NZPhotographer Issue 6, April 2018

nzphotographer

Whether you’re an enthusiastic weekend snapper or a beginner who wants to learn more about photography, New Zealand Photographer is the fun e-magazine for all Kiwi camera owners – and it’s free!

ISSUE 6, April 2018

OUR BIGGEST ISSUE YET

Over 100 pages of Photo Inspiration

SUMMER SHOT

COMPETITION WINNERS

INTERVIEW

WITH DOMINIC STOVE

LANDSCAPE

ADVENTURES

WITH BILLY NUNWEE

SMELLING PHOTO

OPPORTUNITIES IN ROTORUA

WITH BRENDON GILCHRIST

HOW TO CAPTURE: LAKES

WITH RICHARD YOUNG

April 2018 1


From the Editor

Join the conversation!

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nzp@excio.io

Get in touch!

Taya Iv, Editor

Dear reader,

Issue 6 is filled with motivating

and thought-provoking

content that will help you

reach new heights. Billy

Nunweek highlights his

favourite landscape images,

Dominic Stove talks about

his creative journey, Brendon

Gilchrist describes the beauty

of Rotorua, and much more. To

put it simply, we think this issue

is our most exciting one yet!

So many of you sent your

gorgeous photos to us this

month. Your hard work is proof

that the future of photography

is incredibly bright. Keep

inspiring us and submitting your

amazing work!

General Info:

NZPhotographer Issue 6

April 2018

Cover Photo

by Dominic Stove

Publisher:

Excio Group

Website:

www.excio.io/nzphotographer

Group Director:

Ana Lyubich ana@excio.io

Editor:

Taya Iv

Graphic Design:

Maksim Topyrkin

Editorial Assistant:

Emily Goodwin

Advertising Enquiries:

Phone us on 04 889 29 25 or send

us an enquiry hello@excio.io

© 2018 NZPhotographer Magazine

All rights reserved. Reproduction

of any material appearing in this

magazine in any form is forbidden

without prior consent of the

publisher.

About NZPhotographer

Whether you’re an enthusiastic

weekend snapper or a beginner

who wants to learn more, NZ

Photographer is the fun e-magazine

for all Kiwi camera owners – and it’s

free!

2 NZPhotographer

Disclaimer: Opinions of contributing authors do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the magazine.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

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6

7

10

16

18

25

BEHIND THE SHOT WITH EMRE SIMTAY

HOW TO CAPTURE: LAKES WITH RICHARD YOUNG

Richard Young

A VISIT TO ROTORUA

Brendon Gilchrist

INTERVIEW WITH DOMINIC STOVE OF LUCKYSHOTZ PHOTOGRAPHY

BACK TO BASICS PART 4 TAKING MANUAL CONTROL OF YOUR CAMERA

LANDSCAPE ADVENTURES WITH BILLY NUNWEEK

SUMMER SHOT COMPETITION WINNERS

CONTRIBUTORS

RAY HARNESS

RICHARD YOUNG

EMILY GOODWIN

BRENDON GILCHRIST

Ray is an amateur

photographer who has

dabbled in photography

for 45 years. He has a lot

of pre-digital knowledge

under his belt and enjoys

capturing landscape

scenes and animals.

Richard is an awardwinning

landscape and

wildlife photographer

who teaches

photography workshops

and runs photography

tours. He is the founder

of New Zealand

Photography Workshops.

Emily fell into photography

a little over 10 years ago.

She is passionate about

documenting her travels

and loves to spend time

in nature capturing the

details as well as the wider

views.

Brendon is the man behind

ESB Photography. He treks

from sea to mountain, and

back again, capturing

the uniqueness of New

Zealand’s unforgiving

landscape.


Behind The Shot

with Emre Simtay

EMRE, CAN YOU TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT

YOURSELF AND YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY

BACKGROUND?

I was born in Germany, but returned to my parents’

native Turkey in my late childhood and studied

there. In 2005, I came to New Zealand to study

Computer Science. While studying here in Wellington

I met my wife, got married and settled down. I

developed an interest in photography with my wife’s

encouragement about six years ago. I taught myself

all about taking photos and since then I have been

constantly photographing and documenting what’s

happening around me. Becoming a photographer

has changed my life, I started seeing things with a

different perspective, observing people and our

surroundings.

WHAT CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT THIS

PARTICULAR PHOTO?

I was wandering around with my camera on

Courtenay Place when this gentleman took my

attention. My camera setting was on manual so while

I am approaching him I set my shutter speed to 1/250

so I wouldn’t get blurry shots, cranked up my ISO, set

my aperture to the widest f 1.4 and changed focus

mode to continuous.

I was going to do a sneaky shot but then I decided to

make it obvious to the gentleman. I made my camera

visible and interacted with my subject with a smile. He

smiled and covered his face with an interesting hand

movement - I love this photo.

IF YOU COULD GO BACK AND RE-SHOOT

THIS MOMENT, WHAT WOULD YOU DO

DIFFERENTLY?

I was thinking that if I used my flash I would have

gotten better light but then my subject’s face would

be visible. I really like how you cannot see anything in

the hoodie with only his hand visible. I would probably

go ask for a portrait after taking this shot.

WHAT EDITING WAS DONE?

I shoot in RAW format so I converted this photo in

black and white using Adobe Lightroom. Through

editing, I increased the contrast by 30%, reduced the

black by 30%, increased the highlights by 35% and

increased the clarity by 20%.

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WHAT EQUIPMENT DO YOU USE?

My main camera is a Sony A7ii with a Zeiss 35mm

f 2.8 prime lens though sometimes I use my Canon

FD 55mm f 1.2 lens. My other favourite carry around

camera is a Panasonic GX7 with 200-600mm

equivalent zoom lens which I use for telephoto

photography only. I also have a Canon 70D with

10-18mm + Sigma 30mm f 1.4 art lens. Additionally,

I have two more mirrorless cameras, two SLRs, a TLR

and some more lenses to go with them. My favourite

film camera is my 6x6 medium format Yashica 635

combined with 120mm Kodak tri-x 400.

DO YOU ALWAYS CARRY YOUR CAMERA WITH YOU?

I started carrying my camera with me when I first

bought my DSLR. After spending so much money on a

camera I thought I shouldn’t let it sit and gather dust


so I decided to carry it with me everywhere I go. Now,

when I go out without my camera I don’t feel whole!

WHY CANDID PHOTOGRAPHY? AND WHY B&W

OVER COLOUR?

I like candid photography because everything looks

natural. It’s not staged so it looks more dramatic...

what we see is more real with true feelings and

actions. I prefer black and white over colour most of

the time as I find colours distracting and things look

simple and more interesting and moody when it’s a

black and white photo.

HAS SHOOTING ON THE STREET EVER CAUSED

PROBLEMS FOR YOU?

I haven’t had many problems, mostly because I

observe people and I can tell if they are going to be

annoyed so I keep away from them but sometimes if

it’s worth it, I just shoot without much thinking and try

to be ready for any consequences. Once, I was told

off at the Wellington railway station by a staff member

because I might be disturbing the passengers by

taking their photos.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.flickr.com/photos/emre_simtay

www.instagram.com/wellington.nz

April 2018

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HOW TO CAPTURE: LAKES

Lake Photography Tips by Richard Young

Lake Matheson, West Coast

THINK ABOUT YOUR HEIGHT:

When photographing an expanse of water, height

can make a big difference in your photograph.

Getting down lower can often change reflections

and allow you to capture foreground, close on the

shore. A higher view will often let you include more

water and less foreground.

FIND A VIEW:

Most lakes are only as pretty as what surrounds them,

otherwise they are just an open expanse of water.

Find a view across the lake, this could be some distant

peaks, amazing forest or an impressive sky at sunset.

If the opposite lake shore/background is a long way

away, you may need to use a zoom lens to bring it

closer and make it a stronger focal point.

FRAME WITH SOME FOREGROUND:

Finding some foreground in your lake photograph will

help to add some depth in an image. The foreground

could be quite subtle e.g some bankside vegetation

or it can be used as a stronger element and the main

focal point of the image; like a classic jetty shot.

LOOK FOR REFLECTION:

F11, 1/125s, ISO 100, 24mm

Reflections in lakes can make striking photographs

even on bright sunny days, capturing the perfect

mirror image. If you head out on a windy day, don’t

expect any lake reflections as the water will be

rippled by the wind. Often, calm mornings are best

for reflections as there is little breeze until the sun has

risen.

CAPTURE LAKE MATHESON ON A 7-DAY WEST COAST TOUR: 19TH - 25TH SEPTEMBER 2018 WITH

NEW ZEALAND PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOPS

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A VISIT TO ROTORUA

by Brendon Gilchrist

F/13, 1/100s, ISO 64, 24mm

What is that smell you ask? That is the smell of opportunities!

Rotorua is a town nestled in the Bay of Plenty

region known for its volcanic activity (of the

good sort) which has beautiful rich colors

that only volcanic activity creates. Rotorua

might just seem like a small town that is a

bit smelly (due to the sulphur-rick air) but if you drive

beyond the town perimeter you will discover how lush

this region is and how photogenic this place can be.

There are 11 lakes in the region all of varying sizes and

each rich in history. Lake Tarawera is one of those

places, a short scenic 22 minute drive from Rotorua to

the lake edges, where there are many jetty’s. It might

be hard to choose which one to photograph, but I

have no doubt that when you do you can create

something special with it.

If you are into Astro Photography, this lake has some of

the best dark skies in the region with Mount Tarawera

being prominent on the other side of the lake - The

milkyway rises above it if you visit early in the season.

On the other side of this lake there is a natural hot

pool which I first learned about many years ago when

I was completing my Diploma in Adventure and

Eco Tourism – That day we were learning about sea

kayaking and after paddling over this lake, having

lunch, then soaking in the hot pool it was very hard to

climb back into the kayak and paddle back to where

the van was. The experience of this was worth it as

you’re in nature from the moment your feet hit the

sand on the beach to when you get back to where

you started.

Also highly recommended is a visit to the Wai-O-

Tapu Thermal Wonderland which includes the famous

Champagne pool. This hot spring was formed 900

years ago by a hydrothermal eruption. Its crater is

around 65 meters in diameter with a maximum depth

of 62 meters, the water is around 260 degrees celsius.

This lake has beautiful colours around its edge, formed

from orpiment and stibnite deposits. Other features of

this magical place are the Lady Knox Geyser which

erupts daily at 10:15am so be sure to arrive early so

you can get a seat and listen to the very informative

guide.

Blue Springs - Te Waihou Walkway is one of New

Zealand’s most purist water sources and supplies 60%

of NZ bottled water. The walkway takes you along the

Waihou River, through wetlands, and besides pastoral

land. Once you emerge you will be left speechless!

I recommenced a Circular Polarizing Filter for this

location, this removes glare off the top of the water

allowing you to see through the water, while also

making some of the colors more vivid. This is a short

walk but it is best to take your time, take a picnic,

enjoy this place for all it is, and photograph it in a way

you see it.

To sum up Rotorua, it is a place of diversity offering

adventure, mountain biking, nature walks, water sports

and amazing and unique photographic opportunists...

I wish I had spent more time there. Till next time

Rotorua, you are a beautiful area indeed.

April 2018

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F/3.5, 20s, ISO 10000, 24mm


F/11, 1/80s, ISO 320, 24mm

April 2018

9


Interview with Dominic Stove of

LuckyShotz Photography

DOMINIC, CAN YOU TELL OUR READERS A BIT

ABOUT YOURSELF?

I’m probably best described as a keen amateur

photographer. I work a regular job as an IT Manager in

Kaiapoi just north of Christchurch, and live on a lifestyle

block in Oxford, North Canterbury with a menagerie

of horses, dogs, chickens etc.. All this keeps me fairly

busy, so I don’t get a lot of time to pursue my hobby!

I’m married to a professional photographer (Rhonda

Stove), so this helps a lot. It’s good to have someone

who understands that I really do need to spend all

that money on yet another lens! It’s also great to have

someone to go on road trips with whenever the mood

arises, to help set up shots and to offer critique and

encouragement.

WHAT’S YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY BACKGROUND?

My first camera was an Agfa Agfamatic 126 camera

that I got for Christmas when I was about 8. I imagine

everyone who was a youngster in those days

remembers going through a few films and then having

to save up the pocket money to get them developed!

Photographs were certainly more valued back then and

people took more care to get them right because they

were so expensive to produce! I grew up in Arthurs Pass,

so I had plenty of natural beauty around to inspire me,

and I’m sure I took a lot more photographs than ever

ended up being developed.

Later, at boarding school, I joined the photography club

and was able to use their darkroom. I also invested in

my first ‘real’ camera, a Russian Lubitel 2 twin lens reflex

camera. Before too long I was rolling my own film, taking

more photographs and developing the results. I wasn’t

overly successful with the film developing, but there is

nothing like watching a blank piece of paper suddenly

come alive with one of your images.

After leaving school I often borrowed my Father’s’

Praktica SLR but I then moved up to Auckland for work

and it wasn’t until about 15 years later that I got around

to getting another decent camera. It was at this time

that my wife also became interested in photography

again and started a course at AUT. We each invested

in a camera - Hers a Pentax K1000 and mine a Pentax

ME. Back then the focus was predominantly around the

young family growing up, and general holiday snaps,

but the interest continued through the end of the film

era, with various Pentax cameras until we purchased an

early Fujifilm digital camera and then a Pentax K100d.

Suddenly the cost of getting films developed was no

longer a barrier, and we could take pictures whenever

we felt like it!

10 NZPhotographer

With the children getting older, my wife decided to take

her photography hobby further and enrolled in more

courses. I helped her with some of them and also started

to spend more time taking photographs of things that

interested me, rather than just cataloguing life events for

distant grandparents that only see their grandchildren

once or twice a year!

I soon developed a preference for landscape

photography and the Pentax was replaced with a Nikon

D50. We were now able to take off for the weekend

whenever we felt like it, and with family back in Arthurs

Pass and Lake Ohau, we had easy access to some

of the countries most beautiful scenery which we

took full advantage of. We both joined the Rangiora

Photographic Society and I found that the enthusiasm

of the club members gave me a huge boost as well.

The encouragement to enter competitions and the

feedback given by the judges has been invaluable in

improving the quality of my photography.

WHAT EQUIPMENT DO YOU USE TODAY?

I have a Nikon D200 that I take with me most places

- It’s in the laptop bag I take to work, or it’s in the car

when I go out. It’s not the newest of cameras, and it’s

only about 12mp, but everything is easy to find on it

and it feels nice and solid - It’s the sort of camera you

can’t break! It’s great to be able to take it out and

grab a picture of that sunrise that’s just poking through

the trees and sending fingers of light through the mist

that you’ve just spotted on the way to work. The lens


April 2018

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on it at the moment is a Tamron 18-200. I use this lens

because it’s light and it covers all the bases for this sort of

unexpected photography.

I have a Nikon D7200 that I usually use this for planned

shoots. I love the D7200 because it has built in wifi, so I

can set up shots with my phone or iPad if I have to put

the camera in a position that makes the angle difficult,

or if its cold and I want to sit in the warm car!! A Tokina

12-24mm lens generally stays on the D7200 all the time

but I also have a Tamron 28-75mm lens and a 50mm lens

for when I want a closer shot.

Other equipment includes ND filters for each lens and

a circular polariser filter, a nice light Beike magnesium

alloy tripod, and a Peak Design Capture Pro camera

clip. I have my ‘fauxpro’ - a $50 GoPro clone that I often

set up to capture time-lapse videos of sunrises etc.

and I carry a Yongnuo speedlite flash around with me

plus remote for it, but I never use it! I also have access

to my wife’s studio and various lighting equipment like

softboxes, reflectors, studio backdrops and props.

However, my most portable camera is a Huawei P10+

cellphone with a Leica 27mm 1:1.8 lens and 22mp

sensor. It has a fully manual mode and even takes raw

images!

WHAT INSPIRES YOU?

My inspiration comes from online forums and galleries

such as the Facebook New Zealand Landscapes group,

Gurushots, etc. People that have been a big influence

on me are Craig Potton, Andris Apse, and the wedding/

couples photographer Zhou Ya, who puts people in

the most stunning landscapes. There are some great

photographers at RPS as well.

WHERE’S YOUR ULTIMATE FAVOURITE PLACE TO

SHOOT?

There are too many! Anywhere in high country. I love

capturing water in my images, whether its waves, rain,

waterfalls, lakes, rivers or heavy stormy clouds. I like to

go places I haven’t been before, get some images and

then go back and try for better ones. I like places that

nobody has been to, but they’re getting harder to find!

WHAT TIPS CAN YOU GIVE OUR READERS FOR

CAPTURING LANDSCAPE SCENES?

Pick your light, usually dawn or dusk, although good

cloud can offer a different dimension to a landscape. If

you’re driving a distance to somewhere, you often don’t

have much choice and have to take the photos as you

go, so take an ND filter to bring out some of the depth in

the clouds. Direct noon-day sun is very rarely any good

even with an ND filter unless you can filter it through a

tree or hide part of it behind a hill or something! Shadows

add depth to images - Without them, images can look

flat so use the sun to your advantage if you can.

Make sure you keep your horizons straight and your

tripod level - Many cameras have a level in them that

you can turn on if you’re in an area where it’s difficult to

see the horizon and some tripods have a spirit level builtin.

If your tripod is level, when you pan around to take in

a large area, it’s much easier to stitch the images later if

you want to!

WHAT DOES YOUR POST-PROCESSING ROUTINE

LOOK LIKE?

Normally I bring all the images into Adobe Lightroom.

First I correct the colour profile, white balance, and

take down the highlights making sure to balance out

anywhere the whites have blown out and bring up the

shadows if the detail is lost.

If I’m stitching images this is where I copy my settings

and paste them to the rest of the images. Then I will go

through and correct any spots I can see. This generally

takes me about 2 minutes.

If the image needs more work, I will bring it into

Photoshop and use layers to bring up highlights, add

shadows and enhance colours etc. Sometimes I

will use Nik filters to bring contrast into the image,

especially if it was taken with flat light, or if I want to

turn it black and white.


CAN YOU PICK 1 FAVOURITE PHOTO YOU

HAVE TAKEN?

My favourite image is probably my photograph of the

tree in the Nevis Valley. We had planned a trip down

to the Catlins, back through Wanaka and across to

Haast, the glaciers and back home. I decided to plan

a few places that I wanted to go. One of these places

was a tree I had seen a photograph of. I knew it was

by a pond in the Nevis Valley so I searched Google

maps satellite images until I found the most likely

place, and put it on my list.

When we got to the Catlins, it was pouring with rain,

so we only managed a couple of muddy shots of

waterfalls. On the way to Wanaka I was going to go

to Glenorchy however, the road had been washed

out from all the rain and was closed! The weather

was clearing though, so we headed to Bannockburn

and drove through the Nevis until we found the tree,

exactly where Google showed it!

On the way back through Haast the next day,

the weather again packed in and we missed the

opportunity to get to the glaciers, got a very cloudy

picture of Lake Matheson, and then it rained all the

way home.

So the only good image I ended up with was the one

I had planned so meticulously! It was worth the effort,

as it has won several awards and is one of the few of

my own images I have hanging on my wall!

WHAT’S YOUR PROUDEST PHOTOGRAPHY

MOMENT?

I’ve had a few over the last year actually. I’ve had

an image accepted for the Canon PSNZ National

exhibition in Dunedin, I’ve had an image published

in a book called ‘Big Nature’, as well as in NZ

Photographer, but I think my proudest moment

was selling 2 images at the Rangiora Photographic

Society annual exhibition. It’s a great feeling to have

a judge say that my work is worthy of being shown to

everyone, but it doesn’t beat the feeling of having

someone appreciate your image so much that they

want to put it on their wall and look at it every day!

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MOST CHALLENGING

SHOOT?

Without a doubt, my most challenging shoot was a

family wedding! It was down in Otago in January so

we expected searing hot days and cloudless blue

skies. The event was meticulously planned and was

to be held in a marquee on the family property. The

bride’s father had built a small pond with a wooden

jetty specifically for the event, and we went down a

few weeks before to plan out the shots.

The property has incredible views and the pond,

a rugged outcrop, and the lavender garden were

chosen as feature spots. The day of the wedding

came, and about 10 minutes before the bride was

due to arrive, the sky clouded over, the heavens

opened, and a full-on southerly storm came up the

valley, complete with gale-force winds!

The wedding went on regardless, in the windbattered

marquee instead of the tranquil pond,

and we managed to get some great shots, but the

preparation we had done went completely out the

door. On the plus side, the storm did pass, and we got

some of the shots we wanted, as well as the bride and

groom under a full rainbow that we hadn’t expected!

The lesson? Never rely on the weather, and always

have a plan B prepared! There are some things that

you just can’t go back and do next week!

WHAT DO YOU KNOW NOW THAT YOU WISH

YOU KNEW WHEN YOU STARTED?

I wish I’d saved my images as RAW! I always looked

and thought that I could save twice as many images

on a card if I just saved as Jpeg format, but I don’t

think I’ve ever run out of space on a card, and as

images get larger, so do SD cards!

You may not have the skills for post-processing now

but you will gain as you practice more and as the

tools themselves develop. I look back at some of my

older images and regret that I can’t go back and edit

them properly. It’s like not saving the negatives!

Also, just because your camera takes 10 shots/

second, doesn’t mean you should. All you end up

doing is filling your card up with duplicates and you

usually miss the shot that really counts while your

buffer unloads. Wait for the real shot, then take it.

WHAT ELSE CAN YOU SHARE?

Find a friend who enjoys going on road trips with you.

If you can’t, join a photographic club or society. Most

of them let you go to a couple of meetings without

needing to join up, and if you don’t like the vibe, try

another one in the area. Clubs give you challenges

that spark your creativity, competitions that give you

something to aspire to, and companionship on field

trips, events, etc. Don’t be put off because you don’t

feel you’re good enough, or don’t have the right gear

- clubs will cater for all levels and all ages.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.luckyshotz.com

www.gurushots.com/luckyshotz/photos

www.facebook.com/Luckyshotznz

www.instagram.com/luckysh0tz

April 2018

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BACK TO BASICS PART 4

TAKING MANUAL CONTROL OF YOUR CAMERA

by Ray Harness

Whenever you find yourself in a situation where

your camera is not functioning as you had

hoped (we’ve all been there when the whirr

of the autofocus just doesn’t give us that satisfactory

beep no matter how many times we try!) switch to

manual focusing and manual metering and you’ll be

able to capture the shot you had in mind.

There are two parts for taking manual control of your

camera, the first is manual focus. You can switch from

autofocus to manual focus using the switch on the

camera body, or on the lens itself. Many lenses allow

manual focus without the need to switch but check

your particular model to be sure. It takes practice to

get a sharp image when manually focusing but the

focusing aids in the viewfinder will show you when you

are in focus, and an “in focus” light will come on in the

viewfinder. Alternatively, especially if your eyesight isn’t

so good when using the viewfinder, you can use the

back screen to zoom in before taking the shot.

The second part is manual metering, being able to

set the aperture plus the shutter speed as opposed to

just one or the other as discussed in previous articles.

This is usually done by selecting M on the mode dial,

then using the dials on the camera body to select the

aperture and shutter speed you require. Check your

manual for precise instructions if you’re unsure since

each camera model varies.

WHEN WOULD YOU NEED TO USE MANUAL

CONTROL?

Macro & Close Up Shots. When shooting with a

dedicated macro lens, or lens extensions, it is best done

using manual focusing. In this situation, the metering

system is fine left on aperture priority (or whatever

metering setting you chose), but the focusing needs to

be precise as you will be working at very short distances

which the autofocus system may not be able to cope

with.

Night Time Shots. Night time shots are difficult to

assess for exposure, and auto exposure can fall short,

especially in very low light conditions. In this case, you

would need to use full manual control and a tripod. A

remote shutter release is a bonus as it lets you control

the amount of time the shutter stays open as opposed

to the camera deciding for you. Digital cameras only

extend auto shutter response to 30 seconds - This may

be fine for illuminated towns and cities, but poorer

lighting requires longer exposure to collect fine detail.

Tricky Lighting Situations. In lighting situations where

there is massive contrast, or conversely colours are

16 NZPhotographer


muted and very similar to each other, both the

autofocus and metering can easily be fooled into not

performing correctly. So first switch to manual focus, and

ensure the focus is correct for your subject, then check

the metering. Take a couple of test shots and if the

pictures are too light or too dark, bracket up or down

with either the aperture or shutter speed depending on

which is more critical to your picture. If the shot is too

light, use a narrower aperture and vice-versa if too dark.

Alternatively, if too light use the next speed up, or again

vice-versa if too dark.

Artistic Photography. Complete artistic control is

achieved with full manual control. You make all

the decisions regarding focusing and metering, to

purposefully overexpose or underexpose your pictures,

to blur backgrounds, purposefully create grain and

more. Only your imagination and creative thinking will

put any limit on what you can achieve. Look back to the

interview in issue 5 with Eva Polak to inspire you!

ALTERING OTHER SETTINGS.

ISO

One of the three components of the exposure triangle

(the other two being aperture and shutter speed),

changing the ISO increases the flexibility of the camera

by giving more scope in different lighting situations. Most

cameras start at ISO 100, this being the least sensitive

setting for the measurement of available light. It refers

back to the measurement of light sensitivity in film, and

this has been carried over to digital photography in the

same way. ISO 100 is good for most general daytime

photography, but in lower light, you can increase your

options by changing up to 200 or 400, bearing in mind

your camera’s limitations regarding acceptable noise.

The benefit of increasing ISO is that it allows narrower

aperture settings e.g. f2 at ISO 100 becomes f2.8 at

200, or faster shutter speeds, 1/60th of a second at 100,

becomes 1/125th at 200, 1/250th at 400.

White Balance

This is a tool that corrects the colour temperature of

a picture depending on the type of lighting you are

shooting under. We need white balance to produce

natural looking light whatever the source. Fluorescent

lighting is quite harsh and gives off a cold blue cast if not

corrected. A regular household bulb which is generally

incandescent will give a warm reddish / orange to the

picture, neither of these will look correct so have to be

adjusted. The following presumes you are shotting in

jpg, if shooting in RAW then you can adjust your white

balance easily in post.

The auto white balance function is adequate in most

cases, but there are times when you may want to alter

it using a pre-set white balance from your camera’s

menu, or go one step further and create your own

white balance settings. For example, bars and clubs

often have a mix of artificial lighting which can make

capturing the scene as you see it in front of you quite

difficult. You might try a shot using the pre-set fluorescent

and incandescent settings which give you the result you

were hoping for. Experiment with the pre-set options to

see the difference they can make to your photograph.

April 2018

17


LANDSCAPE ADVENTURES

with Billy Nunweek

I’m Billy, a 24 year old Landscape Photographer

from Auckland based out of Christchurch. During the

week I spend my time working as an aircraft engineer

with our national carrier, Air New Zealand and on

my days off I spend my days exploring our glorious

country in a mission to find all things beautiful. I find

myself frequently on the road making new friends and

travelling across the country with my camera in hand,

I often find I spend more time away from home than I

do at home but I wouldn’t have it any other way.

For me, there is nothing better than being on the

road with no real agenda apart from soaking in the

beauty that New Zealand and Mother Nature has to

offer. I am particularly passionate about mountains,

golden light, and distant stars but if there is one thing

that really takes the cake, for me it is the ever elusive

Aurora.

Allow me to take you on some of my journeys,

showcasing some of my favourite images...

18 NZPhotographer


the composition I wanted, I knew how I was going to

photograph it, it was all a matter of getting there and

having the sky play ball.

These little micro adventures are actually my favourite,

particularly for sunrise, it’s literally the best way to start

the day; watching the stars fade, the horizon glow

and the clouds light up. The stuff dreams are made of.

The three of us were rewarded for our early start and

braving the cool spring morning. With a gap on the

horizon and some cloud almost directly overhead we

were treated to what I would consider as one of my

top 5 sunrises since I got into photography.

This shot is composed of 16 photographs, 8 different

vertical frames with two exposures to correctly expose

the foreground and sky. This image was taken using

the Canon 750D paired with the Canon EF-S 10-22mm

f/ 3.5-4.5, mounted on the Manfrotto 055 tripod and

edited in Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop.

I love this image so much partly due to the preplanning

but more so for the technicality of the shot,

most images I take are a single exposure image and

this was a first for me. I love pushing myself to see what

I’m capable of, its all about growing.

F/11, 1/6s (sky), 1.3s (foreground), ISO 100, 10mm

CATHEDRAL CLIFFS – 11 AUGUST 2017

On this trip, my second visit to Cathedral Cliffs, I

took two friends, Temuera and Emily with me whom

I met through photography. The cliffs are quite a

unique spot and very different to what I normally

photograph but that’s all apart of the fun in my mind.

I was determined to nail it this time - On my first trip

I was without my tripod due to some unforeseen

accidents on an earlier trip to Hakatere Park - I had

WANAKA – 9 OCTOBER 2017

My trip to Wanaka was another great trip for

building friendships with other photographers, I

left Christchurch with Mark for what would be a

three day trip to one of my favourite places in New

Zealand. Exhausted after days of doing nothing but

drive, Mark and I opted for the lazy option, to shoot

the instafamous Wanaka Tree. I’d photographed it

before and didn’t particularly like my shot as it looked

the same as every other photo taken there. It is very

rare that you get an opportunity to take an image

that sets you apart when you’re at a location like

the Wanaka Tree but I had an idea that, if executed

correctly, could be a one off. I for one haven’t seen

an image before or after like it and I think that comes

down to luck really.

I decided I would attempt a single exposure image

that correctly exposed the Tree and contained star

trails, I’d literally never attempted it before, I’d never

even set my camera to the bulb function before so

after a few test shots to ensure I was happy with my

composition I selected my settings and clicked the

shutter. It was a nervous wait, probably the longest

15 minutes of my life as I had to watch Mark rattle off

some truly stunning shots including the tail of the milky

way. I could see low cloud rolling in and had to battle

with tourists and their head torches, fortunately, there

was one Chinese man who understood what I was

attempting and literally stood guard while I waited.

900 seconds later, the shutter closed, the busy

message could be seen on the back of my camera

April 2018

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20 NZPhotographer

F/4, 900s, ISO 800, 35mm


and then boom, there it was, as close to perfect as

I could ask for. When it came to editing I removed a

few highlights, cropped the image slightly and dialled

the exposure down a minimal amount otherwise the

image you see here is quite literally what came out of

the camera.

This single exposure image was taken on a Canon

6Dmki paired with the Canon EF 16-35mm f/ 2.8

mounted on the Manfrotto 055. Edited in Adobe

Lightroom.

HUNUA FALLS – 1 MARCH 2018

Aerial photography has always been something I’ve

admired, be it from a helicopter or using a drone

I’ve fallen in love with the ability to revisit some of

my favourite places in New Zealand and capture a

completely different perspective of the landscape.

Hunua is a place very dear to my heart, I’ve spent

quite a bit of time here whilst growing up and respect

the land more than I can put into words. Recently

there has been a push to raise awareness of Kauri

Dieback and close some of Auckland’s greatest

trails in an attempt to save what little we have left so

it will remain for future generations. I saw this as an

opportunity to capture one of my favourite places

for potentially the last time in a long time. I wanted

something special, something different to really grasp

people in a way that had never been done before.

I was already happy with the composition in my mind,

all I needed was a ND64 filter to allow for the long

exposure effect I was after, something rarely done

with a drone. In order to do this I needed perfect

weather and yet weekend after weekend I’d fly up

to Auckland only to have it rain in what has probably

been the worst summer I’ve experienced in New

Zealand. Finally, the first day of spring came and with

it clear skies! I jumped in my car and raced east as

the wind was expected to pick up in the afternoon,

unfortunately for me it clouded over in next to no

time and rain fell from the heavens trying to get me to

turn around but I wasn’t having it, I’d committed now

and there was no turning back. To my dismay it was

raining at the Hunua Falls which literally dampened

my spirits, I decided to rattle out a few shots on my

camera since I’d made the effort to come so far and

then miraculously I got 15 minutes of dry skies, sent my

drone up in the air and got the shot I’d spent literally

months dreaming of.

This single image was taken using a DJI Mavic Pro

paired with Polar Pro’s ND64+PL filter and edited in

Adobe Lightroom.

I have to say all the struggles to get what should have

been an easy shot made the idea of finally capturing

it that much more satisfying.

F/2.2, 1/10s, ISO 100

April 2018

21


LAKE BENMORE - 10 FEBRUARY 2018

Location scouting has always and will always be a

pivotal part of being a landscape photographer

for anyone looking to set themselves apart from

the rest, particularly with drone photography. This

photograph is a testament to that, I can quite

honestly say that I’d never been to this spot until

the day I took this photograph but I went there

knowing exactly what images I would walk away

with, so long as the weather and other acts of

mother nature played ball.

This little collection of streams are apart of a

river of yesteryear that used to take water from

the likes of Lake Pukaki and Lake Ohau down to

Waimate and to the Pacific Ocean. Now however

due to hydroelectric dams completely changing

the landscape rivers like this one are only ever

active to prevent overflows. This provides unique

colours as the new waters pick up old sediment

providing a view unlike any other. Fate was

definitely on my side this day!

This is a bracket image made up of three different

exposures to ensure I was able to capture all the

colours and tones, it was taken on the DJI Mavic

Pro paired with Polar Pro’s ND16+PL filter and

edited in Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop.

I do hope you’ve enjoyed reading

about myself and some of my

favourite photographic memories.

Coming up in 2018 I’ve got trips

around New Zealand planned to

iconic places like Aoraki/Mt Cook

National Park and Fiordland National

Park. What’s even more exciting

is that I’m heading to Iceland in

September to explore one of the

most beautiful places in the Northern

Hemisphere.

If you’d like to follow more of my

adventures feel free to follow me

on social media, or for those who’d

like to join me on the road and learn

more about photography feel free

to contact me via email -

billy.nunweek@gmail.com

www.instagram.com/billynunweek

www.facebook.com/btwnphotography

22 NZPhotographer


April 2018

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24 NZPhotographer


SUMMER SHOT

COMPETITION WINNERS

Our team enjoyed looking through all of your wonderful submissions

for the Summer Shot competition, seeing your summer memories

from both home and abroad. We think you'll agree that the images

featured on the following pages truly reflect the super hot summer

that NZ experienced this year! A big congratulations to everyone who

entered but especially our 3 winners:

1ST PLACE ROY CHERNOHORSKY WITH HAMILTONS GAP

$100 printing voucher

2ND PLACE JOHN KELLY WITH ALL FALL DOWN

$50 printing voucher

3RD PLACE SARAH VARENNE WITH WHARARIKI BEACH

$50 printing voucher

Winners will be contacted via email on how to access their voucher

from Wellington Photographic Supplies

COMPETITION SPONSORED BY:

April 2018

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1ST PLACE

HAMILTONS GAP

F/16, 1/200s, ISO200

A beautiful day at the gap with extremely low water giving me plenty of reflection and the

ability to to cram the image into frame.

Roy Chernohorsky

26 NZPhotographer


April 2018

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ALL FALL DOWN

F/16, 1/50s, ISO200

Beach walking along the coast at Raumati South, I saw this shell stuck in the

sand and took the shot. It wasn't till I got home and processed the image that I

saw I had captured the sand and debris falling within the shell.

John Kelly

28 NZPhotographer


2ND PLACE

April 2018

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3RD PLACE

30 NZPhotographer


WHARARIKI BEACH

F/7.1, 1/125s

The wind blew strongly on the northwestern coast of the South Island in February when I took

this shot. The sand was swept away at the surface of the beach. I positioned myself so that the

numerous streaks of sands seemed to converge towards the distant cape.

Sarah Varenne

April 2018 31


LYALL BAY

Image taken from the playground at Lyall bay while supervising my daughter.

Fiona Fitchett

32 NZPhotographer


CAPE PALLISER SUNRISE

F/2.8, 1/60s, ISO200

I wanted to see Cape Palliser after seeing some family photos of a visit there.

I couldn't sleep after 6 weeks of night work, so I left Stokes Valley at 4:30 am

to go check it out. This photo was one of the resulting images.

Jonathan Hupman

April 2018

33


BLACK AND GOLD

F/7.1, 1/125s, ISO100

Taken during a late evening walk through the paddocks on Christmas Eve.

Rangitumau, Masterton

Laura Pascall

34 NZPhotographer


April 2018

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36 NZPhotographer


A SPIRAL OF CANDLELIGHT

I was camping at a music festival on The Forgotten World Highway for the New Year this summer.

We had cold weather with lots of rain and mist and then a tranquil clear evening arrived for

the New Year celebrations! The spiral of candlelight was made by placing tealight candles

individually in brown paper bags each weighed down with sand, arranged on the hillside

nearby. I was wondering how to get a good image as the light was VERY challenging but when

I saw the tent all lit up looking so surreal I had to get it! I used a fence for stability, high ISO and

slow shutter speed and got my shot. 5 minutes later the tent lights were gone!!

Mary Livingston

April 2018

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38 NZPhotographer


MAM XOI

F/4.8, 1/250s, ISO100

A farmer walking through the fields near Mam Xoi viewpoint. This is a popular

stop for visitors to the region of Cang Chai, Vietnam.

Aaron Herron

April 2018 39


40 NZPhotographer

THE FALL

F/3.5, 1/640s, ISO400

I road tripped around the North Island in NZ for the first time this summer.

Caught this beautiful waterfall on the way.

Adan Meser


SEAGULL IN FLIGHT

This photo was taken on Wellingtons South

Coast with a Samsung S8 on Auto setting.

Dani Sunko

April 2018 41


42 NZPhotographer


BUSY BEE

F/5.6, 1/1600s, ISO200

This bee was on one of the pots that I have on my deck.

Ali Pike

April 2018 43


44 NZPhotographer


ESCAPING SUMMER'S HEAT

Teenagers jumping off the Days Bay wharf to escape the summer heat.

Andrew Gibbs

April 2018 45


46 NZPhotographer


THE LOO

Foggy day in the woods on the Banks Track, Banks peninsula.

Baptiste Auguie

April 2018 47


48 NZPhotographer


BUSY SUMMER DAY

It takes a lot of energy on a hot summer day to visit and collect enough food. These

sunflowers provided a welcome landing pad.

Barb Lewis

April 2018 49


50 NZPhotographer


TOGETHER

F/5.6, 1/1600s, ISO200

Captured in Petone at sunset, this Panorama captures the beautiful orange hues in the distance above

Wellington City. Within the shot is a family playing on the beach.

Benjamin Long

April 2018

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52 NZPhotographer


TAI CHI TEACHER TRAINING WITH LIGHT SABRE ON MT EDEN

F/13, 4s, ISO2000

I wanted to photograph my friend Allister doing some Kung Fu training. I was looking for a way to record his

movements (Pref. with a nice backdrop). We decided to climb Mt Eden at night and use a light sabre on a

slow shutter speed to create this image of motion.

Cameron Young

April 2018 53


54 NZPhotographer


PREPARING TO GO KAYAKING

F/10, 1/320s, ISO200

A class being readied for an expedition in Kayaks.

Eric Pollock

April 2018

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56 NZPhotographer


LAST DAYS OF SUMMER

F/2, ISO200

Taken at Auckland's Viaduct harbour on a busy weekend - The perfect 'summer' day in March.

Gail Orgias

April 2018 57


58 NZPhotographer


SUNRISE ON BANKS PENINSULA

F/2, ISO200

Testing a new surfboard at Marsden Point Beach, a legal road, that you really need a 4wd to

access. The Jeep is the perfect vehicle! And it guarantees few other people on your beach.

Goldie Walker

April 2018 59


60 NZPhotographer


SUNSET

Watching the sun set over the Greek Island.

Santorini, Greece

Grant Spiers

April 2018 61


62 NZPhotographer


A FIERY DAWN

F/16, 1/50s, ISO200

The colours were richer before the sunrise!

Hilary Lakeman

April 2018 63


64 NZPhotographer


SUMMER ON ICE

F/5.6, 1/160s, ISO200

A selection of colourful summer flowers captured in

ice. I wanted to preserve the colors and the form of

flower from my garden.

Karen Moffatt-McLeod

April 2018 65


66 NZPhotographer


PAEKAKARIKI PERFECTION

Wellington gifted us with an uncharacteristically still and clear day

to experience the Paekakariki Escarpment. This image was taken

halfway through the 10 km tramp and conveys a blissful Sunday

afternoon spent outdoors with friends.

Kate Walters

April 2018 67


WATERFALL

F/9, 1/80s, ISO200

68 NZPhotographer

This was taken in Milford Sound from one of the tourist

boats. It was a stunning day and we got so close that I had

be careful to keep my camera dry. The colour of the moss

was stunning.

Kathleen Seaward


THE SWING

F/7.1, 1/1600s, ISO800

Just before the splash!

Solvej Mortimer

April 2018 69


70 NZPhotographer


SANDY REFLECTIONS

F/7.1, 1/320s

My son enjoying Piha beach while on holiday in Auckland.

Kathryn Taylor

April 2018

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WHAKATANE FARM SCENE

F/11, 1/100s, ISO125

A restful pastoral scene but with ghostly tree forms outlining the rolling hills on Maraetotara Road.

Mary Hutchinson

72 NZPhotographer


April 2018

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74 NZPhotographer


SUNRISE ON BANKS PENINSULA

F/9, 1/80s, ISO200

Taken from Godley Head.

Maureen Pierre

April 2018 75


76 NZPhotographer


ON GOLDEN RIVER

F/16, 1/60s, ISO400

I love the golden light over the river and the layers of the hills in the distance in this image. Taken

on an evening walk with my dogs along the Waikato River near Meremere, one of whom fell over

the bank into the water when my back was turned. I just heard this huge splash and then this

very wet dog appeared. If a dog could look embarrassed this one would have.

Nichola Smith

April 2018

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78 NZPhotographer


FLOATS LIKE A BUTTERFLY

This little guy visited while I was learning to use my camera. Don’t know what

setting as I had been playing around with it!

Nigel Fleming

April 2018 79


80 NZPhotographer


WAITING FOR A BITE

F/13, 1/25s, ISO100

Medlands Beach, Great Barrier Island

Noel Herman

April 2018 81


82 NZPhotographer


BLESSING OF THE BOATS

F/11, ISO360

Blessing of the Boats is an annual event in Island Bay, Wellington where the

fishing fleet gets blessed for safe passage and bountiful catches. It was a heavily

overcast but still day and the shot of these two boats waiting their turn seemed to

capture the mood of the occasion.

Peter Maiden

April 2018 83


84 NZPhotographer


SUMMER SEED

F/8, 1/800s, ISO100

Taken near the Moa Point Radar station while watching planes land.

Philip Banks

April 2018 85


86 NZPhotographer


RAKING ISLAND

Drone shot taken on great Auckland summers day!

Roger Mills

April 2018 87


88 NZPhotographer


PLIMMERTON ALIGHT

F/22, 30s, ISO200

Plimmerton warf during glowing sunset.

Ryan Cornwell

April 2018 89


90 NZPhotographer


FLYING INTO SUNSET

F/5.6, 1/320s, ISO125

On a day excursion return from Picton to Wellington on InterIslander I caught

this plane flying into the sunset while the Ferry was approaching Wellington.

Sabyasachi Banerjee

April 2018 91


92 NZPhotographer


MAGNOLIA FLOWER AND BEES

F/8, 1/320s

Playing with my wide 11-16mm wide angle lens on a typical overcast slightly rainy day in Auckland.

Steve Harper

April 2018 93


94 NZPhotographer


COCKLE SHELL

F/2.2, 1/250s, ISO100

Cockle shells at Paekakariki Beach on the Kapiti Coast.

Sydean Kendrick

April 2018 95


96 NZPhotographer


BURNING SKY

F/16, 1/30s, ISO100

I took this photo of the sunrise at Miranda. Prior to the sun rising, I was surrounded by darkness and

birds chattering. As time ticked by, the sky started to colour up into this glorious shades of red and

now the chattering birds can be seen as little silhouettes along the water.

Tanya Rowe

April 2018 97


98 NZPhotographer


BRILLIANT NIGHTLIFE

F/2.8, 1/10s, ISO200

As the sun went down the Chinese Lantern Festival came into its own. The displays were spectacular

and this is just one example.

Thomas Charmaine

April 2018 99


100 NZPhotographer


SKIMMING AT LONG BAY

A boy gets ready for an afternoon of skim boarding at Long Bay Regional Park.

Todd Henry

April 2018

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A GLORIOUS MISTY MORNING

F/4.5, 1/1000s, ISO320

On the way to Kaikoura from Christchurch, my friend who was driving pulled

over on the road while I was still asleep in the passenger seat. We started very

early that day to catch a morning dolphin tour. As the car stopped, I opened

my eyes. The divine light from the sun rays casted colours on to the morning

mist creating this beautiful magical moment. I simply could not resist not

getting out of the car to capture the moment.

Stephanie Rachman

102 NZPhotographer


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April 2018

103


104 NZPhotographer


DON'T SHOOT WHAT

IT LOOKS LIKE.

SHOOT WHAT IT

FEELS LIKE

David Alan Harvey

April 2018

105

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