adventure. When

it comes to sending it in the

backcountry, Tremblay’s got us

covered with his free-formed style

that still means total business. His

riding could be compared to the

mullet of the sport. In the front

he’s got it figured out through

accomplishments such as riding

with the Wildcats crew in 2016,

pushing his limits around BC and

working with Absinthe films more

recently this year. However, on

the backside he’s got this laidback

demeanour of having a great time

on the mountain and letting his hair

down for some good old-fashioned

French-Canadian forceless fun.

BC is quite the place to be

snowboarding. It’s unpredictable;

sometimes it’s good and sometimes

it’s bad, but when it’s good it can be

really good,” says Tremblay. Growing

up, he was lucky to have a family

that were avidly dedicated to skiing,

and even had a chalet in Mont Valin

in Québec. It was there that he grew

up on a snowboard. He dusted off

his chops for the first time when he

was just three years old, and then

by the time he was seven he finally

owned his very first board. He

remembers watching snowboarders

hitting the park there from the

chairlift and deciding that was what

he wanted to do with his life. He’s

since been true to that word.

“Me, I had to work and always

really love to snowboard. I just

kept working to snowboard sort of

my whole life, and I think you can

tell when you see me ride. I think

it’s more raw, less structured,” says

Tremblay.

He has been around the area

for eight years after moving away

from Québec to pursue riding in

the Rocky Mountains. Whistler

and Blackcomb’s painstakingly

massive surrounding areas provide

limitless possibilities for exploration,

whether through their terrain parks,

hiking or just goofing around with

mates. “Feel like I’m just starting to

poke into some zones here, it’s so

big. It’s huge, you probably need 10

years to explore, if you did it every

day.”

Tremblay overshot the landing

at a prestigious SuperPark event

in Mammoth two years ago. The

Mark Tremblay has been dedicated to making snowboarding his life.

January 2019 15


CITY

JENIKA GORDON

UPPING THE ANTE FOR TOTAL WELLNESS

KIMBERLY BUDZIAK

Crossing over from being trained to being coached is a little disarming.

For Jenika Noelle Gordon of JNG Coaching, your stress levels, sleep

patterns, eating habits, and fitness status – every small idiosyncratic

detail of your day – allow her to make two diagnoses: the first, an

accurate and disarming summation of where you’re at, and the second, a

hope-laden but plausible moving target of where you could be.

“You have no consistency in your life.” That’s her diagnosis for me, and

she is markedly correct. Then: “Everything you’re going through is normal

and you are amazing. You have to do what makes you feel your best so

you can feel better everywhere else. We can get you there this year.”

Gordon’s personal blend of sharp truth and warm understanding is

what makes her so popular with clients, many of whom have been seeing

the payoff of her progressive training, nutrition, and lifestyle coaching for

over a decade. It all stems from a deep desire to help people, as evident

in her political science background with a focus in peace and conflict

issues, lifelong love of sport coupled with personal training certificate,

and a magnetic pull to find inspiration in people and disciplines that

seem polarizing to who she is and what she does.

That insatiable curiosity drew her to the second-ever CrossFit gym in

Seattle years back. “It was the weirdest thing I’d ever done,” she recalls. “It

was so different. At first, I was like ‘Oh my god, I might get sick,’ but I was

excited at the same time.” She went on to learn the trade from founder

Greg Glassman and was able to open a small gym in Yaletown to around

one hundred clients her first year.

“I love connecting with people through health and wellness,” she says.

“It leads to bigger conversations and possibilities.” Possibilities rooted in

her programming: a variety of plans tailored to flow with each client’s

individual life, come stress, vacation, injury, whatever. “There is absolutely

no judgement when you start. I’m not thinking anything other than ‘I’m

right here, right now,’ so everyone can be who they need to be in that

space.”

Gordon’s in-the-moment outlook is contagious. “There will come a

point where you say, ‘No, this is my time’ and ‘Don’t put anyone else in

that time,’” she tells me. So far, her prediction is exact.

NADA GROCERY

LAYING WASTE TO WASTAGE

AUSTIN TAYLOR

To start coaching and contact Jenika Gordon, visit JNGcoaching.com.

The food industry is tied closely with global pollution, and Nada aims to reduce that by eliminating packaging altogether.

Jenika Gordon makes health and wellness addictive.

16

Waste is a problem. Around the world, beaches are dotted with

beer cans and landfills grow to the size of small towns; there is

even an entire island of plastic floating in the Pacific Ocean. It

seems to be everywhere. There is, however, a place where waste

is not. On the corner of East Broadway and Fraser stands Nada,

Canada’s very first package-free grocery store.

Whether it’s vegan butter, fresh produce, cricket-protein bars,

or four different kinds of miso paste, at Nada you can check off

the boxes on even the most eclectic grocery lists. The store uses

a unique system that accounts for the weight of its customers’

containers by way of encoded stickers, solving the problem

of time and inconvenience that most waste-free businesses

face. For those that forgot their mason jars at home, there is a

plethora of reusable containers for purchase and a selection of

clean, free containers that have been donated to the cause. Nada

appears to have parried all the qualms of the skeptical before

they make them. The thoughtfulness of the business plan is the

work of inspired leadership.

For founder and CEO Brianne Miller, Nada is much more

than just a business. Working in the field of marine biology for

almost a decade (a job that brought her all around the world),

the idea for a waste-free grocery store came to her after seeing

the impact of careless waste first hand. “It became very apparent

very quickly just how widespread the plastic pollution problem

is,” says Miller. “I was making connections between these

environmental problems and our food systems.”

Teaming up with co-founder Alison Carr, they began their

initiative as a pop-up shop based out of Patagonia’s Kitsilano

store in 2013. After years of fundraising and organizing, Nada

finally came to fruition, a fully waste-free grocery store and cafe

that sources their wares from local businesses and food artisans.

Though Nada’s tag line is “Just Food,” they are quickly proving

that it’s much more than just food. They’re a chance break the

mold and inspire change in a world that needs it.

Nada Grocery is located at 675 E Broadway.

January 2019


CITY

SOAP

HUNNYBEE’S NIGHTTIME GIG IS NO MUSS, NO FUSS

MAGGIE MCPHEE

The duo behind The Birds and the Beets have partnered

with former Bao Bei bartender Tyson Davies to open a

space that by day is Hunnybee Bruncheonette and by

evening becomes cocktail bar Soap. Sharing the same

venue on the corner of Union and Gore, each business

operates on its own but shares in financial and creative

decision-making. BeatRoute caught up with Davies about

Soap’s first month and future plans.

The bubbly Londoner spoke with gratitude about

the project. “We’re growing week by week and getting

actual regulars in the area, which is so humbling – it’s

nice that people like it,” Davis says. “The area has been so

welcoming.”

Davies saw a need for a no-frills neighbourhood bar

in Strathcona. “We don’t want it to be a flamboyant

restaurant in any way,” he says, noting the existing

presence of several high-end eateries in the area.

He serves well-priced beer, wine, and all the classics,

as well as a small but thoughtful cocktail menu. “My

menu kind of hits a lot of fields,” he explains. “I think it’s

important for a cocktail to be made for the person who

drinks it… the cocktail’s not made for me.” Indeed, the

three cocktails we tasted were similar in their simplicity

but worlds away in taste and style.

Soap also serves food. Chicha Restaurant chef Shelome

Bouvette – who won Bao Bei’s coveted Dumpling Award

– makes the dumplings currently on rotation. “This week

the dumplings were flying out,” Davies says, smiling.

Davies has humble hopes for Soap. “Just to get Soap

to be a neighbourhood fixture would be nice and for

everyone to enjoy it and know where we are.” Having

worked as a bartender around the world, from London

to Egypt to Dubai, he finds something special about the

Canadian service industry, especially “the ends that people

go to and how welcoming they are.” That’s a standard that

Davis has certainly surpassed, having spent an evening

under the purple glow of Soap’s neon sign, listening to

great music on an even better sound system, and chatting

with the gregarious bartender.

“I’ve worked in bars for a long time. I like how social

they are. People always seem to be having a good time.”

With a genuine love for good food, good drinks, and

a good atmosphere, Davies effortlessly makes Soap a

cocktail bar that everyone can enjoy (and afford).

Soap is located at 789 Gore Avenue.

When day turns to dusk, Hunnybee Bruncheonette turns to Soap.

Photo by Lynol Lui

CHEWIE’S BISCUIT CO.

BAKING TRADITION, INNOVATION, AND COMMUNITY INTO THE DOUGH

AUSTIN TAYLOR

Chewie’s takes a step outside the traditional with contemporary takes on a timeless snack.

Chewie’s Biscuit Co. opened its doors this fall and has

quickly gained notoriety amongst the brunchers, Yelpers,

and folks craving a little homestyle nourishment with a

southern flare. It was whisked together by restaurateur

Richard Chew after a visit down south ignited his

obsession with the delicious buttermilk baked biscuit.

“I wanted this to [be] a family project that we could

all work on and bring something a little bit new to

Vancouver,” says Chew a.k.a. Chewie, whose name you

may recognize from his previous savory venture, Chewie’s

Steam & Oyster Bar.

If you’ve already seen photos of these appetizing eats

flooding your feeds, you will be pleased to know they

taste just as good as they look. Each biscuit is handmade

with great attention to detail – precise timing, the

highest quality ingredients, humidity controlled rooms,

lots of buttermilk, a little trial and error, and a dash of

cream and tartar, and you’ve got a biscuit you’ve been

dreaming of. But it’s not only the scrumptious biscuit

that makes Chewie’s so special: it’s the combination of

many unique flavours.

“The biscuits on their own are soft, flaky, and

delicious,” Chew describes, “but when you add

homemade fennel sausage, pepper gravy, and double

smoked bacon, it just adds to the deliciousness.”

Their menu is stacked with delectable variations on

the traditional biscuit: take the illustrious “Moose” for

instance. A buttermilk biscuit, fried chicken, double

smoked bacon, cheddar cheese, fennel sausage gravy,

and green onions all topped off with a perfectly fried

sunny side up egg. It is basically breakfast, lunch, and

dinner in one bite.

“The Davis” is one of their more brunchy options:

a French toasted biscuit, homemade sausage patty and

an egg slathered in maple syrup. If you’ve got a severe

case of the munchies, try “The Stoner,” which includes

fried chicken breast, stone ground mustard, honey,

bread and butter pickles. And don’t fret if you’re not

in the mood for a savory combo. Chewie’s also offers a

selection of sweets featuring ingredients like fresh berry

compote, gooseberries, and whipped cream. Or, if you’re

on the go, try Chewie’s legendary “Bonuts” – biscuit

donuts. Their take on the timeless snack is available

in old fashioned, chocolate, or the adventurous daily

“Mystery Bonut.”

Chewie’s also delivers on their drink selection. The

coffee bar is fully stocked with beans by local java

experts Agro Roasters. They are known to pump out

an espresso that will make even the biggest coffee snob

unfurrow their brow. Icy brews on tap by Whistler

Brewing Company with a crisp lager and the Parkside

Brewery’s hoppy pale ale, as well as two local wines from

Okanagan vineyards, the View Winery and Chaberton.

Or if you’re in need of a hair of the dog brunch staple,

they got you with mimosas, caesars, and boozy coffee to

take the edge off.

The interior decor is described by Chewie as

“comfortable with a touch of style.” With casual bench

seating and tables in cozy proximity, he adds, “We

wanted a warm feel and a space that you can connect

with your friends, family, and even someone sitting close

to you.”

Family run and community minded, Chewie’s is a

welcome addition to the eclectic Kitsilano restaurant

scene. So next time you’re craving buttermilk, gravy, fried

chicken and a frosty brew, check out Chewie’s Biscuit Co.

Chewie’s Biscuit Co. is located at at 2822 West 4th Avenue.

January 2019 17


BUDTENDERS TAKE CARE

SETTING THE BAR FOR BUDS BEHIND THE BAR

JAMILA POMEROY

THE ABCS AND 123S OF CBD

YOUR KEY TO A POTENTIALLY PAIN-FREE NEW YEAR

KEVIN BRYCE

Grassifieds

TOP CBD PRODUCTS TO CHOOSE FROM:

Elixinol CBD drops

A dietary supplement, taken sublingually. Elixinol is a very pure and

powerful product. It combines CBD with coconut oil and plenty of natural

flavors. Yet, the best thing is that it contains synergistic cannabinoids,

terpenoids and other essential oils of the original Hemp plant. ($0.069/mg)

Endoca Raw Hemp Oil Paste

It has a full spectrum of raw CBD oils that can treat anything you throw at

it. In terms of power, there is no other option like Endoca. It has an organic,

concentrated synergistic cannabinoids that can get you across the finish

line. ($0.095/mg)

While we may be a few months into cannabis legalization, remnants

of the grey-zone industry still remain. Frankie M, a budtender in the

grey-zone cannabis industry explains that while the legal changes

haven’t changed the customer experience a great deal, the budtender

experience has.

“There was a disconnect between the directors of the operation and

the store staff, which lead to a lack of trust and, at times, questionable

ethics. It’s complicated how I feel about the grey zone,” says Frankie,

who has worked in the industry for a few years. While many elements of

the old cannabis industry may be dismantled, there are some elements

that persist to remain.

“There was a great sense of community, and I would say there still is,”

he says. “Working in the grey leading up to legalization, I got used to

living and working in kind of a bubble where what was normal to me

was not to the average. Eventually you got to wake up to reality. They

kind of let the whole dispensary proliferation become this playground

to do whatever they want and the police to just turned a blind eye. Like

a farmers market for instance, you need a license: you can’t just set up

and sell goods, it doesn’t work like that. There needs to be regulation.

You need a license for any kind of business.”

These previous “bake sale” style operations may have paved the way

for the quiet green revolution, but with many unregulated and undertested

products, the objective shifts greatly towards money; making

some products, even with an initial good intention, be labeled as snake

oil. With regulation aimed at the betterment of product and the safety

of consumers, we can only assume to expect high caliber products for

the future.

Frankie explains that the current goal for legal cannabis businesses

appears to be on social responsibility, providing quality product and

information to the public. While these may be great elements of

legalization, they proceed alongside the cost of restrictions for cannabis

users.

“For someone coming from the pre-legalization industry, it’s more

restrictive. On one hand, in regards to stricter regulation on the potency

of the products, it’s more socially responsible. For new users or people

who aren’t familiar with dosing, this could be beneficial,” he says.

Legal cannabis consumers will now be less-likely to consume the

incorrect dose, due to lower integramed products, making it easier for

consumers to figure out the dose that is right for them. “In the grey

zone, we had up to 400mg THC capsules,” Frankie says, explaining that

restricting access to higher dosed products will prevent users from

consuming too much. While we may be veering further from mom and

pop-style operations, the cost, for budtenders at least, proves to provide

a safer and more secure working environment.

STRAIN-OF-THE-MONTH

Northern Lights

Cover yourself in the warm blanket of a rainbow

sky with Northern Lights. While the strain may

have a name that belongs up in the higher, and

colder regions of Canada, it is rumoured to have

first sprouted in Seattle. Northern Lights provides

a comfortable mellowness, ideal for pain relief and

sleep disorders. As a descendant of famous parent

strains, Afghani and Thai Landrace, this indica strain

has given rise to the popular Super Silver Haze.

Written by Jamila Pomeroy

The CBD industry is growing at a staggering rhythm, lending to a great

variety of products at the consumers disposal. CBD products come in a

wide range of forms, including oils, tinctures, capsules, gummies, salves

and creams. With so many options, it may be difficult to decide what

product is right for you. There are several CBD product reviews, which

you can easily find online. One of the most reliable sources of information

regarding any product is customer feedback. Therefore, it’s advisable to

surf the web for information, in addition to seeking information from a

legal cannabis operation or healthcare professional.

Take into account certain factors when deciding which product is the

right one for you. The reason why you need to use CBD products depends

on if your needs are therapeutic, recreation or dietary. The amount of

money that you are willing to expend in your CBD product is also a factor,

as is the degree of potency that you need to use. The dosage that you are

going to consume (Not every CBD product comes in small dosages for

example) should also be taken in to consideration. Also, if you travel a lot,

consider purchasing a CBD supplement that can be easily transported.

Endoca Raw Hemp Oil Drops

It is a very affordable raw CBD oil option that many customers prefer.

Don’t be surprised though, Endoca is already a top-rated brand in the

CBD industry. Plus, this option of 300mg drops is perfect for maintenance

options. ($0.10/mg)

Elixinol Citrus Twist Water Soluble Liposomes

Despite having a lot of citrus, it doesn’t have any bitter taste thanks to a

cutting-edge tech during its manufacturing. This CBD product is 100%

naturally fruit-flavored with a little stevia-sweetener. It is also very portable.

($0.20/mg)

CBDfx Vape E-Liquid

It offers a different option in regards of how you intake CBD. It supports a

very strong philosophy around plant medicine. Plus, CBDfx has very tasty

and powerful e-liquids. It costs ($0.19/mg)

CBD or CBD/THC salves and creams

Topical CBD creams and salves provide pain-relief to targeted areas, ideal

for people with arthritis and joint pain. A small amount of these applied to

the temples can also help relieve headaches. (The Buddha Bar costs $45.00)

18

January 2019


CITY

WEATHERED BEER CELEBRATION

DARK LIKE DICKENS

JENNIE ORTON

Weathered Beer Celebration celebrates all brews dark and moody.

In the wake of the holiday season, many people seek to purge the ghosts of Christmas by getting

a gym membership and putting down the bottle. But for those of us who know better, there

is the Weathered Beer Celebration: a showcase of the best dark beer the BC craft community

has to offer alongside the art that represents them. Brought to you by the folks that gave you

summer’s Farmhouse Fest, Weathered is something to look forward to when the crust of New

Year’s Eve has officially worn off.

Director and Organizer Jonathan Evans is personally stoked to have the opportunity to

sample and celebrate the darker offerings from a local craft beer scene most noted for its hazy

hop sauces.

“This city is still going hop mad,” says Evans. “Not any particular flavour, but the juicier the

better, it seems. The West Coast IPA, while extremely delicious, has given way to the haze craze.”

This is why Evans believes it is time to give a little press to the dark counterparts. “I’ve been

a little surprised but also impressed with how many imperial stouts have come out this last

month. Even last year, you could probably count on two hands how many were available in the

city. Not anymore.”

“Bigger darker beers, I think, have an association that goes well with the holiday’s cold

weather,” he adds. “And you don’t need to drink an imperial stout ice cold to enjoy it. Many of

these barrel aged beers have spent a year in hiding, so you’ll want to sip on them a little slower,

which is perfect when it gets dark at 4 p.m.”

Along with celebrating local and import wares of this type, Evans is also primed to appreciate

the art behind the creative branding that tends to accompany a lot of BC’s craft beer.

“The goal is to feature the designs and illustrations you see on the actual beers, but isolated

to feature just that artwork,” he says. “There will be original photography as well. Collective Arts

has a series of six imperial stouts and individual artworks from various artists. Matt Kump. who

is one of my partners on Farmhouse Fest, is doing design work with Boombox Brewing, Alison

Page at Four Winds will have original photography, Steve Kitchen from P49 has prints from the

new label art of their barrel aged series. The images from Weathered by yours truly will also be

present, along with hopefully a whole bunch more from other Vancouver breweries still TBD.”

The event will also feature short films from Field House, Back Country, and projected visuals

from other breweries as well. And, of course, beer. All the beer.

Weathered is a chance to celebrate the artistry from stem to stern in the craft brew process

in BC, and to recognize the bounty of gifts we have in this province for creating beer year-round

that satisfies whatever itch your barley craving needs scratched.

“You’re starting to see a lot more locally sourced whole BC fruit used in the wild ales and sour

beers. As for the stouts and barley wines, there’s beginning to be a bit more of a partnership

with distilleries based in BC for their barrels. A combination of their ingredients and the beer

ingredients with our extended growing season do make for a very local product, which just isn’t

possible in all regions. Local is very important to people, and being able to grab a pint down the

street from someone you can connect to is a big deal.”

Weathered takes place on January 12 at Heritage Hall.

January 2019 19


ENSIFERUM

FOLK METALLERS WANT TO HAVE FUN BEFORE THEY DIE

ANA KRUNIC

SILVERSTEIN

CELEBRATING 15 YEARS OF WHEN BROKEN IS EASILY FIXED

SLONE FOX

A staple in Canadian post-hardcore for 18 years

running, Silverstein doesn’t pick favourites when

it comes to their growth as a band. Revisiting their

roots and heading back to the basics, the band has

embarked on a unique journey in honour of the 15th

anniversary of their first record, When Broken Is Easily

Fixed, accompanied by Hawthorne Heights, As Cities

Burn and Capstan, playing the album from start to

finish and following it up with their greatest hits.

“We’ve put out, like, eight albums,” says vocalist

Shane Told. “Having a favourite song at this point is

like having a favourite child, but let’s say you have

over a hundred kids. A lot of people are excited

because at this point in our career, they just never

thought they’d get to see those songs live. A lot of

them have so much meaning to people because

they’ve grown with them for years.”

While most fan bases have an innate fear of

bands drifting away from their initial sound, this has

proven to be a non-issue for Silverstein. Staying true

to their original style, Silverstein has progressed and

snowballed into a band that has now toured the

world, sold over one million albums, and has yet to

even reach their full potential, according to Told.

“We feel like we’re just getting started,” he says.

“We’re not one of those bands that went away –

we’ve been here the whole time. Since we got signed

in 2002, all we’ve done is work. Whether we’ve been

on the road or writing and recording, we’ve really

been taking no breaks. We’ve gone back and forth

from one to the other for 18 years. When this tour is

done, we’re going to go back home and book some

studio time and start writing some songs. Hopefully

we’ll have a record out pretty soon.”

Silverstein is notorious for putting out albums like

clockwork, with a new one released every two years

on the odd numbered years, but fans shouldn’t get

their hopes up for 2019. While it’s not impossible,

2020 is much more likely according to the quintet,

who are content continuing to play what they’ve

already created in the meantime.

“Bringing back the stuff we’ve done is just

celebrating. Nothing is taking away from the music

we’re making now,” says Told. “Obviously it’s always

important to promote our current stuff, and a lot of

bands, to be frank, they suck worse and worse and

worse as they get older. Their records get less inspired.

In some cases, it gets a little embarrassing, and we

take a lot of pride in that we always push ourselves

every record and our music has only gotten better.”

With 18 years behind them and countless more

on the horizon, call it karma that Silverstein has been

able to blossom into the beautiful, hardcore flower

they are today.

Silverstein plays January 25 at the Rickshaw Theatre.

Ensiferum are so metal that even their acoustic shows inspire mosh pits.

Photo by Wyatt Clough

There are few live acts in metal today that

are as unironically fun as Finland’s Ensiferum.

Their particular folky/power metal branch on

the genre tree is pretty much the antithesis

of doom. Beaming faces and accordions are

not what you’d expect to see on stage. When

you write what sounds like drinking songs

for mild-mannered Vikings, it’s easy for your

shows to get pretty rowdy, which was even

the case on their most recent all-acoustic

tour.

“Even though we’re playing ballads and

stuff, we’ve still got mosh pits and crowd

surfing and all the normal wild things going

on,” says vocalist and bass player Sami Hinkka.

“We’re playing songs we haven’t been able

to play normally, since it’s tough to mix an

acoustic song in the middle of a metal set. So

we decided to just go for the acoustic tour

concept. We just come onstage as ourselves,

sit down and we get to drink a bit more,” he

laughs. “It’s been great for the really hardcore

fans. It’s a chance to see a lot of songs that

we’ve never played outside of Finland.”

Ensiferum as a concept is best

encapsulated in their live show. In an effort to

catch that in studio, their most recent album,

Two Paths, was recorded analog rather than

digital.

“The goal was to have an album that

sounds more like a live album,” says Hinkka.

20

“Because Ensiferum is absolutely a live band.

It’s really hard to get into that state of mind

when you’re in the studio. So the whole band

would be playing at the same time when we

would be recording the drums. For example,

on the last album there are two songs where

the drums and bass are from the same take

from beginning to end, and that’s pretty oldschool.

It gives it a whole different groove.”

Because folk metal is such a different

animal from the many less immediately

embraceable metal subgenres, it’s exploded

in popularity in the last 15 years and its

epicenter was almost certainly in Finland.

Ensiferum, along with other Finnish bands

like Finntroll and Korpiklaani, helped to

popularize it in the early 2000s.

“How a lot of us got into metal was

melodic style death metal – that had a really

big impact. So I guess folk metal is easier for

people to approach because it’s got catchy

melodies,” says Hinkka. “While there are so

many serious songs with serious topics, we’ve

got lots of tongue-in-cheek moments. Like,

come on, let’s drink and have fun before we

die!”

Surely not many people would argue with

that.

Ensiferum performs at the Rickshaw Theatre

on January 18.

Their upcoming tour is a love letter to early 2000s teens with support from Hawthorne Heights and As Cities Burn.

January 2019


WEEDEATER

LONG LIVE CAVE METAL!

CHRISTINE LEONARD

Three close buds, Weedeater know how to roll.

Weedeater is North Carolina’s answer to that

persistent mental overgrowth that’s been

hampering your pit game. Whip-snapping

spines and ears since 1998, the outfit was

sparked by Dave “Dixie” Collins who drove

the project forward with sludgy bass lines and

swamp-holler vocals.

“The formula for what we do is quite simple.

It’s cave metal. We’re not trying to reinvent the

wheel,” explains Dixie. “It’s easy to play and hard

to write. We’ve got a bunch of new riffs now

that sound just like Weedeater, so I imagine we

will put them to tape as soon as we can.”

Having signed to Berserker Records,

Weedeater emerged with their debut album, ...

And Justice For Y’all in 2001 with their second

LP, Sixteen Tons, following in 2003. Both releases

established Weedeater as a powerful force to

be reckoned with. Their strafing vocals and

punishingly heavy downstrokes were wellaligned

with tourmates like Down, Arch Enemy

and Gwar that saw festivals unfurled the green

carpet for Dixie, guitarist Dave “Shep” Shepherd

and drummer Keith “Keko” Kirkum. By 2009

Weedeater was conquering the world and

moving on to Southern Lord Records. Their

third album, God Luck and Good Speed, which

appeared later that year and 2011’s Jason… The

Dragon shared the distinction of having been

produced by punk-producer guru Steve Albini

(Big Black, Shellac).

2013 saw more shake-ups for Weedeater

as Travis Owen took over drumming duties

and the group migrated to the French record

company Season of Mist. Their new label

subsequently reissued the band’s back-catalogue

and their latest doom metal meets southern

rock offering, Goliathan, which dropped in 2015.

“We’ve never been much of a political band.

Even though there are some political songs,

but their meanings are hidden. Like the song

‘Weed Monkeys’ people think it’s about weed

monkeys, but it’s about government. The

Goliathan record had a lot of weird Biblical

themes to it. The next record is going to have

some themes, as well. Possibly plant based.”

Naturally, given their name, receiving treats

from fans is an occupational hazard for Dixie

and the pot diners in Weedeater.

“We get them given to us all the time, I guess

that’s built into the name. I like ‘em! Especially

for long rides, they’re great. We’ve got a driver

on tour now, so they definitely help pass the

time and make you feel good! There’s lots of

places in the U.S. where you can buy edibles

that have been regulated and packaged up and

everything. They tell you what you’re dealing

with, so you know not to overdo it. Or to

overdo it, if that’s what you’re trying to do. The

people that bring us their homemade gifts like

that are forthright about telling us what’s in it

and how much. One time, years ago, our old

drummer ate a whole cookie that was supposed

to be a four-way and that about ruined him for

a couple of days. But he knew better, and he

was told not to do it. He said ‘Whatever, I’ll eat

the whole damn thing! I’m a grown man!’ and

sure enough he was curled up in the corner

whimpering.”

Weedeater perform Feb. 2 at the Rickshaw

Theatre (Vancouver).

S T A Y

N E W S I N G L E A V A I L A B L E N O W


January 2019 21


HAWTHORNE HEIGHTS

EMO SUPERSTARS AREN’T AFRAID OF YOUR LABELS

SLONE FOX

Photo by Kat Nijmeddin

Despite what people say about labels, Hawthorne Heights stay true to their sound and are just happy people want to rock out.

A staple in emo music since 2001, Hawthorne Heights has endured more than

the average band. Through extensive member changes, lawsuits, and the death

of former guitarist Casey Calvert, the quartet has bonded and grown together

in a way that many other bands never experience. Their versatility and resilience

ring true in nearly everything they do, and their newest album is no exception.

With the release of Bad Frequencies earlier this year, the band has dusted

off their throne in one of the most fondly loved genres of the 2000s. While

Hawthorne Heights ebbs and flows between many of the harder genres, the

band has no problem embracing a label many others routinely reject.

“If you label something long enough, that’s what everyone refers to it as and

we have no problem with it at all. We’re just excited to be bunched in with so

many great bands,” says guitarist Mark McMillon, citing a long list of influential

bands from Sunny Day Real Estate to the Get Up Kids and beyond.

“I know a lot of contemporary bands shy away from it, specifically with the

resurgence of things like ‘emo night,’” McMillon continues. “There seems to

be kind of a trend of bands not wanting to be labelled that and claiming that

they’re just a rock band, but we’ve learned not to shy away from it and let

people put whatever kind of label they want on it. We’re just happy that people

want to talk about it.”

Hawthorne Heights’ sometimes enviable longevity can mainly be attributed

to their non-stop labour of love when it comes to music. Having joined up with

Silverstein to open for the When Broken Is Easily Fixed 15 Year Anniversary Tour

this winter, the band finished the first leg of the tour in high spirits, but also in

an energy deficit.

“Right before this, we were in Europe for a month and we only had, like, 22

hours at home between tours. By week three of the Silverstein tour, we’d been

on tour for a month and a half.”

With a brief break before making their way through Canada on the second

leg of the Silverstein tour, Hawthorne Heights already has their sights set on

writing a new record in 2019. From hard rock to post-hardcore, screamo to

emo, no matter what genre they venture into for future records, fans can be

comforted knowing that Hawthorne Heights will always stay true to their

sound.

“Once we get our music played out and JT adds his vocals to it, it always just

ends up sounding like Hawthorne Heights,” says McMillon.

Hawthorne Heights plays January 25 at the Rickshaw Theatre with Silverstein, As

Cities Burn and Capstan.

22

January 2019


MUSIC

ALTAMEDA

SHINING THROUGH ON NUMBER TWO

JOE HARTFEIL

There’s a palpable live feeling at the heart of

Edmonton-based Altameda’s second release,

which is at odds with their more tailored debut,

2016’s Dirty Rain. The genesis of Time Hasn’t

Changed You took shape in a manner that might

please legendary Big Pink denizens The Band (a

long-time fixture in the Altameda van’s disc

changer), in that the new songs were first laid down

in somewhat primitive fashion at keyboardist Matt

Kraus’s cabin. While the group considered putting

out the recordings in this barebones form, the

tracks went through a transformation under the

guidance of Toronto producer Aaron Goldstein

(known for his work with City & Colour, Daniel

Romano and Kathleen Edwards).

Upon arriving in TO, Goldstein invited the

musicians to Thanksgiving dinner then sent them

off for a good night’s rest before rolling tape the

next morning. According to bassist Todd Andrews,

there was “a lot of togetherness with this record

compared to the last one.” Opposed to the usual

routine where band members worked their

respective day jobs then got together when they all

found the time, the group would “get up and walk

to the studio from where we were staying, work for

the whole day, get some dinner, walk home, repeat.”

The organic atmosphere Goldstein fostered

meant the band would record basic tracks as a

group (with perfection sometimes sacrificed in

favour of feel), while overdubs often involved

surprise guests as they happened by. One such

instance saw John Prine’s fiddler Kendel Carson

popping in to borrow a cable from Goldstein. She

subsequently laid down a gorgeous part for the

plaintive “Fire,” which, as drummer Erik Grice tells

it, had everyone “weeping in the control room.”

Additional ornamentations such as Goldstein’s

tasteful pedal steel touches and the Last Waltzesque

horns courtesy of Joseph Shabason and

Vince Spilchuk underline Altameda now playing

with a relaxed, swinging confidence beyond the

best moments on its first album. In listening

to Dirty Rain and Time Hasn’t Changed Me back

to back, the former now feels like a promising

warmup.

Time hasn’t changed the essence of a band

whose members take genuine pleasure in playing

and spending time with one another. Rather, it’s

allowed the individual parts to stand out more in

the context of a cohesive whole. Guitarist/singer

Troy Snaterse sounds every bit the plainspoken

alt-country troubadour, and his layers of acoustic

and swirling electric textures on “Good Will

Surely Come” lend an intelligent groove to the

proceedings. Keyboardist Kraus is capable of

resembling Garth Hudson or Richard Manuel one

moment and Ian McLagan at his boozy Faces’ best

the next, while the rhythm team of Erik Grice and

Todd Andrews (who have played together from

the age of fourteen) put enough power in the pop

to break Tom Petty’s heart. A well-crafted album

ready to flourish alongside Altameda’s upcoming

trek through the Canadian prairies.

Altameda perform January 25 at the Commodore

Ballroom.

FEATURED CONCERTS

VICTORIA, BC

THE DUDES

PLUS ACRES OF LIONS & TROPHY DAD

CAPITAL BALLROOM // FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28

Photo by Levi Manchak

TAGGART & TORRENS

PLUS GUESTS

CAPITAL BALLROOM // THURSDAY, JANUARY 17

THE TREWS

PLUS ALTAMEDA

CAPITAL BALLROOM // TUESDAY, JANUARY 22

OLD MAN LUEDECKE

PLUS GUESTS

CAPITAL BALLROOM // SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2

A rock ‘n’ roll powerhouse from the prairies, Edmonton’s Altameda are on a roll with their sophomore album, Time Hasn’t Changed You.

FOR FULL CONCERT LISTINGS & TO PURCHASE

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January 2019 23


MUSIC

REMEMBER SPORTS

REVISITING EMOTIONAL HARDSHIP ON SLOW BUZZ

GRAEME WIGGINS

EMILY KING

LEARNING TO WORK WITH THE CRICKETS IN THE CATSKILLS

ADAM DEANE

Photo by Carly Hoskins

Remember Sports has revamped their live show, playing with the notion of what a four-piece should be.

When Emily King transplanted herself from

the hustle and bustle of city life to the quiet

mountains of upstate New York, the successful

33-year-old recording artist and all around gentle

individual found some magic inside herself. King

decided to title this magic, Scenery. For the past

year, she’s been living out every child-of-music’s

dream and recording her second studio album in

her backyard garage.

Rather than dealing with the preposterous

demands of studio personalities, explosive egos

and judgment all around, her main concern

recording Scenery in the Catskills were the crickets

living in the floorboards of her recording studio.

BeatRoute found King in her element amidst her

pre-tour preparations to talk to her about what

stirs her creative spirit.

“Sometimes, you have to put on high heels,

makeup, or wear a backpack around the house —

you really have to trick yourself into being in the

place you need to create. I find it really helps to

have some sort of feelings to start off the whole

recording process. The nice part about making

Scenery was that I had all kinds of genuine feelings

from all of the change happening from my move

away from the city.”

Although donning makeup or heels doesn’t

necessarily bring out everyone’s creative side, King

assured us that will-power and believing that your

work matters is a necessary precursor to success in

a lot of ways.

“In a city you can walk around at night. You’re a

weirdo if you do that up here (the Catskills). One

of my favourite things is walking around the city at

night,” she says. “You get out of your head, you’re

physical, there is so much stimulation. Lyrics and

feelings come from that. A lot of it is sitting down

to do it and knowing not everything is going to be

awesome.”

King’s lead single off of her upcoming release,

“Remind Me,” happens to be one of the times

she sat down and something awesome was the

by-product. King’s squeaky clean staccato vocals

lend the perfect complement to the warm,

vintage, synthy vibes of the sound. You can’t argue

with radio praise and her solid following in every

city she frequents on tour. King has kept her fans

waiting four years for the launch of Scenery, which

only hints at the amount of mastery and care that

has gone into this album. If King’s humble attitude

is any indicator of her success it’s safe to say 2019

will be a good year for her and all of her hungry

fans.

Emily King performs January 27 at Fortune Sound

Club (Vancouver)

Not all breakups are created equal. They needn’t

all involve the intense betrayal and drama that

requires an Adele record to cry one’s way to

catharsis. Sometimes they’re slower and more

filled with ennui than angst, the result of a long,

slow process. Punky indie rockers Remember

Sports (formerly just Sports) have just the

album for that with Slow Buzz, an upbeat,

punky breakup album that deals with being in

an emotional place but maintains a jangly beat

to keep one from getting too overcome with

sadness.

As for the “breakup record” label, singer

Carmen Perry is okay with it: “I don’t mind

oversimplifying it to that. That is what it is, at its

core. And I think a lot of albums are. It doesn’t

really make it special – it’s just what it is.”

This kind of plain-speaking is mirrored in

the album. One might wonder if the target

of a breakup record will ever listen to it, and

how that affects the writing process. This is

important for Perry.

“I think about that a lot,” she says. “It’s really

hard to write about something that you went

through with someone who is inevitably going

to hear it. That’s something I’ve struggled with

since I started putting music out and not just

writing for my own personal use. It makes it a

little harder, and puts a block there that you

have to get through that you don’t really have

when it’s just you that’s ever going to hear it. It’s

something I’m still working on: getting back to a

more honest place.”

Slow Buzz is their third album, and it’s not

their first to deal with emotional topics. It’s a

pretty important feature of the band: many of

their songs are about specific situations that

24

no longer feature prominently in the singer’s

emotional life. Those could be either easier

to perform, no longer going through those

emotions as they come up, or they could be

harder, as one no longer connects as strongly.

“There are definitely songs that we’ve

played for a long time that I think it’s gotten

to the point where I don’t think about them

anymore because they don’t require me to,”

says Perry. “A song from our last album called

‘The Washing Machine’ was sort of getting to

that point for me and then the day that me

and this person broke up, I played a show right

after and we played that song and I just started

crying through it. The emotions came back

because of the context. Something I like about

writing songs and recording them and having

them forever is that they start to mean different

things. The way you view them and what they

are about is always changing, so it’s nice to have

time capsules to remember them by.”

Slow Buzz features some new sounds and

song-writing styles for the band and this has

translated to trying new things for their live

show. They’re expanding their sound from their

stripped-down, punky basics.

“For me personally, I never fucked with

guitar pedals at all,” she says. “I’ve been doing

that recently. And we’re using some wacky

stuff in our live shows that sometimes works

and sometimes doesn’t. I think we’re really

consciously trying not to totally break the mold

of the four-piece band setup, but maybe push its

limits a little bit in a way that feels refreshing.”

Remember Sports perform January 13 at the

Biltmore Cabaret.

Photo by Bao Ngo

Emily King pauses to enjoy the scenery after an inspiring upheaval of her big city life to the mountains.

December 2018


LP

CREATING AN ECLECTIC UNIVERSE OF HER OWN

NOÉMIE ATTIA

MUSIC

LP’s Heart To Mouth is a moody expression with a colourful aesthetic.

SNAIL MAIL

LOOKING TO THE PAST AND FUTURE WITH INDIE SINGER ON THE RISE

GRAEME WIGGINS

It’s been a pretty huge year for Lindsey Jordan, the

creative force behind indie rock project Snail Mail. She

released her first full album, Lush, which was critically

acclaimed and just recently landed on many end of year

best-of lists, and toured nearly non-stop. This is for good

reason, as Lush is a melodic and engaging album that

shows surprising maturity for a debut. It deserves the

praise it’s getting.

Given it’s been such a successful year, if Jordan was

given the opportunity to give any advice to her year-anda-half

younger self, there’s not much she feels she could

impart. As she puts it: “I’m pretty proud of myself from a

year and half ago. I was so focused and on it that I feel like

now I’m just trying to force myself to relax, which is great

off an album cycle but not great trying to make a new

album. I would actually channel frantic me from a year

ago and maybe get some advice from her.”

“Maybe just ‘keep doing what you’re doing, and good

job!’ I was pretty hard on myself at the time and pretty

impatient with myself. I feel like I would have given myself

a hug and let them chill out for a sec.”

This translates directly into her plans for the new year.

In terms of New Year’s resolutions, they involve a little bit

of self care.

“I’ve been going to movies a lot this year,” she says.

“I really like seeing everything in theatres when I have

time off, so maybe just making more time for my friends.

Hopefully just write as much as possible, take some time

to myself and kick back and enjoy things more. We’ve

kind of improved the logistics of our live show now that

we have a sound-person. Just work on things being the

LP has given a new meaning to her songwriting in the last

few years. It’s been her main focus for many years, but

her solo career as a performer is getting more and more

attention. Her hit, “Lost on You,” from 2016 was as successful

as the tunes she made for Rihanna, Cher, Christina Aguilera

and even the Backstreet Boys. She shows how a music

composer can also be a talented singer and create a universe

of her own, as eclectic and well put together. Her new album,

Heart to Mouth, was released in December 2018 and she

insists on her complete creative implication.

“Of course I’m the composer and songwriter as well,” she

says on the phone. “It’s my project I mean, I’m not singing

other people’s songs, I write for other people as well, so that

would be kind of weird.” She jokingly adds, “maybe I’ll do

that some day… get a bunch of people writing for me.”

However, one could hardly picture LP giving away part of

her creative process. Her genre is, in her words, “a bit all over

the place,” but it’s her own indie, pop, rock interpretation

of “life, just all life.” She comes up with musical ideas on her

breaks during her tours: lyrics, melodies, inspired by her

experiences.

“I just collect different stuff, everything,” she says. “I’m

constantly collecting: chords, lyrics, concepts and titles. Then

we get to the studio and we just throw our stuff around. And

I’m with some very good writers as well.”

LP not only expresses a particular musical standpoint,

but she also has her own way of performing, with a voice as

best they can possibly be.”

Looking even further forward, to a possible next

album, she has already put in some thought.

“I would love a little more synth action,” says Jordan.

“I know that’s what everyone does with their second

record. We just added a synth to our live show. Any

kind of keys... more diverse instrumentation. I want the

songs to be longer, even though they are already pretty

long. I love a long song. It’s kind of what I was trying to

go against when I was writing Lush and I think that was

really unnatural for me. I’m going to take as much time as

I want and keep working on it.”

While we might not be hearing a new album for

awhile, with Jordan’s work ethic and perfectionism, we

can expect things to be held to a high standard.

“I’ve been working on one Snail Mail song that will

come out eventually for a year and it keeps changing.

It could have been done six months ago when we were

at Coachella. The song was basically finished then but I

wasn’t completely satisfied and I have been working on it

basically every day since, opening it and changing it and

finally it’s at a place where it’s at my standard for a good

song which I’m really happy about. I think giving it that

time and room to evolve and breathe is super important

to my writing process.”

So while those songs and ideas marinate for a

while still, we’ll have Lush to listen to and a live show

guaranteed to involve some intense sing-a-longs. There

are worse ways to start the year.

Catch Snail Mail live January 27 at The Imperial.

raucous as it is lyrical that she trained assiduously. “I did a lot

of scales and studied some opera but really it was the scales

that did a lot for me. It’s like if you were a guitar player and if

you did a lot of scales. I needed to. My voice is very dynamic

and very loud and bulky and I knew that I would have a

problem with it if I didn’t take care of it, warm up and do all

the things that you’re supposed to do.”

And she is keen to perform at her full artistic capacity

during her shows, which makes them highly qualitative and

satisfying for the most attentive musicians. “I like people to

be able to hear, almost exactly what’s on the record, maybe

with a few variations obviously. I think the live show is an

extension of the album, I hope. The public gets everything

they love about the record and more.”

LP describes Heart to Mouth as follows: “I think this

record is nothing if not moody for sure.” She creates this

impression musically and visually, with a rather colourful

choice for her full orange cover and aesthetic music videos.

“It was just an explosion of colour to me. All my work had

been in black and white and I just felt like this one wanted

to be colour. You’re definitely doing colour if you’re wearing

monochrome orange. It felt fun and different and the picture

of orange with teal blue: it’s two colours that are weird

and classy and beautiful,” as her video for “Girls Go Wild”

illustrates.

LP performs January 31 at the Orpheum Theatre (Vancouver).

Snail Mail’s Lindsey Jordan is brimming with creative energy on the heels of first full-length.

January 2019 25


UPCOMING SHOWS

CLASS OF 2019: LITTLE DESTROYER JANUARY 17

WITH DUMB, HALEY BLAIS & KIM GRAY

STILL WOOZY

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

JANUARY 13

REMEMBER SPORTS

WITH PLLUSH, JOCK TEARS & CLUB SOFA

JANUARY 13

WARBLY JETS

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

JANUARY 15

THE VTH CIRCLE

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

JANUARY 19

ZOMBIE ROOF

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

JANUARY 26

EFRIM MANUEL MENUCK

(OF GODSPEED! YOU BLACK EMPEROR)

JANUARY 29

TRACEYANNE & DANNY

KEUNING

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

FEBRUARY 1 FEBRUARY 9

FEBRUARY 10

DRAMA

WITH CLAIRE GEORGE

TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT BILTMORECABARET.COM


AARON PRITCHETT

COUNTRY MUSIC STAR GOES OUT ON THE TOWN

KELLY FINDLAY

Made with his fans in mind, Out On The Town is certainly not Aaron Pritchett’s first rodeo.

Aaron Pritchett has been in the country music

business for more than twenty-five years, but music

wasn’t his first choice. He originally wanted to be

an actor but joked, “I realized that I probably wasn’t

that good at it.” Music kind of just happened for

Pritchett. One night in 1991 he was at a karaoke

bar with his mom. He had no plans to sing that

night but his mom begged him to. After singing, the

owner came up to him and offered him a singing

PUGS AND CROWS

INDIE JAZZ TROUPE PLAYS RESPECT TO FAMILY

MADDY CRISTALL

The ever impressive Pugs and Crows have just

released their fourth album, UNCLE. The Vancouver

based indie-jazz band never cease to create

innovative and genre bending music. They blend

together modern jazz, art folk and avant garde

stylings. The combination is these otherwise

underexplored genres accumulated brilliantly. This

is only possible because each member of the band

is objectivity talented and have excelled at the

instruments they play. Pugs and Crows have been

making music for 10 years, have toured across the

world and earned themselves a Juno award for

best instrumental album in 2013. Now they have

joined forces with hypnotic singer-songwriter Marin

Patenaude and elevated their already highly evolved

music to another level.

The band’s frontman Cole Schmidt explains, “The

album took three years to make, when my uncle,

who gave a lot, got hit with fourth stage esophageal

cancer and died four months later. Around the

same time, many close friends and bandmates

were starting to have kids. A few others also came

and went along the way.” It is deeply apparent that

this music comes from a highly emotional place,

it plucks every little delicate string inside of you.

Patenaude adds a visceral element to the band’s

otherwise mostly instrumental approach. Schmidt

says, “Marin and I have been playing music together

for as long as the Pugs and Crows have been going.

This batch of music felt a little extra vulnerable

and required someone that wouldn’t allow too

job.

It wasn’t an easy road, however. “The path got

really bumpy, a bit of a deterrence,” says Pritchett.

He wasn’t having the success on the radio and

wondered if he should just move onto something

else. After doing a lot of soul searching, Pritchett

realized music was all he wanted to do, so he

pushed on, hired a different producer and teamed

up with a new record label.

much ego to get in the way. Just like the others in

the band, I have a lot of trust for all the choices

she makes musically.” Patenaude does to Pugs and

Crows what Beth Gibbins does to Portishead, she

breathes life into the music.

UNCLE was recorded at Afterlife Studios by John

Raham. Cole Schmidt also produced the album

alongside Chris Gestrin.

“The recording process for this album was totally

different for us. Rather than write parts, rehearse for

months, and play lots of live shows before recording

the music live off the floor, we went into the studio

very underprepared,” Schmidt says. “Instead we

spent time improvising on each section at length,

Pritchett just released his eighth album, Out On

The Town, with his first hit single “Worth A Shot.”

He explains that this album has grown from his

previous -releases due to his “maturity level and

the overall approach to the business.” Although

Pritchett doesn’t write many of his own songs

anymore, he really thinks about what the fans want

to hear. He says each song on his new album is

diverse. There is one song, an anthem song called

“Drink Along Song” that he hopes will have the

impact like “Hold My Beer” and “Let’s Get Rowdy”.

2018 was a busy and successful year for Pritchett.

Earlier in the year he was asked to be involved with

the JUNOfest doing the meet and greet with fans

and playing in the JUNOCup hockey game. “Hockey

is my first true love of life,” he says.

With such a busy schedule, it’s extremely hard to

have a lot of time with family and friends. Pritchett

said there was a time that he lost focus on his

friends and family and realized “never let a moment

go by with the industry, but more important are the

people that will always be there for you, in the end,

your family and friends.”

Aaron Pritchett performs January 15 at the Vogue

Theatre (Vancouver).

before editing it down like a film.”

The handiwork on the album is impressive, every

single moment feels important. When asked if it’s

difficult to make jazz music in 2018, Cole responds,

“Probably not much more difficult than being in a

grindcore band in 2018. Maybe more old people,

and less pitbulls with jazz.” They make complicated

music and it pays off. Their choice to collaborate

with Patenaude was another strong choice for the

band. Uncle is an extraordinary album that doesn’t

take any shortcuts, it takes you down a scenic walk

through a place you’ve never seen before.

UNCLE is now available on all streaming platforms.

Photo by Sam Tudor

Blending jazz and folk stylings, Pugs and Crows invite vocalist Marin Patenaude along for the ride on Uncle.

RIO

THEATRE

1660 EAST BROADWAY

JANUARY

4

JANUARY

5 & 6

JANUARY

7

JANUARY

8

JANUARY

9

JANUARY

11

JANUARY

12

JANUARY

13

JANUARY

17

JANUARY

18

JANUARY

19

JANUARY

24

JANUARY

25

JANUARY

26

FEBRUARY

6

FEBRUARY

7

JANUARY

Mamoru Hosoda’s

*MIRAI OF THE FUTURE

LOVING VINCENT

Melissa McCarthy & Richard E. Grant

*CAN YOU EVER

FORGIVE ME?

LABYRINTH

Friday Late Night Movie

One Trilogy Marathon

to Rule Them All...

THE LORD OF THE RINGS

(Extended Editions!)

All Day. All Night. All Middle Earth!

Hosted by the Geekenders

Spike Lee's

*BLACKkKLANSMAN

*for additional screenings see riotheatre.ca

CRAZY RICH ASIANS

Willem Dafoe in

*AT ETERNITY'S GATE

*for additional screenings see riotheatre.ca

Ethan Hawke in

FIRST REFORMED

STORY STORY LIE

Hot and Heavy

SUPER CHIKAN &

THE MOJO STARS

Bring Your Multipass!

THE FIFTH ELEMENT

Friday Late Night Movie

Ralph Bakshi's

THE LORD OF THE RINGS

40th Anniversary Screening!

The Tumor Foundation of BC Presents

COMEDY FOR A CURE

*FREE SOLO

Natalie Portman in

*VOX LUX

*for additional screenings see riotheatre.ca

The Gentlemen Hecklers Present

STAR TREK III

The Search For Spock

Jane Fonda in

BARBARELLA

Friday Late Night Movie

Portia Favro & Cherry OnTop Present

LUST 2.0

*Also Friday, January 18

Crazy8s DGCBC

20th Anniversary

Fundraiser Screening

April O’Peel Presents

CARTOON CABARET

Destroy Your Childhood!

John Carpenter's

THE THING

Friday Late Night Movie

The Geekenders Present

NAUGHTY PYTHON'S

FLYING BURLESQUE CIRCUS

The Fictionals Comedy Co. Present

IMPROV AGAINST HUMANITY

Game of Love #IAHatRio

11th Anniversary Show

PAUL ANTHONY'S TALENT TIME

First Thursday of Every Month!

MUSIC

COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.RIOTHEATRE.CA

January 2019 27


MUSIC

CHERRIE LAUREL

THE POLITICS OF BEING A WOMAN

JOHNNY KOSMOS

Brittney Rand finds her inner flame on A Furnace, A Fire.

Photo by Ian Lanterman

Cherrie Laurel is the solo pseudonym of Vancouver based

artist Brittney Rand. This is not her first musical rodeo, but as

she puts it, “an exercise in relinquishing control.”It is apparent

from the first few seconds of our encounter that she is

someone who doesn’t need my time, but values it as much

as I will. There is a struggle apparent within the confines of

society that I have acknowledged but am still working to fully

understand. Women are essential but have yet to be given the

respect that being essential commands.

“It made me incredibly angry,” Rand says of how everything

unfolded throughout the #metoo movement. Her own

personal struggles coupled with so many public cases made

for a very frustrated and pissed off woman. Her debut EP, A

Furnace, A Fire, is the personal embodiment of all that anger.

Written over the course of several years, she realized her

experiences weren’t unique. They were merely the culmination

of a lifetime as a woman now epitomized in the wake of

today’s awakened movement. The questions still linger for

Rand. What do we do now? Can we forgive? Is it even possible?

The music itself is impressive, especially coupled with the

fact that she did everything on her own. “Written, recorded

and produced by me” is quite a statement in and of itself.

When the end product is something any studio would strive

for, everyone should take notice.

“I try to write songs in one sitting, because if you go to bed

and wake up the next morning you lose the magic and the

place where you needed to hear that story. I was listening to a

lot of Luminations by Buffy St Marie. It’s all about witchcraft.

It’s really hard to find and it’s really political too. It informed

this idea of writing a call-and-response song with myself, which

ended up being ‘Fire Low.’”

The political overtones are definitely present on this album.

“One of my favourite lines on the whole album is in ‘Love

song’ — ‘sweeping floors to keep the rich clean’ — Cause I

was literally cleaning the mansions of rich people. Sweeping

their Louis Vuitton bags out of the way. Sitting in their marble

bathtub writing this song.”

Fans of Vancouver’s now defunct Mu will most certainly

like Rand’s solo endeavor, as she was a co-creator of the act

before her bandmate Francesca Belcourt moved to the United

Kingdom. This is her same brand of electro-pop, but different.

“The difference for me is this is my experience. It isn’t veiled,

it’s exposing and honest,” Rand says of the song writing. There

really is no veil here. It’s all out there. Lyrically presenting abuse,

gas lighting and mental health, all supplemented by an edge

and a sense of urgency and fun that will keep you dancing.

A Furnace, A Fire is one of those albums that will contribute

to giving Vancouver’s music scene its cool and cutting edge

demeanor. Expect great things from Cherrie Laurel in 2019.

A Furnace, A Fire will be released on all streaming platforms

January 2019.

28

January 2019


MUSIC

THE CRYSTAL METHOD

FINDING THE BALANCE THAT BRINGS EVERYTHING TOGETHER

JAMIE GOYMAN

The ’90s were thick with the buzzing underbelly

of the electronic music scene bubbling up into

mainstream culture with acts like The Chemical

Brothers, Fatboy Slim and the Prodigy leading

music charts worldwide.

Photo by Graham John Bell

Scott Kirkland has reimagined The Crystal Method as a solo moniker following the retirement of Ken Jordan.

Making waves of their own was The Crystal

Method, formed out of Las Vegas between two

friends, Ken Jordan and Scott Kirkland, creating a

lasting impression with their first release, Vegas,

which captured the energy and music stylings of

the time the two had helped create, and went on

for five more album releases.

Fast-forward more than 20 years, Kirkland has

adopted The Crystal Method as a solo moniker,

finding his footing in the new studio layout with

the question of what the future has in store for

him.

“I had those moments of a little apprehension,”

says Kirkland. “Wondering if I was going to do a

different act or do The Crystal Method form. I

listened back through the years at the albums and

got kind of wrapped up in some of the processes

we would use in those early years, not knowing

what we were doing, just making music for

nobody but ourselves.”

Taking that steam from the very beginnings,

Kirkland has reinvented The Crystal Method

into where he is today with his own creative

exploration, keeping himself open to the process

while working with collaborators who bring their

differences to the studio.

The latest release, The Trip Home, had Kirkland

working with many talented names who all laid

their own influence out on the table, aiding in

creating an album that demands to be played from

start to finish.

“I thought, do something organic that tells

a story,” says Kirkland. “Music is sometimes the

balance that brings everything together, the

score or back story to everybody’s daily existence.

There are sometimes so many different narratives

going on in someone’s head that you just need

something that brings you in and lets you go at

the same time. Let’s you find your way through

the day.”

This new album has the uncanny ability to do

just that, the way “The Drive Inside” and “Chapter

One” come together is captivating, pulling

listeners into the ethos created alongside Teflon

Sega’s liquefied vocals. The idea of building off

the embers of the previous track in cue – creating

a story, is prevalent through the album and can

be felt with the chaotic disassembly of “Ghost

in the City” dissolving into the combustible and

aggressive sounds that kickoff “Turbulance,”

showing that sequence is key in the process for

Kirkland. The Trip Home is a series of segues built

to captivate listeners while bringing them on a

non-stop ride full of talent built to make magic.

“[Collaborations on the album] brought this

humanity that I wanted to find. I wanted to hear

something that is and hard to put your finger

on. It’s humanity, it’s life experience, it’s soul, it’s

a combination of do you believe what they’re

singing and does it make you want to hear more.

The great magic of music is that connection it

makes with people and its continuation through

the years. It’s one of the beautiful things I’ve always

enjoyed about music.”

Keeping that positive light well lit above him

Kirkland is set to continue pushing forward in the

new direction he has been working toward the

last two years and shows no hint of slowing down

anytime soon. Filled with that perfect amount of

passion and drive to continue in an industry that

chews up and spits out more names then can be

remembered, Kirkland has found that perfect

balance between embracing where the music

came from and working towards where he sees it

in the future.

“For me this was really just embracing the core

of what the band was all about,” says Kirkland.

“The youthful enthusiasm that brought us

through the years of touring and grinding it out

and believing in ourselves; I think the album is an

adult version of that. It’s confident, comfortable,

and contributes in a positive way to the things

that go on in everyone’s life. The distance that’s

there, the ups and downs, pressures of what goes

through their lives kind of solidifies the fact that

we’re all going through the same shit and we’re in

this together and will get through it one way or

another.”

Avid listeners keep your head up as Kirkland has

confirmed that his second album, The Trip Out, is

looking to see a release date near the end of 2019.

The album is meant to be a continuation of what

he visited in The Trip Home while featuring a lot of

the same collaborators.

The Crystal Method performs at the Imperial

(Vancouver) on January 12.

January 2019 29


BPM

CAUTIOUS CLAY

OVERNIGHT SUCCESS YEARS IN THE MAKING

JOEY LOPEZ

CLUBLAND

YOUR MONTH MEASURED IN BPMS

JOEY LOPEZ

Whatever your New Year’s resolutions may be, the one thing at the top of

your list should be more bumping and grooving to some of the funkiest

shows January has to offer. 2019 is here and what better way to break

in the New Year than to shake off the snow, dancing away those winter

blues and getting smothered in the warm embrace of some bone-rattling

bass.

MICK JENKINS

January 5 at Fortune Sound Club

One of the most underrated rappers in the business is coming to town

to tour his strongest releases yet, so you’re not going to want to miss this.

Get up close and personal with the Chicago-based rapper and let Mick

Jenkins take you on a tour of his mind with his powerful one-of-a-kind

lyricism.

NAO

January 12 at the Vogue Theatre

Have you ever craved for early 2000s nostalgia but with a touch of neofunk

to cater to your modern sensibilities? Well, English R&B artist NAO

is about to bring her self-proclaimed brand of wonky funk to the Vogue

Theatre. Satisfy the needs of your soul with some of these guaranteed

grooves.

88GLAM

January 16 at VENUE

Toronto-based hip-hop duo 88GLAM have only been around since 2017

and these cats are aiming to light-up VENUE with their fresh sound that’s

reminiscent of Drake’s OVO style with a touch of that southern trap that

we all know and love. Catch them before they blow up because it’s only a

matter of time before 88GLAM is on the tip of everyone’s tongues.

Joshua Karpeh forged a path and followed it until he got to where he wanted to be as Cautious Clay.

Joshua Karpeh, known professionally as Cautious Clay, has

made quick work of his dreams and made them into a reality.

Just last year, Clay was working in marketing for a real estate

agency, making beats in his Brooklyn home whom he shares

with 12 other people – embodying the true artist’s life

style – before making the leap into full-time producing and

songwriting. The decisions have proven fruitful as Clay has

been touring throughout North America all year, playing his

first show in early 2018 and is now preparing himself for a

series of headlining performances and festivals in 2019. With

the release of his debut EP, Blood Type, Clay has seemingly

found success over night. In reality, his success is a long time

coming, toiling away at music for most of his life, starting with

the flute.

“Alladin was my intro into playing the flute. I saw the snake

charmer and I was like ‘Oh my God, I totally want to be a snake

charmer now.’ I was just really into that idea and I think it

might have also been this artist Herbie Mann. My mom would

play a lot of Herbie Mann. He was a flute player. I was really

into it because it was jazz flute, but I’m always looking for new

things with music and trying to stay inspired by something.”

Never letting go of the inspiration that was born within him

at a young age, Clay stuck to the grind, honing his skills until he

was eventually ready to take it to the next level.

“There’s so much noise nowadays, it’s just cool that I can put

out music and get people’s attention. It’s cool that I can inspire

that organic sharing of my music and people are connecting

with it. It’s kind of surreal and I didn’t expect it happen so fast,

but I was prepared for it. I was confident in my ability and my

sound and I knew what I could do with it. I even played my

first show earlier this year and I’ve played about 34 shows since

30

then. It’s so interesting. The first couple shows were definitely

very informative for me, but now it’s just about my mood. If

I’m in a great mood I’m going to have the best show of my life

every night. I think I just have to be in a good mindset and

focused with my band on things. I feel like I’ve played in such a

variety in situations now and I feel a lot more comfortable on

stage. I’m just excited for my first headline thing.”

Clay’s humility has made him instantly likable. His

intelligence is apparent and he speaks like someone who

knows exactly what he’s doing. He forged a path and followed

it until he got to where he wanted to be. A source of this

aspect of him seems to come from his mother, someone who

believed in him from a young age and pushed him to excel. A

lot of Clay’s talents and successes appear to have been seeds

planted within him a long time ago. Six years ago, when he was

still performing as Josh Karpeh, working on beats and releasing

them on Soundcloud, he found himself collaborating with

future pop superstar Billie Eilish and her brother Finneas O’

Connel,

“That’s funny to me because I can’t believe some people

remember that. I guess we were tapping into something.

Great minds think alike, you know? They were just really cool

because they hit me up when they had just a small profile on

Soundcloud at the time and they were equally on their own

tip. I think they’re really incredible artists, so that’s a testament

to where our mindset was at the time.”

Cautious Clay has cocooned, making music beneath our

noses and is now spreading his wings to achieve great things.

Cautious Clay performs January 19 at the Fox Cabaret

(Vancouver).

MYKKI BLANCO

January 30 at Commodore Ballroom

When it comes to new experiences to change their perspectives, most

people disembark on month long journeys to Asia or Europe. That won’t

be the case for when Mykki Blanco comes to town at the end of the

month to completely blow your mind into a million pieces and open your

eyes wider than previously thought possible. This gender-fluid rapper is

unlike anyone else in the game and is going to fuck your shit right up with

a show that is certain to be unforgettable.

NAO

January 2019


WHITE UMBRELLA

GOOD VIBES ONLY

LYNDON CHIANG

Jeremiah Klein is fully prepared for singing in the rain on his psychedelic outing as White Umbrella.

I M U R

PREPARING FOR THE END OF THE BEGINNING

JOEY LOPEZ

White Umbrella is the psychedelic brainchild

of vocalist and multi-instrumentalist, Jeremiah

Klein. After collaborating with up and coming

local acts like Basketball and Evy Jane, Klein

has stepped out of his comfort zone by

independently releasing a self-titled album on

all major streaming platforms

Growing up in Canmore, BC, Klein reflected

on happy childhood memories with his uncle,

who he described as a hippy with long hair

and an avid horse racer. Second to that, Klein’s

uncle was a true fan of Rock and Roll, who

introduced him to the likes of household

names such as Jimi Hendrix and Led Zeppelin.

Klein even goes on to say, “This record is a

revisiting of what got me into music in the first

place.”

White Umbrella’s self-titled debut is an

ambitious 30-minute project, blending the

essence of psych rock with the unique style

of Klein’s slow-burning compositions. Tracks

like “Jocelyn” and “4am” feel a bit closer to

home for classic rock fans, as listeners will

definitely catch on to the influences of garage

rock instrumentations and Bob Dylan-esque

vocal deliveries. Conversely, Klein’s freedom

as a solo artist has given him the opportunity

to showcase reverb-heavy tracks like “Cut like

BPM

Water” and “Swans.”

The drop of White Umbrella has allowed

Klein to reflect on the independent release

process and his growth as a musician so far.

After writing songs for other artists in the past,

with labels that handled publicity, Klein has

come to appreciate the nuances of juggling

both the creative and promotional efforts

needed to build an audience alone. Now

that the album is out, he’s on the hunt for

musicians to help perform his work live.

Klein finds his inspiration from live

performance; particularly from female-fronted

bands like Uni and Sunflower Bean. “It really

feels like women are the ones keeping rock

‘n’ roll and live music alive.” It’s important to

note here that Klein is also a huge fan of @

SheShreds on Instagram. Admittedly, Klein

argues that live music is hard to make, and he

holds a soft spot for those who “update the

sound and keep it relevant”—exactly the same

reason why this album is so rewarding. White

Umbrella is familiar in instrumentation but

stays fresh with its tasteful structure, effects

and overall vibe.

White Umbrella’s new album is available now

on all major streaming platforms.

Vancouver neo-soul trio I M U R, consisting of

front woman Jenny Lea, Mikey Blige and Amine

Bouzaher, have just come off of a stellar release

of their latest EP Thirty33, a cathartic release of a

heavily emotional project that feels like a weight

lifted off their shoulders as they continue on their

upward trajectory toward world domination. But

as the clouds clear I M U R is faced with an even

bigger mountain to summit as they approach the

end of the beginning.

“We thought the hard part was going to be

releasing the EP, but the hard part is going to

be following it up,” says Blige, pondering the

aftermath of Thirty33, preparing himself and the

band for what’s to come and the reality of life

after the release of an acclaimed work of art. “I’m

relieved it’s out because now comes the fun part:

performing. We’ve done three shows since the

release party and it’s been amazing to hear how

the songs are making people feel. There’s been a

bit more of a cinematic approach to these songs,”

says Lea, her voice cushioned by relaxation; the

sense of relief radiates from her carried by a touch

of pride seen in parents watching their child

graduate. “It’s been crazy seeing all of the songs

off the EP do so much better than pretty much

every song we’ve released in the past has been

amazing. It was so scary. We went to Toronto and

only played the new songs. It went over better

than I think the old songs would have. It feels like

it’s connecting everywhere we take it,” says Blige,

sharing Lea’s sentiments. “We know how we’re

going to follow it up. We have ideas, but there’s

still so much work to be done. Right now, we’ve

set up this base camp before climbing Everest.

We know it’s going to hurt, but we’re excited to

climb.”

For the first time, I M U R feels like they

have made something that belongs to the

fans. Something their listeners have attached

themselves too and claimed ownership through

intense and deep connections, “It’s funny I was

thinking about this this morning, from Slow Dive

to Little Death it was a lot of Jenny’s songs with

production added on to it. But with Thirty33

it was a blend of production and song-writing

being done together with a focus on how people

are going to receive it. It’s everything learned

from the process of the last two releases put into

one big package and that’s been resonating with

people,” says Bouzaher.

I M U R have just returned from a tour of

India and are ready to take their journey to the

next level. Thirty33 has grown up and flown the

coop to live on its own out in the world for their

audience to enjoy and admire.

Thirty33 can be found on all streaming platforms.

Feelin’ free on the heels of their Thirty33 EP, I M U R are ready to take their journey to the next level.

January 2019 31


FILM

VANCOUVER SHORT FILM FESTIVAL

SHOWCASING TALENT IN THE INDUSTRY AND UNITING INDUSTRY PEERS

HOGAN SHORT

THIS MONTH IN FILM

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL CINEMA

BRENDAN LEE

GENESIS 2.0

Travel north to the harsh, bleak country of Serbia where the wooly

mammoth once roamed, and be led on a path towards a not-so-distant

future. Oscar-nominated documentarian, Christian Frei, tells the story of

modern day mammoth hunters, whose lives revolve around the rush to

uncover fossils and carcasses that not only prove lucrative ventures, but

are helping provide answers to long sought after questions in the world of

science. (Jan. 2)

THE HEIRESSES

A middle-aged Italian woman loses everything amidst her husband’s

imprisonment on fraud charges and she’s quickly thrown from a life of

luxury into a life of relative normality as a taxi driver. From there, she

meets a younger woman. And as is expected, life continues to unfold.

(Jan. 16)

(L-R) VSFF co-director Marena Dix, board chair Kristyn Stilling and Zlatina Pacheva (also co-director) look to the stars.

Short films are perfectly designed to be watched during a

film festival — back-to-back. When they’re great, they tell

beautiful stories in moments. And when they’re not for you,

you only have to stay with it a little while longer and onto the

next one. Luckily there’s the Vancouver Short Film Festival

and co-director Marena Dix is excited to share just what to

expect from the VSFF and what they’re aiming to provide for

their Vancouver audience.

“Our ultimate goal is to connect short filmmakers to a

broader audience in order to grow the local film industry,”

Dix says.

During the two days of the festival there are an impressive

39 short films to see. The films must be under 40 minutes in

length and this year the festival received a record number of

submissions. Dix is confident the programming will appeal to

wide audience, especially with that much content.

“We have such a wide range of themes and genres. In one

screening, you might start with a comedy and end with a

suspenseful drama. The viewers can expect to laugh, cry and

question reality.” The variety of short films continues to grow

at the VSFF, offering audiences the best experience possible

every year. “We have added an additional screening on the

Friday to highlight Horror and Thriller filmmakers in our After

Dark Screening.”

Highlighting filmmakers is a key component of the VSFF

mission, which also gives the audience a unique chance to

interact with the creative people creating short film. “Usually

we have an 80 per cent filmmaker attendance rate for each

screening,” Dix says. “We love supporting BC talent and it’s

great when the audience can interact directly with them.”

As an audience member experiencing this festival for

the first time, Dix has some words of advice to make your

experience as rich as possible.

“See as much as you can and meet as many people as

you can. As a filmmaker myself, I find that festivals offer a

unique experience to meet fellow peers and find inspiration.

I have met lifelong friends and collaborators at film festivals,

including at the Vancouver Short Film Festival.”

The VSFF will be screening January 25 to 26 at the Vancity

Theatre (1181 Seymour). For more information visit www.vsff.

com

THE IMAGE BOOK

Jean-Luc Godard is known as one of the first true auteurs, the centerpiece

of French New Wave cinema in the ’60s and an all-time great. Nearly sixty

years since Breathless, Godard returns with an avant-garde collage in the

form of film-clips, paintings and music. It’s designed to be watched in a

living room, and it’s orchestrated in such a way so to move you. (Jan. 18)

THE WILD PEAR TREE

Turkish Filmmaker, Nuri Bilge Ceylan, follows up his 2014 Palm D’or

win with an atmospheric homecoming tale about an aspiring writer

who returns to his parents’ home in the countryside after years away at

university. The humble country life and all that come with it clash with

the son’s aspirations in this beautifully shot family drama. (Jan. 30)

THE HEIRESSES

32

January 2019


FILM

IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK

IN CONVERSATION WITH KIKI LAYNE

PATRICK MULLEN

“Of course, I just lost my shit,” laughs KiKi Layne,

recalling the moment Moonlight director Barry

Jenkins offered her the lead role in his new film If

Beale Street Could Talk. Layne plays Tish, a 19-yearold

woman who discovers she is pregnant shortly

after her lover Fonny (Canadian actor Stephan

James) is arrested for a violent rape he didn’t

commit. It’s Layne first role, and she’s a revelation

as the shy, reserved, and resilient Tish. Offscreen,

she’s a bubbly, outgoing, and outspoken delight.

Layne, speaking with BeatRoute at the Toronto

International Film Festival in September, credits

Jenkins and James for making her big screen debut

a breeze.

“I spent so much time investigating who Tish

was and Stephan spent so much time investigating

Fonny. Naturally, in doing that, you start to kind of

tap into that love that they have for each other,”

says Layne. “When we brought all of that work

together, it just blossomed.” Beale Street flows like

sweet jazz as the film cuts back and forth between

Tish and Fonny’s present-day predicament and the

early stages of their romance in 1970s Harlem. It’s

a slower, smoother love story than Moonlight, but

equally poetic.

As with Moonlight, Jenkins’ film demands

natural down-to-earth performances that anchor

the story in reality. Layne, who studied theatre

at DePaul University in Chicago, adds that her

theatrical roots helped with Beale Street’s longer

takes, like a memorable scene in which Fonny

brings Tish to their new loft and encourages her

to imagine their life together. The camera dances

around the young lovers as they move through

their invisible kitchen, pantomiming with the

appliances as they envision the future.

“I pulled from what I knew,” says Layne. “Theatre

was what I knew, and that’s what I brought to the

table. Barry knew how to direct me and show what

works for stage, but for film it can’t be that big or

it needs to be a little tighter – that technical part

you can only learn by doing.”

The star adds that If Beale Street Could Talk

had a special energy on set as the cast and crew

brought to life the novel by James Baldwin.

“From the people very high up to everybody

that was there on set every day knew how special

it was,” reflects Layne. “We knew it meant so much

to be bringing James Baldwin’s words to life and I

think it created this beautiful, supportive family

energy on the set.”

The actor finds it inspiring to be part of a new

generation of artists getting to tell their own

stories. “I’m not too concerned anymore about

asking for anything,” she says when probed on

what she hopes the industry will do moving

forward. “I want to see more people take control.

Whatever type of film you feel is missing from

Hollywood, don’t expect Hollywood to do it. You

figure out how to do it. We’re done asking.”

If Beale Street Could Talk is in select theatres now.

January 2019 33


MUSIC REVIEWS

DEERHUNTER

Why Hasn’t Everything Already Disappeared

4AD

If a woman, man, human, or human-like creature

were to immerse themselves into the strange tidal

wave that was 2018, they’d be sure to emerge with

the heavy netting of the uncertain future, gooey

unknown substances put forth by the mainstream

media and an uncomfortable anxiety-forming itch

that closely resembles that of sea lice. If after taking a

long, hot and soapy shower, this being were to form

a band, name it Deerhunter and release an album

with the intent of recreating that tidal wave… you

might find yourself wondering why the heck they

thought the desert was the birthplace of the wave,

let alone the ocean. These are the feelings evoked

from listening to Why Hasn’t Everything Already

Disappeared, the latest Deerhunter album. With

an ocean of possibilities for the band, who hasn’t

released an album in four years, we are left instead

with a wading pool. You know, the kind where you

aren’t allowed to dive or else you’ll hit your head on

the bottom.

For fans in love with catchy guitar-driven

psychedelic rock and dreamy shoegaze, this isn’t

your new 2019 anthem. However, for fans married

to the more bizarre and experimental personalities

of Deerhunter, your strange container of sound

has arrived and it’s ready to take your ears on an

unexpected and avantgarde journey. This is a brand

new era of Deerhunter.

Beginning with the first song, “Death in

Midsummer,” you are greeted with a repetitive

harpsichord riff that sounds slightly like the

background music to some Shakespearean play – is

this why it’s called “Death in Midsummer”? Perhaps

we’ll never know, but what we do know is that the

repetitive nature and eventual blown out horn

sounds like a locomotive on acid. Ah, maybe this is

the sonic depiction of the Thomas the Tank Engine,

“Yellow Submarine”, Shakespearean hybrid cartoon

that was never made. Unfortunately in this case, it

wasn’t made for a reason. The album goes on in this

nature until about song number five, with “What

Happens to People?” This a closer match to its sonic

predecessors: dreamy, flowy, experimental and full of

wanderlust. If the album were to start here, it would

feel less confusing and more reflective of previous

albums, contributing to the cohesive essence of the

band. Instead, the first half has us confused as to

what era we are living in, breeding questions like:

Is “No One’s Sleeping” an unreleased track of The

Kinks’ recording session in 1977 Berlin? Could this

be the soundscape of another frightening Yoko Ono

performance piece?

Like a forgetful sun-drenched and dehydrated

surfer who has smoked too much weed, “Deerhunter

forgets the questions and makes up completely

unrelated answers directed at their non-existence.

It gets up, walks around, it records itself in several

strategic geographic points across North America. It

comes home, restructures itself and goes back to bed

to avoid the bad news.” While this may have been

intended to be a selling point in review, bad news is

bad news, and for a band with eight LPs under their

belt, there is no way to make finding your confused,

lost, red-eyed uncle sound like a sexy Friday night.

Coming from an ear in love with Deerhunter’s early

days, the album Microcastle in particular, Why Hasn’t

Everything Already Disappeared feels too far removed

from the band’s true essence. In replacement of a

cohesive concept album, we are left with something

that feels like a slightly disappointing goodie bag

of plastic toys from a children’s birthday party: not

nearly as mature or quality of a gift as hoped, but still

a gift nonetheless. This could have something to do

with the band’s recording process, which has shifted

from real vintage amplification to pure digitized

chrome, plugged straight into the mixing desk. Even

then, the guitars are an afterthought and there is a

clear shift in focus to electromechanical and synthetic

sounds. While the intention may have been to align

closer with the now electronic- and hip-hop-focused

music market, the album fails to feel relevant.

Encompassing the many unexpected moods

of a hormone saturated pre-teen, the album

bounces through eras of the known, while breeding

implanted memories and fake feelings of nostalgia.

“Detournement” speaks through analog robotic

tongues, greeting us with the words “Good morning

to Japan and the eastern sunrise over these majestic

cliffs and the vultures circling,” in a voice that belongs

in an ‘80s sci-fi. While the memory of a visit to this

robotic dreamland may be about as real as Conan

O’Brien’s new Japanese family, we are left feeling

we were there: a point in which we push these

theoretical falsehoods onto the first half of the album,

zapping ourselves into a new dimension where we

can pretend it didn’t happen. Here in this other

dimension, “Futurisim” resorts all hope. A song that

holds the much-needed sameness of an expected

Deerhunter sound, encouraging us to take off our

seatbelts and arrange ourselves, in comfort, to the

new Deerhunter. “Futurism” carries a very shoegaze/

surfer-rock quality, overwhelmingly reminiscent to

that of “Agoraphobia” off of Microcastle. This is the

moment your strange, dehydrated and red-eyed

uncle returns to reality, clearing all questions of

insanity with a tall glass of water.

“Futurism” exclaims “your cage is what you make it,

if you decorate it,” and while this may be true about

life, it’s hard to decipher the strange sonic decorations

and true thematic intention of Why Hasn’t Everything

Already Disappeared. We are instead left feeling a

little bit like Siri made a playlist based off algorithms

on a shared computer – but maybe that in itself is

a perfect representation of the modern age and,

ultimately, a perfect sonic depiction of the tidal wave

that was 2018.

• Jamila Pomeroy

• Illustration by Kyle Hack

34

January 2019


Altameda - Time Hasn’t Changed You Beirut - Gallipoli Bob Sumner - Wasted Love Songs Cherry Glazerr - Stuffed & Ready

ALTAMEDA

Time Hasn’t Changed You

Pheromone Recordings

Poised for a breakout year, Altameda’s sophomore

full-length sees the band dialing in a sound that

has a lot of appeal. There’s a certain objective

taste that hears rock n’ roll as good songs with a

standard instrumental lineup of guitar, keys, bass,

and drums, and Time Hasn’t Changed You churns

with elements of all the bands that made that

the default setting for rock music, whether The

Heartbreakers, The Band or The Rolling Stones.

Kicking off with the greasy guitar and keys

on “Bowling Green,” Altameda presents a more

driving vibe than their 2016 debut, Dirty Rain.

“Losing Sleep” punches in with punk rock energy, a

blast of rave-up giddiness with a whoohoo refrain

that’s hooky as hell, along with tuneful gang vocals

running throughout the cut. It’s a likely shaker,

the kind of number that kicks your heels up for

you. “Rolling Back To You” lives in some wild space

near Springsteen’s Born To Run, and you get the

feeling the band’s well-aware of the vibe they’re

laying down with the line “And I wanna tell you,

just how I feel, I ain’t tryin’ to reinvent the wheel.”

The title track comes in near the end of the record,

with a ’70s AM radio feel, while “Waiting On The

Weather” goes back to spazzy rock n’ roll energy

before closing out the record.

Altameda’s put the work in to get the sound of

classic rock n’ roll just right, and there’s a lot to like

about Time Hasn’t Changed You.

• Mike Dunn

BEIRUT

Gallipoli

4AD

Beirut frontman, Zach Condon comes out

cymbals crashing with Beirut’s fifth studio album.

Gallipoli was recorded in Southern Italy and

receives its name from an Italian town Condon

and his bandmates visited during recording.

Often times mesmerizing, Gallipoli more

closely resembles Beirut’s first two albums,

Gulag Orkestar and The Flying Cup rather than

Condon’s more recent work. This resemblance is

in part due to the large presence of the organ on

which Condon wrote all three albums but also

the return to the often-incomprehensible lyrical

style heard in his earlier work. An effective return

to Beirut’s Balkan folk-inspired, breakthrough

sound, Gallipoli distinguishes itself with eccentric,

screeching organ on the instrumental “On Mainau

Island” and the wonderfully wordless melodies

in “Varieties of Exile.” True to Beirut fashion, the

quirky instrumental and intricate Gallipoli has

the ability to transport the listener to a different

period in time. Gallipoli features a marvelous

medley of brass instruments, organ and Condon’s

hypnotizing melancholy vocals.

Along with the release of the single, “Gallipoli,”

Condon offers this fairy-tale-like reflection of how

the album’s first single came to be,

“We stumbled into a medieval-fortressed island

town of Gallipoli one night and followed a brass

band procession fronted by priests carrying a

statue of the town’s saint through the winding

narrow streets behind what seemed like the entire

town. The next day I wrote the song I ended up

calling ‘Gallipoli’ entirely in one sitting, pausing

only to eat.”

• Sheena Antonios

BOB SUMNER

Wasted Love Songs

Independent

Along with his brother Brian in The Sumner

Brothers, singer-songwriter Bob Sumner built his

reputation as one of Canada’s best underground

songwriters the old-fashioned way, logging

thousands of miles across Canada, playing bars,

coffee shops and living rooms. Sumner’s songs

have always been a bit dark, and his debut solo

effort, Wasted Love Songs, balances the heavier

themes with sunny, finger-picked acoustic guitar

and subtle production notes that allow his

conversational timbre to shine through the mix.

“Riverbed” is beautiful opener, feeling

somewhere between Willie Nelson and The War

On Drugs, with a chorus that begs to be sung

along with and beautiful instrumental harmony

between the pedal steel and electric guitar. “A

Thousand Horses” picks up the pace to an easy

mosey while Sumner’s ability to hang a beautiful

chorus in a tune becomes more apparent. He

lulls you in during the verses, before he drops an

achingly lovely melody line when the song picks

up. That ability would be for naught if it weren’t

for Sumner’s masterstroke, laying words into

those melodies with a painter’s precision; “All the

running of a thousand horses, tearing the prairies

apart, is but a murmur and a whisper compared to

the beating of my heart.” Not a single word goes

to waste while Sumner’s poetic minimalism tips

its cowboy hat to Hemingway. “My Old Friend”

waltzes to a gentle opening, before cranking the

volume like Crazy Horse, with a gritty guitar line

mildly reminiscent of Son Volt’s Straightaways.

Wasted Love Songs is an early contender for

2019. It has an easy, laid back feel that fits on the

highway or in any room in the house. Sumner’s

ability to channel the likes of Townes Van Zandt

and Willie Nelson while adding flourishes of

more contemporary alt-country ought to make

him a part of some serious conversations when

discussing standout Canadian roots artists.

• Mike Dunn

CHERRY GLAZERR

Stuffed & Ready

Secretly Canadian

Upon first listen it sounded like Cherry Glazerr

had a more mature sound on Stuffed & Ready.

Having gone on as a three piece after losing synth

player Sasami Ashworth (due to her working on

her solo career), it seemed like the extra space

in the mix was met kindly by the remaining

musicians. However, on following visits the album

becomes less courageous and more so a typical

festival-tailored indie rock piece aiming to please

an angsty teenage audience. Songs often being

too reminiscent of too many other poppy “punk”

rockers from the last five years.

Formulated rhythms and predictable

pauses and drops keep the listener from being

engaged or shocked. On top of the characterless

instrumentation, the lyrics lack depth. Although

they are sung melodically by Clementine Creevy’s

undeniably beautiful voice, they struggle to

engage the listener into the story being told.

Although there are songs like album opener,

“Ohio,” where Cherry Glazerr are undeniably on

point, or “Daddi,” where the lyrics do have some

backbone and subtle aggressiveness, overall, even

though Creevy has said an incredible amount of

time was spent creating it, Stuffed & Ready comes

across rushed & uninspired.

• Cole Young

THE DANDY WARHOLS

Why You So Crazy

Dine Alone

Something happens to people, and families, as

they age that pushes them to evolve or get left

behind. For a band entering their 25th year in the

biz, we should expect nothing less. They’ve done,

seen, and survived things. With Pete Holmström

and Brent DeBoer exploring solo projects (Pete

Intl Airport & Immigrant Union, respectively), one

might expect the family to drift apart, and lose

the fire of their early years. And yet the band still

shows up when dinner is ready. They hit familiar

territory with “Terraform”, a bass driven dance

number. Zia McCabe gets her time to rock out

with “Highlife”, a stompy ol’ country tune. Single

“Be Alright” boom-clacks its way into your ear just

fine, if just missing that certain something. “Thee

Elegant Bum” again hits that familiar groove,

almost. By the time they hit “Motor City Steel”

they’ve gone full 16 Tons and what do you get.

The Dandys likely won’t gain any new fans with

this effort but Why You So Crazy is not without its

charm. After all, crazy is better than boring.

• Chad Martin

FIDLAR

Almost Free

Dine Alone

For the most die-hard fans, FIDLAR – which stands

for “Fuck it dog life’s a risk” – is a band, a motto

and an ethos. Rather than become pigeonholed

in skate punk for fear of disappointing fans, the

Los Angeles four-piece has diversified their sound

since their eponymous LP and hit single “Cheap

Beer.”

That’s what their latest album Almost Free is

about. Frontman Zac Carper has said the album

was influenced by the aesthetics of Soundcloud

hip-hop, but opening track “Get Off My Rock” is

more Beastie Boys than Lil Pump.

“Can’t You See” is a departure from FIDLAR’s

usual sound with a piano solo and walking bass

line, while the satire on materialism is in keeping

with Carper’s lyrical style. “By Myself” also revisits

a familiar subject – drinking that teeters toward

self-destruction – with fresh percussive range.

“Too Real” is FIDLAR’s most explicitly political

song. Carper howls, “Well, of course the

government is going to fucking lie.” While much

of Too (2015) focused on Carper’s struggle with

addiction and sobriety, tracks like “Too Real” and

the Clash-esque “Scam Likely” prove he can write

as passionately about the political as he can the

personal.

Parts of Almost Free retread familiar territory.

“Alcohol” could fit on any FIDLAR album in sound

and subject. Blistering forty second track “Nuke”

has the intensity of underrated Too track, “Punks.”

“Called You Twice” is a surprise standout.

Carper’s vocals meet their match in a duet with

K.Flay about both sides of a messy breakup. It’s

warm, vulnerable – the album’s emotional core.

While Almost Free is less consistent than its

predecessors, the range it displays proves that

FIDLAR is far from finished.

• Courtney Heffernan

GIRLPOOL

What Chaos Is Imaginary

ANTI-

Cleo Tucker and Harmony Tividad have been

January 2019 35


FIDLAR - Almost Free Girlpool - What Chaos Is Imaginary Juliana Hatfield - Weird

jamming together since they were teenagers. It is no wonder then

that their music has matured dramatically and beautifully since

their gritty debut four years ago. Having moved from explosive

transparency into something subtler and more nuanced, Cleo and

Harmony still refuse to compromise honesty for harmony. New

album, What Chaos Is Imaginary, emerges more versatile and multidimensional

than ever.

Opening track “Lucy” sets the stage for the aural vastness and

poetic clarity that continues throughout the album, marking a shift

from the more journal-like forcefulness of past work. Songs like

“Stale Device” and “Where You Sink” then erupt into being, alluding

instrumentally to the ambiently energized shoegaze of the early

’90s. It becomes clear that this record will confront atmosphere in a

way the band hasn’t yet, and for the most part it keeps its promise.

“Hire” and “Swamp Bay” revisit old habits with freshness, ensuring

the band is still prepared to feel out loud. As always, they sing what

they mean, but confessionalism turns toward the more opaque

and abstract. Building fleshy, concrete worlds through surreal

metaphors, composite scenes, and circular symbolism, the writing

wrestles poetic possibilities with zeal.

The album’s unpredictability reflects the subject matter –

dissociation, intimate relationships, substances and the volatility of

the human mind. What Chaos Is Imaginary remains faithful to the

vulnerability that put Girlpool on the map in the first place, but

with a sensibility that there are a world of ways to pull it off.

• Safiya Hopfe

JULIANA HATFIELD

Weird

American Laundromat Records

Juliana Hatfield has always been on the fringe of the alternative

music scene, defining weird on her own terms. Her latest aptly titled

offering brings everything she’s never said before to the surface.

Feelings of being out of step with the world emanate from

the mellow track “It’s So Weird.” Between the sedate classic rock

influenced chord choices are stories of awkwardness and relations

that have gone sour over time, sung for all to hear like a big

celebration of the alienation.

This uneasy mellowness continues on “Sugar” as Hatfield croons

“Sugar, I hate your guts, Sugar I love you so much” as the acoustic

guitar picking seems to quote George Harrison’s “Here Comes the

Sun.”

Cleanliness is set-aside on “Alright, Yeah” where fuzzy glamrock

guitar playing pushes things to the edge of alternative rock

oblivion. Tongue biting anger and distrust bubbles underneath

her heart melting voice on “Paid to Lie,” summing up this album’s

self-restrained angst perfectly; that which makes it such a gloriously

tasty bitter pill to swallow.

• Dan Potter

KID KOALA

Music To Draw To: Io

Arts & Crafts

Rearranging the chemistry of the cosmos with a flick of his subtle

wrist, Kid Koala remains a master tastemaker and beat-breaker

with the invention of his new album, featuring soul singer Trixie

Whitley. The forerunning single “All For You,” with its accompanying

celestial video,sets a serene tone for the second installmentofthe

Music To Draw Toseries, conceived andlaunchedbythe noted DJ

and producer otherwise known as Eric San. Continuing where

Volume1: Satelliteleft of, Io is a voyage to Jupiterand back again

in eighteenambient tracks,or 70stellarminutes, however you

measure the space-time continuum. Recalling the orchestral

movements of Holst’sThe Planets, and the lysergic emanationsof

experimental composer and accordionist Pauline Oliveros’Deep

Listening, San’s musical meditation reveals itself one tremulous

note at a time. “Lost at Sea” in an ocean of stars, our Billy Pilgrim

pilot finds his Siren of Titanin the sultry R&B compass ofWhitley’s

interplanetary homesick blues. The jarred-head of Philip Glass and

a pantheon of mythological deities look on as theycircumnavigate

“The Moons of Galileo” and mine a hurtling meteorforits

lonely“DiamondHeart.”The future is not the enemy, the duo assures

on “Look-Back Time,” so turn up the speakers and let the vibrations

of Kid Koala’s universe be your astral guide and art instructor.

•Christine Leonard

LEMONGRAB

It Doesn’t Sound Good But It Feels Awesome

Independent

Montreal-based Lemongrab’s debut full-length is overflowing with

a spazzy and meandering hybrid of post punk and stoner rock.

Opening track, “Too Many Bitches,” is righteous and raunchy and by

the time we hit the “yayayayayaya” chorus of “Naked Ass Marimba,”

you can’t help but put your head down and party through it.

The most interesting songs sit in the middle of the album with the

opening of tracks like “Scratch” and “Last Night in Jose” being the

strongest of the bunch. Recorded in Montreal with Rene Wilson

(Michael Rault, Faith Healer), there is an outcry of energy captured

throughout the whole album that gives you the idea that this

band is definitely a lot of fun live. Their push-around melodies on

album single “Keep Door Open” will have you running in a circle

and shoving your friends in that playful way where everybody has

fun while Lenonie Deshaw and Zale Burley’s guitar work keeps the

arrangements melodic and steered away from coming across as

shrill or screechy. Included are a few tracks from the band’s 2016

EP, The One With The Brooms, re-recorded and presented here

in better developed arrangements, showing how this new band

has grown a lot in the last two years. With its sing-along choruses,

Lemongrab has put together a collection of songs even your mom

would love, if your mom was a teenager in Washington state in the

early ’90s.

• Jody Glenham

MAGGIE ROGERS

Heard it in a Past Life U

Capitol Records

American, singer-songwriter, Maggie Rogers released her single

“Alaska,” in October 2016. The song now holds 100 million

global streams to date and is the lead single off her new album,

Heard It In A Past Life. While Rogers’ previous work was released

independently, her new full-length album is her major label debut.

A new caliber of pop music, Heard it in a Past Life is cathartic,

captivating and consistent; an extraordinary album that strives from

start to finish. Rogers’ sound is the result of a desire to combine

the folk music she heard growing up in Maryland with the dance

music that later influenced her while living in France. Up-tempo for

the most part, Heard it in a Past Life often stays true to the layered

sounds, folk melodies and pop style of “Alaska,” while tracks like

“Say It” offer range by possessing a sound reminiscent of ’90s R&B.

Rogers’ transcendent vocals belt out thought-provoking lyrics with

the album having an overall lyrical theme of reminiscing, revival and

letting go of resentment.

Alongside the release of Heard it in a Past Life, Rogers will be on

tour throughout North America and Europe in the New Year.

• Sheena Antonios

MONO

Nowhere Now Here

Temporary Residence Limited

2019 marks twenty years for Japanese noise kaiju MONO. That’s

two hard fought decades of crashing through post-rock landscapes

and performing their charismatic symphonies in temples of sonic

worship around the world. If you’ve experienced the muscleliquefying

might of their live presence then your ecstasy is about

to be redoubled with the release of the latest opus by electroglockenspielist/guitarists

Taka (akaTakaakira Goto) and Yoda (aka

Hideki Suematsu). Technicians of the supernatural, theoutfit’s rockinfused

orchestral compositions have an ethereal yet willful lifeforce

alltheir own. The organic rhythms introduced by the addition of

new drummer Dahm Majuri Cipolla (The Phantom Family Halo)

adds a very physical heartbeat to the center of MONO’s boundless

imagination. Lyrical novels “Breathe” and the10-minutetitle track

surgeheadlonginto the stony towers of “After You Comes the Flood”

andfearsomethunder of “Meet Us Where the Night Ends.” If you’ve

ever admired the more cinematic elements of powermetal with

its medieval flourishes and magnificent tangents, but cringe at the

36

January 2019


UPCOMING SHOWS

NAO

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

JANUARY 12

VANCITY COMEDY EXTRAVANGANZA

DINO ARCHIE, DAVE MERHEJE + MORE

JANUARY 4

BERT KREISCHER

BODY SHOTS WORLD TOUR

JANUARY 13

AARON PRICHETT

WITH KIRA ISABELLA AND DAVID JAMES

JANUARY 15

PETER MURPHY

RUBY CELEBRATION FEATURING DAVID J

JANUARY 19

JEREMY HOTZ

DANGEROUSLY HANDSOME TOUR

JANUARY 25

PANCHO VILLA FROM A SAFE DISTANCE

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

JANUARY 31

RICHARD THOMPSON

(ELECTRIC TRIO) WITH RYLEY WALKER

FEBRUARY 6

CHOIR! CHOIR! CHOIR!

“DANCING QUEEN” THE ABBA EXPERIENCE

FEBRUARY 7

DAN MANGAN

MORE OF LESS TOUR

FEBRUARY 12

SOLD OUT!

TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT VOGUETHEATRE.COM


Swervedriver - Future Ruins The Twilight Sad - It Won/t Be Like This All The Time Toro Y Moi - Outer Peace

over-the-top vocals –order up an earful of the paradoxically mute

MONO. It’llbe the best thing you’ve never heard.

•Christine Leonard

PEDRO THE LION

Phoenix

Polyvinyl Record Co.

Pedro the Lion are back! Fifteen years have passed since Achilles

Heel, the band’s fourth and last full length release. This is not to say

that founding member David Bazanhas been sitting on his ass. The

Seattle-based musician has released a number of solo projects over

the years while Pedro... has been sleeping. Now awoken, they return

with Phoenix.Pedro the Lion always seemed like a solo project with

a swinging door of guest musicians (24 to be exact), the likes of

Ben Gibbard of Death Cab For Cutie having once laid their mark

with Bazan. And so in this latest carnation, Pedro the Lion have

produced a wonderfully upbeat indie rock record in Phoenix, a

little more brazen and urgent then their previous output. “Yellow

Bike” sets the scene after the instrumental and aptly named opener,

“Sunrise.”There are classic Pedro moments, with the slow moving

folky lo-fi sounds that were so common in their previous output.

“Circle K” and “All Seeing Eye” reflect this, but what is strikingly

different is the more open tone and uplifting sound of Bazen’s

voice, even as he covers dark themes of his life, he finds a brightness

in his delivery.Standout tracks include “My Phoenix” and “Model

Homes,” but Phoenix overall is a great return from a band many of

us probably thought we’d never hear again.

• Adam Rogers

SWERVEDRIVER

Future Ruins

Dangerbird Records

Swervedriver have been making edgy sound waves for decades,

but until just a few years ago had almost disappeared completely.

When they released I Wasn’t Born To Lose You (2015), things

started picking up and their legendary, mythical proportions

started returning to people’s minds as the band started touring

again. Now they have another, Future-Ruins, which, as the dystopian

title suggests, leads the listener on a journey into a place and time

of disjuncture and dark fates. Though in the first song, “Mary

Winter,” Adam Franklin sings, “I’m never comin’ back,” it seems they

have. They have traded some of their heaviness for more modern,

spectacular architectures of instrumentals. They continue to amaze

with their usual complex arpeggios, bended notes and shimmering

guitar strains. Swervedriver have always talked or sung about

“space-travel” and in this song, he sings, “My feet won’t touch the

ground.” In “The Lonely Crowd Fades In The Air,” Franklin sings, “so

we stumble into the end of days/where the future comes to cry/so

choose your colors wisely/’cause things ain’t the same as in times

gone by.”

Their undulating and circular vocal and instrumental lines are

reminiscent of a surrealist’s film mis-en-scene. They do continue to

sing about rocket fuel and an engine, which follows the propulsive

force of their earlier efforts, like Raise and Medical Head. Their

music has mellowed from the force of its sound in the ’90s, so those

looking to take in the new sound should expect something with

more dreamy complexity, than razor-edged and honed wit and

darkness.

• Keir Nicoll

THE TWILIGHT SAD

It Won/t Be Like This All The Time

Rock Action Records

In 2016, the Cure’s Robert Smith named the Twilight Sad as one

of his favourite bands. He personally picked them to support the

Cure on all their recent world tour dates, and there’s no question as

to why. The Twilight Sad write some of the most compelling, dark

and depressing music out there. Their name describes their sound

perfectly.

It Won/t Be Like This All The Time is the Twilight Sad’s fifth

studio album and their first release with Mogwai’s Rock Action

Records. It’s without a doubt their strongest and most cohesive

project to date.

One of the standout tracks, “The Arbor,” is a particularly

haunting post-punk offering that features wailing, ghostly synths

that sound like the chatter of spirits in a cemetery. On this album

the band also delivers their signature wall of sound on tracks like

“Auge Maschine.” It opens with a swirling, intoxicating layer of hazy

glide guitar that fluctuates in and out of pitch. By blending together

the strong suits of all their previous work, the Twilight Sad come

through with an absolutely fantastic record that offers something

familiar yet very refreshing.

• Robann Kerr

TORO Y MOI

Outer Peace

Carpark Records

Outer Peace is the eighth studio album from Toro Y Moi. ABRA,

WET and Instupendo, all friends of mastermind Chaz Bear, are

featured on the album. With every listen of Outer Peace comes a

deeper understanding of Bear’s message and stylistic vision.

On the surface, Outer Peace is a fun and quirky basement jam

session, while at a closer look Bear alludes to some deeper issues

including climate change, consumerism and debt. Funky bass lines

and sci-fi inspired samples create a disco-like feel for the album as

a whole.

Recorded in the Bay area, Bear considers it somewhat of a

homecoming album and has allowed himself a more playful

approach to song making than what we saw on his last album,

Boo Boo. Autotune is used extensively throughout the album and

at times you can hear the presence of xylophone. Outer Peace is

unpredictable, groovy and original.

• Sheena Antonios

SHARON VAN ETTEN

Remind Me Tomorrow

Jagjaguwar

Sharon Van Etten has been a busy human since the release of her

critically acclaimed 2014 release, Are We There. With the birth of

her first child, a move into acting as Rachel in the Netflix drama,

The OA, an appearance in David Lynch’s reboot of Twin Peaks and

scoring her first feature film, Strange Weather, it’s clear Van Etten’s

sonic palette has expanded into new territory. And by goodness,

it’s what makes Remind Me Tomorrow such a beautiful thing to

behold.

You’d be forgiven in thinking that as the piano chords chime in

on album opener, “I Told You Everything,” that you’re listening to

the direct follow-up to Are We There. In discography terms it is, but

the similarities are shattered when the electro beats of track two,

“No One’s Easy To Love,” kick in.

The atmospheric and drony sounds she employs throughout

the following eight tracks (fuelled by producer John Congleton)

are far ranging and, at times, down right eerie. But there is always

an upbeat feel to even the moodiest of tracks. “Memorial Day,”

“Comeback Kid” and “Seventeen” shine bright like no other Van

Etten tracks of days gone past. The whole record is absolutely

mesmerizing.

Van Etten is a truly remarkable artist. 2019 hasn’t even really got

going yet, but we clearly already have a contender for album of the

year.

• Adam Rogers

WARBLY JETS

Propaganda EP

Rebel Union Recordings

The dream of the ’90s is alive in Warbly Jets’ new EP, Propaganda.

With knob-turning, air horn squealing Brit rock swagger, this short

sampling of tunes is reminiscent of the Chemical Brothers and

Oasis, which makes sense seeing how the band spent a good chunk

of 2018 on the road, touring as the opening act for Liam Gallagher.

“No Allegiance” could waltz into the Snatch soundtrack without

a ticket, and you can’t help but get jazzed by the chorus of “Kill Kill

Kill” in “Cool Kill Machine.” Reminds one of the film Tank Girl and

the time when we still felt like we had time to reclaim our water and

avoid a dystopia. But now, as we strive to survive this tortured era,

these mean bangers will do just fine in calming the itch.

As Warbly Jets shake off the Dandy Warhols bop of their former

work in favour of some mean and sexy fare, we can all rest easy in

the choice to do the same in our shattered hearts.

• Jennie Orton

January 2019 39


LIVE

Photo by Zee Khan

Photo by Zee Khan

Photo by Zee Khan Photo by Zee Khan Photo by Zee Khan

BREAKOUT FEST W/ LIL UZI VERT, PLAYBOI

CARTI, KILLY, PRESSA, VALEE AND MORE

Pacific Coliseum

December 14, 2018

Three phenomenons in life are meant to be

experienced first hand: birth, death and Breakout

Festival. Breakout is Canada’s only bi-annual,

all hip-hop music festival (No EDM allowed!)

This winter, the festival was held at PNE’s Pacific

Coliseum and boasted Lil Uzi Vert as its headliner.

The stage was broken in by local Soundcloud

acts, including Yurmsauce, Rude Nala and AC,

though the butter-smooth delivery, dynamic stage

show and ardent crowd reception distinguished

Illyminiachi as the most promising Vancouver

artist in attendance.

Killumantii shook everyone out of their

Illyminiachi-induced daze with razor sharp bars

and here-to-fuck-shit-up attitude. G.O.O.D.

Music’s Valee graced the stage while enjoying

some of that legal. Last minute addition Pressa

was a last minute addition to the lineup, catching

a good chunk of the audience by surprise. The

Toronto rapper later came out to perform “420 in

London” alongside Uzi.

The moment Killy came on, the floodgates

were opened. Mosh pits started to bloom in the

crowd to the bone-rattling beat, commencing

survival of the fittest through natural selection.

He had the audience in the air with “Doomsday”

and “Distance,” and had everyone on the chorus of

“No Sad, No Bad”

On the subject of immediate danger, Carti’s set

was prefaced by a bright green nuclear warning.

The “Magnolia” rapper pounced onto the stage,

as masses swarmed to the floor of the coliseum,

and in pure Carti tradition, maintained that same

energy throughout the entire set.

Then Carti was gone, and music came to a halt.

Tension was reaching a crescendo, and the crowd

was becoming restless, as murmurs carried over

the pulsing lights.

“He’s not showing up.” “Wasn’t he banned from

Canada?” “Watch them send Killy on again.”

Skepticism was at an all time high, as everyone

seemed to debate “will he/won’t he”. Then all at

once, it stopped. Uzi was here. If it had not before,

all hell broke loose.

The moment he stepped on, the energy

exploded. The wait proved to be well worth it

with the thousands of voices on “Bad and Boujee”

and “XO Tour Llif3.”

Despite being the favourite punching bag

of any hip-hop purist, Lil Uzi Vert has peaked

in popularity, largely due to his nonconformist

approach to genre.

By breaking the pre-established framework

and repackaging rap, punk and emo to fit the

mainstream, Uzi single-handedly achieved mass

appeal and changed the rap game. This very

approach put the rapper at the vanguard of the

music world and made him the crowned prince

of the burgeoning punk rap movement, not

without raising a sea of eyebrows along the way.

Love it or hate it, Lil Uzi Vert’s innovative sound

and presence made him a celebrated lepper and a

quintessential artist of this generation. That much

was evident that night.

The vehemence of unattended youth is

manifested and contained within a 7-hour sensory

kaboom. Inhibition fades as communication

becomes purely kinetic everywhere you look.

Whether in bathrooms, where girls delicately

hold each other’s hair over toilet bowls; or in

pits, where bodies thrash till they bruise blue and

strangers kiss and grope with teeth flying above

their heads.

Anything can happen at Breakout.

• Maryam Azizli

40

January 2019


Photo by Darrole Palmer

KURT VILE

Commodore Ballroom

December 16, 2018

On tour with his latest album, Bottle it in, Vile

played to an overly eager sold out crowd at

the Commodore. Floating amongst Christmas

lights on the balcony, lurked a warmth parallel

to a family gathering during the holidays. The

set of Kurt Vile matched in intimacy, radiating

smiles and encouraging hand-holding from

spectators through a spectacular set.

Beginning with songs like “Loading Zones,”

off of his latest album, Vile graced the stage in

a red plaid flannel and matching red guitar. His

long, loose, curly brown hair fell as he swayed;

just about as flowy and breezy as his music.

Combing through the crowd, you would be

more than likely to spot fans replicating his

LIVE

look - something with an air of the 70’s- rock n’

roll and free love.

For long-time fans who’ve witnessed Vile

perform in his early days, it was clear there is

a new level of sonic maturity. It’s beyond clear

that the name, Kurt Vile, will be the “Johnny

Cash” of our time; only instead of all black like

Cash, it will be flannel, vintage-chic as an ode.

Vile performed with a calmness and

nonchalant demeanor, making the show feel

as though concert goers were privy to a high

caliber weekly jam session. This was not a

show put on for the sake of performance, but

a display of viles heart, and often, moments

of creative purity. While the weather outside

may have been cold and rainy, his performance

radiated the warmth of a coveted summer

campfire.

• Jamila Pomeroy

ELVIS COSTELLO AND THE IMPOSTERS

Queen Elizabeth Theatre

December 4, 2018

No malignant cancer scares or tickles of the throat

were going to prevent transplanted hometown hero,

Elvis Costello, from performing a marathon show this

past Tuesday evening at Downtown’s Queen Elizabeth

Theatre. Currently on tour in support of his latest,

highly acclaimed new album, Look Now, Costello and

his band of Imposters played a nearly three hour set

that maybe went on too long for some of the fatigued

and heavily perfumed baby boomers, but wowed diehards

and new fans of his dense catalogue.

New tracks like “Burnt Sugar is so Bitter,” and “Don’t

Look Now,” held their own alongside classic bangers

like “This Year’s Girl, and “Watching the Detectives,

offering a consistent set that tested the ferocity of

his voice, and also the buttons of his snug outfit.

Costello, never one to be immediately heralded for

his understated guitar chops, shred his signature

Jazzmaster erratically, walloping the audience with

grungy interludes throughout the evening. But Good

Guy Costello never overshadowed his insanely tight

band, specifically virtuoso keys smasher Steve Nieve

whose focused demeanour never broke, or missed a

single note.

On the surface of his tunes, Costello presents a

playful persona of pop oriented punk and reggae

fused hits, but beneath is a lingering misery that is

bubbling up as he ages. He even called out his O.G.

New Wave followers for never fully absorbing his

lyrical mysticism back in the day, but understanding it

more now with increasing wear and tear of their skin

and bones.

Going through Elvis Costello’s immense discography

can be a daunting task, but Tuesday night offered an

eclectic vignette of his past works, collaborations and

life experiences. He’s a genuinely funny and solid dude,

with a likely huge arsenal of Dad jokes…but it might

be time to let a few stitches out of those trousers.

• Jeevin Johal

Photo by Greg Noire

Photo by Tom Paille

CHILDISH GAMBINO

Rogers Arena

December 7, 2018

“This isn’t a concert, this an experience.” On

his recent tour as Childish Gambino, Donald

Glover stood shirtless in front of 12,000+ at

Rogers Arena and informed the crowd that

they are about to be taken to church. The

triple-threat performer would prove himself

throughout the night that he was serious

about his opening statement.

Gambino’s This is America tour had quite

the production with dancers, a live band and

stunning light shows, leaving his devoted

flock in awe all night. Whether it was sitting

in the crowd singing “Stand Tall” or rapping

during “IV. Sweatpants,” Glover had the

crowd wrapped around his finger throughout

the show. The former Community star would

even showcase his acting skills, urging the

audience to get louder for an encore during

a behind the scenes live video with his stage

manager once he stepped off stage.

It may have been Childish Gambino’s

last show in Vancouver, but after playing a

new song titled “Human Sacrifice,” all signs

point to him continuing his career as Donald

Glover, which should relieve many. The

master performer creatively engaged with

his congregation until the lights of Rogers

Arena went on. Even during the final song

of the night, “Redbone,” Glover was on the

floor right in front of anyone who was lucky

enough to get floor seats.

Gambino was not lying when he said

this was going to be an experience. He

managed to make you feel like you’d never

seen anything like this in your life. He truly

did take Vancouver to church and give us a

religious experience.

• Darrole Palmer

January 2019 41


NEW MOON RISING

YOUR MONTHLY HOROSCOPE

QUAN YIN DIVINATION

MONTH OF THE FIRE TIGER

This year starts with a healthy dose of

heat, bringing a busy and hectic start

to an otherwise relaxed and laid back

year. The Fire Tiger helps pave the way

for the arrival of the Earth Pig’s year,

as these two signs are best of friends.

And although they can work well

together, there is also a destructive

and sometimes drastic energy that can

brew beneath the surface, depending

on the context. This month will pull

on the sentimental heart strings of all

good Tigers and Pigs, and can bring

irrevocable changes with irreversible

consequences. January will need to

be handled with care, if you are in the

Tiger’s lair!

Rabbit (Pisces): Dreaming of spring

and planning for your next adventure

will give you the stamina to survive the

last few harsh weeks of winter. You may

feel more delicate and sentimental now,

so take refuge in quiet places with artful

companions.

Dragon (Aries): Outings with friends,

club nights, and expensive toys keep

you focused on the bright side of life,

while your active mind and keen talent

will be inspired to create. You’ve got

energy now to work hard, play hard,

and leave others basking in your glory.

Snake (Taurus): Appreciation works

both ways. In order to attract the

acclaim you deserve, you’ll need to offer

other people recognition for their skills

and talents too. Give praise where it is

due, and doors will open now, on a road

paved with gratitude.

Horse (Gemini): Find the courage to

stand up for what you believe is right.

There is more at stake than just the

small stuff – battles fought now can

save you from a pending war down the

road.

Sheep (Cancer): Think things through

carefully and evaluate any actions that

don’t fall in line with your good morals

and strong values. Meditation and quiet

introspection can provide the answers

you seek – go inward and listen to your

inner voice.

Monkey (Leo): Proceed with caution

and remember to take things one step

at a time. An over-zealous attitude or

strategic plan may backfire if the timing

isn’t right. Carefully plan your next steps

and be sure to anticipate how other’s

may react to it.

Rooster (Virgo): Your reputation soars

now and it’s a perfect time to make an

announcement, receive an award of

recognition, or reach out to your crowd

to let people know a bit more about

you.

Dog (Libra): Keep your eye on the

goal and make good use of your time,

but don’t over-do it. Less effort and

more planning can prevent burn out

and conserve your energy for when

it’s needed. Take it easy – some things

can definitely wait, so why not just

procrastinate?

Pig (Scorpio): Spontaneous rewards

arrive out of a care free and ‘laissezfaire’

attitude. There is wisdom in the

path of non-action. Keep your word, be

on time, and stay open to the possibility

of everything working out just fine.

Rat (Sagittarius): Step outside your

routine. Travel to a place you’ve never

been to restore your optimism and

curiosity. Make plans to go solo, and

refresh yourself by exploring creative

interests, and take in the best in

entertainment.

Ox (Capricorn): It is possible that you

don’t have the whole story and it might

look quite different when it comes to

light. Some secrets are best kept and it

might be better now if you don’t ask, or

just don’t tell. Stay present, quiet, and

keep your lips sealed.

Tiger (Aquarius): Superficial

connections may inspire your dreams

of a different life. Look before you leap,

as what you find now may only be skin

deep.

Susan Horning is a Feng Shui Consultant

and Bazi Astrologist living and working

in East Vancouver. Find out more about

her at QuanYin.ca.

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42

January 2019


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