The Ultimate Guide to Chester and Cheshire - Spring Edition

MarketingCheshire

Chester

&

Cheshire

Spring

2019

The

Ultimate

Guide

Issue 06

JANUARY —

APRIL

2019

Featuring:

Plus:

CHESHIRE’S BEST

WINTER WALKS

AND GARDENS:

That happen to

start and end at

the pub

JOSEPH

BENJAMIN:

Can the Chester

restaurant live up

to the hype?

ALL THE FUN OF

THE FOREST:

The Forestry

Commission

hits 100

THE NEW YEAR

BEGINS:

With stargazing,

musicals and jazz

Food, booze and unusual

news, full event listings

and more...


There’s always a warm

welcome at The Oakfield

Join us this winter in the cosy setting of our contemporary

British pub, The Oakfield. Enjoy locally sourced food in this

stunning property located at the heart of Chester Zoo

Find out more www.theoakfield.org

1

@TheOakfieldatCZ

*zoo admission applies


Start the New

Year as you

mean to go

on – making

the most of

Cheshire’s

natural assets

IMAGES

ABOVE:

QUARRY BANK

MILL /

BELOW:

DELAMERE FOREST

Banish the winter blues with the best that

Cheshire has to offer: countryside walks that

offer spectacular views or take in great seasonal

gardens – and which happen to start and end at

the pub (p6) - or head into the fabulous forests

dotted across the county, with our guide to some of

the better and lesser-known woodlands (p24).

Get your culture fix via a series of West

End musicals that grace the stage

at Storyhouse this spring, or just

find something interesting to do

(and which get you out from

in front of the TV) – from

stargazing to jazz and a

food festival (p8). Talking

of food, we have Sunday

lunch at Joseph Benjamin,

an independent restaurant

that’s been crowned the

region’s best (p28), while

elsewhere we round up

the latest happenings in the

Cheshire food and drink scene

(p32). However you choose to

spend your New Year, make the most

of our full listings of what’s on in Chester,

Cheshire and Beyond – and start 2019 absolutely

as you mean to go on.

Find out more about what’s on in Cheshire at:

visitcheshire.com

This guide has been put together by

Marketing Cheshire and was made possible

with the help of our editor, Susie Stubbs

and with the invaluable support, ideas and

reality checks of Marketing Cheshire’s

Leanne Eaton. Thanks also to our

interviewees and contributors, including

Laura Howard, Nancy Davies, Ian Gambles,

PK Khaira-Cresell and Peter Broughton.

Designed in Cheshire by

Lemondrop Creative.

Printed by Stephens & George Ltd.

Supported by

Editorial and advertising:

Leanne Eaton

l.eaton@marketingcheshire.co.uk

Front Cover Image: BalletBoyz, Storyhouse

For more information visitcheshire.com

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be copied,

stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form by

any means, electronic, mechanical, recording or otherwise,

except brief extracts for purpose of review, and no part of

this publication may be sold or hired, without the written

permission of the publisher. Words, photography and design

copyright: Marketing Cheshire 2018, except where stated.

Although the authors have taken all reasonable care in

preparing this book, we make no warranty about the accuracy

or completeness of its content and, to the maximum extent

permitted, disclaim all liability arising from its use.

The publisher gratefully acknowledges the permission granted

to reproduce the copyright material in this book. Every effort

has been made to trace copyright holders and to obtain their

permission for the use of copyright material.

03


2


Cheshire’s best

winter walks and

gardens (that

happen to start

and end at the pub)

As the ‘Beast from the East’ so chillingly proved,

the last weeks of winter are often the hardest.

Christmas feels like forever ago. The cold seeps

into your bones. Everyone is, frankly, a bit of a

misery. So, with that in mind, we’ve put together

a guide to get you through winter’s last gasp –

a guide that gets you out and about, but also

has you warming up before and after in some of

Cheshire’s best country pubs.

Pubs-with-walks

All the best winter-but-wishit-was-spring

walks feature

a pub like the Dusty Miller

(Wrenbury). This former

industrial corn mill, sitting

pretty beside the Llangollen

Canal, boasts a sun terrace

if the sun does shine, while a

quick Google reveals details

of a five-mile walk that

starts and ends there, taking

in canal and countryside

along the way. As it turns

out, the Dusty Miller is not

alone in having industrial

roots: much of Cheshire’s

best walking comes courtesy

of the rail lines and canals

that crisscross the county,

leftovers of an era when

the north west boomed to

the sounds of mills, coal

and cotton. The ten-mile

Middlewood Way is one such

a trail, a former railway line

that fell victim to Beeching’s

axe in 1970, but reopened

15 years later as a relatively

level walking and cycle

path (which also makes it

an option for those who use

wheelchairs and buggies).

Walk done, go and eat pies

at The Railway (Marple), just

by the station.

The 18th-century The

Partridge (Stretton) is a

fancier affair, a gastropub

that underwent a £1m refurb

a couple of years ago, and

has the prices to prove it. It

has, however, put together

a gentle, 4-mile loop that’s

downloadable from its

website. Gentle too are the

walks that run close to the

historic Swan with Two

Nicks (Little Bollington).

Warm yourself by the fire, or

feed yourself in the heaving

restaurant, before jumping

onto the Bollin Valley Way,

a riverside trail that skirts

the National Trust’s Dunham

Massey estate. There’s

a dedicated page on the

Swan’s website with details.

FROM TOP

THE PHEASANT

INN / LOVELL

QUINTA

ARBORETUM

Pubs-with-dogs

Out walking with your dog? The Fishpool Inn (Delamere)

is a spruced-up inn that does a fine line in modern British

dining – and which boasts a handful of dog-friendly tables

in the restaurant. It’s also close to the canine paradise that

is Delamere Forest, though the Inn lists three other walks

online, including one that drops down into the depths of the

Urchin’s Kitchen, a sandstone gorge scoured out during

the Ice Age. Nearby, the Swettenham Arms (Congleton) is

another creaky old number, a 16th-century gastropub that’s

unashamedly dog friendly. And next door to that you’ll find

the Lovell Quinta Arboretum (Congleton), a garden created

by he of telescope fame – Jodrell Bank’s Sir Bernard

Lovell – that contains 2,500 trees and shrubs. The pub

lists a couple of walks, including a three-miler where the

Arboretum, River Dane and Swettenham Meadows all

loom large.

06


Mobberley is a safe bet for the four-legged fanatic, home to

The Church Inn (Mobberley) – check out the doggy snacks

on the bar – whose four-mile walk passes close by the

Bull’s Head (yup, another dog-friendly pub) and St. Wilfred’s

Church. There’s a poignant window in the latter, dedicated

to George Leigh Mallory, the local mountaineer who died

during an attempt to scale Everest, and whose gruesomely

well-preserved body was found on the mountain 75 years

later. Shudder. Up on the Sandstone Trail, meanwhile, the

Rawhead Circular Walk starts and ends at the Bickerton

Poacher (Bulkeley). As with the Church Inn, dogs are

welcome in the bar, while it’s open early – from 8.30am –

for pre-walkies breakfast. Rather marvelously, it also boasts

its own skittles alley, though if your dog joins in we’re pretty

sure that’s classed as cheating.

Walks with views (and quite

possibly pubs)...

FROM TOP

CHURCH INN /

NESS BOTANIC GARDENS

Walks these days seem to be as much

about getting content as they are about

enjoying the great outdoors.

We blame the Millennials. But,

whether you’re after an Instagram

100-liker or not, the views from the

medieval Beeston Castle (Tarporley)

are pretty special, all the more so

when you figure out that this is a

panorama that’s been enjoyed for the

best part of 4,000 years. Mind blown,

refuel at the Pheasant Inn, four miles

away (Higher Burwardsley). If it’s

warm enough, sit out on a terrace that

overlooks the Cheshire Plain.

ABOVE

THE PHEASANT INN

There are views of a different kind

at Dunham Massey (Altrincham),

whose winter garden is stuffed

with thousands of snowdrops,

irises and cyclamen. Ness Botanic

Gardens (Ness) is also sprinkled

with snowdrops each February and,

while its snowdrop walks don’t finish

at the pub, they do on occasion end

by a roaring fire – which is a similar

story at Rode Hall (Scholar Green).

Here, snowdrop walks that feature 70

varieties of the little white blighter also

include a massive great wood burner

at the walks’ end (walks run 2 Feb-3

Mar). The Boat House (Parkgate),

meanwhile, offers eyeball-dazzling

views across the Dee Estuary, and

there’s Instagram fodder a-plenty at

Werneth Low Country Park. A twomile

walk from the 18th-century Hare

and Hounds (Hyde) takes in Werneth

Low. Don’t be fooled by the name. It’s

really quite high up. In fact, this was a

spot used by the Celtic Brigantes tribe

to celebrate the winter solstice – head

to the pub at sunset to see why (and

download details from its website).

07


IMAGES

RIGHT:

BEESTON CASTLE,

BELOW:

STORYHOUSE

(GHOST) (JOSEPH)

Something

less boring

instead...

Started the New Year with

broken resolutions? Make

life easier for yourself: dig

into our guide to the most

inspirational things you can

do this season.

Let’s get one thing straight, while it

might be that time of year, we’re not

going to give you any dodgy detox or

self-improvement tips here. Why would

we? Chances are, once you lay off the

last of the Quality Street, you’re fine

just the way you are. You may however

be feeling a little… sluggish. In need of

inspiration. In which case, step away

from the remote and try stargazing,

courtesy of Chester Astronomical

Society. The society – open to all,

though contact ahead – meets monthly

to watch the skies, or you can try the

Dark Skies Stargazing event at Beeston

Castle. With views across the Cheshire

Plain you’re likely to see twinkling

lights both above and below; contact

English Heritage for details (Tarporley,

1 & 2 Feb, 8 & 9 Feb, 5pm-8pm).

Prefer to see stars on stage? This

spring Storyhouse (Chester) becomes

a musical hotspot, thanks to a slew of

West End musicals gracing its stage,

among them Annie (25-30 Mar), the

smash-hit Joseph and the Amazing

Technicolor Dreamcoat (16-20 Apr)

– which has sold a mind-bending

15 million tickets, not all of them at

Storyhouse – and tear-jerker Ghost (5-9

Mar), the stage version of the film that

shot Patrick Swayze and Demi Moore

to household-name-fame, and whose

storyline would melt even Elsa’s frozen

heart. (As an aside, the Grosvenor

Museum hosts a Frozen Sing-Along

(Chester, 5 Jan) if that last reference

set your pulse racing. If it didn’t: move

along, nothing to see here.)

08


3

A fantastic day

out for all the family

Take a river cruise, a boat trip through the lift or

simply explore with FREE ENTRY into our coffee

shop, interactive exhibition, gift shop and grounds.

andertonboatlift.co.uk


IMAGES

LEFT:

STORYHOUSE

(BALLETBOYZ)

ABOVE: QUENTIN

BLAKE & JOHN

YEOMAN, 50 YEARS

OF CHILDREN’S

BOOKS /

ABOVE: TASTE

CHESHIRE FOOD

AND DRINK

FESTIVAL

There are hot tickets of

another kind at Storyhouse,

too, as all-male dance

company BalletBoyz return

to Chester (4 Apr). Not

seen here since 2017, the

Boyz have two new works

to premiere – likely to be

as physical, beautiful and

boundary-breaking as their

last sell-out gig. Don’t

miss it. Elsewhere on the

arts front: Quentin Blake,

one of Britain’s best-loved

children’s illustrators –

thanks to work with authors

such as Roald Dahl, Dr.

Seuss and, more recently,

David Walliams – is the star

of a gorgeous exhibition at

the Lady Lever Gallery (Port

Sunlight). Quentin Blake and

John Yeoman documents a

creative partnership that has

spanned five decades and 50

projects via many of Blake’s

original illustrations (until

3 Mar). The smaller people

in your life will love it - and

Tatton’s Scarecrow Festival,

where thirty of the strawstuffed

blighters can be

found in the gardens (Tatton

Park, 16-24 Feb).

If dead things do it for

you – and hey, we’re not

judging if they do – head

to the Grosvenor Museum

(Chester) for a pair of

exhibitions that front up

to death. Dead Normal:

Death in Everyday Life does

what it says on the tin: it

explores the rituals we

observe when someone dies

(until 22 Apr), a small-ish

show that’s paired with

Memento Mori: Tombs and

Memorials in Cheshire.

Memento Mori continues

the cheery theme, taking a

sweeping look at the tombs

and sculptures, cenotaphs

and shrines constructed to

commemorate the dead.

It’s an exhibition that comes

with added poignancy thanks

to the nation’s recent WWI

commemorations, where we

witnessed a kind of collective

refocusing on a war, whose

brutality remains unmatched

(until 24 Feb).

Finally, if all our talk of death

is too much of a downer,

may we nudge you instead

towards the Taste Cheshire

Food & Drink Festival

(Chester, 20-22 Apr) There

are 150 exhibitors laying on

artisan, seasonal, local and

a-bit-further-afield eats

for the culinarily curious,

alongside cooking classes,

activities for kids, celebrity

chefs and, um, a dog show.

Or try the guitar and blues

heavy Nantwich Jazz, Blues

& Music Festival (18-22 Apr),

which returns in April for

its 22nd edition. And, if all

else fails, go and glory in the

wonder of nature, courtesy

of a Winter Deer Walk, at

Tatton Park (12 Feb) – a

chance to see these most

majestic of beasts in their

natural surroundings.

10


4


AT THE BRIDGEWATER HALL, MANCHESTER

SUNDAY 10 FEBRUARY, 5PM

5

‘the Hallé at their

dazzling best.’

Seen and Heard International

www.halle.co.uk • 0161 907 9000

6


Unexpectedly elegant:

One museum’s mission to reclaim

the fashion of the 1970s.

While most write off 1970’s fashion as

inexcusably ugly, Chester’s Grosvenor

Museum has other ideas – but can it

really make us fall in love with flares?

Brown, orange, floral and flared: as

many family photo albums will attest,

the fashion of the 1970s treated few

people well. This is an era regularly

derided for its flamboyant fashions.

That celebrated any colour so long as

it was loud enough to make you wince.

That made medallions, bell-bottoms,

very tight trousers and perma-tans

acceptable.

Which makes the Grosvenor Museum’s

current fashion exhibition – drawn from

its impressive costume collection - all

the more surprising. Instead of going

along with the notion that the 1970’s

was a fashion write-off, Unexpected

Elegance presents the era as a time of

creativity and invention. The museum

might have a point. This was a period

that saw designers such as Ossie

Clark and Zandra Rhodes use new

fabrics and mass-produced materials

– polyester, exotic prints, fake furs –

with abandon, creating a fashion scene

that felt as joyful and as it was bright.

Behind that joy lay the fact that, for the

first time, women could (more or less)

wear what they wanted. Mini-skirts,

floor-sweeping maxis, disco-influenced

halternecks, platform boots, enormous

flares, startlingly-bright trouser suits:

anything went. Counter-cultural trends

also played their part, from the hippy

movement that held sway in the early

part of the decade, via disco and on to

the emerging punk trends that came

towards the end.

Unexpected Elegance is a useful

reminder, then, that stereotypes rarely

hold true. The 1970s were not the

decade that style forgot. The fashions

of the era were simply products of

their time, and the clothes people wore

reflected the changes occurring all

around them – from manufacturing

and equality to political protest and

increasing globalisation. Back then, as

now, we wore our lives on our sleeves,

and on our backs, heads and feet.

Unexpected Elegance: Female Fashion

from the 1970s, The Grosvenor

Museum, Chester, until 7 July 2019

Our five favourite fashionista

haunts in Cheshire...

Si Belle (Tarporley): This highend

boutique housed inside a

former coach house stocks labels

including Moschino Boutique, 7

For All Mankind and PS by

Paul Smith.

Cheshire Oaks (Ellesmere Port):

Decent fashion at decent prices in

this out of town shopping centre,

with brands including Burberry

and All Saints on offer.

Nichols & Co (Chester): More of

a lifestyle boutique than a pure

fashion one, keep an eye out

for Issey Miyake watches and

beautiful accessories.

Lily Vintage (Chester):

If all that talk of the 70s whets

your appetite, go retro at Lily’s.

Everything is handpicked.

Hoopers (Wilmslow): While other

department stores fall by the

wayside, Hoopers is still going

strong. Luxurious clothes for men

and women.


7

January - April Highlights

New winter brochure

out now!

25 MINS FROM CHESTER, 35 MINS FROM LIVERPOOL, 45 MINS FROM MANCHESTER


Discover Chester Cathedral

Cathedral

at Height

Take an award-winning tour

to the top of the central

tower and see one city, two

countries and five counties.

At over 125 feet above

ground, you really will get

Chester’s best views.

Choral

Evensong

An evening act of worship

with music from the

Cathedral Choir and organ.

Mon, Tue, Thu and

Fri - 5.30pm

Sat 4.15pm

Sun 3.30pm

8

Refectory

Café

Take a break, enjoy a

delightful lunch or coffee and

a cake in one of Chester’s

most unique dining locations

- the thirteenth century

monk’s dining hall.

Gift Shop

Step inside and discover an

inspired collection of gifts

for friends and family alike or

possibly something special

just for you.

FORTHCOMING EVENT HIGHLIGHTS

SATURDAY 12 JANUARY to WEDNESDAY

6 FEBRUARY

Knit One Share One

Join us for a knitting extravaganza including the

Knitted Bible - a fabulous exhibition of miniature

scenes from the bible knitted and created in wool.

Alongside, Knit & Natter events, craft lectures and

workshops will take place - whilst everyone will be

invited to knit to help the homeless in Chester - for

the ShareShop.

Free entry - generous donations welcome

Open during normal cathedral opening hours

THURSDAY 14 FEBRUARY

Valentine’s Dinner in the Chapter House | 7pm

Spoil your loved one to a four-course Valentine’s

Dinner in the cathedral’s magnificent Chapter House.

£35 per person

Call 01244 500964 to reserve your table

SATURDAY 2 MARCH

Chester Philharmonic Orchestra presents

‘Life and Death in an Art Gallery’ | 7.30pm

Tickets from the Cathedral Welcome Desk, by

calling 01244 500959 or clicking to:

chestercathedral.com/events

chestercathedral.com

SATURDAY 23 MARCH

Chester Music Society presents: Bach,

St John Passion | 7.30pm

Tickets from the Cathedral Welcome Desk, by

calling 01244 500959 or clicking to:

chestercathedral.com/events

GOOD FRIDAY

The Crucifixion by John Stainer | 8pm

Chester Cathedral Choir

Philip Rushforth, director

Andrew Wyatt, organist

Richard Dowling, tenor

Tristan Hambleton, bass

Free entry with retiring collection

Chester Cathedral has a very exciting year of events

planned, celebrating the water of life. To keep up-todate

with all that we have planned, sign-up for our

regular Enews - chestercathedral.com/sign-up

or by scanning here:


9

10% off

Save 10% on our Half-hour City

Cruise with discount code UG19

Sightseeing Cruises

30-minute city trips and two-hour scenic cruises

Great value combined bus and boat tours

Private charters, weddings and celebrations

Party nights afloat, fish & chip cruises, afternoon teas

All cruises depart from The Groves, Chester, CH1 1SZ

Buy sightseeing cruise tickets on board (subject to availability), or save money by booking online.

Party nights (over 18s only) do sell out and must be booked in advance.

01244 325 394 | chesterboat.co.uk

MAKE IT A DAY TO REMEMBER AT ONE OF

15 FIXTURES BETWEEN MAY–SEPTEMBER

Tickets, Badges & Hospitality now available to purchase

chester-races.com I 01244 304 600

10


IMAGE:

16

BIG LEGO® CATS AT CHESTER ZOO


Event

Guide

Jan / Apr

2019

IMAGES

RIGHT: NESS

GARDENS /

ROUNDEL: BRIDE:

THE WEDDING

SHOW AT TATTON

PARK

10 January

BULLEY’S BIRTHDAY

A free entry day into the

Gardens for everyone to

celebrate the birthday of

Arthur Kilpin Bulley, the

gentleman who created

Ness Botanic Gardens.

www.nessgardens.org.uk

12 January - 6 February

KNIT ONE, SHARE

ONE

Join Chester Cathedral for

a knitting extravaganza

including the Knitted Bible

- a fabulous exhibition of

miniature scenes from the

bible knitted and created

in wool. Alongside, Knit &

Natter events, craft lectures

and workshops will take

place - whilst everyone will

be invited to knit to help the

homeless in Chester - for

the ShareShop.

www.chestercathedral.com

29 January – 2 February

THE COMEDY ABOUT

A BANK ROBBERY

Ocean’s Eleven meets

the Marx Brothers in this

dynamite new comedy

direct from the West End!

Following the phenomenal

sell-out success of their

multi award-winning ‘The

Play That Goes Wrong’,

Mischief Theatre return

with their latest West End

smash hit.

www.storyhouse.com

2 February

HEARTH LITERARY

FESTIVAL

Four of the most exciting

contemporary writers

gather around the fireside

to talk about their writing

lives. This year’s line-up

includes Jacqueline Saphra,

Tania Hershman, Ellen

Wiles and more!

www.gladstoneslibrary.org

2 & 3 February

BRIDE: THE

WEDDING SHOW AT

TATTON PARK

Plan your perfect day at

the North’s premier bridal

exhibition in the spectacular

marquee set in the grounds

of Tatton Park which is

now in its 17th year. With

the finest local suppliers,

champagne bar and lots

of ideas for bridalwear,

menswear, bridesmaids’

dresses and wedding outfits

in the highly anticipated

choreographed catwalk

show.

www.bridethewedding

show.co.uk

2 February – 3 March

SNOWDROP WALKS

AT RODE HALL

One of the finest displays

of snowdrops in the north

west. Tearooms are also

open serving homemade

light lunches and cream

teas complete with roaring

wood burner.

www.rodehall.co.uk

7 – 10 February

CHESTER

ANTIQUES FAIR

This famous fair takes

place over the three floors

of Chester Racecourse’s

County Grandstand. With

lots of choice both for

stylish pieces for inspired

home decoration and fine

examples to enhance

a private collection. All

exhibits are labelled

with their price, age and

description and have been

vetted for quality and

authenticity.

www.penman-fairs.co.uk

17


IMAGE

SCARECROW

FESTIVAL

11 February – 3 May

BIG CATS ARE

COMING TO THE ZOO!

Discover the world’s biggest

felines as you’ve never seen

them before at Chester

Zoo. They’re bringing an

incredible collection of

‘Big Cats’ made completely

of LEGO® bricks. You’ll

get the chance to get up

close to 12 life-size cats,

unbelievably crafted using

thousands of bricks, in this

exciting exhibition. En route

to the Big Cats, keep your

eyes peeled for 9 LEGO®

endangered animals hiding

around the zoo. You’ll be

handed a trail map on entry,

so you can tick them off as

you find them!

www.chesterzoo.org

12 February

WINTER DEER WALK

Join the Rangers for a

guided walk of the winter

parkland, observing Tatton’s

deer in their natural

surroundings.

www.tattonpark.org.uk

13 & 14 February

JASON MANFORD:

MUDDLE CLASS

One of the UK’s most

popular stand-ups returns to

Storyhouse.

www.storyhouse.com

16 & 17 February

ANNIE

Presented by Ella

Performance Group. Enjoy

a family musical that has

stood the test of time. Take

a journey with Annie from

the orphanage, run by Miss

Hannigan, to the mansion

where she finds Oliver,

‘Daddy’ Warbucks and her

happy ever after.

www.thebrindley.org.uk

16 – 24 February

SCARECROW

FESTIVAL

Visit the Scarecrow Festival

in the Gardens. Over 30

scarecrows will be resident

in the Gardens - will you find

them all?

www.tattonpark.org.uk

19 & 20 February

SHERLOCK HOLMES -

THE SIGN OF FOUR

20 February

SNOWDROP &

WINTER WALK

Enjoy a guided walk of

the snowdrop collection

and other plants of winter

interest followed by a

question and answer session

with a tea/coffee by the

roaring fire.

www.nessgardens.org.uk

21 & 22 February

MOSCOW CITY

BALLET: SLEEPING

BEAUTY & THE

NUTCRACKER

Moscow City Ballet makes

its debut at Storyhouse with

two stunning ballets, each

presented in classic Russian

style with full orchestra.

www.storyhouse.com

1 March

MARILYN

16 February

NESS WINTER

MARKET

A craft, plant and food

market to enable local

artisan businesses and

craftspeople to show off

their wares.

www.nessgardens.org.uk

Crammed full of adventure,

romance, comedy and of

course one or two rather

brilliant deductions, ‘The

Sign of Four’ is Sir Arthur

Conan Doyle’s epic second

Sherlock Holmes tale, a

breath-taking yarn brought

to life in this spectacular

new stage adaptation.

www.venuecymru.co.uk

Presented by Breakthrough

Theatre Company. This

playful and poignant play is

Marilyn’s story, told by her -

alone in her dressing room.

Direct from its West End

run, this a brand new, onewoman

show that follows the

dark and thrill-filled life of

the iconic Marilyn Monroe.

www.thebrindley.org.uk

18


CTR246x171Ultimate.qxp 23/11/2018 13:11 Page 1

11

Chester

Antiques Fair

7 th - 10 th February

County Grandstand

Chester Racecourse CH1 2LY

Art & Design

to embellish your Home

Open daily 10.30am - 5pm

and for

Valentines

Up to 40 knowledgable exhibitors

offer a wide variety of Antiques & Art -

Furniture, Jewellery, Silver, Sculpture,

Rugs, Ceramics, Paintings & Prints etc

from the past 300 years.

Everything Vetted by expert committees,

labelled with price & full information.

Register for Complimentary E-Tickets

at www.penman-fairs.co.uk

Excellent Catering

Turf Restaurant, ground floor

Opens 10am for coffees

Restaurant 1539, first floor

reservations: 01244 304611

Free Parking

Show this ticket at the gate

Subject to availability

See attendant for Disabled Parking

Organised for 30 years by Penman Fairs Ltd

T: 01825 744074 At the Fair: 07961 371961


IMAGE:

ANTON & ERIN,

VENUE CYMRU

23 March

QUENTIN CRISP:

NAKED HOPE

Gaining global notoriety via

The Naked Civil Servant’,

Quentin Crisp was an

extraordinary raconteur and

wit. Openly gay as early as

the 1930s, he was beaten

up for his refusal to be

anything less than himself.

This acclaimed solo play is

written and performed by

Mark Farrelly, who’s West

End credits include Who’s

Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

opposite Matthew Kelly.

www.thebrindley.org.uk

1 March

CLARE TEAL-

SWING’S THE THING

The award-winning jazz

vocalist and Radio 2

presenter with her excellent

musicians present sparkling

material interspersed with

Clare’s warm and witty

storytelling.

www.thebrindley.org.uk

2 March

COLLABRO

Crammed full of adventure,

romance, comedy and of

course one or two rather

brilliant deductions, ‘The

Sign of Four’ is Sir Arthur

Conan Doyle’s epic second

Sherlock Holmes tale, a

breath-taking yarn brought

to life in this spectacular

new stage adaptation.

www.venuecymru.co.uk

2 & 3, 9 & 10 March

REASEHEATH’S LIVE

LAMBING WEEKENDS

The whole family can enjoy

this unique springtime

experience. Children will

always remember seeing

lambs being born! With lots

of fun children’s activities

taking place including farm

competitions and colouring.

The zoo will also be open.

www.reaseheath.ac.uk/

lambing

5 – 9 March

GHOST THE MUSICAL

The Oscar-winning love

story live on stage featuring

Unchained Melody, and

songs co-written by the

Eurythmic’s Dave Stewart.

www.storyhouse.com

7 March

ANTON & ERIN

Dance those magical

musicals. Join the nation’s

favourite ballroom couple

in their new, show-stopping

dance production. The world

of ballroom meets musical

theatre with stunning

costumes & breath-taking

choreography set to iconic

theatrical favourites.

www.venuecymru.co.uk

9 March

FAMILY

SCIENCE FAIR

By popular demand,

scientists from the

University of Liverpool are

back with many hands-on

activities. This year there

will be additional activities in

the garden too.

www.nessgardens.org.uk

18 March

CIRCUS OF HORRORS

Back with a bang and a

brand-new show, Psycho

Asylum which includes an

amazing amalgamation of

acts, driven by a rock ‘n’ roll

sound scape, a show that

will have you sat on the edge

of your seat when not falling

off it with laughter.

www.venuecymru.co.uk

19 – 23 March

WISE CHILDREN

Emma Rice (Tristan & Yseult,

The Flying Lovers of Vitebsk

and Brief Encounter) brings

her unique, exuberantly

impish vision to Angela

Carter’s great last novel,

‘Wise Children’. Direct from

the West End.

www.storyhouse.com

3 April

MINISTRY OF SCIENCE

This is not your ordinary

science show – it comes

with a bang. It comes with

a whoosh. But most of all it

comes with a hovercraft built

on stage! This amazing new

production takes an anarchic

approach to science.

Join the super talented

presenters, using brilliantly

designed demonstrations.

www.ministryofscience.org

4 April

‘BRILLIANT IN

THE EXTREME’ -

MANSION TOUR

Owners of the Tatton Estate

from the end of the Tudor

period, the Egerton family

resided in the present

18th century neo-classical

Mansion until the death

of the last Baron, Maurice

Egerton in 1958. Aside from

the sumptuous staterooms,

a guided visit to the Mansion

also offers a view of the life of

the staff who worked there.

www.tattonpark.org.uk

20


12

FOUR SIZES

in association with

TATTON PARK, KNUTSFORD

2-3 February 2019, 10am–5pm

Spectacular choreographed fashion shows Band performance stage

Dressed marquee showcase Wedding dresses Florists

Jewellery Groomswear Bridesmaids’ dresses

Hair and beauty Venues Photographers Cars

Cakes Champagne bar

bridetheweddingshow.co.uk

*Booking fee applies

TICKETS

JUST £10

IN ADVANCE*

Images middle left and right, and

bottom middle and left by John Snowdon


IMAGE:

The Chester Tour

5 - 7 April

ZOG

Julia Donaldson and Axel

Scheffler’s much loved

Zog comes to life with a

sumptuous folk score.

www.storyhouse.com

14 April

SPRING PLANT FAIR

Enjoy a day out browsing the

specialist plant nurseries

selling unusual plants,

shrubs and spring flowering

bulbs and gather great ideas

for your garden.

www.arleyhalland

gardens.com

15 – 20 April

JOSEPH AND

THE AMAZING

TECHNICOLOR

DREAMCOAT

Andrew Lloyd Webber’s

sparkling family musical

full of unforgettable songs

including ‘Those Canaan

Days’, ‘Any dream will do’

and ‘Close every door to me’.

www.storyhouse.com

15 – 20 April

BLOOD BROTHERS

Written by Willy Russell, the

legendary ‘Blood Brothers’

tells the captivating and

moving tale of twins who,

separated at birth, grow up

on the opposite sides of the

tracks, only to meet again

with fateful consequences.

www.venuecymru.co.uk

18 – 22 April

NANTWICH JAZZ,

BLUES & MUSIC

FESTIVAL

An annual music festival

not to be missed offering an

eclectic line-up of wellknown

international artists.

For further updates visit the

website.

www.nantwichjazz.com

19 April

CHESTER

CATHEDRAL CHOIR

The Crucifixion by John

Stainer with Philip

Rushforth, director, Andrew

Wyatt, organist, Richard

Dowling, tenor and Tristan

Hambleton, bass.

www.chestercathedral.com

20 – 22 April

TASTE CHESHIRE

FOOD & DRINK

FESTIVAL

A weekend packed with

delicious food from around

the world. As soon as you

enter your senses are

aroused with the most

marvellous smells, colours

and tastes. Watch chef

demonstrations, taste

delicious food and join in

with the BBQ Cook-a-long.

www.chesterfoodand

drink.co.uk

26, 27 & 28 April

ANTIQUES FAIR

A wide range of items on

display including town

and country furniture,

silver, jewellery, paintings,

sculpture, glass, porcelain,

antiquarian books and

prints, angling antiques,

oriental rugs, mirrors,

clocks, lighting and many

decorative items for your

home.

www.arleyhallandgardens.

com

27 & 28 April

ESTATE & BLUEBELL

WALKS

Enjoy huge carpets of

bluebells and many other

wild flowers and take a walk

by the lake to see many

kinds of water birds and

experience countryside not

normally disturbed.

www.arleyhalland

gardens.com

27 April – 8 May

STORYHOUSE:

JOSEPH AND

THE AMAZING

TECHNICOLOR

DREAMCOAT

BLUEBELL WALKS

Marvel at the carpet of

bluebells in the old wood

and take the walk down to

the pool where you can spot

herons nesting on Birthday

Island. The courtyard

kitchen will be open serving

homemade lunches, cakes

and refreshments.

www.rodehall.co.uk

The must-do walking tour

of Chester during which

your guide will lead you on a

captivating journey through

2,000 years of history taking

in all the main sights along

the way, including the unique

Medieval Rows, the mighty

Roman Walls, the beautiful

River Dee, the impressive

Cathedral and not forgetting

the world-famous Eastgate

Clock.

Departing at 10.30am

from the Town Hall Visitor

Information Centre,

Northgate Street. No need

to book, just buy your tickets

direct from the guide on the

day (£8 Adults, £7 Concs,

£20 Families).

Chester Ghost Tour

The Ghost City - Chester can

claim to be one of the most

haunted cities in Britain,

steeped in history and with

hundreds of ghost sightings.

Experience a frightfully good

evening of fun and phantoms

as your guide takes you on

a journey around the eerie

haunts of Chester’s murky

past.

Tours every Saturday

evening at 7.30pm and Friday

evenings throughout March,

from outside the Town Hall

on Northgate Street.

Booking essential at

www.ghostcity.co.uk or

at the Town Hall Visitor

Information Centre (£10

Adults, £9 Concs, £25

Families).

22


Symphonic

Cinema

BBC Philharmonic

Ben Gernon conductor | Lucas van Woerkum film director

Saturday 19 January 7.30pm

Stravinsky The Firebird

Ravel Daphnis & Chloe – Suites 1 & 2

A live performance of classic works by two of the 20th century’s

greatest composers, accompanied by specially created dramatic films.

Join us for a weekend of guitar events including

concerts, free performances, workshops,

family events and a film screening.

Box Office: 0161 907 9000

www.bridgewater-hall.co.uk

13

Box Office: 0161 907 9000

Box www.bridgewater-hall.co.uk

Office: 0161 907 9000

www.bridgewater-hall.co.uk

The Bridgewater Hall International Concert Series 18|19

St. Petersburg Philharmonic

Yuri Temirkanov conductor | Freddy Kempf piano

Friday 1 February 7.30pm

Prokofiev Classical Symphony; Piano Concerto No.1

Tchaikovsky Symphony No.5 in E minor

Peter Donohoe & Noriko Ogawa piano duo

Friday 22 February 7.30pm

Debussy En blanc et noir | Rachmaninov Symphonic Dances

Stravinsky The Rite of Spring

tenThing Brass Ensemble

Tine Thing Helseth trumpet

Sunday 31 March 7.30pm

Copy

Breaking the Rules: The Marian Consort

Wednesday 17 April 7.30pm

Copy

Stephen Kovacevich

Sunday 28 April 7.30pm

J.S. Bach Partita No.4 in D, BWV 828

Beethoven Sonata No.31 in A-flat, Op.110

Schubert Sonata No.21 in B-flat, D.960

Box Office: 0161 907 9000

www.bridgewater-hall.co.uk


All the fun of

the forest

Riverside woods, epic oaks, pine-needle paths snaking

through the trees: there’s something undeniably

magical about a woodland walk. As the Forestry

Commission celebrates 100 years, we take a walk on

Cheshire’s wooded side.

IMAGES

ABOVE: WRITERS

IN THE FOREST

(CREATIVE

WRITING

INITIATIVE) 2019

RIGHT: QUARRY

BANK

The First World War changed

everything, from attitudes

towards women to advances

in medicine - yet one of its

least-known legacies was

the creation of the Forestry

Commission. Created in

1919, the commission had

one aim: to make sure

Britain didn’t run out of

timber, as it so nearly had

during the war. A century

later, things have moved on

a bit, with the focus now on

recreation, research and

biodiversity as much as on

sellable timber. “While we

celebrate the achievements

of the past century, we

also look to the next 100

years,” says the Forestry

Commission’s Ian Gambles.

“We want everyone to share

our passion for trees and

forests.” Which seems

eminently sensible – and

where better to start than

the commission’s Delamere

Forest (Northwich), whose

972 hectares takes in the

Sandstone Trail, Go Ape,

summer concerts, biking

trails and a visitor centre?

Keep an eye out for special

centenary events here as

2019 ticks on.

Delamere is not the only

woodland show in town. Take

Quarry Bank (Styal). Yes,

you read that right. Quarry

Bank may be known for its

Industrial Revolution mill,

but its estate includes the

400-acre Chapel Woods, a

historic ‘pleasure ground’

planted with ornamental

conifers, giant redwoods and

firs, which attracts winter

visitors such as redwings

and fieldfares. Macclesfield

Forest (Macclesfield) is also

historic, a remnant of the

medieval Royal Forest that

stretched from the Pennines

to Staffordshire and over to

the High Peak. What’s left is

a working forest owned by

United Utilities; it butts up

to the Peak District National

Park, contains wild deer and

a heronry (both found close

to Trentabank Reservoir). It’s

also close to the brilliantlynamed

Bottom-of-the-Oven

village, itself home to the

rated Stanley Arms.

24


Lumb Brook Valley

(Warrington) is a smaller

affair, its semi-ancient trees

managed by the Woodland

Trust. It is linked to another

mature wood by Millennium

Green, an area of young-ish

trees, open space and (sweet

relief) benches. Make a plan

to return later in the year:

Lumb Brook is carpeted with

bluebells, lords-and-ladies,

lesser celandine and wood

anemones come spring.

Likewise Warburton’s Wood

(Kingsley), a three-hectare

clough woodland managed

by Cheshire Wildlife Trust.

It runs down to the River

Weaver, and its rich soil

(and mix of tree cover and

grassland) is home to fifty

kinds of flower, including

violets, giant bellflower,

yellow archangel and the

common spotted orchid.

The thundering Daresbury

Expressway may not on first

glance appear to be the most

peaceful of settings, yet it

runs alongside Big Wood

(Runcorn), a wildlife haven

whose history is intertwined

with Norton Priory. It was

once part of the 900-yearold

priory’s estate and was

later owned by the Brooke

family, who turned it into

a pleasure garden full of

ornamental trees such as

sugar maple, dawn redwood

and monkey puzzle.

Gnarled,

hollow, usually

a bit skew:

a truly ancient

tree tends not to be

a showstopper. Yet there’s

something about a 500-yearold

tree that does stop you

in its tracks: a living thing

that has borne witness to

civil wars and world ones, to

kings who lost their heads

and a sun that rises and

sets, seemingly without

end. There’s one such

oak at Dunham Massey

(Altrincham); it stands by

the moat and predates the

neighbouring National Trust

house by around 200 years.

It’s not alone: the deer park

here is renowned for veteran

trees, home to a huge array

of incredibly rare beetles

and insects, and in turn to

the sorts of animals that

feed on them, such as the

beetle-eating noctule bat.

So, as we head into 2019,

make time for some of

Cheshire’s better and

lesser-known woods and

forests – today places of

sanctuary and pleasure that,

as PK Khaira-Cresell at the

Forestry Commission points

out, “are some of the most

varied and beautiful places

in the country”.

IMAGES

DELAMERE FOREST

25


HEALTH CLUB & SPA

MEETINGS & EVENTS

DINING

GOLF

SLEEP

WEDDINGS

At The Mere, you can look forward to unwinding in our award-winning spa,

taste our exquisite dishes in our elegant restaurants, enjoy a relaxing overnight

stay, play 18 holes on our Championship Golf Course or inspire your next

business moment. The scene is set to experience your next Mere Moment.

01565 830 155 | reservations@themereresort.co.uk | themereresort.co.uk

LifeatMere

TheMereResort

14

WHAT’S ON

at Reaseheath

Live Lambing

Weekends

March 2019

Sat 2nd & Sun 3rd

Sat 9th & Sun 10th

10am – 4pm

Reaseheath Zoo will also be open to the

public on these dates.

15 16

Reaseheath

Family Festival

May 2019

Sunday 19th

10am – 5pm

open for breakfast, lunch & dinner

reaseheath.ac.uk

enquiries@reaseheath.ac.uk

Reaseheath College, Nantwich, Cheshire CW5 6DF

Carluccio’s, 38 Bridge Street, Chester, CH1 1NQ

Telephone: 01244 401938


17

NEED A TAXI?

Call 01244 343434

CHESTER’S MOST TRUSTED TAXI SERVICE

KingKabs located at:

51-53 Bridge Street

Chester CH1 1NG

Download our free booking app

available on apple and android

www.kingkabs.co.uk

Get Wrapped Up

at

THE YOR K ROAST Co

F A M I LY R U N S I N C E 2004

World-famous The York Roast Co. Chester has re-opened with a

fresh new look, giving street food fanatics the perfect setting to relish

in delicious wrapped-up roasts and hearty hand-carved sandwiches.

18

With a passion for high quality British ingredients, The

York Roast Co. continues to serve up the world-famous YorkyPud

Wrap bursting with beef, pork, ham or turkey, an accompanying

sauce, stuffing and a choice of vegetables, drizzled with rich gravy.

Those who like to keep it traditional can opt for classic cuts of roast

meat served in thick slices of home-baked bread, paired with

delectable roasted sides and condiments.

Pull up a pew and take five from the chaos as you tuck

into meaty mouthfuls of heaven.

The York Roast Co. 15 Bridge Street, Chester. Cheshire, CH1 1NG

01244 470122

www.theyorkroastco.com

T: @TheYorkRoastCo | F: TheYorkRoastCo | I: @theyorkroastco

Home of the

WORLD FAMOUS


No bombing, no fighting,

no fussing: can Joseph Benjamin

teach us a thing or two about

family dining?

Joseph

Benjamin

28

Chester’s sibling-run

restaurant has won national

awards every year since

2012. Susie Stubbs sees

whether it lives up to the

hype.

It’s not often that the stars

align. At least not when it

comes to family. By which I

mean it’s not often that our

unit of four can sit around

a table for two hours and

just… talk. Not without

fighting, knocking things

over and poking each other

in the eye at any rate (and

that’s just the grown-ups,

boom tish). Yet that’s exactly

what happened when my

husband and I, with eyerolling

boy and wriggly girl

in tow, descended on Joseph

Benjamin one Sunday

lunchtime. Spoiler alert: we

ended up having the best

meal out for months.

Joseph Benjamin, JBs to its

friends, is a neighbourhood

bistro run by brothers

Joe and Ben Wright. They

clearly know their trade: the

Chester independent has

been awarded a Michelin Bib

Gourmand every year since

2012, and is currently one of

only six restaurants in the

North West to hold the title.

The 2019 Good Food Guide

also has it down as the best

restaurant in the region. No

mean feat.

Yet while it has all the

accolades, JBs has none

of the pretention. Inside,

it’s stylish but understated:

dark walls, a little bare brick

here, a handful of retro

Whitechapel posters there.

Specials are chalked up on

boards that are discretely

moved as the tables fill up,

and while diners are packed

into three small rooms, it

doesn’t feel crammed, or

hectic, or anything other

than happily relaxed. There’s

no kids’ menu, but kids are


produce (chicken from Preston, cheese

from Yorkshire). But JBs shares

with other Modern British indies –

Hoole’s Sticky Walnut, Chorlton’s The

Creameries – a dedication to a kind

of earthy, salty richness, to deeplyflavoured

dishes that underscore the

skill and time taken to prepare them.

To put it another way: this is proper

food, with full-on flavour and respect

for ingredients.

As for us, while towering plates of beef

brisket emerged for the Sunday roast

crowd, we ended up with creamy goats

cheese paired with fresh figs. Cod

loin came atop an earthy bed of puy

lentils, and sea bream perched on a

spectacularly light South Asian noodle

salad. A plate of meaty Portobello

mushrooms was turned into a main so

rich I thought I might have to lie-down

afterwards: hard cheese, runny egg

yolk, sage leaves and polenta combined

to create a dish that probably shouldn’t

have worked but did. Tomato sauce

was homemade. I held my breath as

the ‘Fussiest Child in the World’ dipped

her chips into their tomatoey bath, and

again as her broccoli came deliciously

charred and salty. She ate both, and

promptly gave JBs a four-out-of-five

star rating.

Puddings, meanwhile, were simple:

affogato, damson ice-cream, brownies

and sorbet all went down well,

although the boy remarked that he’d

have preferred his berry sorbet a little

less sweet. I’ll make a gastronome of

him yet.

still made to feel welcome.

Case in point: when my

youngest asked for broccoli

and chips for her main

(don’t judge me; she’s the

dictionary definition of the

word ‘fussy’), our waiter

didn’t bat an eyelid.

Which leads me onto the

food. Ah, the food. Joseph

Benjamin’s short menu is

probably most easily defined

as modern British, though

on the drive home we tried

to beat that description.

It wasn’t easy. What we

came up with was this:

it’s seasonal, sure, with

an emphasis on regional

And, just like that, two hours sped

by, with only the smallest amount of

familial moaning. Like I said, it’s not

often we manage to make mealtimes

the sort of lengthy, sociable affairs I

fantasised about when my kids were

babies. Parenting goals – right there.

Yet while I’m sure my smugness will be

chipped off next time we eat out, one

thing looks set to remain constant. The

food and service at Joseph Benjamin,

a restaurant that actually manages to

live up to the hype.

Joseph Benjamin,

Northgate Street, Chester

Tel: 01244 344 295

josephbenjamin.co.uk.

29


19

CHESHIRE

RESIDENTS’

FESTIVAL

2019

30th March - 7th april

For one week only, enjoy FREE and

discounted entry to over 30 attractions

across Cheshire!

Be a tourist for a day and discover

what's on your doorstep.

Tickets are limited, find out more at

www.visitcheshire.com/residentsfestival


Maps

Chester

10

11

21

8

20

18

16 17

9

1 Chester Zoo

2 Ness Botanic Gardens

3 Anderton Boat Lift

4 Venue Cymru

5 The Halle

6 Hack Green Secret

Nuclear Bunker

7 The Brindley

8 Chester Cathedral

9 Chester Boat

10 Chester Races

11 Penman Fairs

12 Bride:

The Wedding Show

13 Bridgewater Hall

14 The Mere

15 Reaseheath College

16 Carluccio’s

17 King Kabs

18 The York Roast Co

19 Residents Festival

(not on map)

20 Visitor Information

Centre

21 Storyhouse

22 The Ice Cream Farm

Cheshire

5

13

7

14

12

3

4

2

1

22

15

6

31


Food, Booze &

Unusual News

The food, drink and

other happenings that

are on our radar (and

should be on yours)

IMAGES

TOP: STICKY

WALNUT / ABOVE

TOP: JOSEPH

BENJAMIN / ABOVE

BOTTOM: CHEF’S

TABLE

This being January, and you’re either

on a diet or a detox, we thought

we’d torment you with a bulletin full

of - you guessed it - food and booze

news. Let’s start with the 2019 Good

Food Guide, the gastro-bible whose

pages every decent restaurant wants

to grace. Making it onto this year’s

list: Joseph Benjamin (page 28),

gastropub The Church Green (Lymm)

and Bollington’s Lime Tree. The guide

also recommends Porta (run by the

same team as Joseph Benjamin) and

listed all four of Cheshire chef Gary

Usher’s restaurants, among them

Sticky Walnut (Hoole) and Burnt Truffle

(Heswall). Nice one, Gary.

The Chef’s Table (Chester) didn’t

make the list, but no matter: it’s still

getting rave reviews on Trip Advisor

(and before your eyes begin their

roll, consider how hard it is to please

those keyboard warriors). Elsewhere,

Chester’s unassuming Chai Station

is quietly gathering a following for its

Indian street food. It’s all veggie, too.

The Cheshire Cat (Christleton) has,

meanwhile, signed up to the Pubs

for Pups campaign, and accordingly

stocks ‘Bottom Sniffer’, a beer brewed

especially (and solely) for dogs (check

page 6 for more dog-friendly boozers).

And if Bottom Sniffer doesn’t drive you

to drink, perhaps the Rum Festival will

(Chester, 30 Mar). The one-day minifest

showcases over 100 different kinds

of the Caribbean tipple. Expect steel

drums, Cuban dance and street food.

32


Non-alcoholic drinks

If you’re giving the hard stuff a

swerve, good on you. Taking a

break from alcoholic drinks is

no bad thing – but there’s no

need to stick to tap water. The

Chester-made Jeffrey’s Tonic won

‘Product of the Year’ at the latest

Cheshire Food & Drink Awards,

tonic syrups that are a drink in

their own right. Variations include

one made with Sicilian lemon,

and another with yarrow, rosehip

and elderflower. Just add soda

water and ice. Also recommended

is Fruits of the Forage, a

Macclesfield producer that takes

wild and foraged herbs and fruits,

and turns them into marvels such

as Hedgerow Harvest Jam, Dam

Sloe Chutney - and Elderflower,

Rhubarb and Grapefruit Cordial.

Fruits of the Forage also run wild

food supper clubs; the next, a

“springtime forage course and

wild lunch”, is in March.

Let’s talk about Altrincham

The rebirth of Altrincham

– from shuttered-up town centre

to foodie hotspot – isn’t news.

Nor is the fact that behind that

remarkable volte-face is the

multi-award-winning Altrincham

Market. Not been yet? Not been

for a while? Make a beeline: the

lively covered market and 6-daysa-week

Market Hall have been

joined by New Market Square,

an ‘outdoors but undercover’

specialist food market. Alty

Market has also enticed countless

others to open ventures nearby,

including highly-recommended

tapas joint Evuna (it opens an

Altrincham branch in February),

another Porta, and the Guardian

food-reviewed Con Club. In fact,

Alty Market has been such a

success that just over a year ago

it opened Manchester’s Mackie

Mayor, and is now in talks to

turn Macclesfield’s abandoned

Picturedrome cinema into a

similar food hall-style venture.

We’ll keep you posted.

© Claire Harrison

33


20

www.visitcheshire.com

WE SELL TICKETS FOR

TIP TOP

PRODUCTIONS

at the

FORUM STUDIO

THEATRE

DISCOVER

CHESTER

Come to Chester Visitor Centre to get a warm

welcome from folk who really know their City and

want YOU to get the most from your visit.

We are located in the heart of the City next door to the

Town Hall and our friendly team will share information

on attractions, events, places to eat and places to stay.

We are your first stop for tickets, tours, maps and a wide

range of Chester and Cheshire themed gifts

and souvenirs.

Pop in and say hello!

Cheshire

Ice Cream

Sold


Spring 2019 stage highlights at

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The Comedy

About a Bank Robbery

29 January – 2 February

Jason Manford:

Muddle Class

13 – 14 February

Moscow City Ballet

The Sleeping Beauty

and The Nutcracker

21 – 23 February

Avenue Q

25 February – 2 Marcha

Ghost – The Musical

5 – 9 March

English Touring Opera

Macbeth and Idomeneo

15 – 16 March

Wise Children

19 – 23 March

Annie

25 – 30 March

Dara O’Briain:

Noise of Reason

1 – 3 April

BalletBoyz:

Them / Us

4 April

Zog

5 – 7 April

Joseph and the Amazing

Technicolor Dreamcoat

16 – 20 April

book now at storyhouse.com | Hunter Street, Chester, CH1 2AR

Funded by:

Key partners:

Principal Sponsor:


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