NZPhotographers Issue 8, June 2018

nzphotographer

Whether you’re an enthusiastic weekend snapper or a beginner who wants to learn more about photography, New Zealand Photographer is the fun e-magazine for all Kiwi camera owners – and it’s free!

ISSUE 8, June 2018

INTERVIEW

WITH PAUL WHITHAM

INFRARED

PHOTOGRAPHY

HOW TO CAPTURE:

ALPINE LIGHT

POST-PROCESSING PROGRAMS

LIGHTROOM VS PHOTOSHOP

THAT WANAKA TREE

COMPETITION WINNER

June 2018

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General Info:

NZPhotographer Issue 8

June 2018

Cover Photo

by Paul Whitman

www.pwfotos.com

Publisher:

Excio Group

Website:

www.excio.io/nzphotographer

Group Director:

Ana Lyubich

ana@excio.io

Editor:

Emily Goodwin

Graphic Design:

Maksim Topyrkin

Advertising Enquiries:

Phone 04 889 29 25

or Email hello@excio.io

About NZPhotographer

Whether you’re an

enthusiastic weekend

snapper or a beginner

who wants to learn more,

NZ Photographer is the

fun e-magazine for all Kiwi

camera owners –

and it’s free!

© 2018 NZPhotographer

Magazine

All rights reserved.

Reproduction of any

material appearing in this

magazine in any form is

forbidden without prior

consent of the publisher.

Disclaimer:

Opinions of contributing

authors do not necessarily

reflect the opinion of the

magazine.

2 NZPhotographer

Hello Everyone,

WELCOME TO ISSUE 8 O

I hope these cooler days find

you well and catching up on all

of your photo editing from the

Summer and Autumn!

I've had the privilege of

working with some new content

contributors over the past month

to bring you some informative

new content for issue 8... James

Hickok is taking the reigns on

a new post-processing series,

starting with a Lightroom vs

Photoshop article. We also

welcome one of our long-term

readers Emanuel Maisel to the

pages with his article about

Infrared photography. Of course, we also have the regular features;

Brendon recounts his storm chasing days and Richard tells us how

best to capture the Alpine light.

As well as gathering all the content, we've been busy going through

all of your Wanaka Tree entries for the competition and want to say a

huge Well Done to everyone – Turn to page 35 to see who won!

CONTRIBUTORS

James Hickok

James is an amateur

photographer from

the United States who

recently moved to New

Zealand for soccer. He has

taken a keen interest in

photography having lived

in five countries over the

past few years.

Brendon Gilchrist

Brendon is the man

behind ESB Photography.

He treks from sea to

mountain, and back

again, capturing the

uniqueness of New

Zealand’s unforgiving

landscape.

Emily Goodwin

Editor NZ Photographer

Richard Young

Richard is an awardwinning

landscape and

wildlife photographer

who teaches

photography workshops

and runs photography

tours. He is the founder

of New Zealand

Photography Workshops.

nzphotographer nzp_magazine nzp@excio.io


F NZ PHOTOGRAPHER MAGAZINE

4

19

Interview with Paul Whitham

Behind the shot

with Travis Young

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INTERVIEW

14

19

20

28

29

30

35

WITH PAUL WHITHAM

CHASING STORMS

By Brendon Gilchrist

BEHIND THE SHOT WITH TRAVIS YOUNG

INFRARED PHOTOGRAPHY

By Emanuel Maisel

HOW TO CAPTURE: ALPINE LIGHT

by Richard Young

FINDING A FRIEND IN PHOTOGRAPHY

by James Hickok

POST-PROCESSING PROGRAMS

LIGHTROOM VS PHOTOSHOP

THAT WANAKA TREE

PHOTO COMPETITION WINNER

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Infrared

Photography

How to capture:

Alpine Light


Interview with Paul Whitham

I bought my first digital camera in 2003 which ended up

being a mistake. It was a Samsung point and shoot. It

could take good images of anything that didn’t move

but struggled to focus on things that did. Hence it was

fairly useless to record a fast moving daughter who was

very active in both netball and roller skating. About 18

months later my wife’s boss loaned us his Nikon D70 to

have a play with and I was hooked. Within a month I had

bought my first digital SLR but despite an investment in

fast glass I was still very much at the mercy of the camera

settings.

Then, in 2007, I agreed to photograph my first wedding

and that was the incentive to decide that the camera

needed to come out of auto and I needed to take

charge. I enrolled in a night class and at the end of it the

tutor suggested that we should join a camera club if we

wanted to continue to improve. Eleven years later, I am

still involved in that camera club!

PAUL, CAN YOU TELL OUR READERS A LITTLE

ABOUT YOURSELF?

Photography is my passion rather than my profession

(I’m an accountant), although some may say that my

photography borders on an addiction. I have an artist

wife and three grown children (all of whom have an

interest in photography), so there is plenty of support for

me to pursue my interests.

I am currently on the board of the Hutt Camera Club as

well as being a councillor in the Photographic Society

of New Zealand. In this latter role, I am both editor of

their online magazine CameraTalk as well as being the

convention director for the 67 th Annual Convention,

which will be held in Lower Hutt in April 2019.

HOW DID YOU BECOME INTERESTED IN

PHOTOGRAPHY?

I have been involved in photography for a very long

time. I was in the camera club at both school and

university which at the time meant shooting and

developing your own film. I still have a film tank in the

roof! After university, the interest waned apart from taking

family and holiday snaps which generally meant sending

the film off for processing. Looking back now a lot of the

shots were awful.

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WHAT EQUIPMENT DO YOU HAVE?

I am currently shooting two different systems, namely

a Nikon D600 and a Lumix G9. As a result, I have a

collection of lenses for both. I made the move to

mirrorless at the start of the year and am really liking how

the gear is so much lighter and therefore I am taking it

out more often. The D600 is not fully retired though as I

find it gives me better images in the studio environment

so it will be used in that setting alone. I have an Elinchrom

lighting system for studio work and have just ordered a

Godox battery strobe for outside work.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVOURITE GENRE TO SHOOT?

I am primarily a people photographer, although the shots

range from simple fashion, models, and weddings up to

creative composite images. Although I do dabble with

the occasional nature or macro shot, the majority of my

work involves people.

TELL US ABOUT YOUR TATTOO PHOTOGRAPHY

PROJECT...

Despite the fact that I am too much of a coward to have

any of my own, I have always been drawn to photos of

people with tattoos. In fact, it is fairly unusual that I shoot

a model who does not have any. After I achieved PSNZ

Licentiate I started to plan the set I would submit for the

next level up, and I decided to do a series of images of

people with tattoos. I posted a casting call on Facebook

and also visited a number of local tattoo parlours in my

local area leaving a flyer.

The response was not as good as I would have liked and I

only managed to get four images shot in the first year. As

a result, I have moved onto a different concept for the

honours submission, but am still continuing with the tattoo

series, now as more of a personal series.


F8, 1/125s

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F6.3, 1/100s, ISO200

F9, 1/120s, ISO200

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WHERE DO YOU GET INSPIRATION FOR YOUR

CONCEPTIONAL IMAGES?

I am not sure that there is a single answer to this question, as

the inspiration often comes from different things. I do spend

a lot of time looking at images online and also looking at

portraits from the past.

In the case of my “Role of the model” image, the starting

point was a comment I heard about the fashion industry

treating models as merely walking coat hangers. I then

saw an image online from Italian photographer Alessandra

Favetto that had a subject hanging from a coat hanger that

she was holding.

Taking that concept further I thought of a coat rack that

the models would be hanging from. I wanted three models

so I posted a casting call and ended up selecting five. As it

turned out only two turned up on the day, so one had to be

shot twice. The models stood on a box and we raised the

bar so that it looked like it was holding their weight. Then the

box was removed and the models were reshot with them

holding themselves up between two chairs. This provided the

dangling feet. The completed image was a composite of

seven images put together in Photoshop.

WHAT IS YOUR POST-PROCESSING ROUTINE?

My post-processing regime really starts with trying to get as

much right in camera. While I know that you can fix a lot of

issues in post I find that spending 5 minutes at the start is much

better than hours in post.

I mainly use Lightroom and it probably does most of the

adjustments that I do. Once I get the image the way that I

roughly want it then they will be passed across to Photoshop

to fix up anything that Photoshop does a lot better. Obviously

composite shots are mainly put together in Photoshop.

When it comes to retouching portraits I have a fairly simple

approach. I will only retouch out any temporary blemishes

(such as acne). Unless I receive a specific request from the

model, I will not remove any features that are permanent. I

will only use the liquify tool to reshape a body where the issue

has been created with either the pose, or the clothing (such

as a bump created from a bra strap digging in).

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR PROUDEST MOMENT IN

PHOTOGRAPHY?

I would have to say that it was achieving my Licentiateship

of PSNZ in 2017. This involved submitting a portfolio of ten

images to the PSNZ Honours Board to assess. You have to

demonstrate a high technical ability as well as a diversity

of approach. At the Licentiate level, around 40% of the

applications are rejected each year.

CAN YOU PICK A SINGLE FAVOURITE IMAGE?

My favourite image in recent years would be the

Reflections image. It was a combination of a concept that

came together completely and the end result has always

been received well by people who have seen it. The

whole effect with the reflections was achieved in camera

with a relatively simple lighting set up. Jason Naylor (who is

an uber talented Wellington wedding photographer) was

the perfect choice for the look I was going for.

F8, 1/160s, ISO200

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.pwfotos.com

www.instagram.com/pwfotosnz

www.facebook.com/pwfotos

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F4.5, 1/40s, ISO640

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F5.6, 1/25s, ISO100

June 2018

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F4.5, 1/100s, ISO200


JOIN AN AWESOME

PHOTOGRAPHY COMMUNITY

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Get free entry into all competitions and earn

by participating in photo challenges

BECOME A MEMBER

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June 2018

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CHASING STORMS

By Brendon Gilchrist

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F7.1, 0.6s, ISO640

June 2018 15


2015 was an interesting year that found me travelling

to the USA to go and look at clouds in the Midwest

during the Spring storms.

There was a funny incident when I arrived at U.S.

customs, the customs officer asked where I was going

and when I responded with the Midwest, he asked

why I’d want to go there since most people know

there’s nothing much in the region except flat plains.

I got an even funnier look when I replied that I was

going to look at the clouds in the sky! Perhaps he

would have understood better if I’d said I was going

to chase storms!

A week into the trip, we found ourselves in a town

called Gillette in Wyoming, close to where some

severe weather was forecast. In the morning we went

to the Devils Tower, a huge geological deposit of

igneous rock that rises dramatically from the ground,

measuring in at 265 meters from summit to base. This

natural wonder is a really impressive sight and an

interesting location to visit.

After our walk around the rock, we got back to the

car, headed down, and hung out with some prairie

dogs for a while. They reminded me of meerkat’s

except they have this cute bark if you get too close to

their burrows. Once they got sick of us, we started to

seek the clouds that we had come for though didn’t

really think much was going happen on this particular

day but we were wrong... As the day progressed the

storm got bigger and bigger.

We stopped at a few spots to take photos of some

clouds and a nice hail core. As the storm moved so

did we, stopping and starting and finding various

roads to go down while keeping at a safe distance.

The storm developed quite fast, either that or we

were looking in the wrong place! As we were driving

along the storm seemed to develop into a supercell; a

thunderstorm with a deep rotating updraft. We were

lucky to find a high point in Rapid City overlooking the

Black Hills and Badlands National Park from where we

could see the storm rotating and letting out the odd

lightning strike. It was one of those structures I really

wanted to see while there.

People do not realize how big these storms are until

they see them first hand. They are monsters, one

storm as far as the eye can see with another rotating

thunderstorm on the edge creating a storm within a

huge storm. Amazing!

That night, as we were organizing accommodation,

we heard gunshots – Turned out some guys drove

past and shot our car with a paintball gun, luckily no

one was hit. From one extreme to another this was an

amazing day and one that I will not forget.

The Midwest is a place I will return to again one day

to do more storm chasing as I did not get the tornado

photos that I would have liked. All the lightning shots

I have are from time lapse sequences, this method

allows me to sit back and enjoy the storm while

capturing its raw beauty.

TIP TIPS FOR CAPTURING LIGHTENING.

• Get near the storm – But not too close, remain a

safe distance away!

• Use the widest angled lens you have to capture a

greater area.

• Time lapse is one way to ensure you capture some

bolts as well as a movie clip.

• Invest in a lightning trigger, or use long exposure

with a neutral density filter (these filters help

increase exposure time).

F10, 1/40s, ISO64

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F6.3, 1/80s, ISO64

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F2.8, 1/320s, ISO4500


BEHIND THE SHOT

WITH TRAVIS YOUNG

TRAVIS, TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT YOURSELF

AND YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY...

I grew up in a small town called Katikati in the Bay

of Plenty. I studied Business information systems

at Massey University and currently work as a

fabrication and estimation manager for an ITM

Building supplies business. I am recently married and

we together have 3 amazing children between us.

Growing up I spent a lot of time with my

grandparents. My Pop always had his large video

camera recording all the family events so naturally

when I had kids, and an opportunity came up while

I was working at Harvey Norman to purchase my

first DSLR (A Canon 450d) I jumped on the chance

so that I too could take photos of my family. About

2 years ago I upgraded my camera gear and

started to take my photography more seriously and

started to push myself to learn more. That’s what I

love about photography, there’s always something

new to learn.

WHAT EQUIPMENT DO YOU SHOOT WITH?

My main camera is a Nikon D750 and I also have

a D7200. I have a sigma 35mm art which is on my

D750 the majority of the time. In my bag, I also have

a Tamron 70-200 F2.8 VC, Tamron 24-70 F2.8 VC,

Sigma 85mm Art and a Nikon 14-24mm so I have

most of my bases covered.

TELL US ABOUT THIS PHOTO...

This image was shot on my Nikon D750 with a

Tamron 70-200 F2.8 VC attached to it, my go-to

combo when shooting sports.

It’s an annual pre-season clash between Katikati

and Waihi rugby clubs. It’s is a game that is always

played in good spirits but at the same time, it's still

treated as a fiercely contested local derby game

between the two teams. I was wandering the

sideline capturing the action and a line out formed

in front of me so I knew there would be a good fight

for the ball coming up. With the hooker positioned

infront of me about to throw the ball in I could see

the two forwards packs eyeing each other up,

ready to fight for the prized ball once more. I felt

this image best portrayed the battle between these

two rivals in some horrible conditions as position of

the ball was vital to winning this game.

ARE YOU HAPPY WITH THE SHOT? IF YOU

COULD RE-TAKE IT WHAT WOULD YOU

CHANGE?

Yes, I love the image. I like the tension in the photo

as two teams are about to fight over the ball.

There is one thing I would change though and that

is because I didn’t quite nail the focus on the ball.

WHAT ELSE SHOULD WE KNOW ABOUT THIS

PHOTO?

This image doesn’t really show how bad the

weather conditions were. The rain was very heavy

and coming in sideways at times. I had my camera

gear inside a plastic cover to protect it from the

weather, however, the rain still managed to find its

way in and I ended up with some wet gear. Lucky

the Nikon D750 and the Tamron 70-200 F2.8 VC

seem to be able to handle a small amount of rain.

ANY TIPS YOU CAN SHARE WITH OUR

READERS ON CAPTURING MOMENTS IN

SPORT?

My number one tip is to always be ready to capture

the action. The moments in games happen so

fast you cannot afford to sit back and watch the

game. Be prepared and anticipate the moments.

another tip I can suggest, if available, is to have two

cameras on you so that you’re able to capture the

action be it far away or close to you.

www.flickr.com/photos/132706176@N05

www.instagram.com/travisjyoung

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INFRARED PHOTOGRAPHY

BY EMANUEL MAISEL

June 2018

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Infrared (IR) photography is described as peculiar,

special and unique. The camera captures a part

of the light spectrum that we do not see with the

naked eye so that a transformed world emerges

with nothing about the colours, as we know them,

making sense - Green becomes white, water and the

sky a tone between black and blue. This is a world

of surreal photographs that utilizes light to display its

extraordinary shapes and characteristics.

One of the reasons I got involved with IR photography,

is the fact that not many photographers are doing it

and appreciation for the images are limited as well.

Although it’s not my main genre of photography, I’ve

been shooting IR for some time now and it gives me

a very different world to explore. Some of the images

almost remind me of those early Noddy books with the

round trees and shrubs.

I have three full spectrum IR cameras, a Canon

Powershot SX20IS, a Panasonic DMC-FZ7 and a

Panasonic DMC-TZ6 and my filters range from 590nm

to 850nm. The 850nm produces some really nice black

and white images though I have yet to embrace the

like for B&W!

INFRARED LIGHT

IR light is measured in nanometres. The normal light we

see every day ranges between 400nm, which is violet

and 700nm, which is red. This band from 400 to 700nm

is also known as the visible spectrum, which allows you

to see the normal colours violet, blue, green, yellow

orange and finally red. The 700 to 1000nm is your

primary concern and the common 720nm filter falls

into the IR Spectrum, allowing you to see this esoteric

world. This is also known as near infrared as it is close to

the visible spectrum and most digital camera sensors

should be able to pick this up.

Shooting infrared doesn’t differ that much from a

perspective of composition, depth of field, exposure

and F-stop. IR images range from nature, architecture

to portraits. The latter becoming more popular,

because of the wide range of possibilities, it is seen

as a much less used medium for creating some

unanticipated results. Normally, photographers would

prefer not to shoot in the “avoid-the-time-of-day”

zone but for IR photography, the sunnier, the better.

RAW vs JPEG doesn’t count here either (in my opinion)

as you are now relying on the neutrality of your

22 NZPhotographer


images, which can be processed either in Lightroom

or Photoshop, each IR image bringing up it’s own

unique challenge when processing.

YOUR CAMERA

If you’re feeling intrigued and would like to have a

go at IR photography yourself, you must first test the

sensitivity of your camera to IR as not all cameras

are compatible due to a hot mirror plate sometimes

covering the sensor.

Testing the sensitivity of your camera to IR is quite an

easy process. Just point your camera to any remote

control handheld unit and click the power button.

Take a shot and you should be able to see the light

emitted from the front of the unit. If you’ve tried in

the past to shoot IR images and ended up with a red

mess (like above), the hot mirror plate will have been

the problem. Don’t give up just yet, this is where the

magic starts...

In order for your camera to see the invisible light, you

might have to modify it, either by removing the hot

mirror plate and replacing it with an IR filter with a

specific band width, or by removing the hot mirror

plate all together so that the camera becomes full

spectrum.

A full spectrum camera allows you to fit any external

IR filter. There are some companies who do these

conversions for a substantial amount and replace the

filter of your choice. Unless you have some skills, very

special skills, do not attempt to do this on your own

as it requires some very steady hands as well as an

almost dust-free environment.

TAKING THE SHOT

There are two ways of capturing your first shot, either

have the filter screwed on the lens or placed over

your sensor. Point your camera at anything green

(please limit this to grass or shrubs) and go to the

White Balance setting in the camera’s menu and

do a Custom White Balance. I do not recommend

Auto White Balance. Yes, there are those who do the

correction in Lightroom using the dropper but I prefer

the initial setting as it makes the final processing of the

image so much easier. Now take your best shot and

you will see your ‘Red Mess’ has turned into a much

more acceptable image.

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POST-PROCESSING

The Red & Blue Channel swap is one of the most

common processing styles in IR, but it does not

always work and your image can come out quite

the opposite of what you expect.

In Lightroom go to Image > Adjustments >

Channel Mixer and do the channel swap from

there.

From the Settings Output Channel – Red, set the

amount to 0 and do a swap to the Blue Channel.

Set the amount to +100

At this point you can basically use any filter plug-in to

do some good creative work. Unsharp and Denoise

filters can also be applied at this stage.

My favourite processing method is to use a

downloaded action. Go to Windows > Actions and

from there use the infrared action and you have a

image ready to be tweaked.

LEARNING MORE

I can recommend Youtube videos by Mark Hilliard

and, if you can find it, the book Digital Infrared

Photography by Deborah Sandidge. For inspiration, I

hope you’ll enjoy seeing more of my own work:

www.notbyintent.com/infrared

www.instagram.com/notbyintent

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HOW TO CAPTURE: ALPINE LIGHT

Capture the best light in the mountains with these tips from Richard Young

Sunset over Aoraki/Mount Cook F11, 1/15s, ISO100

SUNRISE in the mountains is always magical to witness

and pre dawn pink alpen glow bathing high peaks

has to be some of the most beautiful light to capture.

The dawn air is clearer than any other time of day,

offering crisp views and vivid colours. As the sun then

breaks the horizon, it casts a wonderful low and warm

light across the landscape, offering some of the best

lighting of the day.

DAY TIME is best avoided for capturing views of snow

covered alpine peaks. Especially the middle of a

bright summer’s day when the light is very harsh, as

the sun is high in the sky, making everything very flat.

Shooting in the morning/afternoon will offer a more

interesting light.

SUNSETS offer a softer light than sunrise, as the sky is

full of wind-borne particles from the day. This thicker

atmosphere at dusk can tend to dull the colours,

leading to more washed-out sunsets. On the other

hand, lots of dust can have the effect of scattering

light across a greater region of the sky, creating a

larger drape of colours.

AFTER DARK the mountains can retain a very subtle

light long after the sun has actually set. Once every

last bit of the light of the day has slowly faded away,

night opens up a whole new world of star filled skies.

The light of a full moon on a clear night can also light

up snowy peaks enough to capture the mountains in

a whole different light.

CAPTURE SUNRISE AND SUNSET OVER AORAKI/MOUNT COOK ON A 4-DAY LANDSCAPE MASTERCLASS

WORKSHOP: 14TH - 17TH SEPTEMBER WITH NEW ZEALAND PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOPS

28 NZPhotographer


FINDING A FRIEND

IN PHOTOGRAPHY

by James Hickok

Having had a short yet nomadic career

in professional soccer (I have played

internationally at various levels in Sweden,

Scotland, Spain, U.S.A, and now New Zealand) I

often find myself moving to a new corner of the

world alone with not much more in my suitcase

than clothes, soccer gear, and camera. As you

might imagine, at each stop of the way I have had

to adapt to new cultures, players, languages, and

landscapes, but for me I have always found comfort

in having my camera by my side.

Photography did not come naturally for me. Up until

my graduation from Dartmouth College in the United

States I was usually kept busy with all things soccer

and getting my degree in economics, and frankly

I never saw myself as an even remotely creative or

artistic person.

But they say boredom often breeds creativity, and

things changed when I graduated and decided to

pursue soccer professionally. In soccer not only are

you expected to pick up and move on the spot to

whichever team is interested in signing you, but you

must also look for the best ways to fill your time in a

new city or country outside of team commitments -

Enter my interest in photography!

At first, my infatuation with photography came

from traveling and simply wanting to share my

experiences with my friends and family through a

lens other than my iPhone so I purchased a Canon

Rebel T6.

For me, getting my first real camera was like finding

the golden ticket in a Willy Wonka chocolate bar (or

Whittaker’s, excuse me) – a feeling of pure elation.

All of a sudden, I had all the freedom in the world to

express myself through pictures and capture unique

perspectives of the amazing places I was seeing but I

soon discovered I had so much to learn!

My photography work originated in landscapes but

over time has progressed into street photography,

wildlife, and portraits. Outside of my original Canon

EF-S 18-55mm kit lens I have made several important

purchases: a Canon EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III, a Canon

EF 50mm f/1.8 STM (“the nifty fifty”), and a multitude

of accessories like a polarizing filter and tripod. There

is nothing special about that list, but all of those

products together have the ability for me to get the

most out of every shot and also fit into my backpack

with ease while traveling.

I have only been living in Christchurch for two

months, but it hasn’t taken long for me to be

absolutely captivated by the beauty of the South

Island paired with the friendly Kiwi culture. I have

tried to explore all of Canterbury that I can by car,

from Akaroa to Kaikoura to Arthur’s Pass.

Right now, the top thing on my mind (aside from

soccer) is working on further honing my editing

software abilities with Lightroom and Photoshop,

which is why I am so excited to be a part of NZP.

There are an amazing amount of resources available

online to help you unlock your full potential in using

editing software, but there is no better way to learn

than being part of a community of photographers

who are all passionate about improving their work

and seeing how they do it. Over the coming months

I will be covering different post-processing programs,

techniques, and tools to help you get more out of

your photos and expand your creative sphere.

www.jimbotography.com

www.instagram.com/jimbotography


POST-PROCESSING PROGRAMS

LIGHTROOM vs PHOTOSHOP

These days, the photos you see are rarely, if

ever, a finished product that straight from a

camera before being uploaded or printed.

Even your neighbour’s Instagram post of her cat

on a rainy day has been through some form of

post-processing!

Adobe Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop are the

two applications that are synonymous with editing

and can open up a whole new world of possibilities

to bring more creativity to your work. But with all

that room for creativity comes a lot of functionality

and confusion, how do you decide which program

to use to create your desired effect? Read on as I

explain the fundamental differences between the

two.

LIGHTROOM

Pricing Options (only available as an annual

subscription plan prepaid in full or paid monthly):

• Lightroom CC with 1TB of cloud storage:

A$14.94/month

• Lightroom CC + Photoshop CC with 1TB of

cloud storage: A$29.89/month

• Lightroom CC + Photoshop CC with 20GB of

cloud storage: A$14.94/month

Lightroom is your bread and butter - you could

only use Lightroom and create some absolutely

fantastic photos from your imports. At a basic

level, Lightroom is highly regarded for its ability

to edit and manage RAW photos in a completely

non-destructive way. That doesn’t mean that you

have to shoot in RAW to use it, but it was certainly

designed to handle the rich set of metadata that

comes along with using the RAW format. If you

don’t know the difference yet, shooting in RAW

essentially provides the most detailed photo and

set of information for your computer to process,

while JPEG is a considerably smaller file and set

of information that results in a less detailed photo

to work with. If you are a beginner, Lightroom is

without question the place to start honing your

editing skills because it will provide the simplest

platform to learn the ins and outs of postprocessing

software while still creating magnificent

photos.

PROS

One of Lightroom’s top benefits is its organizational

capabilities which allow you to easily sort and

catalog your images before editing them. This helps

to keep your workflow consistent, something that is

normally a nightmare in the post-processing phase

when you have hundreds or thousands of images.

HERE ARE A FEW OF THE ORGANIZATIONAL

TOOLS LIGHTROOM PROVIDES:

• Create Folders and Albums (multiple albums can

go into a folder)

• Sort photos by Date Taken or Date Imported

• Rate each photo from one to five stars

• Add a list of Keywords to each photo

• Choose between “Flag as Picked” or “Flag as

Rejected” (helpful when you have imported

multiple shots that are very similar, the rejected

photo is greyed out)

• Filter your search for photos based on Camera,

Sync Status, Keywords, etc

Another bonus is the ability to edit RAW images

directly as opposed to needing any plug-ins to

convert files (as needed with Photoshop). This builtin

capability helps serve the purpose of making

Lightroom the simplest and most user-friendly

application out there.

Lightroom’s dedicated set of basic editing tools are

easy to navigate and allow you to adjust the light,

colour, effects, and detail using simple sliders to

create the aesthetic you’re looking for. Adjustments

can easily be applied to many photos at once,

and you can even save those changes as a preset

to use on your future photos with the click of a

button. If you’re not sure how to achieve a desired

look, Lightroom provides you with default presents

and you can also download presets created by

professional photographers to use on your photos.

Lastly, part of Lightroom’s larger purpose is derived

from the fact that you can make all these edits and

adjustments to a photo and not run the risk of ever

destroying or damaging the original photo that was

imported. The original photo remains intact and is

always recoverable and Lightroom continuously

saves your work as you go so you never have to

worry about hitting the “Save As” button.

30 NZPhotographer


CONS

While at a basic level Lightroom seems to

check all the boxes, at an advanced level

it, unfortunately, does not perform as well.

Lightroom does not possess any of the high-level

editing capabilities you can find in Photoshop.

For example, the ability to clone objects, create

multiple layers on an image, smooth/blend

objects into a photo, stitch photos together, or

edit at the pixel-level. It is also important to note

that you can only edit photos in Lightroom –

meaning that you must already have an existing

photo to work with as opposed to creating

something from scratch like in Photoshop.

PHOTOSHOP

Pricing Options:

• Photoshop CC (CC = Creative Cloud) single

app annual plan with 100GB cloud storage:

A$29.89/month

• Photoshop CC single app monthly plan with

100GB cloud storage: A$45.99/month

Adobe offers multiple versions of Photoshop,

ranging from the full blown Photoshop CC,

to Photoshop Elements, and finally down to

Photoshop Express, with the latter two being

more pared down and simple to use than the

first – Read about these 2 lighter versions below.

Photoshop CC can do everything and more

than Lightroom in terms of its editing capabilities.

The Camera RAW plug-in feature in Photoshop

has almost exactly the same layout as Lightroom

(it just requires an extra import step), so anything

that you can do in Lightroom you can do in

Photoshop (from an image editing standpoint).

If you’re willing to spend the money, Photoshop

is known for being a best-in-class image editor/

creator used by professionals in creative

industries around the world.

PROS

• Pixel-level editing

• Removal and smoothing of objects (people,

signs, major eye sores)

• Cloning and addition of objects, people,

animals, etc. to a photo

• Use of image layers (can change position,

opacity, distortion, etc. and use to preserve

bottom layers)

• Actions (save a sequence of editing actions

to apply to other photos with one click)

• Stitching multiple photos together

(panoramas can now be stitched

automatically)

• Major enhancements to photo aesthetics

(think of ethereal, cartoonish, and movie-like

effects)

• Creation of advertisements, posters, and

other media

Although this is just a brief list that is missing

countless tools, it is clear that Photoshop can

do anything and everything you’re looking

for in an image editing software. Professionals

and amateurs alike love to utilize Photoshop’s

powerful processing speed and wide array of

advanced tools to not only edit their pictures

but create art.

One of the best aspects of Photoshop is how

intelligent each of these tools are, as actions

like refining, masking, stamping, filling, etc.

all incorporate technology that can detect

contrasts in your image down to the pixel-level

to allow for remarkably easy and accurate

adjustments.

Another unique and defining feature of

Photoshop CC is its use of adjustment layers,

which not only aid in keeping your original

image in tact, but allow for easy editing to top

layers, objects, or smart objects without having

to get into them and edit the pixels. Learning

how to use all of these tools in unison to create

your image takes practice, but having the

power to control and adjust every pixel is hard

to not see the value in.

CONS

With so many photo-editing tools comes great

responsibility… and a really steep learning

curve. There’s no question that the biggest

drawback to Photoshop is learning how to use

all of its powerful features. If you were to just use

Photoshop to perform the basic type of editing

that you can do in Lightroom, everything would

feel intuitive and you wouldn’t have any trouble

but that would be like buying a brand new red

Ferrari and only using three out of the six gears,

because there’s just so much more power to

take advantage of!

The lack of an image management system

means you are on your own when it comes to

organizing your Photoshop images and a few

additional complications can arise through

this. With each progressive save of your image

in JPEG format, the photo will lose information

and its quality will continue to deteriorate each

time. Thus, you must keep saving images in .psd

format while you are still working on them if you

want to hold the quality – The drawback to this

is the massive amount of storage space that will

be used on your computer.

June 2018

31


• Built-in processing of RAW photos

• Organizational capabilities for

thousands of photos

• Easy retrieval of old photos with

search filters, keywords, and ratings

• Non-destructive photo editing (no

need to "Save As")

• BASIC EDITING

• HDR PHOTOS

• PANORAMAS

• Pixel-level editing

• Removal and smoothing of

objects

• Cloning and addition of objects

• Use of image layers

• Saving of actions

• Stitching multiple photos together

• Creation of advertisements,

posters, and other media

PHOTOSHOP EXPRESS

This is a free, mobile-friendly version of

Photoshop (also available for PCs) that has

extremely limited capabilities but is fantastic

to use for simple retouching and sharing of

photos. It is a little more expansive than the

default photo editing options that appear on

every iPhone, so it is worth the download, but

you definitely get what you (don’t) pay for.

PHOTOSHOP ELEMENTS

Price: A$151.79 (Not available as a

subscription)

Photoshop Elements is a lighter version of the

full Photoshop CC program, ideal if you’re not

sure about the financial and/or educational

aspects. It trims some of the unnecessary fat

in terms of editing tools and also has many

different Guided Edit tutorials that will walk

you step by step through the actions needed

to create your desired outcome.

Elements also includes an Organizer as a way

to manage your photos that the full version

of Photoshop doesn’t because it expects

you to use Lightroom too. It might seem like

the inclusion of PS Elements confuses things

more, but in fact, it is an app directed at a

completely different audience.

PS Elements is not directed at aspiring or

learning professional photographers, but

rather amateurs and families who need a

post-processing program to be simple yet

powerful. It has similar basic editing and

organizational capabilities as Lightroom but is

less powerful at processing RAW images in any

sort of quantity.

32 NZPhotographer


WHAT PHOTOSHOP ELEMENTS LACKS

COMPARED TO PHOTOSHOP CC:

• Edit large batches of images, especially in RAW

(the Camera RAW plug-in is different)

• Accept a large number of third-party plug-ins

• Channel mixing

• Record actions

• No support for Duotone, CMYK, Lab, or

Multichannel colour modes

• Little 16-bit support (will limit use of layers and tools)

• Fewer blending modes and vector-based tools

• Overall fewer panels (missing 3D, Brush, Character,

Clone Source, Layer Comps, Paths, and more)

IN CONCLUSION

Many photographers use both Lightroom AND

Photoshop to allow them to have the image

management system plus the full range of editing

tools. I’m the same, often times my editing work starts

in Lightroom and then I’ll choose to open the photo

in Photoshop from there which allows me to save the

final, more significantly edited photo as a copy back

into Lightroom when I’m done.

In short, it’s best to think of Photoshop as an

advanced image editing tool while Lightroom is more

of an image management tool with some limited

image editing capabilities.

FREE ALTERNATIVES TO LIGHTROOM AND PHOTOSHOP

GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) – Mac and

PC

An open-source photo editor (meaning it is constantly

being developed and updated by the community of

people who use it) that is definitely the most popular

free alternative to Photoshop in terms of advanced

editing capabilities.

Pros: Offers basic assistance and tutorials

Cons: Not as intuitive in layout or workflow (can seem

even more complex than Photoshop), no adjustment

layers, no RAW processing or CMYK support

Paint.net – PC Only

A fantastic alternative that will perform and feel quite

similar to Photoshop, but is more user-friendly.

Pros: Easy user interface, similar basic editing features

to Photoshop, list of actions makes it easy to undo

your mistakes

Cons: Not as powerful as Photoshop (no adjustment

layers, no dodge or burn tools, and limited brushes),

no photo organization or sharing features

PAID ALTERNATIVES TO LIGHTROOM AND

PHOTOSHOP

Luminar by Skylum – Mac and PC

Price: NZ$101

Another example of a software that skirts the gray area

between Lightroom and Photoshop. It has advanced

editing capabilities using layers and pixel-level detail,

but that doesn’t make up for its complete lack of

organization for your photos. That being said, it is a single

image editor like Photoshop, and its competitive price

certainly makes it attractive.

Pros: Price, support for layers, non-destructive editing,

smooth design, unique filters

Cons: Lack of image management tools, slow data

processing, no batch editing

Capture One by Phase One – Mac and PC

Price: Either US$20/month subscription or US$299 one-time

purchase

Best described as a significant upgrade from Lightroom,

Capture One will feel quite familiar to amateur

photographers and above as it can process RAW files

while also introducing the use of layers, masking, and

other Photoshop-like features.

Pros: Easy to use, ability to use layers and masking, quick

photo importing

Cons: Not good for composites or extensive retouching,

not supported by all cameras

Affinity Photo by Serif – Mac and PC

Price: NZ$74.99

A high quality alternative to Photoshop that performs

most of the same functions and boasts a similar easyto-navigate

layout, Affinity Photo certainly gives you a

bang for your buck, with the catch being reduced RAW

processing ability and sometimes destructive editing.

Pros: Price, batch processing, multiple editing “personas”,

image stacking

Cons: RAW processing and some editing features are

destructive, exporting to other file formats will reduce

image quality.

Paintshop Pro by Corel

Price: NZ$134

Another budget-friendly version of Photoshop that

can handle advanced editing of almost any kind for

beginner and intermediate photographers, Paintshop

Pro has released a new update that addressed many of

its previous concerns from users regarding its processing

speed and outdated crop, clone, and dropper tools.

Pros: Price, “Essentials” workspace mode for easy use,

customizable interface

Cons: Limited built-in RAW tools, occasionally slow editing

June 2018

33


34 NZPhotographer


That Wanaka Tree

PHOTO COMPETITION

On the following pages, you’ll find the best entries to our Wanaka Tree photo competition.

This was our hardest competition to judge to date due to having just 1 prize winner and a

high amount of images of the same quality hence also having some highly commended

picks. For the winning entry, we wanted a photo with the wow factor of course but we

were also looking for something a little bit different. A big Well Done to all who entered.

WINNER

Kane Hartill

HIGHLY COMMENDED:

DAVID BOWIE

ROB DICKINSON

ANUPAM HATUI

WAYNE BOARDMAN

CHRIS WATSON

MARK HANNAH

June 2018

35


LAKE MYSTERIOUS

F14, 1/25s, ISO100

Deepest winter... just two of us there to see this dense misty minimalism. Captured at first flush of

brightness not long after the sun crested the mountains beyond.

Kane Hartill

36 NZPhotographer


WINNER

June 2018

37


WANAKA TREE

F8 ,121s, ISO80

David Bowie

38 NZPhotographer


HIGHLY

COMMENDED

June 2018

39


ONE CALM TREE

F10, 100s, ISO200

A whirlwind trip around New Zealand's top landscape locations ended with a

gloriously calm morning at Lake Wanaka.

We'd travelled 1500kms in 5 days and slept barely 18 hours , finding our peace

on the shore if only for an hour before the drive back to Christchurch.

Rob Dickinson

40 NZPhotographer


HIGHLY

COMMENDED

June 2018

41


42 NZPhotographer


HIGHLY

COMMENDED

THE TREE ON A LAKE...

The colors of Spring, the snow clad Buchanan Peaks, and the blue and clear Lake Wanaka make a

complete frame. I loved capturing the beauty...

Anupam Hatui

June 2018

43


SERENITY

F8, 30s

A peacefull and calm sunset at Wanaka when the light and reflections perfectly match the mood.

Wayne Boardman

44 NZPhotographer


HIGHLY

COMMENDED

June 2018

45


46 NZPhotographer


HIGHLY

COMMENDED

WANAKA TREE

A very low angle (slightly under the water!) taken with my Samsung S8 Phone on HDR mode. TOO many people

about plus I had the pleasure of being wheel clamped when I got back to my car!! (I didn't even stay the night!)

Chris Watson

June 2018

47


THOSE WANAKA PETALS

F14, 30s, ISO64

I've waited a long time to share a shot of the Wanaka tree that I'm happy with. I try

to avoid posting shots unless I can do something unique or apply my style to it to

make it at least a bit different. Hopefully this is a bit of the latter by being able to

apply my moodier darker style to the much loved tree.

I tried to get a unique foreground for this composition, so I was pretty happy to find

some petals on the shore next to the water. Actually taking this shot proved a bit

harder than it might look. In order to get everything in focus I had to do some focus

staking and due to how close I wanted to get to the petals, it meant I had to shoot

this as a 5 shot vertical panorama. To get the water smooth I had to use filters too.

So quite a few advanced techniques all going in to one shot.

Mark Hannah

HIGHLY

COMMENDED

48 NZPhotographer


AUTUMN REFLECTION

F2.8, 2.5s, ISO50

This was shot on an Autumn morning with the famous Wanaka tree.

The sky was clear and the lake a bit dried-out but it was perfect for

reflections.

Dice Sales

June 2018

49


WANAKA TREE

F22, 1/160s, 10mm

Wide shot of the Wanaka tree

Colin Hall

50 NZPhotographer


June 2018

51


A CRISP SUMMERS DAY

F22, 8s, ISO200

It was a beautiful day in Wanaka earlier this year. Having previously come down for sunset I wanted to capture

the tree in daylight as well. I took this on a Nikon D7100 with a wide angle lens. I used a ND filter to get the long

exposure and smoothness of the water. I was at the tree for about 45 minutes after setting up my shot waiting for

a group of kayakers to get out of the way in the background. The tree was humming with photographers.

Thea Betts

52 NZPhotographer


June 2018

53


DIFFERENT VIEW WANAKA TREE

This was taken April 2017 when the lake was low and the tree exposed

and out of the water.

Lindsay Muirhead

54 NZPhotographer


MINIMALIST WANAKA TREE

F22, 3.2s, ISO50

The little Wanaka tree has been photographed, and then some! This is my attempt at something a

little different. I'm a minimalist at heart.

Annemarie Clinton

June 2018

55


WANAKA TREE

F14, 1/40s, ISO100

That Tree. Taken while filling in time waiting for a flight to Milford Sound.

Fortunately nobody else was around!

Dominic Stove

56 NZPhotographer


June 2018

57


58 NZPhotographer


WANAKA TREE

F8, 1/800s, ISO200

My two dogs having a drink down at the tree on a late January morning in 2017. We can get snow

on the mountains at any time down here. It really improves things for landscape photography too.

Geoff Perry

June 2018

59


THAT TREE

F16, 1/40s, ISO100

'That Tree' with a stormy sky in Wanaka

Jan Macpherson

60 NZPhotographer


June 2018

61


BIRD IN THE TREE

F4.8, 3s, ISO200

That Wanaka tree early one

morning. The long exposure made

the lake a milky white and the

bird remained still long enough to

remain sharp.

Jim Jefferies

62 NZPhotographer


June 2018

63


WANAKA TREE 2018

F9, 1/200s, ISO100

Taken over Easter on a windy day. Raw file processed in Lightroom

Classic, I added an Infrared Profile for a different look.

John Moore

64 NZPhotographer


June 2018

65


INTERNATIONAL LINEUP IN WANAKA

F10, 1/80s, ISO1000

The Wanaka Tree is a lone small willow growing in the shallows of Roy's Bay, at the southern end of Lake

Wanaka. It's a photographer's dream and at every dawn and dusk you'll see scores of snappers setting

up tripods, or crouching in front of viewfinders, clamouring for the perfect shot. The morning we were

there was a perfect example of just how popular the tree has become with international visitors.

Julie Simpson

66 NZPhotographer


June 2018

67


BURNING SUNRISE AT THE WANAKA TREE

F11, 50s, ISO100

This was the first time I had ever photographed the Wanaka Tree and I was treated to a sunrise I will

never forget. Not sure if I will ever be lucky enough to get vibrant light like that again!

Laurie Winter

68 NZPhotographer


June 2018

69


THAT WANAKA TREE

F4.5, ISO400

This photo was taken during one winter evening. It was my first time to

Wanaka. This infamous tree was definitely on my list to see when I was in

Wanaka.

Stephany Rachman

70 NZPhotographer


THE WANAKA TREE

F20, 15s, ISO800

This photo was taken on a cold winter evening. There certainly weren't as many people

photographing it then as there are now! I wanted to take a photo of this popular tree, but I wanted a

photograph that was different to the many taken before, so I decided on a portrait orientated image

and to use the rocks in the foreground to add some depth to the photo.

Michael Sutton

June 2018

71


72 NZPhotographer


THE DUCKS AND THE TREE

F10, 1/30s, ISO800

I was trying to get an early morning shot of "That Wanaka Tree", hoping for calm water and beautiful light,

when these two curious ducks came out of no where troubling my water...

Nils-Olaf Kuellsen

June 2018

73


74 NZPhotographer


DAWN REFLECTION

F8, 1/125s, ISO100

It was a cold morning in August 2016, me and my friends went to Wanaka for a ski trip. The weather was a

bit cloudy but very peaceful, I used a very low angle to shoot this reflection shot.

Phil Qi

June 2018

75


BLACKBIRD

F8, 1/1250s, ISO200

"All your life...You were only waiting for this moment to be free..."

Every single image I've seen of 'That Wanaka Tree' is beautiful and different.That moment when you stand on

the shores of Lake Wanaka is a moment we don't forget soon. The willow tree is a witness to that moment. A

companion to share the majestic beauty with.

Tanya Wallis

76 NZPhotographer


June 2018

77


WANAKA TREE

F20, 1/3s, ISO100

I had heard so much about this famous tree and thought that so many people had photographed it

that there was no point in doing so myself. That was until I saw it on this glorious early morning and

was drawn to taking my own creation of this.

Linda Cutche


AMAZING CLOUDS AT WANAKA TREE

F11, 2.5s, ISO200

I was with a photography group and was at the Wanaka tree the evening before this picture was taken. It was a

huge disappointment as there were at least 20 photographers, no clouds or colors in the sky, and no reflections.

We went again the next morning for sunrise and I was not having high hopes. But then as the sky slowly got

brighter, the colors were getting more intense and red donut shaped clouds suddenly became very visible. That

was the time I got completely overwhelmed by sheer excitement and joy.

Carrie Cheng

80 NZPhotographer


WANAKA DAWN TWILIGHT

F11, 3s, ISO100

The Wanaka Tree, shot at dawn in late autumn, complete

with pied shags happily roosting in the branches.

Neil Protheroe

June 2018

81


SENTINEL

Taken on an early autumn morning, the sun rising over Mt Iron and the light shining on the tree. It

grew from an old willow post which was left in the lake when the fences came down.

Jacqui Scott

82 NZPhotographer


MY WANAKA TREE

F11, 10s, ISO400

The world famous Wanaka Tree with a solitary bird resting on a branch within the tree and the snow

capped mountains as a backdrop. This tree is world famous in photography circles and when taken,

there were eight photographers there, I was the only New Zealander!

Bruce Brodie

June 2018

83


"WHEN PEOPLE

ASK ME WHAT

PHOTOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT

I USE - I TELL THEM

MY EYES"

ANONYMOUS

84 NZPhotographer

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